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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, December 20, 1944, Image 13

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1944-12-20/ed-1/seq-13/

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i
SECOND SECTION
FOR DEMOCRAT WANT ADS DIAL 4-2121
Labor Recruiting Drive
Started By CIO Groups
Activity Planned Throughout Naugatuck Valley;
Transfer of Non-Essential Workers to Vital Plants
Recruitment of labor for the Army’s emergency muni
tion program will be started by the International Union,
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workeis, in accordance with a pro
gram outlined by representatives of all locals of the state
at a recent meeting in Ansonia, according to an announce
ment by John J. Mamkowski, executive board member of
the union.
me union stm strive to induce
.transfer of workers from less es
sential establislinients to war In
dustry, will encourage part-time
help and extra time work by em
ployes in critical jobs, according to
the recruitment program.
The union recruitment conference
was held Monday night at the An
sonia Brass Workers hall, with Col
onel C. C. Hsrshman, as chief
speaker. Colonel Barshman, who is
special representative of the Army’s
Service Forces told of the impor
tance of increasing the output of
shells and the brass strips which
go into the manufacture of shells.
Also addressing the gathering was
Major Skinner, area labor officer of
the First Service Command.
The delegates were addressed by
Col. C. C. Harshman, Special Rep
resentative of the Army’s Service
Forces and by Major Skinner, Area
Labor Officer of the First Service
Command on the importance of in
r
i
For Your
Charistmas
Happiness
Imperial is working extra
hard these last days be
fore Christmas, so that
our customers may have
~ clean clothes and linens
for the Holiday Season.
We hope that we may
disappoint no one. We’re
doing our best with what
we have.
PROMPT
DRY CLEANING
SERVICE
*********** oMacdona£d6*immmmm
Handsome And Practical Gifts
AT
REDUCED PRICES
Closing Out All Our
BEAUTIFUL QUILTED ROBES
Reg. $16.98 Reg. $13.98 Reg. $10.98
$14.50 $11-75 $8-98
Sizes 12 to 44
LOVELY BRUSHED RAYON ROBES
Reg. $7.98 Re*?- $8-98
$6-19 $6-9$
Sizes 12 to 20
WARM WOOL FLANNEL ROBES
__
Reg. $10.98. Sizes 14 to 20. **
PRACTICAL CHENILLE ROBES
$5.69
Reg. $6.98. Sizes 14 to 18. v
+ Timely Suggestions For Gift Buyers ★
HOSIERY.
ANKLETS.
DICKIES.
SCARFS.
FASCINATORS.
NECKWEAR.
SWEATERS.
BLOUSES .
SKIRTS.
HOUSECOATS .
SHOULDERETTES ...
BED JACKETS.
SLIPS.
GOWNS.
PANTIES.
GLOVES.
COSTUME JEWELRY
.... 89c to $1.27
. 29c to 79c
.. $1.00 to $2.98
.. $1.00 to $1.98
. $1.98 and $2.9S
. $1.00 and $1.98
.. $2.98 to $7.98
.. $2.98 to $4.98
.. $2.98 to $5.98
,.. $3.98 to $7.89
. $2.98 and $3.98
... $1.98 to $3.98
... $1.98 to $3.98
... $2.98 to $4.98
.... 69c to $1.98
... $1.00 to $3.50
...$1.00 to $5.98
(Pins *0% Fed. Tax)
GIFT BOX WITH EVERY ITEM PURCHASED
oMacdofta£cl6
COURTEOUS SERVICE — GOOD VALUE ALWAYS
70 SOUTH MAIN STREET
Open Evenings Until 9k Except Sat. to 7.
creasing the output of shells and
the brass strip which goes into the
manufacture of shells.
Steering t'limmittee
A special steering committee of
Union representatives of each of
the maojr brass companies was ap
pointed by Mr. Mankowsld to work
out the problem ol locating people
from within the plants who would
be willing to work extra hours on
those jobs which are vitally con
cerned in the ammunition program
and secondly, to locate people in less
essential work' who might come in
as part-time workers so that the
net effect would be increased man
hours in the production of brass
strip and shells. The steering com
mittee nd stewards will condduct a
man-to-man survey by means of a
questionnaire regarding the avail
ability of employes for overtime
work or part-time v/ork, either with
their present employers or other
employers. The imormation so ob
tained will be transmitted to the
Army for its Information and guid
ance, Mr. Mankowski said.
