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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, May 14, 1942, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1942-05-14/ed-1/seq-10/

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9 SERIAL STORY
CARIBBEAN CRISIS, by eaton k. goldthwaite arasstt'5a.
m STORY: Bill Wcott,
branch manager (or mi American
iilumlrsl arm on a small Dutch
Island in the Caribbean, to about
to return home and enter the
Army. His successor, Halsey, ar
rireo with an auditor, a strancer
named MacDowell, and June Pat
erson, cousin of Bill’s college
roommate. As soon as they are
landed the auditor goes to work,
aecwes Bill of being 1158,000
short in his accounts.
• • •
ON A SPOT
Chapter II
Bill Talcott’s hand was out for a
chair, his foot poised for a step.
Thus he remained as if frozen,
staring at the man behind the desk.
“What's that?” he gasped.
Hie auditor coughed. "Under the
system established by my Arm you
are required to procure duplicate
vouchers signed by the authorized
agents of the various vessels with
whom you ship nitrates. The total
of vouchers signed during the past
years is short by that amount from
your company ledger. In other
words, $158,000 worth of business is
unaccounted for.”
B1U Talcott’s reflexes automati
sally completed the task of captur
ing a chair and occupying It. Ni
trate dust, smelly, all-pervading, ed
died as he flopped down. "You say
I’m short?” he gasped again. "But
that’s Impossible! All my vouchers
are cataloged, In numerical order.
They’re In regular form, consecu
tively numbered!”
Struthers leaned forward, push
ing the pile stack aside. In his
manner was the supercilious con
tempt of the brainy man for the
brawny one. ‘‘They’re NOT all
here,” he said flatly.
Daaedly Talcott accepted the
vouchers, searched, discovered a gap
In the numbers; another and an
other. Big shipments, all of them.
His amazement deepened to anger.
Hotly he said, "I don’t understand
this. I went over the whole busi
ness as soon as I received Winters’
cable that he was sending Halsey.
We keep a monthly Inventory. The
vouchers were positively here no
longer than a week ago.”
Struthers lifted his shoulders.
"Sorry. Mr. Winters’ secretary par
ticularly Instructed me to check
your vouchers. She said they hadn’t
received all the duplicates. Need
less to say, I'm shocked.”
Winters' secretary— The Old
Man changed them as frequently as
he changed shirts, which gave him
the reputation of being the tough
est boss on the Street. Was this
the trick of a new girl, trying to
make a berth for herself by putting
a plant manager on a distant Island
in a hell of a jam? That wouldn't
answer why the vouchers were
missing from this office; it was
fishy, thin, too impossible to be
taken seriously. Yet it was here.
Cold sweat broke out along Tal
cott b spine.
"New York never called me about
any missing vouchers,” he said an
grily. "Is this a frameup of the Old
Mania to keep me on In this stink
ing hole? I’ve done my work, six
years of it. Three years beyond my
contract, twice as long as my best
predecessor. If Winters thinks he
can force me to stay here, he’s
crazy!”
Angry lights darkened Struthers’
eyes. “Are you Insinuating that I
would stoop to accusing you of theft
Just to satisfy a client? Let me tell
you, Talcott, I’m a bonded account
ant and my firm has been estab
lished for more than 50 years. I’m
happy to say that this sort of thing
doesn't happen to us very often, but
June Paterson whirled, and flushing hotly cried, “Being
my chaperon doesn’t include the right of possession. I’ll
go where I like!”
when it does we know how to pro
ceed. Now if, there is an error I’ll
be very happy to see the other
vouchers. In the meantime you need
have no fears about remaining here.
Under the circumstances,” he cough
ed significantly, “it would be out
of the question.”
• • •
Talcott choked back angry words
and in baffled rage strode from the
office. Avoiding his house he head
ed for the worn stone pier where,
short hours ago, Halsey and the au
ditor had landed.
