OCR Interpretation


Norwich bulletin. [volume] (Norwich, Conn.) 1895-2011, September 17, 1917, Image 8

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014086/1917-09-17/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

SPECIAL PROGRAMMES "
WELCOME REV. PURKISS
The
6H)'
Picture Tells
Tft&Storu
CopjrichtedlSilS by Xba Picture i
dvertiaaH, Box 17, Orejron City, Ova
Devoo
Ready Mbred
Paint
Varnish, -Oils
and Brushes
and Metals
Preston Bros. Inc.
and High Grade
GROCERIES
A. T. Otis A. Son
72 Franklin St. .
Bulletin Bids.
WASSERMANN
The
Plaut-Cadden Co.
Estab. 1872
Plaut-Cadden
Building
144-146 Main St.
Norwich, Ct.
I ' v
Soda Water
and Bottling
Works
C. E. WRIGHT
8 Cove St. '
Tel. 42S-2
FERGUSON'S
on
Franklin Square
Diamonds,
Watches,
Cut Glass and
Silverware
239 Main Street
Willard Storage
Batteries
and everything
pertaining
to tnem.-
Things Electrica
Walter P. Mora.
Shetucket St.
Telephone
LUMBER
of ad
descriptions
CHAPPELL CO.
Tsl. 24
AND POCKET
BiLLARDS
OOOLEY eV
SIMPSON
Basement '
Thayer Building
HOME
FURNISHERS
Everything '
For the Home.
SCHWARTZ
BR08.
9-11 Water St.
Tel. 965
THE
THAMES
NATIONAL
BANK
18 Shatucket St.
REO CARS
Are Good Cars
REO GARAGE.
in the
New Majeetio
Building
Shetucket Street
JAMES L. CASE
37 Shetucket St.
A share of
your Insurance
Business '
of all kinds
solicited
AUTO LIVERY
and
EXPRESS
Day and Night
T. J. Fitzgerald
Phone 977
X
We cane chairs in
i the finest way and
sell caning in
wholesale and re
tail.
MIKOLA8l'S
TAILOR SHOP
38 Market St,
PURE DRUGS
Compounded
Accurately
by
GEORGE M.
RATHBONE
133 West Main St
Tel. 182-3
WET WASH
EAST SIDE.
- WET WASH
Ernest Freeman
15 Ripley Place
Tel. 1112-4
Furniture
Upholstery Work
, - of Merit
. GEO. e. '
ZIMMERMAN
83 Warren St.
. Tel. 1254
Everything , Pure.
Clean- and 'Good
at the.
PROVIDENCE
BAKERY
66 Franklin St.
Tel. 1133-3
. - VICTROLA
Tfie
Plaut-Cadden Co.
Estab. 1872
Plaut-Cadden
Building
144-146 Main St.
Norwich', 'Ct.
GOOD ROOFING
.in all
- its branches
Chaa.E. Whitaker
81 Water St.
Photographio
Goods?
Why The
CRANSTON' CO.
of course
25-29 Broadway
'HIGH GRADE
COAL
CHAPPELL, CO.
Telephone 1 '
THUMM'R
Delieatessan
40 Franklin St.
yTel. 1309
) aHlHIViM J
cSl
Self Starting
Remington
Typewrite re
H. R. WAGNER
62 Broadway
Norwioh, Conn.
See SPEAR and
You'll See
C. A. SPEAR J
Optometrist
Franklin Square
up stairs
in Somers Bldg.
r mt'
GET IT
at
RING oV SISK'S
Druggists
Franklin Square
LET ME PAINT
IT FOR YOU !
GEO. F. ADAMS
17 Town St.
Tel. 1343-4
Need a Plumber?
Tel. 897
A BARSTOW
& CO.,
23 Water Street
PLUMBING
As You Like it"
" JAMES W.
MURPHY
16 Thames St.
Telephone 1884-24
DR.
i. B. ELDRED
43 Broadway
Tel. 341-3
Where
Is He Going?
Why to the
WAUREGAN
HOTEL
of: course -
SUPPLIES and .
