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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, October 18, 1935, Image 19

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1935-10-18/ed-1/seq-19/

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Marine
Cooking
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orvicQ
--SAYING WITHOUT SCRIMPING
Know How To Obtain Best
Results With Stewed Meats
’ By EDITH M. SHAPCOTT .
Nutritionist—Former Home Making Center — New York
I
Hany cooks who know how to
prpare delicious roasts and broiled
mats cannot seem to make equally
taty dishes when
till meats used
at| to be broiled
or stewed or
bnised. Yet hare
thre are quite
mny possibilities
foi fine flavor and
teiflemess.
X is important
to know how. to
obain the best
. realts with stew
ed meats. The
cut used for
thfte recipes are usually the less ex
peffilve cuts, and so help to make
suhtantlal savings for those who
are budgeting. I shall therefore
give you a number of suggestions
tha will improve both the flavor
and texture of stewed and braised
meds.
T)ere are three ways in which to
cool meat for a stew. When using
niea for this purpose, it is usually
bestto rub In the seasonings—a tea
spomful of salt, one of sugar and a
quaver teaspoon of pepper and
aier
paprika—then brown well before
adding the .water. As with the
roasts and broiled meats, the car
meligatlon of the sugar will help to
keep In the meat juices and enrich
and hold the flavor. Thus the
broth in which the meat Is cooked
and the vegetables used In the stew
will not absorb so much of the fla
vor of the meat.
Another method which may be
followed when preparing,, stewed
meat Is to plunge the meat Into
boiling water. This hardens or co
agulates the protein and retains the
Juices to some degree. By this meth
od, the broth will absorb more of
the flavor of the meat and will It
self have a stronger flavor.
The third method is to put the
meat In cold water and gradually
Increase the temperature. This ex
tracts much more of the flavor.
Braising Is one good way in which
to cook large pieces of meat from
the less tender cuts. Rub the sur
face of the meat with salt, sugar
and a little pepper, then sear the
meat on all sides. It may be neces
sary to use fat in the searing, for
as a rule meat used for braising is
lacking in fat. After the surfaces
“llI RIGHT
Food Stores
Land O' Lakes
Sweet Cream Butter
lbs.
PILLSBURY CAKE FLOUR.pkg. 29c
PILLSRURY PANCAKE FLOUR.2 pkg. 19c
VERMONT MAID SYRUP.bot. 19c
FRIEND’S RAKED DEANS.2 cant 29c
RUMFORD BAKING POWDER.. I lb. 29c
FREE—I ROYAL
CHOCOLATE DESSERT
WITH
3 ROYAL GELATINE ... 17c ^
are well seared, add a little water
and such vegetables as you wish to
us« for flavoring . . . carrot, onion,
green pepper, celery . . . then con
tinue cooking slowly until tender.
In soup making the principle is to
extract as much of the Juice as pos
sible. The soup bone should be
cracked and the meat cut In small
pieces to give large surface expo
sure. Place the meat and bone In
cold water, together with such herbs
and seasonings as you like to use,
and bring slowly to the simmering
point. Allow the meat to simmer
for several hours.
Remember that the food value of
the meat used for soup Is practical
ly the same as It was before the
juices and flavor were extracted;
therefore do not throw the meat
away*. You can restore or heighten
Its flavor by using condiments or
spices.
Pleasing
The Man
BY CHLOE JAMISON '
Coffee tables — smoking tables —
tables of convenience fore and aft
. . . drawn up beside armchairs, be
fore the sofa, in front of the Are
place. -Where not? Eyen little nest
tables are pressed into service to aid
in dispensing modern hospitality,
which, in addition to its dinners and
luncheons, now includes afternoon
tea, cocktails, after-dinner coffee in
the drawing room and smokes be
fore, after and between times.
The modem hostess gives much
thought to accessories for these in
formal hours, yet her appointments
are not necessarily expensive. Many
a beautiful tea tray is made, at
home at Jittle cost, merely by
mounting an old English hunting
print in the center of the tray,
painting the -body in a soft color
found the body in a soft color found
in the picture, then shellacking
over all.
A quaint pewter or porcelain tea
or coffee service can be bought for
a ridiculously small sum, consider
ing its beauty, or one may go in for
inexpensive modem pottery which is
sometimes very smart. Cocktail
shakers and goblets also come in
pewter, and three are some stun
ning things in Czecho-Slovakian
glass, flecked or rimmed with bright
color. 4 All these accoutrements the
man who has an eye to prestige and
up-to-dateness is very proud to see
in his home.