The new man’s arrival should have
meant happiness for Bill Talcott; re
lease after six deadly years. Econo
mic affairs had been none too good
when he and Lowell Byrd received
their degrees; taking up their com
missions in the army had been a
logical step. Another hitch had fol
lowed for both of them, and at the
end Federal Chemical had made
flattering offers. Lowell Byrd, a
captain now, had decided that the
army was his career; Talcott, with
a mother to support, accepted the
bait of more money.
When viewed fromCederal Chem
ical's plush sanctum In New York,
prospects of life In the tropics had
been thrilling. BUI Talcott had
planned to send for his mother as
soon as he was settled; he hadn’t
seen, until the moment of his ar
rival, how he was trapped. Months
of patient, questioning letters pass
ed to years until finally Lowell
Byrd wrote of Mother Talcott’s
death. So he stayed on at plant No.
Six.
Something of Talcott’s first
crumbling hopes had showed In
Halsey's eyes the moment the new
man stepped from the mailboat.
Was Halsey, realizing that Win
ters’ flowery rhetoric didn’t corres
pond to the facts attempting a rot
ten trick to save himself?
Bill Talcott had done a good job;
had spent a sixth of his life on a
blistering, rain-swept, wind-swept
chunk of rock. Only his daily swims
in the shark-infested waters of
Anegada Passage had kept him
from utter madness. Was it to end
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NO RESTRICTIONS ON
LIGHTING FIXTURES
Com* in and ss* Waterbary's largest light*
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modern fixtures priced from 4tf to $49.90.
TOPPS
55 CENTER STREET
E fj
Nelson Urges Plants
To Stockpile Coal
AH Consumers Advised to Prepare for Eventual l rans=
portation Difficulties in Fall, Winter Months
Boston, May 14—Donald M. Nel
son, WPB chairman, today called
on all consumers of coal, especially
Industrial users and war plants, to
stockpile coal at once to the limit
of storage capacity, according to
word received by the Regional In
formation Office, OEM, 17 Court
street.
Nelson made his appeal in an
open letter in which he said that
transportation difficulties will in
crease in future months but that
there Is still some available carry
ing capacity on railroads and other
transportation facilities which can
be used now to transport coal.
The letter Included a warning
that serious transportation difficul
ties will ensue in the coming fall
and winter months unless the
stockpiling of coal is started at one?
and carried on effectively. The let
ter, follows:
“As chairman of the War Pro
duction Board, I am urging all con
sumers of coal,' especially large In
dustrial users and war plants, to
begin stockpiling coal at once and
to increase inventories of this fuel
to the limit of storage capacity.
"Transportation difficulties will
increase in future months, but the
railroads and other transportation
facilities still have some surplus
carrying capacity which must be
utilized now in order to avoid seri
ous transportation dislocations next
fall and winter.
"Moreover, the fuel oil situation
on the east coast and winter weath
er transportation problems make
stockpiling operations now of great
importance to all consumers who
are now dependent or who may
later on become dependent on coal
for heating their homes or running
their plants and factories.
"In addition to transportation
problems, it is obvious that we shall
consume much more coal than we
do ordinarily. All these factors add
up to the fact that we can meet all
demands and keep our operations
running smoothly only if we plan
the mining and transportation of
coal during the year so that steady
maximum use Is made of our pro
duction and transportation facili
ties.
"If this is not done, there will
undoubtedly be serious transporta
tion problems, probably involving
emergency rationing, which might
otherwise be avoided.
"So far as dealers are concerned
in the retail field, if they require
financial help in building up coal
stocks, and If they purchase coal
for shipment from the mines be
fore August 1, 1943, they may apply
fro loans direct to the Reconstruc
tion Finance Corporation or
through their local banks.
“Complete cooperation with thin
program will help the nation avert
serious problems. We must stock
pile cost to the limit. I know I can
depend on your help,"
KESHIAN TO PRESIDE
AT MEETING TONIGHT
X. 3, French of the International
Nickel Company will be the epMfeor
at a meeting of the New Haven
Chapter of the American Aoclety
far Metaia in New Haven tonight.
