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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, October 17, 1935, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1935-10-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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it Tobe Airport
suitable For Stops
On Boston-NY Route
! Clarence Chamberlain, Trans-Atlantic Flier,
r.es Site Ideal Airway link—Lands Giant Con
■ plane Before Crowd—Takes Guests for Ride
Colonel Clarence Chamberlain brought his giant Con
- plane to the Mt. Tobe airport shortly before 11 o’clock
morning, and after looking over the landing field
need it suitable for the purpose of establishing the
; as a link in the line between Boston and New York.
op li passengersmcludlng city
, men Interested in the
and a Democrat reporter, lor
hour ride over the city. The
carries 27 passengers, lnclud
le pilot and assistant.
_ Trans-Atlantic flyer, who flew
i plane here from Hartford, said
_ Held needs to have a lew trees
C$lt down on the territory, but there
tras ample room lor landing and
. off.
Met By Bronson
I^B was met on his arrivel here
byBichardson Bronson, who acted
as chairman ol the reception com
mittee, and Thomas P. Kelly, execu
tive secretary to Mayor Frank
Hayes. A large crowd ol spectators
had arrived belore the huge plane
landed.
"Colonel Chamberlain said he '
wanted to inspect the site here and I
i determine whether Waterbury wasj
air-minded enough to support the
establishment ol a regular port on
the line between Boston and New
expects to start the express
Service Irom Boston to New York
later In the fall and the passenger
Service In the spring. It will take
about 40 minutes, he estimated, lor
a Hip between Waterbury and New
York. The lair will not be greater,
he Nrmlsed, than the regular train
fare from here to New York.
W. H. Eustace, first selectmen ol
Plymouth, who was largely respon
sible lor the creation ol Mt. Tobe
Held, stated to the Democrat repre
sentative that negotiations are un
derway lor a loan from the govern
ment to complete the Held into a
regular airport. He said about $65,
000 or $70,000 was needed to place
’ the field In better shape, to take
away the large sand-bank at the
north side ol the field, to establish
a large parking place and to erect
a hangar. He said the road leading
to the field from the main highway
Will be coated with a tar substance
to permit easy access and that when
it 1* completed the trip from Wa
terbary to the airport will take a
bont 12 minutes.
Guest At Dinner.
Colonel Chamberlain was to meet
prominent men ol Waterbury in
cluding Chamber ol Commerce of
ficials at dinner at the Waterbury
Club when further discussion con
cerning the establishment ol the
airport will be enjoyed.
Colonel Chamberlain brought his
. giant orange and black condor ship
to,the ground in a perfect three
point landing, about 10:50 o’clock.
The ship touched the ground like a
fegther and a lew minutes later,
several Waterburlans made their
first flight Into the air.
Those included in the first flight
from the field Included Executive
Secretary Thomas P. Kelly, Assist
ant Corporation Counsel Edward J.
McDonald, Attorney Bronson, F. W.
Brodie, his son, John M. Brodie ol
Root it Boyd, Gardner Catlan, Ran
dolph Clowes, John H. Pratt, L. V.
Butterfield, Peter B. Lynch and
James Galvin of the Waterbury
Democrat, Jerry Harrington and
Ray Glynn of the Waterbury
American.
The ship, piloted by Colonel
Chamberlain, took oil easily and
soared to an altitude ol 3,000 feet.
It circled Waterbury twice and
then went back to the field. Colonel
Chamberlain expected to continue
taking passengers up all day today
and as long as he remains in Wat
erbury tomorrow. He expects to take
off tomorrow afternoon.
Others to Take Ride
Others expected to ride in the
plane later today were John P. El
S(mi, Irving H. Chase, former Gov
ernor Charles A. Templeton, Lewis
S. Reed and Frank J. Green ol the
Chamber ol Commerce.
The ship that landed here today is
one ol lour that Colonel Chamber
la*- expects to press into service in
the new Boston-New York line. The
gMp bears the inscription, “Cham
ATTORNEY F. M.