This steering committee is com
posed of Ed O'Brien of Bridgeport
Brass Workers. Local 320, John
Yaraslvich of Jenkins Valve Local
623, John McDonald of Ansonia
Brass Workers Local 445, Joseph
Falcone of Chase Brass Workers
Local 565, Peter Higgins of Torrlng
ton Brass Workers Local 423. Ed
Birmingham of Scovill Brass Work
ers Local 569, Joseph McEvoy of
Waterbury Brass Workers Local 251
and Ed Green of Bristol Brass
Local 500.
The third phase of the discussion
was the hiring of Jamaicans and
the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers
Unions realizing the need for in
creased ammunition and Increased
man-hours necessary for this pro
duction, agreed that, where there
was insufficient manpower in any
area, the local unions would co
operate with management and the
government in bringing in Jamai
cans to assist in the war program.
Under the terms of the govern
ment's agreement with the Jamai
can laborers. CoL Harshman
pointed out that they were hired
for a period of 90 days upon agree
ment with the local union invilved.
Any extension beyond 90 days would
also be subject to the local unlo’s
agreement. It is also understood
that In the event of curtailment of
manpower In any area where Jama
ican labor Is used, and where the
local area may supply the labor,
the use of Jamaican labor would
then be eliminated and the govern
ment would then return them to
This American flag—first ever to wave over Japan—will be sent to Gen
eral Mac Arthur, who will raise it over the Philipines. The ancient flag
then win follow him to the shores of Japan, where again it will flutter,
as it did when Admiral Perry carried it there in 1853. Holding the
flag, above, in Philadelphia’s Atwater Kent Museum, are Sgt. Grace
Steigerwald, left, of Pittsburgh., and Staff Sgt. Mildred Brown of
Olivia, Minn., of the USMCWB
Air Traffic
On Its Way
Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 20.—(UP)
—William A. M. Burden, assistant
secretary of commerce, predicts that
air passenger traffic will be quad
rupled within five years after the
war as compared with 1941.
Ten years after the war it may
be doubled again,” said Burden in
the Harvard Business Review. He
forecast that the entire aviation
Industry would employ some 346,
000 persons in the post-war era, but
he added that expansion of the
industry would not be sufficient to
have a “really major effect on our
national economy.”
Burden also predicted that the
private flying market would soon
equal the transport market in im
portance, and within ten years after
the war .would probably far exceed
it.
He said that reconversion need
not trouble the industry since the
purchase of military aircraft would
not stop with the signing of the
armistice “unless the American pub
lic becomes utterly blind to the
lessons of history.’’ Burden de
clared that "America will have an
infinitely stronger air force after
the war than it had before.”
their homeland or use them in
other oreas where there is a critcal
manpower shortage. The delegates
also went on record to encourage
the Jamaicans to join the local
union existing in the area in which
they are employed.
Plan Conferences
With the CIO unions affiliated
with the International Union of
Mine. Mill and Smelter Workers
initiating their own program for
alleviating the shortages in am
munition, International Board
Member Mankowski expects that
conferences will be held with the
various managements on proper
utilization of the available man
power upon a complete report by
the steering committee.
The meeting was attended by ap
proximately 80 delegates represent
ing all the companies which are
affected by this ammunition pro
gram.
NEW MAILING RECORD
LOOMS AT BETHLEHEM
The nearby town of Bethlehem is
being deluged as usual this Christ
mas with bundles of cards seeking
the distinctive post-mark. Earl E.
Johnson, postmaster, stated that
16,000 pieces of Christinas mail
passed through the office Sunday,
and that he expected that last year's
total of 66,000 would be topped this
year.
46 LOCAL VETERANS
GIVEN EMPLOYMENT
Forty-si war veterans from Wa
terbury were placed in jobs by the
U. S Employment Service during
November, according to a report is
sued today by State Manpower Di
rector William J. Fitzgerald. A
total of 793 veteran placements were
made throughout the state during
that month, as compared to 904 in
October, the report shows.
During the 11 months of this year
veteran placements totaled 8,383, the
state official disclosed.
1 he impacts of a New York'
visit during these busy times are
cushioned by a serenity that
is reflected in the restful com
fort of BARCLAY rooms, the
quiet perfection of BARCLAY
service, the unruffled calm
of the BARCLAY’S atmosphere.
