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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, October 19, 1935, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1935-10-19/ed-1/seq-7/

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Market Jumped Because War Threats Had Eased Off
Stocks Gained Slight
Advance DuringWeek
More Profit Taking Among the Leaders, With Select
Purchases—Industrial Average Made Good Gain
By ELMER C. WALZER
(United Prow Financial Editor)
New York, Oct. 19—(UP)—Stocks
registered small gains this week al
though there was more profit-taking
In leaders and more selectivity in
purchases. -
' A substantial gain in the industrial
average as leading automobile shares
swept ahead to new highs was fol
lowed by moderate reactions and
duller trading with irregular swings.
When Jilgh priced motor shares
quieted, lower-priced ones were given
a whirl. Packard gained a point, or
nearly 20 per cent. Chrysler touched
a new high since 1929 at 83 1-2 and
then backed away. General Motors
reached 49 718 for the first time since
1930. Motor equipments netted gains
ranging to nearly 4 points.
Automobile output Is steadily ris
ing, according to statistics from the
trade. However, buying of steel by
automobile companies has hot de
veloped the Impetus that was antici
pated. Steel operations gained slight
ly from 49.7 to S0.4 per cent of ca
pacity.
When demand for motor shares
subsided traders gave other groups
a whirl. Farm Implement issues were
bid up sharply. Packing shares came
in for attention when Swift & Co.
placed Its stock on a $1 annual basis.
Amusements were active, notably
Radlo-Kelth-Orpheum.
Tobacco issues moved higher on
Increased clgaret output for Sep
COOPERATION IS
BEING SOUGHT
Worcester, Mass., Oct. 19—(UP)—
Closer cooperation between New
England industry and educators to
produce better «rained executives
was urged today by Chairman John
P. Tinsley of the community devel
opment committee of the New Eng
land council.
Addressing the New England sec
tion of the Society for the Promo
tion of Engineering Education, Tins
ley said it was “highly essential that
New England industry give more
study to what the college-trained
man can do for it, over a period of
years, and similarly what New Eng
land institutions for engineering ed
ucation can do in the field of indus
trial investigation and research . .
Tinsley pointed out that industry,
still the largest factor in New Eng
land’s economic structure, could re
tain its competitive position here
on,'y*by “having every advantage in
cident to the best equipment, the
most Improved processes, and far
reaching application of scientific
management principles to its indus
trial operations.”
YOUNG BANDITS
WERE ARRESTED
(Continued from Page 1.)
nearing Monday, pending arrival of
)ut-of-town authorities.
Had Gunshot Wounds
Mitchell was found to be sufler
ng from gunshot wounds on both
egs, which he said were accidentally
nfllcted while he was walking along
i highway at Catsklll, N. Y., ac
:ording to Information received
lerc from Schenectady, It was be
leved Mitchell was one of two men
Ired upon by state police recently
is they fled In a small car to es
i ape questioning In connection with
leveral holdups In that city.
In court today Covey was ldentl
led by Samuel Sabel as the man
vho held him up Tuesday, left him
>ound and gagged and escaped with
ii3S in cash from his store.
] Bridgeport police were to question
1 hem In the deaths of two policemen
- :arly this month. The officers were
‘ lain by a radio thief.
The youths came here several days
igo In a Ford coupe, which, police
aid, bore stolen registration plates.
Surrounded House
Police surrounded the rooming
muse ' late last night and broke
hrough a door. They found Covey
n one room with one of the girls
,nd Mitchell was in an adjoining
ocked room with her companion.
Jltchell was captured on the roof.
In the rooms were found three
Daded revolvers and a kit of burg*
ir tools.
The girls, Helen Becken^nd May
'ooeko, both of this city, were held
n charges of being In danger of
ailing Into habits of vice and police
elleved they were unaware of the
ouths’ Identities.
FATALLY HURT
Bridgeport, Conn., Oct. 19— (UP)—
Ihrlstopher Klewin, Mystic, was
idd on a reckless operation charge
iter his automobile fatally Injured
itephen Lucas, 72, last night. Lucas
ras the father of Councilman
Itephen Lucas of Stratford.
BEER Itf CHURCH
South Bend, Ind., Oct. 19—(UP)—
leer la expected to attract men to
artles at St. Stephen's church. The
lev. Tarzlclus Kupla obtained a 11
ense to serve beer In the basement
f the church.
OBITUARY
EMMONS—Mrs. Dorothy V. Em*
ions, 24, wife of George Emmons
If Terryvllle, died this morning at
le Bristol hospital following a
rlef illness. Mrs. Emmons was bom
i Vermont but had resided In Ter
yvllle for a number of years. She
'as the daughter of the late Irv
ig Troy and Catherine Egan Trov.
esldes her husband she Is sur
Ived by her mother, Mrs. Troy
he body was removed to the fun
ral home of Arthur J. Lunny, IV
entral avenue, from where the
ineral will take place at a time
L > be annbunced later.
