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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, October 17, 1935, Image 17

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1935-10-17/ed-1/seq-17/

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Read the Fannies With ‘Unde Harry’ From Station WATR at 5:00 P. M.
DAN DUNN Sacrat Opantm 48 By NORMAN MARSH
GJm n*
TRAIL OF
THE
SMUGGLERS.
DAN DUNN
IS
TRICKED
INTO
ACCOMPANYING
COMCHITA
TO
JOSES
HOUSE
WHERE HE.
IN THE
0ARKNESS.
FALLS
THROUGH
A
TRAPDOOR/
I WILL INFORM JUG
IMMEDIATELY THAT WE
HAVE Hti AND WHATEVER
HE WANTS US TO DO
^ wnVl THE VILE A
^7 DETECTIVE, WE )
l WILL ACCOMPLISH.' J
HA/ CONCHTTA—MOW CAN
ESCAPE TTTHE WALLS
OF THE PIT ARE L1NEO
WITH STONE—AND THIS
GRILL WORK MAKfft IT
APPLE MARY
jl
By MARTHA ORR
' 1 ■■■■-■ 11 ■■■■
T
r
DENNIS., IT'S ONLY NOON.
YOU SHOULD BE IN SCHOOL.
WHAT HAPPENED?
I'LL TELL
YOU, GRAN'MA,
IP YOU'LL GIVE.
ME A CHANCE.
INTO THE SECOND
GRADE
JUST A MINUTE..
YOU'VE ONLY BEEN
GOING TO SCHOOL A
FEW DAYS . HOW
COULO YOU
PASS ALREADY?
HM-M, HAS THAT I
PRETTY SECOND
N GRADE TEACHER
SAID ANYTHING TO
DO WITH THE
„ BIG GRIN?
BRINGING UP FATHER
r
THEY
BECAUSE YOU
TEACH ME AT
HOME, I CAN
START IN THE.
SECOND GRADE
TO-MORROW.
SURE, SURE .NOW
RUN ON BACK
TO SCHOOL OR.
YOU'LL BE LATE.
By McMANUS
r 7"
-7—
\OU GO CUSMT DOWN TO
PTHE STUDIO ANo TELL
the aoecnocs that
I’LL RESIGN BEFORE I1_l_
ACT IN THAT WESTERN
PL.AV- I WANT TO PL-AV
IN"ROMEO AND JULIET -
ALL. RIGHT
BUT DONT
err angrv
WITH ME
OHI I THOUGHT THE
directors were
in here -pardon
ME-ARE MDU BOVS
TAKING PART IN THE
WESTERN PICTURE ?
WE AL?E= NUi ~
REAL. SHERIFFS- AND
WE'RE TAKING this
STUDIO AND WHAT
A UEMON WE
ARE GETTIN
VOU WON’T HAVE TO
TAKE THAT PART- THE
SHERIFFS OUST TOOK
THE STUDIO
SOOTS AND HER Pr "‘DIES
• tiAe nonoocn A ca/w \ CT i
■N V
wnr
viow.voo two e\T
OOVOfri AN© SEAT .
OPAV. Vb OFF _
TOOAV ANO XVA
6006 TO SET
©\ONEQ
JOE JINKS
Q'r\ , ,W'6
6WEET *. I
AM
T\REO —
©REAOFOUy
LU. 60
©OWN TO
THE CTCRE
AN© 6ET
VOHAT
CROCEREC
WE N6SD
CREAT V'SO.EOOVC'
A06OLOTE\y TOP*
wuwy wu\s _
6ETTVKJ6 A.V0M6?
I I lls W W » -V ■ >, VI » • V
SWc*b ©OH56 W\CE\.V
DOCTOR OSi HER FEET .E.OHPEO HER [
WL^U J HEAD .STRAFE© HER VORVET.;
COT HER FN06ER AND COT i
A EEN6T\y EOR^.VOOR j
„ __ DEAR, i
) V
Something Mysterious
By LLANUZA
! — -/---. . • v-W M At Pi A K f I
yes- I M ROSALIE ROBERTS.
yOU DELIVERED A PACKAGE
AND YOU WANT ME TO
VOUR RECEIPT, BOOK.
