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Norwich bulletin. [volume] (Norwich, Conn.) 1895-2011, May 14, 1917, Image 7

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NORWICH BULLETIN, MONDAY, MAY 14, 1917
The Henry Allen & Son Co.
f unoral Directors
and Embalmcra
WM. H. ALLEN
8ETH N. TAYLOR
DAVIS H. WILSON
63 Maui St
Hamilton Watches
AT
THE WM. FR1SWELL CO.
23-2? FRANKLIN T.
t G 47
ADAMS TAVBRNYl t
t O G1
offer to the public the tiaaat standard
brands of ieer of JCuxopo and America:
Bohemian. Pilsner, Cuimbach Bavaria
Boer, Bass, Pale and Burton M tier's
"Scotch Ale, Uulnneaia Dublin Stout,
C. & C. Imported Dinger Ale, Bunker
Hill P. B. Al. t rank Jones' Nourish.
ir.m Ale. Sterlinit Bitter Alo, Anbsasw.
Budweistx. srnnix ana Pi.Dst.
A. A. ADAM. Norwich Tswa
Teiepnoaa all
The BEST CANDY
To present to anyona as m gift is ban
of
LOWNEVS CHOCOLATES
There is a guarantee slip in eaoh box
that the Chocolates are fresh and
you'll find ths variety excellent. Sold
"DUNN'S pharmacy
60 MAIN STREET
NOTICE
DEAD HORSES AND COWS
Rsmoved Free of Charge
Cad 1526 New London. Ask for Chaa.
"Lata. Reverse charge.
WEST SIDE HIDE CO.
P. O. Box 379. New London
DBS. L, F and A. J. L&PIE3&E
237 Main 8 treat, Norwich. Conn,
Office Honrs:
10 a. m. to 8 p. m. by appointment
Sundays excepted
Trommer's
Evergreen Beer
REAL GERMAN LAGER
is on draught at
H. JACKEL & CO.
i H i n us
DB. SHAHAN, Specialist
en diseases of the Blood and Rtnms.h
Culture therapy for Rheumatism, Neu
ritis. Tuberculosis. Anemia, Skin and
Rtanfy irouDiei. conventional or pro-
-' li ij n ii Hiin.qi j or in loratcn
ireaim.nl jor iu utomtch. i
trSt r:" T.', W?1 I
821.
p. m.
--- mh mivrnw I
Most Cigars Are Good
THE8E ARE BETTER
TOM'S 1-2-3 5c CIGAR
GOODFELLOW 10c CIGAR
Try Them and Seo
THOS. M. SHEA, Prop, Franklin L
Next to Palace Cafo
ft. i
f III Gl fiUiili alQUSOl1
Special Rates to Theatre Troupes.
Traveling Men, Etc.
Livery Connection Shetucrat Street
.",, . ongSK atreet ,
FARREL. A. SANDERSON. Props. i
)
Overhauling
and Repair Work
OF ALL KINDS ON
AUTOMOBILES,
CARRIAGES, WAGONS,
TRUCKS and CARTS,
Mechanical Repairs, Painting, Trim
ming. Upholstering and Wood Work.
Biacksmtthing in all its branches.
Scott & Clark Corp.
507 to 515 North Main St.
TEAMING AND TRUCKING
DONE VERY PROMPTLY AND AT
REASONABLE PRICES
A. D. LATHROP
Phone 175
DB. A. J. SINAY
Dentist
Rooms 18-19 Alice Building, Norwloh
Phone 1177-3
WILLIAM C. YOUNG
Successor to
STETSON YOUNG
CARPENTER and BUILDER
Best work and ' material at right
prices by skilled labor.
Telephone . 60 West Main St.
JOSEPH BRADFORD
BOOKBINDER
Blank Books Made and Ruled to Order
108 BROADWAY
THEM ;s 90 advert! :n, medium la
Cartern Connecticut esual to Ths Bul
eUa for busonesa results.
Norwich, Monday,-May-14, 1917.
THE WEATHER.
The wind along the north and mid
41 Atlantic coast will be moderate
northwest to north.
Conditions.
There were local rains In New Eng
land.
Temperaturea remain low, for the
oaaen.
Pair - weather will prevail Monday
and Tuesday east or the Mississipip
river without decided temperature
change. -
Forecast.
Eastern New York and New Eng
land: Fair Monday and Tuesday, lit
tie change in temperature.
Observations in Norwich.
The following records reported from
Serin's pharmacy, show the changes
In temperature and the barometric
changes Saturday and Sunday
Saturday
Ther. Bar.
T a. m.