DSHD.
MRONS—In Bristol, Oct. IS, 1936,
Dorothy V. Emmons, of Terryvllle.
funeral from Lunny Funeral Horn*,
irrangements later.
I
tember. Electrical equipments gained
substantially an dthen eased. Union
Pacific was strong In a firm rail
group. Utilities and steels lost
ground. Acme Steel, an exception,
soared 8 points to a new high.
Coppers were lower. Golds de
clined with Alaska Juneau making
a new low for the year. Chemicals
had periods of strength.
TWO LABOR MEN
HAD FIST FIGHT
(Continued from Page 1.)
Lewis began to walk slowly toward
Hutcheson. The latter was about to
resume his seat when Lewis tapped
him on the shoulder.
The two exchanged words, then
Lewis struck at the carpenter's pres
ident.
Nearby delegates rushed In and
separated the struggling pair.
After quiet had been restored,
Hutcheson left the hall. Lewis re
mained.
Like Old Times
The fight was more reminiscent
of the old time miners convention,
wtpre frequent brawls Interrupted
the proceedings, than of the Feder
ation's meetings, which usually are
conducted with all the dignity of a
luncheon club.
According to those nearby, Lewis
after tapping Hutcheson on the
shoulder, asked him to forget the
quarrel and permit the discussion
to go ahead. It was said that
Hutcheson made a reply In a tone
which so angered Lewis that he
swung from the hip with his left.
The blow, catching Hutcheson
unaware, staggered him against a
pillar. Hutcheson then went for
Lewis and was met with a blow
which knocked him Into a table.
Table Overturned
The table was overturned and
Hutcheson fell to the floor.
President William Green remon
strated with Lewis over the Inci
dent when the latter came to the
platform .later.
"That’s no way to settle things,
John,’’ Green said.
“He called me foul names, that I
• won’t take from anybody,” Lewis
told Oreen.
"I didn’t know that,” Green re
sponded.
Lewis was unmarked except for
broken skin on a knuckle of his left
hand.
Lewis wears a large gold ring on
his left hand. This probably ac
counted for the marks on Hutche
son’s face.
More Problems Left
The federation approached the
end of a controversial anu highly
significant convention today with
communism and the question of re
viving the NRA among problems still
to be debated.
The federation was expected to
vote down overwhelmingly a proposal
to recruit a political party for the
working men and women of America
and to take an emphatic position
against communistic Influences.
Many of the delegates are due back
on their Jobs Monday. If It weren’t
for the compelling urge of the time
clock most would prefer to remain
hcerc and fight out for another sev
eral days the Important Issues facing
the organized labor movement.
Byy the re-election of President
William Green and his executive
council yesterday the federation re
turned to power the same group
which has guided It since the San
Francisco convention last year.
There was only one change In the
council. William D. Mason of the
street railway workers succeeded
George L. Berry, who resigned be
cause of his position as federal co
ordinator for Industrial cooperation.
Constitution Change
The convention was expected to go
on record favoring an amendment
to the federal constitution which
would make government regulation
of wages and hours .possible through
out Industry, without regard for
state lines. The council already has
advocated seeking some solution of
this question of government’s rela
tion to Industry under the present
constitution and would not be ex
pected to take any militant stand
kfor constitutional change.
The communist issue was counted
upon to bring out John L. Lewis,
head of the United Mine Workers,
In another fight against the leaders.
Lewis Is opposing any proposed ad
dition to the federation's constitu
tion under which communists would
be expelled from membership in any
affiliated union.
The federation convention In No
vember, 1936, will be held in Tampa,
Fla.
STATE COURTS DO
NOT COOPERATE
Hartford, Conn., Oct. 19—(UP)—
The courts were under Indictment
by the state labor department today
for falling to cooperate in cracking
down on sweatshop conditions in
Connecticut Industries.
Since the NRA was declared un
constitutional, there have been In
stances of manufacturers working
employes 70 hours a week at wages
as low as $8 and *7, Deputy Labor
Commissioner William J. Fitzgerald
charged.
"The work of the state labor de
partment Is definitely hampered by
low penalties meted out by Connec
ticut courts," he .declared. "I don’t
know but what the blame Is on pol
itics.
“With light fines being given out
back and start their violations all
to offenders, many of them go right
over again.”
The department, he said, was de
termined to enforce the new laws,
regarding minimum wages and the
48-hour week for women under 13
years.
“We hope the courts In the future
will give out maximum fines and
especially Jail vanaltlev” he said
“The laws must be enforced anr.
from now on we shall make our ar
rests without any warning at all.”