GIVE IT TO ME/ p-1-'
-<(WELL-ER-EH
W-WHAT I-ER-PARDON ME - AND
ARE YOU PLEASE. MISS ROBr:RTS
STARlNGi LISTEN TO ALL I HAVE g
W AT?5^ to SAy- BEFORE YOU *
—J^HAVE ME THROWN OUT
7 1 HAVEN T ANY RECEIPT
L WAS OUST A GAG TO GET IN- TO
---[TALK TO YOU.
THEN YOU'RE THE MANv
THEN-AND I DONT NOW/y
LAJIT I DU n/—\I r r ■>fc-f 1 —
COME HERE TO DO JHINGS EOR^
YOU-BIG THINGS.' I CAN MAKE
to--ur YOU A Ml LLION
» HAPPy? OH ®S FAMOUS-HAPPY.^,
NEVER, NEVER/
THERES SOMETHING STRANGE ABOUT ROS
ALIE-AND JOE FINDS OUT TOMORROW.
ALLEY OOP
A Strong Argument
By HAMLIN
Reymond’s Butter-Krust Twist Bread
A Home That Means Something

Patronize
Your
Neighborhood
Grocer
.-'ivi, m.
• TASTES
• TOASTS
• KEEPS
.IS BETTER
i /
---DAILY SHORT STORY --—-4
DEAD MEN TALKS
Little Joey Could Not Understand That in die I
New Order “Stiffs” Are Practically Eloquent
Little Joey is my pel. So when
he spots me breezin’ down the msin
drag, with leer Qua and Hotshot
Henry trailin’ me not thirty feet
distant, he gets scared.
“Spike," he mutters hoarsely,
pluckin’ at my sleeve as I pass him,
•you’re beiA’ tailed! By Stiff*’*
men! They’ll chop you down sure
when you pass the comer. Maybe
you can make it up this alley.”
“Well, hi there, Joey,” I remark
cheefully, stoppln’ to slap him on
the back. “How’s tricks?”
“Look here!” sputters Joey,
“didn’t you catch what I said?
Tou’re bein’ tailed! Stlffy's had
men out after you for six weeks.
Ever since you busted away from
the gang. Now this alley—”
“It’s muddy,” I tell him. "And I
got on my good shoes.”
“For Pete’s sake. Spike!” Little
Jbey mops the sweat off his fore
head, and then twists his neck to
take one more glimmer at the two
hotshots leanln’ against a bulldln’
thirty feet away,'and waitin’ calm
like for me to move on.
“Have you blew you top, Spike?
You’re cold meat, once them chop
pers git a good straight aim at you.
Cold meat. Spike! Stlffy’s sore as
hell at you for leavin’ the gang,
and he says you know too much.”
The two boys down the street
shift about a little, like maybe
their feet is hurtin’ them. Joey sees
’em, and the goose pimples on him
rise up like the Rockies.
“Maybe it’s curtains for you right
now, Spike,” he murmurs broken
like, and backs up so as not to spoil
leer Gus’ aim — in case he takes
one.
“Skip it,” comes my merry an
swer. “Them guys is Just trailin’
me for protection. To see I don’t
come to no harm, as it were.”
For maybe thirty seconds Joey
stares at me open-mouthed. Then
he shakes his head sadly and mut
ters somethin’ about anyway it
ain’t gonna hurt me so much, me
not bein’ in my right mind.
“Listen, Joey,” I tell him, “You’re
right about how I broke away from
Stiffy’s gang, and about how he
hates me, and would thrill to send
in’ me lilies."
“And ain't it on the up an’ up
that you got enough on every man
in the crowd t’ send ’em up the
river for a stretch?”
“Nothin’ truer. An’ that’s how
come them mugs back there ain’t
gonna put the finger on me. I
know too much, see.”
“It used to be,” said Little Joey
desperately, “that dead men told no
tales.”
“The old order of things,” I re
tort. "But that’s all done away
with. Now it's stiffs which talk.
Dead men ain’t safe bets no more.
I fixed that.”