SULLIVAN APPLIES
(Continued from Page 1.)
* the committee will consider the ap
2 pUcatoin of Hugh John McGill of
* 61 Gaffney Place for permission to
* take the Connecticut Bar examina
■ tlons.
m Members of the committee, be
* aides Attorney Torrance, are Judge
* Robert C. Stoddard of New Haven.
** Attorney David L. Daggett of New
« Haven. Attorney Harold E. Drew
s' of Derby and Attorney William C.
>• Mueller of Meriden.
m COMPENSATION AGREEMENTS
| The following compensation agree
\jnents were filed to-day at the of
* flee of Commissioner James M.
* Lynch: John Grimes of this city
« and the M. J. Daly Sc. Sons, Inc., ln
% temal Injuries, $398 for compensa
* tlontlon and medical expenses, per
j stipulation agreement; Thomas
« Ladden of 122 Cherry street and
J R. F. Worden Sc Sons, Inc., hand
'Injury, $5 weekly.
HARDIMAN EXONERATED
New Haven, Conn., Oct. 17—(U
P.)—Thomas J. Hardiman, East
Providence, R, I., has been exoner
ated of responsibility In the death
of Edward S. Bartlett. 73, In an au
tomobile accident Qctober 12 at
Guilford. A coroner’s finding stated
Bartlett walked Into the path of
Sardinian’s automobile "and paid
no heed when Hardiman sounded
bis horn.”
PUFF BALL HALTS TRAIN
Brie, Mich. (U.P.)-Engineer
John Schur stopped his locomotive
When he saw what appeared to be
a huge whitewashed cannpnball
perched along the right-of-way. It
was a puff ball, 48 Inches In clr
cumberence and weighing 10
jrvv***
ki
berlaln Air Lines, Boston to New
York.’’
The airport Is leased by the town
of Plymouth from the Waterbury
Airport, Inc., for live years.
Onr Reporter's Feelings
Your correspondent has been
back on terra firma about half an
hour after looking at Waterbury
from an altitude of 3,000 feet and
Is still enjoying the thrill of the
take-off from Mt. Tobe airport,
the roar of the motors, the beau
tifully-tinged hill and the entirely
unusual sight of the Brass City
from an air view. It was his first
night.
When Col. Chamberlain brought
his huge condor to the airport and
touched Its wheels in a feathery
three-point landing, all fears of an
airplane ride Just vanished.
When Attorney Richardson T.
Bronson suggested that the famous
Trans-Atlantic flyer take up sev
eral prominent men, including news
papermen, this writer was eager to
go. The Inside is Just like that
of a large bus. Colonel Chamber
lain took his seat In the front of
the ship, and then instructions
were passed out to buckle on the
belts in the seats.
The motor roared to a start, the
brakes loosened and the giant ship
started off tothe north end of the
field. It was maneuvered around
and then with an extra roar the
motors carried the ship at a fast
clip until a point half way to the
other end. Then the ship Just soared
like a bird from the earth and the
faces of the people on the ground
seemed to merge into one white
flash.
Sensation Great
A couple of times the ship seem
ed to drop, creating a sensation
like one feels when an elevator
comes to an abrupt stop. When the
first questionable fears left, a
glance out the window showed the
ship to be gradually leaving the
earth until the trees, roads, streams
and hills appeared to merge into
one huge panoramic view.
In a few seconds, it seemed, we
were over Waterbury. First Water
vllle with its Chase companies
were picked out, then the Water
bury railroad station, the City Hall,
the Chase offices, the center of the
city, the Apothecaries Hall corner.
South Main street, St. Ann’s
church, the Democrat building,
all followed in rapid suc
cession. The plane swung to the
north east flying over the Scovill
company plants, the Wilby high
school, Lakewood park, back to the
Elton, Immaculate Conception
church, Brooklyn, Duggan school,
Chase Park, the American Brass
factories and then back again to
the airport.
While over Waterbury the auto
mobiles appeared like small bugs
crawling along, while human In
dividuals could hardly be distin
guished. Trolleys seemed no larger
than toy cars. While flying over
St. Ann’s church the shadow of the
plane was noticed to be covering
Wilby high school.