NEW TAX HEAD
JOSEPH LA WHENCE
Former Stole Representative
Joseph Lawrence of Stamford has
been named head of the taxes and
penalties of the | |nited States de
partment of Justice, It was an
nounced today. He Is completlnf a
second step In the government's
move against A1 Capone to col
lect $110,000 old taxes and on Il
legal beer. Ex-Representative
Lawrence Is well known In Water
bury, having served In the house
during the 1931 session with At
torney John D. Thoms and Repre
sentative Daniel J. Mahaney of
this elty. Mr. Lawrence Is a for
mer vice-president of the Stam
ford board of education.
Britain Must Stop
War, Says Baldwin
(Continued from Page I)
It was estimated today after an
nouncement that the military class
of 1915 will be drafted soon. One
million men of the giant army will
be In Italy, thus Increasing the
home defense force by approxi
mately 300,000. Best estimates Indi
cated between 650,000 and 700,000
men now are under the Italian col
ors on the continent. Additional
naval classes will be called to the
colors If the Mediterranean tension
falls to lessen In the next few days,
according to rumors here.
Before Christmas, according to
military experts, Italy's first-line
air force will be doubled and will
total nearly 3,500 planes. Bombing
planes are being manufactured at
the rate of seven a day.
The communique announcing tho
forthcoming calling to arms of the
1915 class also said that citizens of
the classes of 1911, 1912, 1913 and
1914, previously exempted from the
full-time period, now wobld be
called, bringing army divisions up
to a war-time footing. Classes of
1911, 1913 and 1914 are to be re
tained In service.
Accusations fired
Addis Ababa, Oct. 19— (UP)—
Ethiopia is preparing a protest to
the League of Nations against al
leged Italian violation of the Red
Cross convention forbidding use of
dum dum bullets, the United Press
learned today from a reliable
source.
A formal charge that Italian
troops have been reversing bullets
within their cartridge cases was
made earlier today In a government
communique. It said "bullets so
treated wreak terrible havoc upon
the human body.”
After denying Italian charges that
Ethiopia troops had used dum dums
and characterizing the accusation
as a “calumny," the communique
said: ,
"Everyone knows the Italian lead
ers' taste for this weapon. The real
truth Is that upon a large number
of dead Italian soldiers clips were
found containing bullets which had
been reversed within their casings”.
The earliest accusation that Ital
ian troops were using ammunition
of a type Internationally outlawed
36 years ago came' from Dr. Robert
W. Hockman, American missionary,
who declared that he had seen
wounded Ethiopians who apparently
were the victims of dum dum bul
lets.
Reports from the southern front
stated that Ethiopian warriors were
brought Into hospitals there with
gaping wounds where bullets had
come out of their bodies. In some
cases leaving openings 25 square
Inches In area.
Pleased With France
London, Oct. 19—(UP)—Great
Britain today received a definite
promise from France of support If
Italy launches a Mediterranean at
tack upon the British navy.
The French reply, In which Pre
mier Pierre Laval took nine pages
to say “yes,” was couched In such
terms as to provide the British for
eign office with considerable satis
faction.
According to authoritative circles
here, the agreement takes the form
of a promise of cooperation If Brit
ain it attacked by Italy while acting,
not as an Individual but as a league*
policeman In the Medlteranean.
France Is believed In return to have
asked a British pledge of aid If
France Is attacked by Germany.
The French reply came as an
anti-climax following the success if
Rome conversations between Pre
mier Benito Mussollnln, Sir Erie
Drummond, Brltsh ambassador, and
Count Charles de Ohambrun,
French envoy. The Anglo-Itallau
agreement, reached at Rome and to,
be announced Sunday, removes
much of the danger of a Mediter
ranean Incident against which Brit
ain sought French support.. It Is
understood to provide for with
drawal of Italian troops from Libya
where they had been threatening
Egypt and reduction In the number
of Brltsh ships stationed in the
Mediterranean. France fits Into the
diplomatic scheme with French
naval replacements for the British
ships and permission for Britain to
use Its naval dockyards In the Med
iterranean.
Despite the fact that the Rome
agreement has largely removed
dangers of the Italo-Ethloplan con
flict spreading to Europe and has
cleared up the threatening difficul
ties between Britain and Italy, the
French answer further backs up the
19 CCC Camps Will
Keep Open To March
Thirteen to Be Located on State Forest Projects;
5,000 Men to Carry on Work During Winter Months
A total of nlnteen Civilian Con
servation Corps camps will be op
erating In the state of Connecticut
during the six-month winter period
ending March 31 next. It was an
nounced to-day at the office of
Robert Pechner, director of Emer
gency Conservation work.
Of the nineteen camps, thirteen
will be located on the state forest
projects, live on private forest
projects and one on a state gtark
project. All told, approximately
6000 men will be carrying on con
servation work In Connecticut tim
ing the winter period.