48 29.62
68 29.62
48 29.55
4T 29.71
66 29.71
48 29.77
p. iw
Hleheet 64, lowest 40.
Sunday
7 a. m
12 m.
6 p. m
Hiahest 60. lowest 48.
Comparisons.
Predictions for Saturday: Cloudy
Saturday's weather: Sunshine and
Showers, warmer.
Predictions for Sunday: Fair.
Sunday's weather: Cloudy, showers,
northeast wind.
Sun. Mooai
and Tides.
ll Bun
II Rises. Sets.
ij High I! Moos
H Water. Rises
Day. I m. p. m. a. m. a. m.
14 ... 4.S0 B8 "a.3B 0.42
15 ... 4.28 6.W 4.39 1.11
IS ... 4.28 7.00 6.41 1.38
17 ... 4.?7 7.01 S.41 2.07
18 ... 4.26 7.02 7.37 2.36
19 ... 4.26 7.02 8.29 3.08
20 ... 4.25 7.03 9.18 Sets.
Six hours after hltrh int,r It Im lna
uao. waicn is rouowea or flood tide.
GREENEVILLE
Mary John Met With Serious Aec
dent Saturday Evening Had Thigh
and Arm Broken Two AutosCome
Together on North Main Street
Surprise Party for Miss Elsie Dom
breski Notes.
About 6:15 o'clock Saturday
Ing Mary John, a small child, received
a tiro Ken thifrh. a broken arm and a
scalp wound when she collided with
tne rear mud guard of an automobile.
j. no jonn girj was playing with a
number or other children near - St.
Mary's schurch and just as the auto
mobile, driven by J. O. Haney of New
London, came along-, she dashed from
me loewaiK and struck the machine
The automobile was aoine at the rate
or eignt or ten miles - an hour as a
team waa In front of it. In the car
witrt Mr. Haney were Mr. Tolman and
Mr. O'Brien, both of New London.
The machine was stooped after the
accident ana a doctor was notified
who took the child to the hospital
wnere ana is Doing cared . for. Mr.
Haney went to the . notice station
where he reported the accident. Up
on examination by the authorities the
men in the car were allowed to pro
ceed on their way on the condition
that they would report at headquart
ers) wnon called upon.
FUNERAL
Levi S. Saunders.
At 1:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon
tne runeral or Levi S. Saunders took
hla late home at 347 Cen
avenue. In the attendance were
relatives from out of town. Forms
or flowers were clustered about the
casket. Rev. J, H. Newland officiated.
Friends filled the places of bearsr.
UuriaJ was In the family plot in the
cemetery at Pachaug Rev. Mr. New
ls.nd read a ahort service at the grave.
unaertaiters Church and Allen had
charge of the funeral arrangements.
Surprise Party.
A peasant surprise party was sriven
Miss Elsie Dombroski at her home in
Preston Saturday evening. The even
spent in playing games and
wita musical selections. Delightful
I solos were rendered by John Sullivan
i sad Henry Blanchette accompanied on
rC, ranJ5Z 'Sle -LoralsKl.
rainty refreshments were served by
Mrs. Dombroski assisted by James
Fra.a6r and Arthur Prodell. The party
broke UD at a. late hour, thanklns- the
j hostess for the pleasant evening.
jrTooeii. Helen Prodell. Agnes and
Eyls&beth Fleming, Marion Howard,
Alice Beetnam, Ruth Kupky, Alice
Erlekon .Helen Shea, Delia Baker,
Henrietta. Clara and Elsie Dombros
ki, Arthur Prodell, John Thorma,
Henry and William Banchette, Joseph
Cormier, John Sullivan, James and
Joseph Frazer, William Evans, John
Harwell, John Hayden, Samuel Per
kins, John and Fred Baton, Albert
Dllworth.
Automobile Accident.
A slight anto accident occurred Sat
urday afternoon when two cars came
together at the comer near the old
Reiiance Worsted company's "building
on North Main street. The cars were
on the same side of the street as the
west side of the thoroughfare Is torn
up. No damage was done to either
car.
Notes.
Oscar Gardner of South Pasadena,
Cal., waa the guest of Mrs. William
Patten of Prospect street Saturday.
The C. A. C. baseball team opened
their season Saturday afternoon by
defeating the Swamp Tanks by the
score of. 18 to 7.
Hard Work for Women.
It is a question if women doing
men's work deserve particular sympa
thy, for it is doubtful if there is any
work that is harder than everyday
housework. Overwork tells on the
kidneys, and When the kidneys are af
fected one looks and feels older than
the actual years. Mrs. A. G. Wells,
R.- R. 6, Rocky Mount, N. C, writes:
"I cannot praise Foley Kidney Pills
enough for the wonderful benefit I
have derived from their use for a short
while." Lee A Osgood Co.