The only reaction, the first flyers
reported was a closing of the ears.
This sensation left when earth was
reached. It was not a bad trip at
all. It was quite worth taking.
ITALY HAS MADE
NEW GOVERNOR
(Continued from Page 1.)
peaceful occupation of the rest of
that area.
A spokesman said five more Ethi
opian chieftains had surrendered
near Entlsco, south of Aduwa, but
numerous enemy forces were said
to be concentrated near Makale,
next big objective of the northern
Italian army.
Make Him Puppet Ruler
Appointment of Gugsa was viewed
as the first step toward making him
a "puppet ruler’’ over conquered
Ethiopian territory, with the pros
pect that his Jurisdiction may be
enlarged as the Italian advance pro
ceeds.
Gugsa was given the title of "Ras”
—a designation which in Ethiopia is
Inferior only to that of king. Ulti
mately, Italy may attempt to set
him up as a puppet ruler of all
Ethiopia. Italy newspapers recent
ly have been giving prominent dis
play to articles about Gugsa’s fam
ily tree, attempting to prove that
he, rather than Halle Selassie, right
fully should be emperor.
While the official communique
said there had been no develop
ments "worthy of mention” on the
southern front, a message from Dji
bouti, French Somaliland, said an
Italian column from Italian Somali
land was marching alongside the
British Somaliland frontier in the
direction of Jijlga, with the objec
tive of occupying an important
junction of cavavan routes.
Today’8 Italian government com
munique—No. 21 of the war series
said:
"General Emilio De Bono (com
mander of forces in Ethiopia) tele
graphed from Adigrat that he has
reviewed the national troops and
troops belonging to Gugsa.
"He then announced that Gugsa
is appointed Ras of Tlgre in the
name of his majesty, the king of
Italy. This announcement was wel
comed with manifestations of en
thusiasm by the leaders and all the
people.
"Consolidation of the occupied ter
ritory progresses with great Intensity
and wheeled traffic can now proceed
from Senafe to Adigrat.
"Aviation units have effected us
ual reconnaissance flights south and
west of the occupied positions. In
the vicinity of Makale, where nu
merous enemy forces are concentrat
ed, several airplanes were fired at,
but no damage done.
"On the remainder of the front,
and on the Somaliland front, no
new developments have occurred
worthy of mention,”
Giant Condor and Trans-Atlantic Flyer Land Safely Here
Colonel Clarence Chamberlain, famous trans-Atlantic flyer, ana his huge orange ana discs conaor, one ox
the largest land planes In the United States, made a perfect three-point landing at Mount Tobe airport in
Plymouth this morning. The colonel is shown In the Inset while at the right Is his ship making the landing
upon his arrival. The lower picture shows a crowd of admirers around the ship after the motors were
quieted following the landing.
SCOn EXPLORES
FALSE THEORIES
Investigation of Soil Con*
ditions Advisable for
Septic Tanks
Several fallacious theories and
statements concerning the efficiency
of septic tanks in the matter of
sewage disposal in those sections
where public sewers do not exist
were exploded by Warren J. Scott,
director of the bureau of sanitary
engineering of the state department
of health, in the first of the depart
ment’s series of fall and winter
weekly broadcasts today.
The statement, "A septic tank ef
fluent is safe to drink,” is entirely
untrue, Mr. Scott declared, inas
much as a thimbleful of such liquid
flowing from a septic tank outlet
contains millions of bacteria, some
of which may produce disease. An
other false claim is that “A septic
tank never needs to be cleaned as
the bacteria eat up the solids.” Any
properly operating tank will retain
settled sludge and floating scum
which must be cleaned out periodic
ally despite the fact that bacteria
do digest 50 to 75 per cent of the
solids and convert them into gases
and liquids that pass out of the
tank. If a tank retains no solids, it
is not working effectively and the
solids are escaping to clog up the
seepage system. A third erroneous
belief and claim is that “A septic
tank system will work under any
conditions of soil or ground water.”