Mr. Wench ie vkC'preaident of the
organieatlon.
Henry O. Keehlan, a metailurglet
at the Oltaae Brace and Copper
will bit tCcliiliCHl d'iiwlj'^
MUCH Oil. IN NAJUMYCIHCW4N
9. Kerr, 1
In disgrace and possible prison?
The brassy sun was low over the
Jade green o nthe Caribbean when
BUI Talcott reached a decision.
Until Hasley, Strothers and the
mysterious Mac Dowell had arrived,
his affairs had been in perfect or
der. One or all of them had dealt
the first hand; now Talcott, who
knew something about poker him
self, would wait for cards.
His eyes were thoughtful as he
came up the path. With a start of
memory he saw, on the terrace, the
lax figure of June Paterson. She
too had arrived on the mallboat.
Was she who claimed to be his
best friend’s cousin also in the
game?
As quickly as It had come he
dismissed the suspicion and, avoid
ing the terrace, went down for a
swim.
Dinner was a complete farce.
Despite excellent drinks and mar
velous viands conjured up be Black
Sam conversation was unbearable.
Hasley was reluctant and hostile;
Strothers gloomily silent. The mus
tached MacDowell, too, was pra
occupled and Talcott repeatedly
felt his searching, cold eyed scru
tiny.
At long last June Paterson became
openly rebellious. “I’m going for a
walk,’’ she announced. “Alone. I
enjoy my conversation. I think I'm
the brightest person I know. You
gentlemen may continue your stu
pid game,, whatever It Is. Don’t
bother to wait up for me.”
Hasley sprang to his feet and
grinned ruefully. "Really Miss Pat
erson, I’m dreadfully sorry. Been
preoccupied you know. New job and
all that sort of thing. Can’t I ac
company you?”
“I wouldn’t think of tearing you
away.”
Hasley captured her arm firmly.
“I have been a terrible bore. I
shall make it up to you. Please let
me.” '
He sullen long-lashed eyes swept
Bill Talcott. “If you Insist, come
along then.”
Arm and arm they had reached
the door when Bll Talcott said
coldly, "Please don’t go out.”
Hasley turned In surprise. “And
why not?"
"Because it’s scarcely safe.”
“Rubbish. Do I look like a child?”
Talcott straightened a little in
his chair. "I must Insist that you
do not leave here at night unless I
accompany you."
June Paterson whirled, and flush
ing hotly cried, “Being my chape
ron doesn’t include the right of
possession. I’ll go where I like!”
And pushing Halsey ahead of her
she slammed out.
(To Be Continued)
Bicyclist Takes
Four Shots’, Four
Beers-Hits Auto!
Recently In Newington, an in
toxicated bicyclist was arrested
after he crashed into the left rear
wheel of an automobile, accord
ing to a State Police report to
the Motor Vehicles Department.
Although the files of the Motor
Vehicles Department are crowded
with accident reports by or about
drivers of cars who considered
their ability to drive was Improved
by “a few drinks," the Newington
bicyclist is in a class by himself.
At the hospital he informed po
police that he had four shots of
whiskey and four glasses of beer,
then started to pedal homeward.
There was a day when a some
what sodden traveler could climb
on the back of "Old Dobbin" and
start for home with a reasonable
hope of getting there. Driver
self-deception must have begun
with the first bicyclist who con
fidently pedaled away from the
curb while well in his cups, a de
partment bulletin comments.
OVERLOOK BOMBED
BY ENEMY PLANES
26 “Killed” Theoretically
in Raid; Wardens Handle
Situation Commendably
The civilian defense organisation
in the Overlook section waa tested
laat night In a theoretical "bomb
ing” Incident. Authorities expressed
themselves as highly pleased at the
way In which wardens handled the
situation.