The nineteen camps assigned to
the state of Connecticut for the
sixth period represent an Increase
of two over the average number of
camps which have been located
during the two years ana a half
that the CCO has been In opera
tion. This figure represents a de
crease of two, however, from the
number of camps In operation m
Connecticut on August 31, 1835.
The locations of the camps which
will be operated In Connecticut this
winter follow: West Cornwall, Torr
lngton, East Hartland, Torrington,
Stafford Springs, Cobalt, Hampton,
Voluntown, Thomaston, Clinton,
Riverton, Haddam, Madison, Wind
sor, Portland, Stafford Springs,
Danbury, East Hampton, Kent.
Summary: State forest, 13 camps;
league and British effort* towards
peace and thus serves as a clincher
In the diplomatic game.
Deserted Expects Honors
London, Oct. 19—(UP)—Has Hal
le Selassie Ougsa, pop-eyed tlgre
chieftain wh odeserted to the Ital
ians, expects to be Installed soon In
a castle In Makale, SO miles south
of the present Italian front lines,
according to an exchange tele
graph dispatch received here today.
“Very soon you’ll be my guests In
my castle at Makale and taste the
best honeywater In Tlgre," he told
correspondents who talked with
him at a press conference at Adl
grat.
Hlrf boast was made In answer to
a question as to whether he ex
pected to be In Makale within Die
next few days. The question was
prompted by reports that Ougsa
and his 1,500 men will participate
In a new Italian advance to Makale,
which the loyal chieftain, Ras Hal
lue, 1s understood to be defending.
War Rumbles
Asmara, Eritrea, Oct. 19—(UP)—
Reports continue to reach here from
the Interior of a strong rebellious
movement among Ethiopian chieft
ains against Emperor Halle Selas
sie's authority.
One such movement Is gaining
momentum In the OoJJam region
between Lake Tana and Addis Aba
ba, according to these reports.
Selassie's policy of replacing gov
ernors whose loyalty he suspects
with local chieftains of his own
choice Is responsible for the rebel
lious movement In the opinion of
the political department at Italian
army headquarters.
Rome, Oct. 19—(UP)—Gen. Emi
lio De Bono, commander of the
Italian East African forces, today
decreed abolition of alleged slavery
In the area occupied by his troops
In Ethiopia, It was officially an
nounced here today.
Djibouti, Trench Somaliland, Oct.
19— (UP)—Capt. Marius Drophll
and James Hickey, both of Dublin,
entrained today for Addis Ababa
whence they will go to the front to
organize a medical corps for the
Ethiopian army. They will be fol
lowed shortly by a number of Irish
Doctors.
Waterbury
Produce Market
(Furnished by Connecticut
Department of Agriculture,
B. P. Storrs, local agent.)
(Unless otherwise stated quota
tion* are baaed on sales of food
merchantable products to retailers
by nearby growers or others).
FRUITS: Apples, fancy 1.00-1.25
bu., No. 1 .75-1.00 bu., No. 2 and
drops .40-.75 bu., older apples (bulk
at farms) .25-.3S cwi; grapes, na
tive .50-.75 1-2-bu.; pears, native
.75-1.00 1-2-bu.
VEGETABLES: Beans, green 4.00
5.00 bu., Uma 2.50-3.00 bu.; beets,
cut .S5-.45 1-2-bu.; broccoli .65-.75
bu.; cabbage, white .40-.60 bu.; red
.65-.75 bu., savoy .40-.50 bu.; car
rots, bunched .2S-.35 do*., cut wash
ed .75-LOO bu.; cauliflower L50-2.00
dos.; celery, native .60-.75 dos.; egg
plant .75-1.00 bu.; lettuce, native
.85-.75 box, western Iceberg 8.75
4.00 crate; onions 1.15-1.50 bu.; par
snips, washed .90-1.00 bu.; peppers
JI0-L0O bu.; potatoes .75-.00 bu.,
1.45-1.60 cwL; spinach .40-.60 bu.;
'squash, winter 1.00-1.50 cwL; toma
toes, native 1.25-2.25 1-2-bu.; tur
nips. native .60-1.00 bu., Canadian
.05-1.00 bu.
POULTRY PRODUCTS: Conn,
eggs per dos.; Newlald Fancy .50;
Special .4S-.47; Extra .43-.45; Gath
ered .40-.43; Newlald medium .40;
Special .38-.40; Extra medium .33
.36; pullets .28-.S3; western .30-.40;
live fowl heavy .10-.22 ’b., Leghorn
.16-.20 tb.; broilers, Rocks .21-31 lb.,
Reds .20-.25 lb.. Leghorns .18-.22 lb.,
roasters .22-.20 lb.; dressed, fowl .28
.30 lb., roasters .31-.34 lb.; turkeys,
Conn. Fancy .45 lb.