GAGER
Funeral Director
, and Embalmer
Prompt s ervice day or night
et. 642-2.
Lady Assist'
NEW ASSISTANT
Richard J. Whitham of Salisbury Succeeds H. J. Tillson
N
Will Take Up Duties Here on Tuesday Committee Ap
pointed to Secure Home Demonstration Agent.
To succeed H. J. Tillson, who has
resigned his position as" assistant
county agent, having accepted a po
sition as farm bureau manager in Es
sex county, N. Y., the New London
County Farm Bureau have secured
Richard J. Whithan of Salisbury, who
will begin his duties here on Tues
day. Mr. Tillson's resignation left the
farm bureau without the services of
an assistant at a time when they were
greatly needed and they have been
fortunate in securing for that position
Mr. Whitham. Mr. Whitham has been
up to the present manager of a farm
in Salisbury and comes with especial
experience to take up Mr. Tillson's du
ties as cow tester in the cow testing
demonstrations, Mr. Whitham having
filled the position of cow tester in a
S6 herd association in Hartford coun
ty. In addition to the cow testing
demonstration work Mr. Whitham will
have immediate charge of the field
crop demonstration work.
In order to accommodate the en
larged staff of the farm bureau, it has
been necessary to secure quarters with
two adjoining rooms so that the work
can continue without interruption and
still accommodate the increased de
mand for information and general ser
vices of the organization to meet the
situation. The executive committee
have secured rooms 211-213, on the
Thayer building.
The executive committee, member
ship committee, and nine prominent
women workers, including Miss ""Cath
erine Luddington, chairman cf the
county suffragists, RTId a meeting in
the new quarters Saturday afternoon
at 1.30 o'clock. The minutes were "read
and accepted and bills were ordered
paid. Then the resignation of Mr.
Tillson as assistant county agent was
presented and accepted. Next came
SAW MEDAL PRESENTED
TO GENERAL JOFFRE.
Cousin ef Mrs. Martin M. Hitehon
Made Presentation at Nowburg,
Mrs. Martin M. Hitehon has been a
visitor in Newburg, N. Y., the past
week, and while there was witness to
and participant in an event of unusual
mtereet when her cousin, "Miss Mar
garet Taylor MacDonald, presented the
medal from the school children to Gen
eral Joffre, marshal of France. In
addition he was presented with the
medal making him a member of the
Order of the Cincinnati byJudge Pen
dleton, a grandson of -' Washington.
These ceremonies took pto.ee in Wash
ington's headquarters at Newburg In
the presence of about 10,000 people and
were of a most stirring and thrilling
character. Over 150,000 people were in
the city to witness as much as possi
ble of these ceremonies in "hone of this
brave and beloved French hero. While
in New York Mrs. Hitehon was pres
ent at the luncheon given by the New
York Chamber of Commerce to Secre
tary of State Balfour.
PAVING IN NEW LONDON.
Abutting Owners to Pay Half the Cost
of Street Paving.
An act amending the charter of the
city of New London was passed at the
closing session of the house in concur
rence with the senate which reads as
f oHows :
The court of common council of the
city of New London shall have au
thority to cause the roadbed of any
street in said city to be paved with
macadam, stone, brick, wood, cement
or other substantial pavement. One
half of the .cost of paving any street,
excluding from such cost so much
thereof aa any stxeet railway company
may be obliged to pay by law or con
tract, shall be assessed against tne
owners of the property abutting on the
line of such Improvement In proportion
to frontage.
After such improvement shall have
been completed the street committee of
said court of common council shall ap
point a time and place when and where
all parties in interest may appear be
fore it and be heard relative to auch
assessment, and sha.ll cause notice of
such hearing, specifying the time and
place thereof, signed by a majority of
said committee, to be published not
less than twice in each dally news
paper .published in said city, at least
ten days before the date of such hear
ing, which publication shall be legal
and sufficient notice to all parties m
interest of all matters relating to such
assessment. Such committee shall
meet at such time and place and hear
all parties in interest who may appear
to be heard in the matter, and shall
thereupon assess against each owner
of property abuttiraR on the line of ouch
improvement his proportion at the cost
thereof.
When said committee shall have
completed its assessment aa aforesaid
it shall make a report thereof in writ
ing and file the same with the clerk of
said city, and a copy thereof with the
tax collector of said city. The amount
so assessed against each of such prop
rty owners shall be a debt due -from
such property owner to said city, and
I unpaid shall be included in the rate
bill of said city next to be made, and
shall become a part of the tax against
such property which shall be hefid for
its payment in the same manner aa
for the remainder of said tax.