The "bombing" was supposed to
have resulted in 26 persons being
kited, 20 trapped or missing, over 40
injured and several buildings de
stroyed or set afire.
Deputy Warden John S. Mona
gan of Zone D directed the test,
which began with the sending of an
alarm signal. As wardens went on
patroj, they were given sealed mes
sages describing the "damage” In
their areas and they were then re
quired to use their own Judgment
In what should be done.
Mr. Monagan and Zone Warden
George Grady said that the test
had been most successful and
praised the work of the district
wardens.
Numerous applications are being
made tor a new air raid wardens
training school, which will open
Tuesday night at Wilty High school.
The school has been arranged espe
cially tor store managers and em
ployes end tor war production
workers who were unable to attend
earlier schools.
ASCENSION MASSES
LARGELY ATTENDED
AmcmIob ThunNter, » holydny at
obllMtlon, vm rtMwnd by (mX
Ostholks todsy. Waists it down*
town church** w*r* thronged with
worsiitpan, lancdlstlon at th«
Um| aiaif .1 lacnniBt will bi
livm In meat church** tonight,
fuplto •ttondtog OtthoUe gred#
•nd high school* cn|oy*d * holl
day tram lh*lt elaam.
COMPARISONS
CHOIR CONCERT
WELL RECEIVED
2nd Congregational Sing
ers Offer Many Numbers
From Famed Operettas
An appreciative audience enjoy
ed the 100th anniversary concert
of Gilbert and Sullivan favorites
last evening in Davenport hall of
the Second Congregational church
cleverly presented by the senior
choir and featuring nine soloists
under the direction of Carl J. Jen
sen, organist and choirmaster.
The solo'sts Included: Marjorie
Nash Nuhn, soprano; Martha Mo
Naught, soprano; Doris Howe, con
tralto; Laurence Bentham, bari
tone; Robert Hill, tenor; Betty Mc
Donald, soprano; Arlene Bauder,
contralto; William Boyd, tenor;
and Charles Sumpf, baritone.
Numbers offered from operettas
were: "Pirates of Penzance," "Pa
tience," “The Gondoliers/’ "Trial
by Jury,” "The Mikado," “Princess
Ida,” "Pinafore" and "Iolanthe."
Marjorie Nash Nuhn offered the
lyric "Sans Souci” from “Pa
tience” and, with Mr. Boyd, the
duet, "None Shall Part Us” from
"Iolanthe."
The familiar and humorous "I’m
Called Little Buttercup" from
"Pinafore” was sung by Doris
Howe. Arlene Bauder offered "Sil
vered Is the Raven Ha'r" from
"Patience” and Betty MacDonald
rendered "The 8un and I" from
"The Mikado." Martha MaoNaught
sang the lovely “Waltz Sang” from
"Pirates of Penzance" and Joined
with Robert Hill for the duet, “Ma
bel and Frederick" from the same
operetta.
Two extremely humorous rendi
tions were given by Laurence Bent
ham, in "When I Was a Lad” from
"Pinafore," and Charles Sumpf in
“Tit Willow" from “The Mikado."
William Boyd offered' "A Pair of
Sparkling Byes" from "The Gon
doliers” and "O Gentlemen Listen
I Pray" from "Trial by Jury."
The mixed chorus offered "Chorus
of the Pirates" from "The Pirates
of Penzance"; “All the Year Is
Merry May" from "The Gondo
liers”; "Take It As It Comes” from
"The Gondoliers"; "The Rum Turn
Turn of a Military Drum” from
"Princess Ida”; “Entry and March
of the Peers” from “Iolanthe”;
and as finale, "Dance a Caohuca”
from “The Gondoliers.”
The girls’ chorus sang "Prithee
Pretty Maiden” from “Patience"
and "Tripping Hither, Tripping
Thither” from "Iolanthe.”