ACCESSORIES
C. E. LANE '
Shop. tel. 731
House: tel. 1123-2
FARMING IMPLEMENTS
MECHANICS' 'TOQLS '
of all kinds '
THE HOUSEHOLD
Bulletin Building, 74 Franklin Street
RECOMMENDED PURCHASE -
OF SHEA PROPERTY
Congress Did' Not See Fit to Include
Appropriation.
The Army and Navy Register, latest
Issue, contains this article of special
Interest in The -Bulletin territory:
"Rear Admiral A. -W. Grant, com
manding tide submarine force, has rec
ommended the purchase or condem
nation, of a tract of land comprising 26
seres owned by a fertilizer company
a the Immediate vicinity of the New
ndoo submarine base. The navy
"
department submitted an estimate to
congress asking $90,000 for this pur
pose, butj the house' appropriations
committee did not see fit to Include
that sum in. the urgent deficiency- bill.
"Chairman Fitzgerald was of- the
opinion that the chief reason for the
purchase was the elimination of the
fertilizer- factory, which Is considered
an awful nuisance by officers on. duty
at that station. He critised the navy
department for falling to include that
purchase when the development and
improvement of the submarine base
was originally provided for. It develop
ed that patriotic citizens of New Lon
don expended the sum of S8,00u to sup-
New Central Baptist Pastor Greeted
. by Large Congregation Sunday.
'l The-occasion of .the entrance of the
Rev. Arthur F. Purkiss upon his pas
torate at the Central Baptist church
was marked by special programmes at
the various services of the church on
Sunday. The church was most beau
tifully decorated ' with hydrangeas,
clematis and yellow daisies, banks of
these flowers-- being., arranged on the
broad ; window-ledges and along the
pulpit platform, most effectively.
' Intrdudctory remarks were made for
the deacons by Deacon C'.- Edward
Smith. Mr. Smith said: "Today Is
one to which we have long been look
ing forward, with hope and prayer. We
ard confident that -here is a -man se
lected by God to be our pastor, to be
our spiritual inspiration and leader.
Our work together has' Just begun and.
we must remember that no matter how
spiritual the leadership, how untiring
fhework put forth by this leader, the
the- - fullest accomplishment '. cannot
be realized unless.' we . do our . share
With this in mind,, we feel that we are
still looking forward to the most sucr
cessful and spiritual era '' of our
church.. '- .
Mr; Purkiss in reply, emphasize of
Mr. Smith s words, that no pastor can
do without the earnest help and co
operation of the church. Success de
pends not alone on the man at the
I head, but on the man and the people
oacK or tne minister must De in
prayers and love of the people. Mr.
Purkiss. epc;e of the evidences of this
intention. . m - the earnest words ad
dress'edVto -him through 'Mr. Smith
and the loving preparation shown in
the beauty of the decorations through
out the church.
Mr. Purkiss read as his Scripture
less the tenth chapter of Mark and
took for the theme of his sermon, Re
ligion as. Life.
Sometimes, he said, we have the con
ception that church ana religion are
one and the same thing. Such is .not
the case. The church is the pro
duct of religion but it is not religion,
We hear it said sometimes that the
churches are all alike, that they are
all good, all Dound for the same place
There is some good in all churches,
the vitality of their -message depend
ing on us, as well as the character of
it. - -
Again- we sometimes think of the
church as the embodiment of a creed
and those not able to subscribe to the
articles of that creed feel that a bar
rier to belonging to church. .The
creed is but a proSuct of the church,
There are a great many people out
in the world who have more religion
than some of those who are in church
living up to a hard, and fast creed.
Sometimes we think that sacrifice
is religion. That a life filled with con
scious and patiently borne sacrifice is
the truly religious life. Religion is
a devotion to high and noble things
ana such devotion always inspires in
voluntary sacrifice.
As Jesus conceives it, religion Is
life, abundant mental, physical, spir
itual life. No one really knows what
life is to define it. It has eluded
philosophers and scientists. The only
way to know life is to experience it.
There lies the danger of teaching and
preaching, since it cannot be describ
ed.
The religion of Jesus brings a deep
satisfactions Most religions fail here,
giving only a spirit of restlessness.
Jesus came to bring peace into the
midst of the World s tumult and storm.
It is difficult for- imperfect man to en
ter info this.