Huffs Imkii M l tJ
DesM* Beams SB I $1#
kites with frivols Serving Pantry
SR-SI5
Special Room Rates to
Members of the Armed Forces
<CL BARCLAY
111 East 4*k St. New York Gty
‘William H. Rorke, Geaeral Manage*
“It Happens Every Day”
Young College Girl Realizes Ambition for Educa
tion — Grateful for Two Year Lift Fro m
Social Security Benefits—Mother’s
Future Safeguarded.
An in t res ting letter came this
week to the manager of one of the
field offices of the Social Security
Board. It bore the postmark of an
eastern university town and was
signed with a girl's name.
"Several days ago my last social.
security check arrived," the letter
said. "And I felt I ought to write
you and tell you what those
monthly payments have meant to
me. You may not remember me but
two years ago what I learned in
your office changed my whole life.
I was sixten then, a junior at high
school. My father died laving my
mother and me alone in the world.
“My mother got a job In a store
but It didn’t pay enough to sup
port both of us. I went to my
school principal’ and told him I
was leaving school to take a job.
He asid I mustn't decide on such
a step to quickly had sent me
to you. It was then I learned that
my father’s social security account
would give me $20.25 a month until
I was eighteen, nrovided I staved
in school.
"I graduated from high school i
last year and got a scholarship in
chemistry at this college. I won’t
be a Madame Curie but I’m going
to have a wonderful life. My moth
er agrees witn me that I owe it
all to my father and to social se
curity. That monthly check for
two years made all the difference
between having to leave school
and getting this wonderful oppor
tunity.”
This letter, breating the aspira
tions and hopes of a budding
young scientist, shows youth’s
stake in social security. Today,
thousands of boys and girls in our
high schools are going on with
their education because of the sur
vivors’ payments due them on the
social security accounts of their
fathers or toothers. This girl’s
mother did not receive insurance
payments as the widow of a work
er who was insured under Federal
Old-age and survivors insurance
hpnnllKP shp was pmnlnvprf in a.
"covered" Job. When she is 85 and
stops work, however, she will be
entitled to old-age benefits ei
ther on her own account or on her
husbands, whichever is higher.
The Social Security Board field
office which serves the Waterbury
area is located in the Jones-Mor
gan building on Bank street. Mr.
Mullarkey. the manager, points
out that information and service
at this office are free to the pub
lic. Though this story relates to
a family in need, Mr. Mullarkey
explains that the payment of ben
efits under this program does not
depend on need but on meeting
the requirements for entitlemnt
set forth in the Act.
TWOFACECHAIR
FOR $1 KILUNG
New Haven, Conn., Dec. 20.—(UP)
—Two Negroeos were said today by
Detective Capt. Raymond J. Egan to
have confessed the slaying of Efimy
Romanow, 49-years old grocer in a
holdup attempt that nettd them a
dollar bill.
Held for the coroner were An
drew Almeda, 33. and Francis Scott,
29, who reportedly signed state
ments that Almeda shot the grocer
as he made a move toward a door
way as if to flee.
Poan eaiH Almorin fnlrf liim hd
had stolen the gun used In
lng and that both man coni
the holdup of a liquor store
December 1 In which a shot
fired att he proprietor.
YES, BUT DIFFERENT
Fort Warren, Wyo. (P- -
wartime version, as reported taf the
Fort Warren Sentinel, camp news*
paper: "Have you tasted a cigarette m
lately"
MMMM
Toys
and
I • i
Furniture
American
Furniture
Company
JOHN D. ADAMS, Urop.
408 S. Main St. Waterbary
1
Open Every Night This Week Until 9 p. m.
*K<Uf4 0?eatunc
PAUL
BKEGUETTE
*49*°
$1.25 A WilK
AfHr 0*wn P«pint
•*» <•*
U4im SiMrt y*U«w «o!4
MM cm. Accarat* 17
PAUL
BREGUETTE
17 Jhw/
'65
>1.25 A wnc
After Down P*ym##»t
TV* won*
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17 j*w«l
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BiEGUEm
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BENRUS
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$i.is a wmc
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After Down Payment
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$1.2S A wine
All«r Down
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BULOVA
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A(He Dow Poywnot
BULOVA
4 WAYS
TO BOY
1
WEEKLY PAYMENTS — Aa
law u (ITS a wi«L
2
OPEN CHARGE—No don
payment it roquirod aa Ail
A YEAR TO PAY—K yaw
total purchatft awaaat to
J90 or meroi
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•UY FOR CASH—TWa1*
only o.io prica at Kayt . . .
H't tko tamo cath ar era#.
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