This is definitely not correct, Mr.
Scott said, because while the tank
may work the seepage system may
not work under adverse conditions
of poor soil, limited area, rock or
high ground water, so that a serious
health nuisance may be created.
An outstanding consideration in
(By United Press)
NEW YORK, Oct. 17—(UP) — An
owl and a construction company
foreman are the newest victims of
New York’s anti-noise campaign.
The owl, of the screech variety,
made such “terrifying" noises, as a
woman telephone police, that It now
Is Incarcerated In an 8. P. C. A.
shelter. The foreman was fined $5
for starting work outside a hotel at
5 a. m.
MUNCIE, IND., Oct. 17—(UP)—
Ambrose Guthrie, farmer, wasn’t
surprised when his registered cow,
Jane, gave birth to a bull calf
three days ago. But when Jane ap
peared the next morning with a
second bull calf, he was amazed.
Yesterday Jane led out the third of
the bull calf triplets.
Installing a septic tank should be
the method of disposal of the waste,
liquid from the tank, since this
liquid contains some solids, is odor
ous, and contains dangerous bac
teria. This liquid must be disposed
of away from wells or springs by
seepage Into the ground. Leaching
tile lines or cesspools may be sat
isfactory in dry porous soils, but
where the soil Is tight and contains
clay extensive seepage systems of
many hundred feet of tile or num-1
erous cesspools may be needed to
leach away the liquid. Sometimes
where lots are small and soil Is poor
It Is impossible to obtain proper
seepage and avoid a nuisance. This
also holds true of rocky areas, and
where high ground water makes the
land wet and swampy at certain
times of the year. Therefore, the
prospective home buyer should con
sider carefully the porosity of the
soil, the extent of his lot and the
possibility of high ground water.
I WAUKEGAN, ILL., Oct. 17—(UP)
—Receiver Melvin B. Erlcson ol the
Waukegan National Bank has $9,
787.22 that nobody seems to want.
He has asked the circuit court to
rule on disposition 61 the money
which represents unclaimed deposits
in the defunct security state bank.
DELAWARE, O., Oct. 17—(UP)—
A. C. Shively, farmer, reported find
ing several plums growing on his
Keller pear tree. A Lombard plum
tre grows near the pear tree.
UNITED STATES
WILL KEEP OUT
(Continued from Page 1.)
tire European situation, but empha
sized that he had received no in
structions from his government to
approach the secretary concerning
American cooperation or the appli
cation of a general embargo against
Italy by the United States.
Before talking to Hull, De Labou
laye spent nearly an hour with As
sistant Secretary Francis M. Sayre,
in charge of the administration’s
reclpjrocal trade negotiations.
A trade agreement with France
is under negotiation, but the am
bassador indicated it may be some
time before the negotiations became
active.
State Department officials said
they had not been approached by
the European power regarding
American cooperation with League
powers in application of a general
embargo against Italy
Stand bx League
Toronto, Ontario, October 17 —
(UP) — Nickel-producing firms of
Power Stockholders
Meet November 18
Abolition of Connecticut Electric Co. as Holding Firm
for Light k Power Co. Expected to Develop
Abolition of the Connecticut Elec
tric Service Co. as a holding com
pany for the Connecticut Light Sc
Power Co. is expected to develop
at a special meeting of stockholders
of the Connecticut Light & Power
Co. at Hartford oh Nov. 18th. The
change would be brought about, ac
cording to circulars forwarded to
stockholders by means of transfer
ring one share of stock of the C. L.
& Power Co. for one sHare of stock
of the Conn. Electric Service.
A copy of the circular, which is
self-explanatory was submitted by
Charles J. Allen, manager of the
Waterbury district of the Connecti
cut Light and Power Company to
day to The Democrat. It explains
that the stockholders wll consider a
proposed re-organization by merger
of the two above named companies,
so that the company will be known
only, in the future, as the Connec
ticut Light and Power Company.