Much is said today of salvation by
character. The gospel teaches us sal
vation for character. . Jesus can start
any man ' in the right way, ho -matter
or what race, or . color, or character.
God establishes relations . with him
through Jesus.
The religion of Christ removes from
our minds all fear. We are living in
times of great blind, brute force, but
after all these forces are but God's
servants. Nothing can havpen to
man that God cannot turn to his ulti
mate triumph and good.
Paradoxically, the religion of Jesus
promotes dissatisfaction. Many re
ligions give a narcotic satisfaction.
dulling effort, and producing only a
.satisfaction with things as they are.
Jesus gives us a noble dissatisfac
tion, an instinct and desire to climb.
We. are anxious to hurry on toward
the light, toward something higher
and better. The need to be calm, but
to make ourselves and tne wrld bet
ter.
One other thing this religion gives
us power. The crying desire of men
is for power. We bend every effort
toward that end and spend years in
training our youth to .develop their
highest powers In every line.
And what Is the greatest power in
the world? The power of personality,
the ability to bend thin;3 to our will,
bringing with It a poise, joy. passion
and devotion to the big things of life.
At the Beginning of Chrisfs
church there streamed forth this pow
er. We today live on too small a
plane. . We do not sound the depths
of life. Life is irrestable. Give it
a start and it gorows. The life of
Jesus Is the same. If started in our
hearts it will grow. So the man who
would have spiritual power must bend
his efforts toward developing that life.
we don t spend time, now-a-days. on
things not worth while. So we must
have all our powers at their highest
expression to be able to go out in the
world to do . the work of the Master.
ou arewvoite
A Cordial Invitation Is Extended To You
To Attend Our
Formal Fall ODeniner
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18tji TO THE 20th INCLUSIVE
MILLINERY
WOMEN'S AND MISSES'
APPAREL
.This formal showing is rriost complete, the
most attractive of the Atitum's models in
both Millinery and Apparel being shown
in profusion.
iz
NO LICENSE SPEAKER
, :AT ND CHURCH
Rev. W. E. Lamphear Addressed Con
gregation at Sunday Morning Serv-
ice.- ' " '
At the Second Congregational
church Sunday morning, Rev. W. E.
Lanphear' field -secretary 'of the Con
necticut Temperance Union, spoke on
the - no-license: question. 'His topic
was Making the World Safe for Dem
ocracy. ' Among the points of his ad
dress were these:
- We are in a great world war to help
make the " world safe for democracy.
We - should also work to make' our
state, or nation,' or city, safe for our
citizens. -' '
Some say, one thing at a time. We
were deep In - the fight against liquor
before the world war started. Lloyd
George and other world leaders state
that; liquor ' is a greater enemv than
Germany; " - The war may last for
years. ' We can do no better service
than - to stop liquor selling now.
The ' kaiser couldn't '. do better for
himself than ' to foster the American
saloon. It -is his best-friend. Noth
ing so militates against' our success
in this war than the sale of liquors.
One man showed his 'patriotism by
saying he was willing to see all his
wife's -relations in the war.
I am ; not a prohibition party man.
This movement is not- a party one.
Men of all -parties support .it. The li
quor traffic has manifold underground
ramifications.- Churchmen hold prop
erty contest to the saloon, etc. In this
time -of our nation's need shall such
press the nuisance for one year, which
incidentally, was the year during
which efforts were made to sell the
site to the government.
- 'Captain McKean informed the corti
ntittee that if the land is not purchas
edN it will be used for a fertilizer fac
tory, and the submarine base cannot
be used with the factory in operation.
He stated that the stench was so bad
that it nauseated husky sailprmen."
men not be ready to sacrifice these
interests.
In the state of Connecticut the di
rect cost of the liquor traffic is $16 to
817 per person, but the direct
cost is not less 'than. $100 for
each inhabitant as I can demonstrate
to anyone who will sit down with me
to go over the facts. The sacrifice of
lives in the country to the saloon is
66 to 67.0OO. Connecticut's share is
660.
In our Jails are 1200 prisoners on
the average, 900 of these are there
because of drink. We need the labor
of those 900 men.