LIVESTOCK AND MEAT: Butch
er stock sitd meat; cows .03-.00 tb.,
calves .09-.12 lb.; meats, beef .10-.19
lb., veal .17-.18 lb., lamb .17-^0 lb.;
pork loins J7-J8 lb.
private forest, B camps; state park,
1 camp. Total, IB camp*. Symbols:
BP, ctate park; P, private forest; 6,
state forest.
FOUR GUNMEN OF
- BOSTON SOUGHT
Boston, Oct. 10—<UP>—Greater
Boston police today sought four
gunmen who held up five employes
of the Educator Crackero cmpany
In Cambridge last night and fled
with an estimated 13,000 cash.
It was the third major holdup In
Cambridge within a month.
Authorities believed the same
gang was responsible tor four other
holdups in metropolitan Boston re*
cently.
Working with speed and precision,
three of the gunmen entered the
cracker company’s offlfflces while a
confederate waited outside in an
automobile. All carried guns.
The bandit leader herded four
clerks Into a comer and demanded:
"Where’s the doughT" He was told
"there Isn’t any money here.” The
loader then opened a safe and two
confederates aided him In looting it.
A company truck driver who was
returning with receipts appeared
and he too was cornered at gun
point.
After taking the money and
wrenching a telephone from the
wall, the three bandits Joined their
confederate and sped away.
WEDDING WENT ON
Topeka, Kan., Oct. 10—(OP)—The
Illness of Felix Ernest, the best man,
did not stop the wedding nor prevent
Ernest from serving. William . R.
Rhea and Mrs. Laveme Smith, bride
and groom, went to the hospital and
had the knot tied there.
Closing Prices
KH1TEHOUIB A CO. TeL 4-3181
Y’st’day’a
ClOM
Adam* Express — 8%
Air Reduc.161 1
Alaska Jun . 14%
Allied Chem.170%
Allis-Chalmers . 30Vi
Amer'. Bank Note .. 29 Vi
Am. Can .142 Vi
Amer. Car Sc Fdry... 20
Am. For. Pwr. 5%
Amer. Inti. 8 Vi
Amer. Metals ’. 27
Amer. Pwr. Sc Lt. .. 7V4
Am. Rad. Btan. Ban. 16%
Am. Roll. Mills .... 26Vi
Am. 8m. Ref. .62
Amer. Steel Fdry. .. 16
Amer. 8ugar .60%
Am. Tel. Sc Tel.140%
Am. Tobacco B —103 Vi
Anaconda Cop.21%
Atch. Top. Sc 8. F. .. 46%
Atlantic Ref. . 22
Auburn Auto . 42
Baldwin Loco. 2%
Balt. St Ohio. 14 Vi
Beldlng Hemingway. 13%
Bendlx Aviation — 23%
Beth. Steel . 37%
Blaw Knox . 13%
Bohn Alum .48%
Borden . 26%
Borg Warner . 63%
Bpt. Brass . 14%
Briggs Mfg.61
Bullard Co.21
Burroughs Add.20%
Byers A. M.16%
Canada Dry . 11
Can. Pacific . 9%
Case Mach.87
Celanese Corp.27%
Cerro De Pasco — 68%
Certaln-teed Prod. . 6%
Ches. Sc Ohio . 44
Chrysler Motor — 80%
Columbia Carbon ... 89
Com’l. Inv. Tr.68%
Coml. Solvents . 18%
Com. Southern. 1%
Congoleum . 39%
Con. Film . 5%
Con. Film, pr.18
Con. Oas . 27%
Cons. Oil Corp. 7%
Container Corp.15%
Continental Can. .. 89% i
Cont’l Oil of Del. ,. 21
Com Psoducts . 61%
Coty, Inc. *%
Curtiss-Wright A .. 8%
Deere Sc Co.49 Vi
Dela. Lack.14%
DuPont .134
Douglas Aircraft J.. 31%
Eastman Kodak —156%
Elec. Auto-Lite -34%
Elec. P. Sc L. 4
Eqult. Office Bldg. .. 9%
Erie R. R. 16%
Foster Wheeler .... 16
Freeport Texas . 24%
Firestone Tire. 14 Vi
Oeneral Asphalt — 17 Vi
Oeneral Elec.34
Oeneral Foods . 34
Oeneral Motors .... 48 Vi
Gillette Razor . 17%
Goodrich . 16%
Ooodyear . 17%
Ort. North, pfd .... 24Vi
Ort. West. Sugar .. 27%
Houdallle Hershey .. 23%
Howe Sound . 52
111. Cent. R. R. 14 Vi
Indust. Rayon 34
Inti Cement . 26%
Inti Harvester — 58
Int’l Nickel . 30 %
Int’l Tel. Sc Tel. ... 9%
Johns Manvllle — 81%
Kayser (Jul) Sc Co. 25Vi
Kelvlnator . 13%
Kennecott Cop.25%
Kresge Stores ...... 26%
Kroger Groceries .. 25%
Lambert Chem.22 Vi
Llg. Sc Myers B —115%
Liquid Carbonic .... 31%
Loews . 47%
Lorillard . 25
McKesson Sc Rob
bins . 7%
McKesson Sc Rob
bins pfd . 44%
Mack Truck . 24
Marine Midland 7%
R. & Macy . 52
Math. Alkali . 31%
Mex. Seaboard 011 29
Minn. Honeywell ...119%
Today’*
Close
8%
162
14%
30%
30%
143%
21
6%
8%
7%
17%
26%
62
16%
60%
141%
103
21
47
22%
44%
2%
14%
14
23%
39%
13%
49
25%
64%
14%
62%
22
21
17%
11%
9%
93%
29%
58
6%
44%
83%
89
66%
18%
1%
39%.