Iso appeal from such assessment
shall operate to vacate the same, but
it shall stand until revised or modi
fied according to law, provided, when
any street shall have once been paved
under the provisions of this act said
city shall keep such pavement . in re
pair or renew it as may be necessary
without further special cost against
the owners of the abutting property
on tne line cr nucn improvement.
This act shall take effect when in
proved, by a majority vote, at a meet
ing of said city, duly, warned and held
for that purpose.
Organizing Farm Lean Associations.
Prof. Guy C. Smith of the Connecti
cut Agricultural college has entered
the headquarters office of the Con
necticut committee of food supply and
will work with I. G. Davis, state coun
ty agent leader. In the agricultural
college's part in the bigger crops
campaign. One of the first things done
by Professor Smith waa to organize in
Hartford the first National Larm Loan
association to be established in Con
necticut. Other communities which
contemplate similar organizations may
get the details of the plan by writing
to Professor Smith at the food supply
committee's headquarters, Hartford.
Farm Labor Needed.
It is pointed out by the Connecticut
committee of food supply that every
home garden will help in the work be
ing - undertaken in the state this year
for bigger crops. At the same time it
is urged that the matter of increassd
production by farmers who are fa
miliar with the science of the soil
should be made the important part of
the v.-hole campaign. To make thus
possible pledges of farm labor are most
essential.
COUNTY AGENT
the consideration of candidates for the
office of home demonstration agent.
There were two applicants for the po
sition of home demonstration agent.
There wore two applicants for the po
sition between whom the choice "lies.
Both are located at the teachers' col
lege at Columbia University and well
fitted for the position. They expected
to attend the meeting - but found it
impossible to foe present and forward
ed telegrams explaining their absence.
President C. P. Bushnell, .County
Agent F. C. Warner and Miss Hayea
were appointed a committee .of three
with power to select the ' woman
worker. , J -
The action of President Bushnell,
Charles I. Smith, chairman of the
membershlip committee, r Robert W.
Perkins, of the finance committee and
County Agent Warner in securing the
new quarters In the Thayer building
was approved.
Immediately following this meeting
there was a meeting of the Boys' Pig
Club committee of the Connecticut
Berkshire Breeders' Association, with
President Faux in the chair. Present
in addition to the president were Sec
retary George C. Grant . of Taftville,
State Director Baker and County
Agent Warner who is also a state di
rector ef the association, and Mr.
Simms who has been appointed pig
club leader for this state. Mr. Simms
is also on the extension staff at Storrs
college.
The conference resulted in the asso
ciation placing thirty-five high grade
Berkshire pigs for the use of the pig
club memfbers, the pfgs to be .placed
under the direction of State Leader
Simms and the county agents in each
county. It was voted that the price
of 12 weeks' old pigs to be used for
this purpose be placed at $10, maxi
mum. CULMINATION OF MUSEUM
EXTENSION WORK
School Children Studied Greek Art at
Slater Hall.
Saturday afternoon saw the culmi
nation of the Museum Extension work
carried on by the Art Students Asso
ciation through a committee of the as
sociation. This committee is composed
of a group of volunteer members with
Mrs. Ozias Dodge as chairman. Twice
a week small groups of children from
the sixth grades are conducted through
the Slater Museum to study and ob
serve examples of Greek art, and since
this is an extension of their school
work it proves of great interest to
them and stimulates their apprecia
tion of the beautiful.
For the past three years the work
has ended with an afternoon of story
telling. Each year has shown an in
creased interest and last Saturday
Slater Hall was filled with an enthu
siastic audience of children. Mrs.
Cronan, who was the speaker on this,
as on previous occasions, is the offi
cial story-teller of the Boston Museum
and the Boston Public Library and is
considered at the head of her (profes
sion in the United States.
She told as her first story, an adap
tation of Charles Kincslev's Water
Babies, a wistful, charming talk of the
grimy little London chimney sweep
with his misadventures and final
transformation into a happier, nurer
state.
The second story was of A Flaer
Raising and the third The Storv of
Trimbelma 'by Hans Anderson, who
excells in delicate imagination and
Whimsicality. Another fairv tale was
added as an encore and the children
went home happy. Mrs. Cronan
brought with her most beautiful slides,
many of them exquisitely hand-colored,
with which her stories were most
profusely illustrated. Pictures by
Kenyon Cbx. Jessie Wilcox Smith.