Don't think voting out the saloons
will totally stop drinking. Some- old
topers will get it somehow, but even
these will drink less if the constant
temptation is removed. Far fewer
boys and young men .will begin the
habit. What are you going to do
about it? . - 1
I heard a man on the street say
"If Norwich goes no license it will
be on the bum!" I said to him: "If
you have had a saloon -doctor- for 30
odd years and he has left you on the
bum, isn't it time to change doctors?
The saloon business will he on tne
bum if Norwich goes No."
When Oct. 1 comes and you go into
the ballot booth and press the lever
labeled "Yes" you are voting for the
kaiser. If you press the "No" button,
it is a vote for democracy.
The signers of the petition have
done their share by providing an op
portunity to vote. Will you do your
share by voting No and getting oth
ers to vote the same? Our union
last winter tried to get a bill through
to permit women to vote on this
question. The saloonmen in opposing
silently admitted that If women voted
they would in large majority vote
against the saloon. I am not going
to be harsh enough to predict what
the result will be, but win or lose,
the result will be worth the effort in
education.
In surrounding towns every night
women He awake nights wondering
if their husbands are coming home
drunk from the --saloons of Norwich.
Let us clean up the cesspools of Nor
wich both for ourselves and our sur
rounding no license towns.
More than 85 per cent, of the terri
tory of the United States and 60 per
cent, of Its people are no license. Con
gress has protected our states by for
bidding liquor to pass our state towns
into dry territory.
The saloons of the District of Co
lumbia close their doors next Novem
ber, s
A week ago last night the last distil
ler of liquor closed his business so
far as beverage use is concerned.
The breweries are still at . work
and wasting food supplies sufficient
to feed seven million people.
The United States senate voted on
Aug. 1 to submit a national amend
ment to the- constitution for prohi
bition by the amazing vote of 65 to
20. Please God, by 1920 the law of
the land will be national prohibition.
Shall Connecticut be pulled on the
water wagon as one of the last 12
states 'or on the honor roll of the 36 to
ratify the amendment?
No License Campaign Notes.
Gustav Bochman of ' Hartford will
speak Tuesday night at 7.30 on Falls
avenue and at 8.15 at Union Square.
W. E. Lanphear of Hartford will
speak at 7.30 at Taftville and at 8.15
on North Main street. Greeneville. .
On Sunday, Sept. 23, Rev. Mr: Pur
kess will speak on the "no license
question at the morning service of the
Central Baptist church. Rev. S. H.
Howe, D. D., of Park church, will
also speak.
TWO SONS ENLISTED:
TWO ON DRAFT LIST
Mrs. James McGrory, of Norwich,
Furnishing Young Patriots for the
Country's Defence.
Not many mothers In Norwich are
giving four sons to the service of
their country, as is the case of Mrs.
James McGrory, of 46 Washington
street, who has two sons enlisted and
two drafted and liable to be called in
due time.
Lawrence McGrory, who was em
ployed bv A C. Swan, of Norwich, is
at Camp Bowie, Fort Worth, Texas,
with the First . Artillery, in Motor
truck Company No. 15.
James McGrory, who eniistea in
the navy, was an electrician in Nor
wich and now is an electrician for
Uncle Sam at the state pier in New
London. His brothers, Thomas, who
left the Hopkins & Allen plant to
work in Bridgeport, and John ".,
Norwich Free Academy, 1907, Holy
Cross College, 1911, a teacher in Drury
High school, Northampton, Mass., are
on the draft list and ready to be
called when needed, leaving only one
of Mrs. McGrory's five children, her
daughter, Miss Anna, at the family
home.
SPIRITUAL SLACKERS.
Such Are Too Many Who Call Them
selves Christian Soldiers, Rev. Peter
J. Cuny Tells St. Patrick's Congre
gation. Preaching at the . high mass in St.
Patrick's church Sunday from the text.
The years pass: I go the way whence
I shall not return Job xvi-23. Rev.
Peter J. Cuny considered what that
life is to which Job refers in these im
pressive phrases whether the life
which is merely a succession of activi
ties p,na sensations and experiences,
or life which is a preparation for an
eternity of existence' with God. Earth
ly life ends when the vital spark
leaves the body; but the soul lives on
forever.