The letter to stockholders, reads:
October 17, 1935.
TO THE PREFERRED STOCK
HOLDERS OF THE CONNESTI
CUT LIGHT Sc POWER CO.:
The Connecticut Electric Service
company was organized in 1925 for
the purpose of aiding in the de
velopment of the Connecticut Light
& Power company. All of the Com
mon Stock of the last named com
pany is owned by the Connecticut
Electric Service company, which, in
effect makes its stockholders own
ers of The Connecticut Light Sc
Power company. It has always
been the purpose of the manage
ment of the two companies at the
proper time to reorganize them so
that there should be but one com
Canada, largest in the world, will
stand by the League of Nations
canstions ruling prohibiting export
of the product to Italy, Robert C.
Stanley, president of the Interna
tional Nickel Company, said.
Peacetime trade in nickel, as far
as Canadian companies are concern
ed, is much more profitable than
war trade, he said.
Ford Trucks Cease
Detroit, Oct. 17.—(UP).—Ford
Motor company officials disclosed to
day that they had advised the sen
ate munitions committee at Wash
ington that all shipments of Ford
trucks to Africa had ceased with
the outbreak of hostilities between
Italy and Ethiopia.
Austrian Cabinet Called
Vienna, Oct. 17.—(UP).—The cabi
net met on urgent call today when
rumors were circulated that the
lower Austrian Heimwehr, or Home
Duard, was marching against
Vienna.
Machine guns were set up in the
radio station building
The chancellory where the cabi
net convened was heavily guarded
by police.
Measures under consideration by
the cabinet were believed connected
with plans to eliminate Minister of
Agriculture Relther, Minister of
Commerce Beursch and Acting Min
ister of Interior Fey.
MARRIAGE INTENTIONS
Arthur Grant, 41 Pilgrim avenue:
Marla Carmela Telesca, 41 Pilgrim
avenue.
Michael F. Parker, 256 South
Main street; Beatrice M. Meehan,
11 Lounsbury street.
pany, the Connecticut Light ft Pow
er company, and upon such re
organization the Connecticut Light
ft Power company would have all
the properties, business and fran
chises now owned by the two com
panies.
The plan of reorganization now
proposed and approved by the
boards of directors of both com
panies calls for an exchange of
shares of The Connecticut Light and
Power company common stock for
shares of The Connecticut Electric
Service company conunon stock. In
order to facilitate this exchange
one (1) share of common stock of
The Connecticut Light and Power
company will be issued for each
share outstanding of the common
stock of The Connecticut Electric
Service company. Thus, each Serv
ice company shareholder will re
ceive the same number of shares of
stock of The Connecticut Light and
Power company as he now holds in
the Service company. The common
stock of The Connecticut Electric
Service company is without par
value whereas that of The Connecti
cut Light and Power company has a
par value of $100. Therefore, the
exchange, as above described, re
quires a change in the common
stock of The Connecticut Light and
Power company to shares without
par value, equal in number to the
shares qf The Connecticut Electric
Service company. The board of di
rectors of this company has approv
ed of this change. No change, how
ever, in the preferred capital stock
of this company Is necessary or con
templated.
lefore this reorganization can be
come effective it must be approved
by the public utilities commission of
the 3tate of Connecticut and a pe
tition has been fllfed therewith ask
ing for such approval.
-n order that this company may
re :lve the full benefit from the
proposed reorganization, it is nec
essary that it be concluded prompt
ly. To that end you will find en
closed herewith a notice of a spec
ial meeting of the stockholders call
ed for the purpose of acting on this
matter. I strongly urge that you at
tend this meeting. If you are un
atle to do so, please send In your
proxy promptly so that your stock
may be voted.
Yours very truly,
J. H. RORABACK,
President.
AHOEMSFIIH
OM JUH rau*T
Evading Responsibility
Charge Dropped—Not
Guilty Plea Changed
Deliberating about U minutes a
Jury In the common pleas court to
day brought In a verdict of not
guilty for Angle Pais, 98. on charges
of evading responsibility. She was
acciued of having struck with her
car, Lucian Milstead, near Miller 6c
Peck's store dn July 31, and to have
driven away.