But a smart coffee or cocktail
service presupposes other equally ef
fective things. . . . Trays to hold
cocktail wafers, hors d’ouevres or
sandwiches. Smoking trays also
. . . amply designed so that the
guest or the host who smoke his
fragrant after-dinner cigar will not
All the dish to overflowing with one
flick of ashes, nor feel that his
smoke will topple off the table the
moment his back is turned. Just as
much difference between the right
ash tray for cigarette smokers and
men who smoke robust cigars as
there is between dinner and dessert
plates, a demi taSse or a full-sized
coffee cup.
As in the larger scheme or deco
ration, the ensemble idea governs
when selecting these accessories.
Which does not at all mean that
the various pieces <must be matched.
Merely that all should be friendly
in line, type, color and size.
Left-Overs
In Disguise
. .• . What a collection of odds
and ends In the Ice-box . . . and
not a thing substantial to eat! Too
many valuable remnants to dis
card without extravagant' wasting;
too little food to suffice for one
full service of anything for the
next meal. So it seems on frequent
occasions. /
Then It is that the Imagination
must come to the rescue." Here are
a few hints that will help:
ltarcbit Cana|K's
Mix the desired amount of
grated American cheese with
enough milk to make a paste;
flavor to taste with Worcestershire
and mixed mustard. Spread thickly
on the strips of bread and broil
just long enough to melt cheese
and brown lightly.
For Soup
Who le some and satisfying
bisques and chowders can be made
by using remnants of left-over
vegetables. A cupful of cooked
corn, celery or spinach put
through a colander will furnish
the flavoring for three cups of
cream soup. Use one cup of puree
to three cups of rich milk or half
ana-half. Thicken the soup slight
ly with a flour and butter paste, if
you wish. Add plenty of butter
and seasoning and serve in bouil
lon cups. Garnish with parsley.
Always save the water In which
fresh beans, celery, peas and po
tatoes have been cooked and you
will have a ,valuable flavoring and
reducing agent for gravies, soups
and sauces.
For an Entree
To one cup' (or less} of diced
ham and one cup of diced chick
en, add one cup of cooked peas.
Mix all with a cream sauce and
place In a buttered baking dish.
Sprinkle the top with buttered
crumbs; heat in the oven until the
crumbs are brown. Serve piping
hot in the original baking dish
. . . if it Is fairly good looking.
For Salads
There is no nicer way in which
to use small quantities Of cooked
vegetables than by the jellied sal
ad method. To a few bits of diced
carrots, a few peas and llmas (or
any similar vegetables add a dash
of onion flavor and two table
spoonsful of finely diced cheese;
also a little chopped relish. Mold
in gelatin (lemon-flavor is pre
ferred for this purpose. When
ready to use, unmold, slice the
sa|ad leaf and serve on a crisp let
tuce leaf with a cream mayon
naise dressing slightly flavored
with prepared mustard, or with a
spoonful of red chill sauce.
The few stewed or canned fruits
left over from other meals can be
combined and used as flavoring for
a light, fluffy whip. Put the fruit
through a colander' to make a
puree and proceed as you would
to make a plain whip.
Small quantities of preserves or
canned fruit will also come In
handy for tiny fruit tartlets . . .
providing an assortment Instead of
tarts all of one kind. Serve them
on a tray—French pastry fashion.
T
Bran Muffins For Breakfast
. I . ■■■ By,Barbara B. Brooks
GRACES BRADLEY,"4 Paramount
actress, enjoys preparing her
own leisurely Sunday breakfast.
Since her reputation as a cook has
spread throughout Hollywood, she
usually finds It necessary to pre
pare an extra supply for guests, In
vited .and otherwise. Miss Bradley
combines all-bran and bananas in
a delicious healthful muffin recipe
which calls forth admiration from
all her friends. Anyone wishing to
emulate Miss Bradley’s success as
a muffin maker will do well to try
this excellent heclpe:
AII-Bran*Banana Muffins’
3 tablespoons shortening
Vs cup sugar
1 egg (well beaten)
1 cup sour milk
* 1 cup all-bran
1 cup flour
tV teaspoon soda
•/V teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
; IV cup chopped banana
'Cream shortening and sugar;’add
egg, milk and all-bran and let stand
wbile measuring remainder of in
gredients. Sift flour with soda, salt
and baking powder. Cut banana in
small pieces and add to sifted dry
Ingredients. Add to first mixture
and stir only until flour disappears.