The longest earthly life seems
short, and none can foretell the exact
length of the span of his existence in
this world. Life ends often in child
hood or early youth, principally
through the heritage of those sins of
the fathers which result In Impaired
bodily strength, quite as frequently
because of ignorance of or disregard
for the laws of hygiene, or bacause of
ones own sins. But whatever the
length of life, it is sufficiently long to
enable man to carry out God's purpose
for him, to make this earthly exist
ence a fitting preparation for . eternity
Life then is a training time: -and in
the perfect system of the Catholic doc
trine there comes the intensive train
ing of Purgatory, which fits the soul
for an eternity of service in God s
army of those men of good will who
have gone' before Those who, while
calling themselves Christian soldiers,
shirk this training, this discipline,
who live rathor for sin, they are the
spiritual slackers whom the preacher
scored. If obedience to God and "His
law His ten commandments is one's
main purpose, then nvill a man be in
condition to answer "Ready!" when
the final summons comes. There will
be none of the cringing of the spirit
ual slacker, who, after a life given up
to indulgence, hopes to get by. on his
death bed a chance he cannot always
"count upon.
The fact that no lire Is wholly sat
isfied, that there is always the craving
for Perfection, is, the preacher said,
to his mind the strongest proof of the
Immortality of the soul.
High mass has been resumed at St.
Patrick's after suspension during the
summer and the regular choir sang
during Sunday's service, directed by
Oranist Frank L. Farrell. JU-f. Farrell
and John Sullivan being heard In sev
eral solos during the mass. Regular
vespers, followed by Renediotion of
the Blessed Sacrament, has been re
sumed also, beginning at half past
three, Sunday afternoon.
of each park, to see that no one vio-
lates fcbe privileges of the stopping
place.
There will be running water. In
the parks, benches and tables whera
picnics can be held, and provisions
will be made so that automobllists
may stay over night if .they care to.
If all goes well, the parks will ba
ready for use by next spring.
On Furlough From Niantie Camp.
Following the high mass in St. Pat-
rick's church Sunday, many friends
in the congregation warmly welcomed
three members 6f the -26th division
who were up from camp at Niantio
on a bripf furlough. They were Wil
liam J. Bresna.n, of Norwich, no.w a
member of the Fourth Ambulance
Corps, U, S. Army: Thomas Flynn, of
Pawtucket, R. I., a member of the
same corps, and William Foerch, also
of the Fourth Ambulance Corps, from
Providence.
There are two ambulance corps now
at the Niantlc camp, one from Rhode
Island and the other a Connecticut
corps.
TRAVELERS' PARKS
FOR AUTO TOURIST?
Here's the simple, easy, safe way to
surely change gray or faded lifeless
hair to a uniform, dark lustrous, beau
tiful shade perfectly natural in ap
pearance. Morely do as many thou
sands have done and apply Q-ban.
Not a quick-acting dye, but defies .de
tection. Guaranteed harmless 50c a
large bottle. Sold by Lee & Osgood
and all good drug stores. Try
Q-ban Hair Tonic; Q-ban Liquid
Shampoo;' Q-ban Soap.. Also Q-ban
Depilatory.
TRAVELERS' DIRECTORY
Will 'be Built Along Trunk Highways
in State, Pomfret Conference De-
cided.
Travelers' parks at various point
on the trunk line highways of tin
state are to be established for the
benefit of the thousands of automo
tive tourists -who visit Connecticut
each year. This decision was reach
ed by the commission on state parks,
which met in Pomfret, Thursday.'
Three 'or four will - be built be
tween 'New Haven and iBridgeport, one
between New Haven and New London,
one between New Haven and Hart
ford
It is planned to have a man in charge
$1.25 To New York $1.25
"HELSfcA LINE
TO NEW YORK
FREIGHT ;ANO PASSENGER
8ERVK1E BETWEEN
NORWIOH AND NEW YORK
From Norwich Tuesdays, Thurs
days, Sundays at 5 p. m.
New Tork. Brooklyn Bridg.
Pier, East River, foot Roosevelt
Street, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fri
days at 5 p. m. Effective Oct. 16th.
191.
J1.25 F. V. KNOUSE, Agent $1.23

xml | txt