Howard Pyle and many others were
among them.
The object of telling these stories to
the children Is to interest 'them in the
stories and authors and so induce
them to read them for themselves and
in this wap cultivate a taste for the
Dear in literature.
HELD SURPRISE PARTY
FOR SAMUEL HUSSEY
Pleasant Evening Arranged in His
Honor by Young People.
Samuel Hussey was pleasantly sur
prised at his home on High street on
Saturday evening by a number of his
friends. He was presented with a
handsome gift and the presentation
speech was made by Miss Nellie O'
Keefe. Piano solos were rendered bv
Miss Rose Clodia. Many games were
enjoyed and refreshments were serv
ed by Mrs. Hussey, assisted by Mrs.
Blair. Those present were: Miss Vic
toria Kohanski. Sadie Rislev. Nellie
"Drake, Stella "Dillon. Nellie O'Keefn.
Anna Hussey, Madeline Grodotzke,
Mary Hussey, Kathleen Blair, Rose
Clodia, Anna Skinder, Statia Museis
kie, Stephka Shiveski, Samuel Hus
sey, James Kearnev. Fred Williams.
Joseph Clodia, Timothy Brewer, Neil
Hoffman, Milton Greene. Thomas Man
ning, ohn Crimmins, Browney Pulas
kie, Henry IHilderbrand, Fred Free
man, and John Brewer.
After a very enjoyable evening the
party broke u.p at a late hour.
UNION LYCEUM
Mrs. Louisa Hall Reoorta $53.38 Sent
to Booker T. Washington Memorial
Fund.
The Union Lyceum met Sundav in
the McKinley Avenue A. M. E. Zion
church. Rev. E. George Biddle. Bastor.
conducting the devotional service. Wil
liam Cole presided at the meetimr and
the programme was rendered under
direction of Mrs. Jennie Moreland as
follows:
Paper, by Mrs. Queenie Bush. The
Negro Yesterday and Today; recita
tion. Miss Olive Brisco; reading, Loui
sa Hall; recitation. Miss Mabel Lacy;
reading. 'Miss Sarah Lacv: solo. James
Green.
Mrs. "Louisa Hall reported the
amount of money sent from Norwich
for the Booker T. Washington Me
morial Fund, the sum receipted for
from the Sunday schools and individ
uals as S5-3.S8.
A unanimous vote of thanks was
given to Mrs. Moreland and those tak
ing part, also to Mrs. Cole.
The programme next Sunday will be
conducted under the direction of Misa
Francis Fields. Miss Carrie Robinson
was installed as president of the
Union lorceum.
CLOSING OF SALOONS.
The Bill That Will Be Considered Next
Thursday.
When the house took recess last Fri
day evening to next Thursday, an act
authorizing the governor to regulate
the sale of SDirituous and Inoxinitirnr
fcquors during the continuance of the
war. Mr. Henderson of Norwich op
posed the bill on the ground that the
governor already had adequate author
ity on thie matter and that the change
MARRIED. .
PARK 9ULESY In Norwich. Mav 2.
1917, Miss Delia A. Riley of Norwich
and Robert Park of Moosup.
DIED.
BPSHJfBIJ 'In Taunton, Mass., May
is, 117, Frances Sherman, wife of
ths late Lucius Bushnell. aged 2
years.
Funeral service at the ehapel room of
the Henry Allen ac Son company.
Tuesday afternoon. May 15. at 1.10
e clock.
SISSON -In Norwich Town. Otrooando
coad. May 11. 117. Daniel Ci. Slsson,
aged 6-9 years.
Funeral from the home ef his daugh
ter, Mrs. warren H. Hamilton, otro
oando road, Norwich Town, Toesoay
afternoon, May IS, at 2 o'clock.
Burial In the family lot In the John
son cemetery, Jioxratl.
MtAIIGHUJI In New York city. May
12. 1917, Mary Kelly, widow of Pat
rick McLausrlilin. aed 63 years.
Funeral in Norwich Tuesday afternoon
on arrival or z o eiocK tram.
BABCOCK In Honolulu S. I.. Aeril 24.
1SU7. Blandina Stanton, widow of
General John Breokenridge Babeoek.
GAPLGS In Norwloh. May IS. 117,
Caroline, widow of Lyman Caples,
aged 19 years.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
LOADEH In Preston. May 12. 1917,
Frances Loader of Darien, Conn.
O'COIVJIBL.1, In New York. May 13.
1917. John O'Connell, aged 22 years
and 8 months.
siwrrrf In Norwleh. May 11. 117. Bd-
gar A. Smith, aged S 'years, son of I
Mrs. Averv Smith-
Funeral services at the residence of
Samuel B. Case, No. 124 Broad street.