Bake In greased muffin tins In a
moderate oven (400° P.) for 20-25
minutes.
Yield: 16 small or 8 large muf
fins.
Here is still another well tested
muffin recipe In which chopped
nuts are used Instead of fruit:
Rich All-Bran Muffins
V« cup shortening
1 cup light brown sugar,
1 egg (well besten)
1 cup sour milk
2W cups tU-braa;
1 cud flour
when
Unexpected guest* arrive
word gets out that Miss Bradley
has made a batch of muffins.
114 teaspoons baking powder;
Vt teaspoon salt
, t4 teaspoon soda ,
2/2 cup chopped nut*
Cream shortening and sugar; add
egg, sour milk and all-bran. Sift
flour with baking powder, salt and
soda. Add nuts to flour and add to
liquid mixture, a. Stir only until
flour disappears. Fill greased muf
fin tins two-thirds full and bake 25
minutes in a moderate oven (400*
F.)
Yield: 12 large muffins.’
Tested recipes
German Dumplings
Dice a half loaf of stale bread
with crusts trimmed off; add one
large onion, minced and softened in
butter, one large cup of warm
mashed potato or cold potato; sea
son with salt and blend with a half
cup of milk to which three beaten
eggs have been added. Add enough
flour (about a cup) so the mixture
can be handled. Mold Into small
balls the size of an egg and drop
in boiling salted water. Cook for
15 minutes by the clock and serve
quickly, dressed with drawn butter
and tiny croutons. Delicious with
roast meats, braised or fricasseed
meats which have rich gravy.
A nice variation of the above re
cipe can be had by adding to the
mixture a half pound of young beef
or calves’ liver which has been put
through the meat grinder; also a
little chopped parsley for extra sea
soning. Make the dumplings the size
of walnuts and drop in boiling meat
stock. Serve as a soup.
Raisin Biscuits
Mix and sift together two cups of
flour, a teaspoon of salt, and four
teaspoons of baking powder. Cut
into this two tablespoons of butter
or one of lard and one of butter.
Add a cup of small seedless raisins,
and to this mixture add gradually
three-fourths of a cup of milk.
Mould into a soft dough and make
into biscuits about a third of an
inch in thickness. Brush the tops
with melted butter and bake in a
hot oven for 12 to 15 minutes.
Baked Noodles With Ham
In a buttered baking dish place
a layer of cooked noodles (the fine
cut noodles are more delicate);
sprinkle with chopped ham and a
few mushrooms sauted in butter;
moisten with white sauce and sprin
kle over with grated cheese. Repeal
the layers until the dish is filled.
Sprinkle the top with cheese and
bake in a hot oven for about 20
minutes.
Cheese Hominy
To a can' of hominy or its equiv
alent in cooked hominy, allow one
cup of grated cheese and two table
spoons of finely minced onion. In
a buttered baking dish put a layer
of the hominy and sprinkle it with
cheese, onion, salt and pepper Re
peat until the dish is filled. Then
add two cups of tomato sauce. Place
in the oven and bake until the
onion is done and the cheese melt
ed and browned nicely.
Macaroon Mouse
Crush stale macaroons and meas
ure out one-third cupful. Whip a
half pint of double cream and to it
NEW ONE-TRIP BEER
BOTTLE IS INTRODUCED
“Stubby” Beer Bottle Requires
No Deposit
• An entirely new type of beer bot
tle known as ‘Stubby" on which no
deposit Is required has been intro
duced by a leading glass company.
The new short necked, light
weight bottle is designed for brew
ers who want to supply their trade,
particularly department and chain
stores with a one-trip, no-deposit,
non-returnnble beer bottle.
"Stubby” is 81 per cent shorter
and is 3 ounces lighter, but haB
the regulation 12-ounce capacity.
The two misses compare in height
approximately the same as
“Stubby" and the traditional size
beer bottle.
Friday & Saturday
ORANGES FOR JUICE
Small, Heavy Fruit—2 Dozen
for .49c.
3 ROYAL GELATINE—1 CHOC
OLATE PUDDING—AU for 20c
2 lbs. HEWITT’S SPECIAL
COFFEE . 44c
BIRDSEYE "FILLETS” —RED
PERCH lb.21o
SUNSHINE FIG BARS—19c lb.
3 lbs. .53o
BIRDSEYE LIMAS — Special
Package .23c
NEW — Old Fashioned Buck
wheat — Oatmeal
-o
add two tablespoons of strained
honey. Fold Into the cream the
macaroon crumbs, place in the
freezing tray of an automatic re
frigerator, or pack in salt and Ice
for old-fashioned freezing.