5
18
28%
8%
16%
89%
21
<62%
5
8%
60%
13
135%
32%
159
35%
4%
9%
18%
25%
14%
17%
34%
'34
50
17%
17
18%
25%
28%
23%
52%
14%
35
26%
59%
31
10%
84%
26
13%
25
26%
26%
22%
116
31%
48%
26
7%
45
24%
53
32%
29%
122
ZENGE IS GIVEN
LIFE TERM FOR
BRUTALMURDER
Jury of Young Men Has
Decided — Woman in
Case Not at Court
Chicago, Oct. 19—(UP.) — Sen*
tenced to life imprisonment for the
emasculation murder of the middle
aged professor who won his child
hood sweetheart, Mandevllle W.
Zenge. arose from a sound sleep to
day, his taciturn composure un
changed.
A Jury of young men last night
found him guilty of murdering Dr.
Walter J. Bauer, 36, after deliber
ating four and one-half hours. Zen
ge, 36, will be eligible for parole In
30 years.
His only hope Is that a motion
for a new trial made by his counsel,
Joseph Roach, will be granted by
Judge Cornelius J. Harrington on
October 25th.
Woman Not There
Mrs. Louise Schaffer Bauer, the
attractive young widow, for love of
whom Zenge allegedly committed
the crime, was not In court. She
made her only appearance as a wit
ness for the state Monday and at
tracted one of the largest crowds
ever seen In the criminal courts
building.
Testimony of Mrs. Bauer, how
ever, tended to show that although
she and Zenge had an "understand
ing" for seven years, his ardor cool
ed until he learned she was to mar
ry Bauer, professor at a Klrksville,
Mo., school of osteopathy, last July.
Then he attempted to persuade her
to-break her engagement and mar
ry him, the pretty nurse testified.
The defense held that the brutal
nature of the crime was Indicative
of Insanity. Buer was kidnaped from
Ann Arbor, Mich., where he went
to attend summer school three
hours after his marriage, driven to
Chicago In his own car, mutilated
with a penknife and left bleeding
to death outside a Chicago filling
station the night of July 30.
Y’st’day’a Today’*
Close Close
Mohawk Carpet 20%
Mont. Ward . 32
Murray Corp.18%
Nash Motors . 16%
Nat’l Biscuit . 31%
Nat’l Cash Reg.18%
Nat’l Dairy . 17%
Nat’l Diet.31%
Nat’l Pow. & L. 9
N. Y. Central . 21%
New Haven R. R. . 3%
New Haven R. R. pr 7%
North Am.20
Packard Motors 6%
Penney, (J. C.). 78%
Penn. R. R.26%
Phelps Dodge . 24
Phillips Petro . 29%
Proctor Gamble _51%
Pub. Ser. of N. J_ 40%
Pullman Co.31%
Radio . 7%
Radio Keith . 5
Rem. Rand . 14
Rep. Iron Sc Steel .. 16%
Sears-Roebuck .57
Simmons Co. 15%
South Pac.17%
Southern Rwy . 8%
Sparks Wlthlngton..
Standard Brands ...
Stand. Oas Sc Elec..