Monday afternoon. May 14, at z..
Kindly omit flowers.
MAXWELL In Norwich, May 13,
117, Maria Reed, widow of John T.
Maxwell.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
Church &. Allen
15 Main Street
FUNERAL
DIRECTORS
AND
EM3ALMERS
Lady Assistant
Telephone 823-3
HENRY E. CHURCH
WM. SMITH ALLEN
DR. E. J. JONES
Suite 46 Shannon Building
Take elevator Shetucket Street
entrance. Phone
Shea & 13urrcc
41 Main Street
Funeral Directors
TAFTVILLE
Men's League Hold Well Attended
Supper Mechanics Trim Smash -
piecers 'Rev. Arthur Varley Speaks
at Congregational Church Notes.
The Men's league of the Taftville
Congregational church held a well at
tended supper in the church parlors
Saturday evening. The menu was
one of the best served in the church
for some time. Following the supper
a social hour was enjoyed and a mus
ical program was given by members
of the league.
Mechanics Take Two.
The (Mechanics took two games from
the leaders in the Mill league bowling
tournament Friday evening. The
games were close and many enthusi
astic sDectators watched the rollina:.
The scores:
Mechanics.
99 271
78 243
86 279
86 239
67 242
416 1274
87 269
10-8 257
82 245
71 236
85 244
433 126-1
At the Congregational Church.
At the Taftville Congregational
church Sunday morning Rev. Arthur
Varley delivered an interesting and
impressive sermon on Meditation. In
the evening the pastor spoke on The
Living Water. There was a large at
tendance at both services.
Notes.
William Miller of New London spent
the week-end as the guest of relatives
here.
Miss Cecelia Rioux spent the week
end as the guest of relatives in Jew-
ett City.
Hector Gaucher has returned to New
London after spending the week-end
with his parents.
Gustave Hedler and son, Curtis, arid
Moses Pruit motored to Westerly on
Sunday afternoon.
Herbert Hoyle of Front street has
purchased a new touring car and will
use it in his business.
William "Damarais and William
Wohelleben motored to Stafford
Springs Sunday where they called on
relatives.
Many baseball fans from the village
attended the game between the Girls'
club and the Plain-field team at Plain
field Sunday afternoon.
of hours in the saloon business with
out order of the governor waa not
justifiable. He moved indefinite post
ponement, but the motion did not pre
vail. Mr. Backus of Thompson, who
declared he was consistent and out
spoken in advocacy of temperance leg
islation, said he was opposed to the.
bill in ite present form as it was not
fair to the "liquor dealers. He said these
men paid high price for protection of
their business as required by the state
and ought to be reimbursed In pro
portion to what they had paid, if their
time for doing business was to be less
ened. If the saloons were to be
cCosed, wholly qr in part, the bill
ought to provide for equivalent reim
bursement for money' paid for liquor
license at least.
On motion of the majority leader the -
Brown S3 89
Brierlv 76 79
Pilling 96 97
Daly 78 75
Emerson 83 92
426 432
Smashpiecers.
Delaney 83 99
Xjafleur 73 76
McSheffrey" .... 76 87
Lambert ....... 83 82
Stone 77 82
392 426
ejjlO pOBtOOBBS i
RUGS AS
Rugs For Every Room
For Living Room
An Axminster will 'be service
able we show them In beautiful
designs and colorings.
A Wilton Rug is also service
able and we show thorn In many
attractive designs, including splen
did Chinese effeota.
For Dining Room
A Brussels or Wilton is desirable.
It will give more satisfactory serv
ice in this room. Our assortment
is very complete.
For Bed Room
A Brussels Rug or Sootoh Art
Rug will either be satisfactory.
Many good patterns to select from.
Rugs also for Library, Halt
Dan.
Tapestry Rugs
9 by 12 feet size, QIC
very low priced at tpiu.tJU
The 8 ft. 3 in. by 10 ft. 6 in. at $14.50
Seamless Tapestry Rugs in a good rang j of de
sirable patterns and colorings.
Better Tapestry Rugs MQ Cf
In 9 by 12 feet size at ylZr.OU
The 8 ft. 3 in. by 10 ft. 6 in. at $17.50
Splendid grade Tapestry Rugs, seamless, all wov
en in one piece a large assortment ef patterns
and colorings a big saving for you at the low
prices quoted.