Orange Pudding
1 1-2 cups boiling water
4 tablespoons granulated tapioca
1-4 teaspoon salt
1-2 cup sugar
1 cup strained orange juice
1 teaspoon grated orange rind
1-2 cup cream, whipped until stiff
Use a double boiler for making
this recipe. To the boiling- water
add the tapioca and salt and cook
for about 20 minutes. Add the su
gar, orange juice and rind, mix and
allow the pudding to cool, then fold
in the whipped cream. Place in
sherbert glasses and set in the re
frigerator until wanted.
A FANCY FROSTING
Have you ever tried Manila Frost
ing for a fresh baked white cake!
It’s delicious. The foundation foi
it is made in this way:
1 cup brown sugar
1-4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1-2 cup boiling water
1 egg white, stifly beaten
1-2 teaspoon vanilla
Blend the sugar, cream of tartar
and water and set over a low flame,
stirring constantly until the sugar
is dissolved and the mixture boils.
Continue cooking until a small
amount of syrup forms a soft ball
in cold water or “spins a thread.”
Pour the syrup in a fine stream
over the egg white, beating con
stantly, then add the flavoring,
beating the whole until it is almost
stiff enough to spread on the cake.
Just before the finish, add to half
of the frpstlng some finely chopped
dates and figs and chopped nut
meats. Use this for a filling and
spread the plain frosting smoothly
over the top. This diversified frost
ing makes the cake a complete des
sert ... a delicious companion for
the after-dinner coffee.
Building permits issued in Mel
bourne, Australia, are far above
those of a year ago.
FREE DELIVERY
POPULAR
1 MARKET11
Dial 3-1)541)
122 BAST MAIN STREET
Next to Genlot’o
Fancy Fresh
Killed
Tqrkeys
ib24<
BUTTER—
Finest creamery
2 55c
5,000 LBS. TO GO.
Standing
Rib Roast
Chuck
Forequart
ers Lamb
Shoulder""
12
1'
2
Clod
Link
Sausages
pound
Fresh Ground
Chopped Meat
Lamb
lamb
Ley of Lamb
Loin Lamb IL
Chops ID
Lamb Stew 7c
*rS5c
LAMB
Sti...
Fresh mTeX"
FOWLS, lb lov
Our Usual 8 to l'£ SpeclaL
17«
STEAK
Round,
Short or
Sirloin
Plate Navel Beef lb 7c
ibl6<
Armour's Lard
Shortening
Fifnh
SHOULDERS
2"” 29c
19c
lb
McIntosh
APPLES
CABBAGE—
Over 2 lbs for
410c
-Tc
6 ,-nP
Dressing Up
The Lunch Box
In the days of the Little Red
School House It may have been
quite all right to carry a dull look
ing luncheon, wrapped in brown
paper and bound round with a
piece of string. Rude desks, crude
pioneer costumes, the old oaken
bucket and community tin cup
constituted the school equipment
then, and quite naturally the hap
hazard lunch box fit into the gen
eral scheme.
But to-day how the scene has
shifted. Modern school buildings
are as classic as Greek temples;
furnishings as finished as those of
the finest home; individual cups
and purified water Issue from artis
tic wall fountains for little folks
clad in smart clothes. There just
is no place in this scheme of per
fection for a common-place Junch
bo&. Too many ways in which to
give it a character are now within
reach of everyone.
Color and design may come in
with the? modem paper napkins, as
daintily designed as for party use.
PaPper cups in macthing colors are
also available . . . not to mention
the pretty plates and other paper
containers which for a few cents
per dozen, may be added to the
list.
Remembering how often the good
taste of a hostess is gauged by the
appearance of her table, it would
seem that the modern mother
should not question the wisdom of
spending this bit to bring change
and variety to the school luncheon.
At best cold foods are less appetiz
FALL OUTING DINNERS
Tomato Juice Cocktail
Veal Loaf Sandwiches
White Bread
Ton rue Sandwiches,
Rye Bread'
Potato Salad
Staffed OUves
Apple Turnovers Cheese
Coffee
Clam Juice Cocktail
Chicken Sandwiches,
White Bread
Deviled Ham Sandwiches
Wholewheat Bread
Salad of Green Peas and
Cheese
Fruited Gelatin in Lily Cups
Wafers Coffee
A CAMP FIRE MENU
A Peeled and Partly
Separated Orange For Each
Grilled Bacon
Home-made Baked Beans
(Reheated)
Chill Sauce
Raisin Bread Sandwiches
Lemon Tarts Coffee
ing than cooked viands; a packed
lunch seems less fastidious than
one served at table. Attention to
little niceties which can so easily
be Introduced will do wonders for
the child’s pride and appetite as
he eats his noonday bite' in the
presence of a dozen other young
sters, who, for all their youth, are
quite observing.