Members of the men’s chorus
offered 'The Flowers That Bloom
in the Spring" from "The Mikado,”
“A Magnet Hung in a Hardware
Shop" from "Patience” and “When
I Go Out of Doors,” from "Pa
tience.”
BASKET LUNCHEON
ENJOYED BY CLUB
Women’s Christian Service
Society Holds Party in
Methodist Parlor
WATER VILLE
Correspondent: Mrs. William E.
Rooney, IN Dwight St.
Telephone 3-8475
Watervllle, May 14 — The Wo
men’s Society For Christian Service
held a May basket social last even
ing in the church parlors of Orace
Methodist church. The hostesses
were Mrs. Arthur Twelves, Mrs.
Clarence Barber, Mrs. Niles Mun
son, Mrs. Harry Lattimer and Mrs.
Harry stride. A very nice lunch was
served.
Those present were: Mrs. Doris
Dorman, Miss Olive Dyson, Mrs.
John M. Johnson, Mrs. Frank Wil
son, Mrs. James Brodle, Mrs. Niles
Munson, Mrs. Charles Probert, Mrs.
Charles Barker, Mrs. Lester Nivon,
Mrs. Arthur Twelves, Mrs. Elizabeth
Jenny, Mrs. Clarence Barber, Mrs.
Harry Riglot, Mrs. Edward Zaugg,
Mrs. Mary MacNamara, Mrs. Eva
Kott, Mrs. Harry Lattimer, Mrs.
Harry Stride, Miss Ruth Norton,
Mrs. Edwin Hlgham, Mrs. Frank
It's bo restful
■t the
Roosevelt
W hether you (tw to Now
York for IhmIimm, *igh tree
ing, flumping or the theatre*,
Hotel Rooggygli ii vourUgil
OrWrwP PVIrW^wV VO w WOwWO
headquarter* ,,, Mid-town
convenience for everything
yon wi»b to mo tnd do—
pin* attrootioo roMMt ouol«
Ituif utoolPf Fostfhtl jfrvi gg|
Hunt with bath from f 4.M.
Ware, Mrs. J. W. Platt, Mrs. Charles
Greene, Msr. Russell Atherton, Mrs.
Allan Pslrhurst. Mrs. Earnest Weise,
Mrs. Dorothy Leonard, and Mrs.
Edwin Wlghtman.
Arthur Twelves Showed moving
pictures of the World’s Pair, and of
several trips he has taken and of
the Sunday school picnics.
Social Parley
There will be a short business
meeting of Court Welch, 7. of A. to*
night at 7:30 o'clock at Foresters
hall. Chief Ranger William Loner
gen will preside. Plans for a soft
ball league will be made. Arnold
Keith will be in charge of the so
cial following the meeting.
At the business meeting of the P.
T. A. Tuesday afternoon plans were
completed for entertaining members
PARK CITY TEAM
OFFICIATES HERE
Anson F. Keeler of Norwalk, grand
master of Masons In Connectdut
was guest speaker last night at a
of Sprague School graduating class.
They will be given a dinner Tuesday
evening, June 16, at the Colonnade
on State' street, Waterbury. Mrs.
Wilfred E. Plerpont, Jr., presided.
Tomorrow evening 7:30 there will
be May Devotions at St. Michael’s
church, consisting of Rosary, Litany
and Benediction of the Most Bless
ed Sacrament.
meeting of 200 members and guests
of Liberty Lodge, A. F. and A. M.,
in the Masonic Temple. A team
composed of employes of the Gen
eral Electric Company of Bridge
port exemplified the Master Mason
degree. Dr. Edwin V. Elbe, past
master of the lodge presided In the
absence of Worshipful Master Her
bert G. Pinter.
Other speakers were Benjamin
S. Coe, past district deputy and
Roderick Cooke, present district
deputy. About 50 members cams
from Bridgeport to participate Ir
the degree work, one of the candi
dates being employed by the G. E
Co., with them. After the meetlnj
a buffet supper was served In the
banquet hall.