WhittalFs PeerlessBrusselsRugs
9 by 12 feet size dJOO OC
The 8 ft. 3 in. by 10 ft. 6 in. at $27.50
The 6x9 feet at $11.00
Here are the standard grade body Brussels Rugs
Rugs which havexbeen proven reliable at these
prices they are lower than they will be for a long
time to come. Why not come in today?
inlaid and Printed Linoleum
IN LARGE ASSORTMENTS
Come in and select your Linoleum. Choose from our splended rangs of patterns. Then we can send our !
ing expert to your home to take measurements, after which ho will be able to cover your floors with the
number of yards possible, and lay the Linoleum as it should be done to assure the greatest amount of nt i
faction.
PRINTED LINOLEUMS
A splendid large variety of patterns to select from,
including light, "dainty effects for chamber, clean
looking tile patterns for kitchen or bath room, hard
wood patterns for hall or for rug borders.
Our excellent values at 45c to 75c
THE PORTEOUS & MITCHELL CO.
bill was tabled until Thursday, the
final day of the present session of the
general assembly. The text of the bill
is as follows:
The governor may, during the con
tinuance of the present war, to pre
serve peace ana order in any locality
or localities, by proclamation forh'd
the sale or dispensing of spirituous and
intoxicating liquors during such pe
riod. Suah proclamation shall be is
sued by publishing the same at least
once in a newspaper puoushed ana
having a circulation in the county in
which such locality or localities are
situated.
No club having a certificate to dls
pense. and no person licensed to sen
or dispense spirituous rid intoxicating
liquors shall, either by .nmself, his
servant or agent, sell, dispense, ex
change or give away any spirituous or
intoxicaJting liquors betweem 11 o clock
at night and 8 o'clock on the following
morning of any day upon which such
sale or dispensing Is otherwise law
ful, during the continuance of the
present war, provided the provisions of
this section shall not apply to any
person selling spirituous or lntoxicat
ing liquors under a druggist license
upon the prescription of a practicing
physician, and no person shaH keep
open that portion of any building.
apartment, store or room In which
spirituous or intoxicating liquor is kept
for sale between 11 o'clock at night
and 8 o'clock on the following morn
ing of any day upon Which such sale
or dispensing Is otherwise lawful, pro
vided, the hours of closing saloons in
towns which have adopted 10 o'clock
in the evening as the hour for such
closing shall not be - affected by the
provisions of thia section.
Any person who shall violate any
provision of this act or who ehaJM fail
to comply with any order issued by
authority of the provisions thereof
shall be suhject -to penalties provided
in section 2712 of the general stat
utes. This act shall take effect June 1st,
1917.
Added to Food Committal,
By appointment of Governor Marcus
H. Holcomb, at the suggestion of the
Connecticut committee of food supply.
Walter L. Goodwin of Hartford and
Seth Low Pierrepont of Fairfield have
been added to the membership of tha
state food supply committee.
iUil
AN INVESTMENT
Buying Rugs NOW, at the prices we ask, is t!.
safest kind of an investment our present price beln-j
from lQ per cent, to 25 per cent, lower than we ha!l
forced to ask in the near future. '
THIS IS NOT MERELY A SELLING ARGUMENT
It is a statement ef facts and conditions which cannot be evd-i.
but one which must make plain the advisability of scouring your Fujt
before we are forced to advance our prices to meet advanced marWt
oonditions.
WE ARE HOLDING BACK FROM THIS ADVANCE
Holding feaek as long aa possible. Fortunately wo have been able to
do so thua far because our last aeasen'a purchases, at the oH pries,
were very large and our etocka ware particularly heavy. As t-e rv.
Ruga come In prlaaa will be advanced.
We Say;- Buy Rugs Now Before Our Advance
or
Whiltalls Teprac
9 by 12 feet size
Our present price
9 by 12
O i I
FLAG UNFURLED AT
PARK CHURCH SCHOOL.
Patriotic Exercises Were Carried Out
in Osgood Memorial.
The patriotic service held by the
Sunday school of Park Congregational
church in. the Hugh H. Osgood Memo
rial Sunday noon was well attended
by members of the school and church.
The program carried out was very in
teresting and was tinged with patri
otism when the call to the colors was
sounded by Bugler Johnson, member
of the detachment of soldiers who are
on duty in this city.
The following program was carried
out: America, the Beautiful, by the
entire school; prayer. Rev. S. H. Howe,
D. D. ; Call to the Colors, Bugler
Juhnson, followed by a Salute to the
Flag; mental flag drill, John TI.