Frightened by the wind, a flock
of sheep dashed down a hill and
over a precipice In the Alps near
Villeneuve, France, all 170 falling
1,000 feet to their death.
- |T
Kitchen
Comments
BY WILD A HOYT
When planning to make cake,
think first of the time you wish to
use It. A plain cake recipe Is quite
all right if the cake Is to be eaten
at once or on the day it Is baked.
Choose a richer cake, made with
more butter and more eggs, or put
together with a soft filling, If you
expect It to keep fresh for several
days.
• • •
Think how mucH more accurately
you can measure Ingredients If you
have a glass measuring cup, Instead
of a tin or aluminum cup, Instead
of a tin or aluminum cup . and
one that Is divided not only Into
half-cup and quarter-cup sections,
but Into third-cup sections as well.
The glass cups are not expensive.
• • •
You can suggest variety In salads
merely by using a new or elaborat
ed dressing with the same old salad
greens. Thus you may serve sliced
tomatoes with French dressing one
night, quartered tomatoes with Rus
sian dressing the next, and whole
tomatoes stuffed with mayonnaise
and chopped egg dressing the third
night, without running the risk of
monotony.
• • •
If you do not like egg plant that
Is fried in deep hot fat, try It sliced
fairly thin and dipped In egg, then
once in fine cracker crumbs. Fry
rather slowly In butter and serve at
once. The secret of goodness here
is in not using a too-thick or a too
coarse coating of crumbs.
" ■■ —
m
SPilms
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1 IhS. *
X>lS$
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fSS£
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SSuuow*
,V**' M ^
6
.. »• lb
Aver»*e
““VlCO*
,»«
’wW'-ESS
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fclkJ*®
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iSTb®*1 *ePate
uno"*
fro"*
«*£«%.
lb
'SS*S ft*
'.oW-VSIti"
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1
Quality Meats -Tasty roods
LAND O’ LAKES BUTTER 2 lbs 65/
FINE CREAMERY BUTTER ■ »*>»$0/
GOOD CUP coffee—---IS/
VAN CAMP’S EVAP. MILK 4 ™ 22/
PASTRY FLOUR “*,b85c Pillsbury’* Flour £&,k$1.25
Crocker’* Best Flourf:*k,b91c Gold Medal FlourI4n*k,b$1.27
--— Gorton’s Ready-to-Fry
FISH CAKES 2
TinsJgC
Dole’s Pineapple
JUICE""-1 3 -25b
Excellent for Table.
Cooking and Baking
GOOD LUCK in,
MARGARINE rk*
Autocrat
COFFEE Vacuum Tin
Campbell’s Tomato
SOUP 4
Tins
29c
27c
HERSHEY’S BREAKFAST COCOA "■ — 7/
HERSHEY’S BAKING CHOC. 2iLS19/
HERSHEY’S CHOC. SYRUP ■«<>■•—10/
HERSHEY’S CANDIESSETSiT 3 —• 10/
DROMEDARY DATES 2 w 25/
CITRON PEEL DROMEDARY Sm»llPk[.|Q^
DROMEDARY DIXIE MIX -39/
GINGER BREAD MIX —23/
NONE SUCH MINCE MEAT 2«*‘23/
DOGGIE DINNER,™ 3"23/
P&G SOAP—'6-23/
R & R BONED CHICKEN
SANI FLUSH
DILL PICKLES
GOLD MEDAL BESQUICK
CHATKA CRAB MEAT 2
Regular 49c
No. % Tin
Now Is the Time to Large
Flush That Auto Radiator Tin
SELECTED Full Quart Jar
Lge pkg 29c
Sml pkg
45/
21/
15/
18/
45/
fancy sweet
Potatoes
10 lbs. .
15
CALIF. ICEBERG
Lettuce
2 for
/
15
CALIFORNIA
Oranges
2 doz.
39'
NATIVE
Carrots
3 bchs.
10
Fancy Macintosh
Apples
5 lbs.
17'
Prince Edward
Island
Turnips
4 lbs.
10*

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