A "flying fox” is a large, fruit
eating bat of the Old World.
BUY UNITED STATES DEFENSE BONDS TODAY!
MEATS—FISH—GROCERIES — FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
COMPARE THESE VALUES!
— THEIR QUALITY ALONE INVI TES COMPARISON ALL THE WAY —
see:; meat department —
•‘CERTIFIED’’—THAT TENDER MILD CURE
Whole or
String Half
SMOKED HAMS
FRESH BREEDER HEN
TURKEYS
LAND O' LAKES
FANCY FOWL
SMALL SHORT SHANK
SMOKED SHOULDERS
M to 14 lb Avf.
3« lb
Avf.
ib 3 7*
ib 38*
ib 29*
lb 37a*
PROVISIONS MADE FRESH DAILY IN OUR
OWN KITCHENS
MINCED HAM
VEAL LOAF
- BOLOGNA -
Machine „
SUc* J |C lO
Frankfurts „29c
Liverwurst 8”*“ »S8c
PRESSED HAM »42c
CHOICE HEAVY STEER BEEF
ROASTS
— LEAN —
SHOULDER
SOLID ROLLED
- CHUCK -
27 »35
lb
Rib Corned Beef »12c
Chop'd Steak crouds a25c
=FRUITS & VEGETABLES RECEIVED FRESH PAILY=
CALIF. ORANGES *. 35c
Golden Ripe Bananas.2 lbs 23c Calif. Iceberg Lettuce .... 2 Ig heads 19c
New Texas Onions.lb 5c Fancy Round String Beans .... 2 lbs 19c
Fancy Asparagus.lg bch. 29c Native Garden Spinach.3 lb pk 15c
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
LIBBY’S
PEAS
CARROTS
No. 2 Tall Tin
DROMEDARY
GINGER
BREAD
MIX
Pk#r.
PILLSBURY’S
SNO-SHEEN
- CAKE -
FLOUR
Lxe. Pit*.
VERMONT
MAID
SYRUP
Lfe. Btl.
12
“Eeodj To
Serre"
NABISCO
LIBBY'S CORNED BEEF
SHREDDED WHEAT
LIBBY'S CUSTARD A z% AB- Tom., Vef*t., Pea or Celery m Ajm „
PUMPKIN 2 ^ 25c Phillips^ Soups4 *. 25c
DROMEDARY _ CLAPP'S CHOPPED n Am.
DEVIL'S ’SSP « 21c FOODS 3 «- 25c
CLAPP'S STRAINED A A a DURKEE’S GROUND
BABY FOODS 3 «. 20c Block Pepper «• 10c
EVAPORATED MILK A tail A M — BAKER'S EXTRACT - _
"SEALECT" 3 24c Vanilla 3gc»..«, 17c
MAYONNAISE BY |hjA. ULTRA REFINED _ _
SEIDNER - 19c CLOROX ... m. 21«
STAR WATER *«25c BRILLO *,15c £ 8«
RED FOX
ALE & LAGER
% 2Qc
3%b25e
Them Quality
Product*
GOTHAM TISSUE
SEDA TISSUE
Ssda Towels 2»u.19C
P«P*r Napkiot 2pkfil7C
PILLSBURY’S
'BEST' FLOUR
5L29e
“2* »1»
Silver Dust FAIRY SOAP
6 3 Bin ^
Lge. Pkg.
with
Tows!
X*“"GoI«l Diut
MMUIAB t LOS. ^ ■■
19e 47C £ 1/e
Kooling
Assorted Sods
All Flavors
, (Contents)
4 Largs Bottlss
29/
US UN
gjsrer
wKi£fgSn .¥iI;un i
%£!?• 73c 27®
LUX Soap
for
ACTIVE
LATHER
Whitsr Wash SpseUI
JS&M* iJK 47
SWAN
fon White VhwUmr sm»
3^19
SWAN
Iters White Mwltag Sm»
2 - 21

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