Vaughn and son, Stanley Vaughn: Star
Spangled Banner, which was followed
by a brief address by General William
A. Aiken.
General Aiken referred to the flags
of England and France, their colors
and arrangement. He referred to the
histories of the flags, which were
mostly religious, while ours was purely
patriotic. He explained the origin of
the different colors In the flags and by
diagrams showed the different British
flags up to the present Union Jack.
Continuing, he referred to the fact that
for the first time in history our flag
has been united with the flags of Eng
land and France and other countries.
All of us are reading in the papers
wonderful things as to what Is going
on in New York and Washington,
where great men from England an1
France, "Balfour and Joffre, the noblest
men in those countries, are visiting.
Thifl all means, I hope, that what
Abraham Lincoln said at the cCose of
his famous Gettysburg address, the
government by and for the people and
that liberty might not perish, will be
continued.
The exercises were brought to n
close by the singing of . the aBttle
Hymn of the Republic. As the call to
the colors was sounded, a large flag
was unfurled across the center of the
platform.
Left on Colonial Express. I
Passengers on the Colonial express
C
Wilton Rus
$45.00
The 8 ft. 3 in. by 10 ft. 6 in. at $41X0
And it will no doubt be a long time before we tn
again offer you these excellent Rugs at tHe 'i
prices. Handsome Wiltono splendid grade, most
ly in the desirable, small repeat patterns wwct
wear so well to the eye.
Other Whittall Wilton Rugs
All standard grades, no doubtful qualities. Fine
reproductions of Oriental designs handeome ct
terns and colorings a big assortment.
9 by 12 feet size at $61.75, $70, $78
8 ft. 3 in. by 10 ft. 6 in. at $41a:j $51.50
Axminster Rugs
feet size,
I ft I .
$27.50
$33.00
3ianaarci uraass, at j 535.00
The 8 ft. 3 in. by 10 ft. 6 in. at $23.75
The 6 by 9 feet size at only $15.00
Splendid wearing, fine looking Axminstere in b' i
the seamed and seamless makes, a wide ranje of
excellent patterns to choose from. Aimmtltri ap
popular rugs, because if of standard ma , tr.
may always be depended upon for good iric
and for rugs of sterling quality. The pri-.t are
moderate.
o
INLAID LINOLEUMS
We are now showing a range of over inty psttrr
in these durable Inlaid Linoleums Inlaid a' more
serviceable than the printed goods, because tHe coio-
go right through to the back.
Prices 85c, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50 tq. yr.
Saturday morning in",.idl Mr, r
ter G. Ambler of "h itti t !
Mrs. William J. Knl3;i rf i
avenue. Mrs. Amblnr j v. rr
son, Ir. Joseph A. Amh.or. a ' '
In the government nr. if ( m
ington, and Mr. Amhltr ( Fi
Holloway), former'.y of .Vorw.- . ;fr
Kendall is spend. r,g n'ri" t rr. v
her husband, who I. in 'v,,,,, ... .
JLel., in the Bancroft bier.-iry.
ARTHUR WILBUR 13
NOW PETTY OFFICE?.
Former Norwich Boy Has Enlised it
a Wireless Operator.
Arthur Wilbur prir to i ,- x
wleh has finished h:n cn,-
Boston wire lean school. At ?-. r. -
Uncle Sam railed for vnrjrfr r
thur was employed In & ..-.. f. -tory
at Chelsea, and ie imrr."'. '
enlisted as wireless man for ;r.n V .
government.
Fortunately h was or. vf "-e i
chosen to go to Crufts h'.f't lr. on
at Harvard for an x'-t ;'.- -I -, ;- !.-;
wireless. In the firs'. ea.?n.r.i-. i
most of the applicants pI :- 5
class. Mr. Wilbur was or.- r, f- fw
who passed second r.a era -r.. 1 1.-. :
and was mado a petty ofTi-r.
He is a member of the -irI Piv
tlst church of this c.ty ari ..- r -
Y. P. C. S. He was a memnr t i
amateur club while In .v,rwii.h. AT'ir
he graduates from the IfarvaM -.,
he will be placed on a j-a t bo
coast guarding.
All EXPERT on car.
5
Comparatively few jvcpl"! rea.ie tr.i
a cold is a signal of physical wr aine.t .
To treat a cold with meaJter.ir
physics, alcoholic ryrups or dnj'A
pills, may smoth er the co! d bu t th r y a I o
reduce the body powers still further ar.i
invite more serious sickness.
Scott's Emulsion has always ben an
expert on colds, because it pec-liar
enriches the blood, quickly tones upt? -forces
and strengthens both throat an i
chest. Try Scott's. Refuse uiv." ut.
Scott & Bosrae, Bloonhc A. !'. J. ir v"
i . .-

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