Yesterday, she pleaded guilty to
the offense and when her attorney
started to explain the case, It was
found that there were mitigating
circumstances. She was permitted
to change her plea to not guilty and
trial was held today before a Jury.
She explained she did not know
she had hit anyone until shes aw
a man’s hat on the running board
of her car at the traffic light at
Grand and South Main street, when
she stopped because of a red light.
She said she Immediately drove to
police headquarters and reported
the hat. Later, she said, she was ar
rested. She was defended by Attor
new A. H. Welsman. Judge Miles F.
McNiff presided.
FRANK L. NEILD
WAS ELECTED
Boston, Oct. 17.—(UP)—Frank I.
Nelld, head of the New Bedford
cotton textile company that bears
,hls name, was elected president of
the National Association of Cotton
Manufacturers at the annual meet
ing heer to-day. Other officers
elected: Seplor vice-president, Dex
ter Stevens, Esmond, R. I.; Junior
vice-president, Henry G. Nichols,
New York city; directors for three
years, Robert Amory, W. Emerson
Barrett, and Henry G. Slmonds, all
of Boston; John A. McGregor,
Utica, N. Y., and Lawrence Rich
mond, Crompton, R. 1. Willard F.
Stayles of Taftsville, Conn., was
elected a director for two years to
succeed Nelld.
STATE
STARTS
SAT.I
HERBERT
Hjjpcti
FISH
G DII IT * Sma«wsxeast
Wqterbury’s Real Fish House
MAIN
ST.
Specials For Tomorrow
Steaming Claim 15c qt. 2 qt» 25 C
SNAPPER BLUES . lb. 15c
FRESH SALMON.Ib.25c
Fresh Mackerel — Bull Heads — Smelts — Butter
Fish — Smoked Fillets — Steak Cod — Sea Trout —
Halibut — Swprd Fi?h — Filet of Sole — Shrimp —
Steak Blue—Oysters—Clams — Scallops
LIVE LOBSTERS — SOFT SHELL CRABS
%i&i2}F*W
NOW WATCH THIS Pl/NT
FROM THE SAME
FORMATION / —
MR.MEEHAN, MY SISTER BETTY WANTS
SOME INSIDE DOPE ON FOOTBALL /
I didn't know each
MAN HAD SUCH A
DEFINITE JOB /
&33
and SHofrS^®
IT TOOK L»«
ELEVEN MEN
TO MAKE
THAT PASS
PERFECT/
LOOK AT
& \ THIS
rU, \ CHART
WHAT A j
PERFECT L
PASS THOSE
TWO MEN
MAOE! cl
ILL BE GLAD TO
OBLISE-COME UP
IN THE STANDS AND
WE'LL WATCH THIS
PRACTICE GAME
what Berry saw-and what actually happened
WELL;BETTS,DID YOU
LEARN SOMETHING?
REMEMBER,
WATCH THE
LINEMEN
DID I / I CAN'T
WAIT TO SEE THE
, BIG GAME./
BETTY SEES A BACK GET
Off A 60YAP0 SP/ffAL PUNT,
A CAMEL ALWAYS RENEWS MY
FLOW OF ENERGY WHEN I NEED
IT—AND THEY NEVER f
V GET ON MY NER.YES I
THAT GAME WAS
A THRILLER/
-MERE,HAVE
A CAMEL /
, <v * -j
’ ' '■>
■itmHi y '
n TOBACCO to,
WHAT A SPLENDID RON
BUT GOOD SLOCKING
MADE IT POSSIBLE/
YOURE AN EXPERT
NOW- THANKS TO
CHICK MEEHAN/'
I NEED ONE / SO MANY
THRILLS USE UP A LOT
OF ENERGY f mm
YES. THEY CERTAINLY
ARE MILD/
BETTY A T THE B/G GAME
i. Reynolds Tob. Co.
GET A till WITH A CAMEL/
-

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