“Maybe," suggests Joey wearily,
“you could explain.” He lamps the
choppers down the street again.
“And if you don’t git finished,” he
adds, “maybe I can flgger out the
rest.”
"For three years,” I begin, "I was
Stiffy’s right-hand man. Nothin’
went through but I put my okay
on it. Also, I was thp fellow which
made all the new contracts.”
"Yeh, I know,” says Joey. “You
was out of town a lot.” He takes
another pleat in his neck. “I guess,”
he says low, “you should of stayed
out of town, too.”
“Joey,” I digress, “the Lord
should of put eyes on both sides
of you.”
"I get by,” answers Joey. “But
*,Todays
Almanac:
October 17^
rr/T^BvrSoyne sur
renders to Crates at
Saratoga.
1795*Austria ana
France sign- treaty
of Campo formic
making yflocess*
I«iy9- childeHassam,
American artist*
-born
Only two Ttfore Mtics
(ill ffdloudenf
itartet
never
split lip.”
“And you blew
Joey.
“Right fin- Stlffy
mug in the bunch out
Every one In the
be s big shot
bought back my
"Tough," murmurs
tils head. "Tough,” he
“Still right,” I
[ couldn’ sleep. Da
bo turn my back on a
iras bell.”
“So you’re Just come back •«*"*
t’ take it,” chokes Joey,
grasps my hand.
"No,” I retort. "Then
[ get this big idea.”
“Idea?” asks Joey.
“Little Joey is my paL”
“That means a plan,” I Inform
him. “I sneak back to town. I see
half a dozen lawyers on the way.
And half a dozen more here. And
a dozen friends. I give each one of
them one of the sealed packages. I
make all arrangements. Then I go
to see Stlffy.”
“You been to see—Stlffy!” chokes
Joey, his mouth puttin’ Mammoth
Cave to shame.
“I go to see Stlffy,” I repeat for
him. “And I say ’Well, Stlffy, I have
dropped in to be shot.’ ” I
“No!”
“Yes, Joey. Then I go on like
this: ‘Before you plug me, though,
one thing I shoulld wise you up
on. With twenty-four friends In this
and other towns I have left sealed
envelopes containin’ Information.
Valuable information, Stlffy. About
you and all your men.
“But them envelopes ain’t to be
opened, pal, until I croak. Each and
every friend gets In touch with me
each and every day to find out am
I still well and happy. And when .
Just one of them guys falls to reach
me, Stlffy, they will deliver pronto
to the cops their sealed envelope.
"But don’t you worry none, Stlffy,
pay. Account of as long as I live,
probably you may get to live, too.
Unless the bulls take you some
other way, over which I have no
control.’ ’’
“Lord!” murmurs Joey, rubbing
his eyes.
“And now so long, Little Joey,” I
remark, as I turn and start back
down the street. And when they
see me coming, leer Ous stands re
spectfully to one side, and Hotshot
Henry stoops to pick up a banana
peel, because he Is afraid I might
slip on it and break my neck.
Copyright, 1935,
The Chicago Daily News, Inc.
GOLD SLUICE BOX BOBBED.
Atlln, B. C. (UP)—First robbery
of a sluice box In 25 years was re
ported by the Spruce Creek mine.
Ten ounces of gold were taken by
thieves whom old-timers said must
be "checkaukoe,” or newcomers.
Sluice boxes were never molested
by sourdough miners.
RELIEF STILL HIGH IN CANADA
Ottawa, Ont., (UP)—Despite a
slight Increase In employment, the
various Canadian governments—
federal, provincial and municipal
still are spending approximately
$7,000,000 a month on various
forms of unemployment relief , It
is estimated here.
Because of the demand for lux
ury flats In London charwomen
are In demand, and they threaten
to strike for wages of $12 a week.
| This curious world l
ttDECEPTIVE CUBE.
LOOK STEADILY AT THE CUBE BELOW/
nr IS IMPOSSIBLE TO KEEP ITS PERSPECTIVE
CONSTANT. FIRST ONE SQUARE SURFACE
APPEARS NEAREST VOU; THEN THE OTV^

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