S. O. of Cal.
S. O. of N. J.
Socony Vacuum
4%
14%
3%
33
45
11%
Sperry Corp.12%
17%
7%
Stewart-Warner
Stone & Webster
Texas Corp.21%
Texas Oulf . 30%
Texas Pac. L. T ... 9%
Timken Roller .... 61%
Trans. Am. 8
Union Carbide. 70%
Union Pacific . 94
United Aircraft — 20%
United Corp. 4%
United Fruit . 69 Vi
United Gas Imp. .. 16%
U. S. Indus. Alco . 46%
U. 8. Pipe Sc Fdry.. 17%
U. S. Rubber . 13%
U. 8. Rubber pr.... 34%
U. S. Steel . 44%
U. S. Steel pfd.109
U. S. Smelt., Refln.
Sc Min. Co.94
United Stores A. .. 5%
Vanadium . 17
Walrecn . 28%
Warner Bros. 7%
Western Md. 7 %
Western Union _58%
Westlnghouse Elec... 84
Westvaco Chlor. ... 21%
Woolworth . 58 %
Worthington Pump. 17
20%
33%
19%
18%
31%
19
18
32%'
9%
22%
3%
7%
20%
6%
79
26%
23%
30%
51%
40%
32
8%
5%
13%
16%
58%
15%
18%
n
4%
14%
3%
33%
45%
11%
12%
17%
7%
21%
31%
9%
63%
8
71%
95
.21%
4%
69
16%
48%
17%
14
36%
46%
109%
93%
5%
18
28%
7%
62%
88
22
59%
17
DOW JONES AVERAOE8
30 20 20
Indus. R.R. Util.
11 a. m.136.03 33.53 25.97
12 m.137.09 33.73 26.10
NEW YORK CURB MARKET
Amer. Sup. 1% 2.
Cities Service . 1% 1%
Elec. Bond Sc Share ..11% 12%
Ford Ltd. 8%
Niagara Hudson .... 8% 8 .
United Founders .. 15-16 1..
N. Y. Bask ft Tnut Stocks
The R. V. Gfiats Co.
Bank of Manhattan... 23 26
Bank of N. Y. St Trust 410 430
Bankers Trust . 53% 56 Vi
Cent. Hanover Bank St
Trust *. 105 111
Chase National Bank . 30 33
Chem. Bank Sc Trust .45 48
Corn Exchange Bank.. 56 60
Empire Trust . 18 21
First National Bank... 1625 1725
Guaranty Trust. 263 272
Irving Trust . 13 15
Manufacturers Trust .. 30 33
National City Bank ... 28 31
New York Trust . 105 110
Title Ouar. St Truat... Vik 9%
* i
»w ■
Dozens Of Issues Had
New Highs During Day
General Motors^Hit 50 for First Time in 4 Years;
Special issues Were Strong and Active
By ELMER C. WALZER
(United Preen Financial Editor)
New York. Oct. 1*—(UP))—Elim
ination at leant (or the time being
of war threats In Europe sent most
of the stock list up fractions to more
than 3 points. Stocks that would
benefit only by war demand such as
the coppers sold off.
Dozens of stocks mounted to new
highs for the year or longer. Gen
eral Motors touched 50 for the first
time In four years. Chrysler came
near its high since 1929 on a gain
of more than 2 points. Motor pro
ducts Jumped 2 points to a new top
at 48 In the motor equipments.
Special Issues were strong and
fairly active. Among the new highs
were made by Collins St Alkman,
Johns Manvllle, Mengel Issues, U. S.
Oypsum, Newport Industries and
Nelsner Brothers. Gains'In most of
these Issues were about a point and
Mengel prferred at Its top was up
5 3-4 points.
Western Union crossed 61 for a
gain of nearly 3 points. Other com
munications were strong with it.
Ralls were steady to Arm. Steels
lost a point or so under leadership
of U. 8. Steel. Packard was the most
active Issue on the board, selling at
a new 1935 high.
The market started higher feat
ured by blocks of 1,000 to 10,000
shares, the later In Packard. Then
trading quieted. As the session pro
gressed new buying orders came in
and Just before the close the list
was boiling. Many stocks rase easily
on moderate demand. J. I. Case
Jumped 6 points to a new high at
93. Other farm implement shares
lollowed. Mail order shares Joined
the farm group with Spiegel, May.
Stern touching a new top at 83 up
3 1-8 points.
Oreyhound Jumped 2 points,
while gains of 1 to more than 2
points were noted in Westlnghouse
Electric. Schenley, American Tele
phone, Celanese, Briggs, Auburn
CONNECTICUT SECURITIES
The IL F Griggs Co.
PUBLIC UTILITY STOCKS
Bridgeport Gas Lt Co. 35 38
Bridgeport Hydraulic Co. 33 36
Conn. Elec. Service >,4 66
Conn. Gas & Coke com. 2 3
Conn. Gas St Coke pfd. 48 51
Conn. Lt. St Pow. 5 14 %
pfd. Ill
Conn. Lt. St Pow. 6 14 %
pfd.115
Connecticut Power Co. . 4714 49 Vi
Conn Ry St Ltg Co com 30 35
Conn Ry St Ltg Co pfd 45 50
Hfd. Elect Lt. Co. com. . 70',4 72',4
Hfd. Gas Lt. Co. com . 43 46
Illuminating Shares A . 50 52
New Haven Water Co... 73
South. N. E. Tel. Co. . 120 124
INDUSTRIAL STOCKS
Amn. Hardware Co. .. 28 14 30 14
Bristol Brass Corp. com. 58 61
Colts Pat Fire Arms Co 37 14 3914
Eagle Lock Co. 25 28
Eastern Malleable Iron 4% o%
Landers. Frary St Clark 4714 49'4
New Brit. Mach. Co. com 14 16
North St Judd Mfg. Co. 27 Vi 2914
Peck, Stow <St Wilcox Co. 314 5'4
Remington Arms. 4'4 514
Scovlll Mfg. Co. 31 33
Stanley Works Co. com. 33 35
Torrlngton Co. 86 88
INSURANCE STOCKS
Aetna Fire Insurance.. 55 57
Aetna Life Insurance .. 2914 31 '4
Automobile Insurance .. 3714 39'4
Connecticut General ... 36 '4 38 '4
Hartford Fire Insurance 7914 7714
Home Insurance . 31 33
National Fire Insurance 7114 7314
Phoenix Fire Insurance 87 90
Travelers Insurance ... 600 610
THE AMERICAN BRASS
COMPANY
COPPER BRASS
•BRONZE
french Small Tuba Branch
Small Dlomatar Seamlei* Tuba*
Wdterbury Brat* Goad* Branch
Manufactured Braw Good*
American Mahal Hum Branch
flexible Metallic Hoie
auto, and Armor prior preferred.
Pere Marquette issues made new
highs at gains of 3 to more than
4 points each. '
WOOL MARKET.
Boston, Oct. 19—(UP)—A fairly
large volume of business was trans
acted In the Boston wool market
during the past week, according to
today's report of the U. 8. Agricul
ture department.
The greater portion of the move
ment was on territory woods at
prices firm to slightly higher than
during the previous week. Original
bag 64s and finer territory wools
of bulk average French combing
staple sold mostly in the range of
75-77 cents, scoured basis, while short
combing staple occasionally sold
at 72-75 cents, and choice French
and strictly combing brought up to
77-79 cents. Ohio fleeces were quiet
but firm on strictly combing staple
at 31 1-2-32 1-2 cents in the grease
for 64s and finer, at 32 cents for
58s, 60s, 1-2 blood, at 35-36 cents
for 56s 3-8 blood, and at 34-35 cents
for 48s, 50s, 1-4 blood.
Investment Trust Quotations
C. T. CULHANE CO.. INC. -
68 Center Street
Amerex Holding Corp. 1114 12%
American Founders
Corp. 6% pfd 37*4 41
American Founders
7% pfd 38'4 42
American & General
Secs. A . .» 7 9
American & General
Secs. Corp. $3.00 pfd 50 53
Associated Standard Oil
Stocks .5 6%
British Type Investors
Class A .30 50
Century Shares .. 25.27 27.17
Diversified Trustee
Shares B . 8*4
Diversified Trustee
Shares C . . 3.35 3.90
Diversified Trustee
Shares D . 5K rt'i
Dividend Shares 1.45 1.57
Equity Corp. of Del. pfd 32 35
Fixed Trust Shares A 9.80
Fixed Trust Shares B 8.12
Incorporated Investors 18.82 20.23
Int. Sec. Corp. of Amer
ica 6% pfd 44 *4 47 tv
Int. Sec. Corp. of Amer
ica 614 % pfd . 44'4 47 V*
Massachusetts Investors
Trust . 22.16 24.09
Nationwide Sec. B . 3.73 3.83
North American Trust
Shares 1955 . 2.83
Second International
Sec. A com. 2Mi 3*4
Second International
Sec. 6% pfd . 42 46
Spencer Trask Fund ... 17.79 18.92
Trusteed N. Y. Bank
Shares . 1.32 1.49
U. S. Elec. Light & Pow- <
er Shares A . 15 *4 16
U. S. Elec. Light &, Pow
er Shares B .' 2.33 2.43
U. S. & British Int. Co.
$3 pfd.15 M= 19*4
HOME LOAN BONDS
Home Owners’ Loan
2%’s . 99.2 99.22
Home Owners’ Loan
3’s .100.4 100.27
y
£
CHASU
The mark that identifies good
Ih-a&s and Copper products
Chase Brass & Copper Co.
— IM0TMPOUATID —
SCOVILL
MANUFACTUBINO
COMPANY
BRONZE AN>
ULVEB MU PRODUCT#
MANUFACTURED GOODS
HAM TO ORDER . VO/
DEPOSITS INSURED
BY
The Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation
*5000
WASHINGTON, D. C.
MAXIMUM INSURANCE
FOR EACH DEPOSITOR
*5000
THE FINANCIAL STANDING
of a man is often judged by the banking relations
which he maintains.
If you wish to establish your credit and com
mercial standing upon an absolutely firm basis,
we invite you to affiliate yourself with this strong
bank which is so widely known for its conservat
ism as well as its unexcelled facilities.
The WATERBURY TRUST
<^•134 GRAND ST
COMPANY

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