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Norwich bulletin. [volume] (Norwich, Conn.) 1895-2011, September 24, 1917, Image 4

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NORWICH BULLETIN, WOl-nJAT, SEPTEMBER 24, 1917
da
V
Harwich gjaltpfm
121 YrARS OLD
- SaViIff Io price lie a weetei Sew a
- --tk M-OS j-a
Entered at the Postefflee at Norwich.
Conn . as aeeond-clasa matter.
: ; T-elephoas CaDat
- I JBnlK -n Business Of flea 4U.
- Billsttn Editorial Rooms
f .Bulletin Job .Of flee
WHlimentic Office. 653 Main Street.
-i Telephone Sl-2i
Monday, Sep. 24, 1917.
The1 Circulation of'
The Bulletin
The Bulletin has the. tart-eat
circulation of any paper In Eastern
Connecticut and from three to foci
times larger than that of any la
Norwjch. It is delivered to ovsr
.04 of thM 4.053 housea ra Nor
wich and read by ninety-three per
eenu of the people. In Windham
ft la delivered tu over tea hoses,
in Putnam and Dantelaon to over
1.100. and In all of these place it
U considered tre local daily. ,
Eastern Connecticut haa forty
nine towns, one hundred and sixty -ave
poatofflce districts, and sixty
sural free delivery routes.
The Bulletin la sold In very
town and on all of he- R. V. IX
routes in Eastern Connecticut.
CIRCULATION
1901. average 4,412
1905. average... -5,920
9,471
September 22, 1917..
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED
PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusive
ly entitled to the use for republica
tion of all news credited to it or not
otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of ' republication of
special dispatches herein are also
reserved.
THE REPUBLICAN TICKET
" r ' 0
Selectmen
'CASPER K. BAILEY
CHARLES P. BUSHNELL .
Board of Assessors
JOSEPH C. MARSAX
Board of Relief
FRED O. PROTHERO
JAMES C. FTTZPATRICK
Town Clerk and Treasurer
CHARLES S. HOLBROOK
Tax Collector
THOMAS A, ROBINSON
Registrar of Voters,
TYLER D. GUY
Auditor
N DAJVIEL F. McNEIL
Agents Town Deposit Fund
fTLLTAM H. ALLEN
CHARLES W. GALE
FRANK L. WOODARD
Town School Board
ROBERT W. McNEELY "
HERBERT M. LEROU
Constables
JOHN H. REEVES
GEORGE W,ROU8E
GU8TAVE LAMBERT
FREDERICK DURR
( Norwich,
A GOOD MOVE.
- One of- the widest things that the
longshoremen in and about New, York
ever did, was to submit their griev
ances to arbitration and thereby stop
the increasing congestion that was
being caused by ' their strike. It re
quired several days to make them
- appreciate thr effects of their inac
. tivity and what it meant to the coun
try to cause such stagnation as was
resulting from their refusal to work.
That a continuance in their action
-- 'was likely to result in government in
terference and possibly in the resort
to conscriptio-n in order to prevent
Ilia interruption of the trade through
t h?- port of New York may have had
.its influence, but as a matter of fact
there was no 'reason why the trouble
should not be submitted . to arbitra-
t lion. . There was nothing in the dis
pute which could not be settled in
such a manner and settled fairly for
, all concerned. So long as the striked
was continued there was IKtte chance
t for an adjustment in accordance with
, the facts. Yet that is the proper way
and the one which will now be fol
lowed. It is fortunate therefore that
the men have reached this conclusion
but equally so that they have done
. no at an early date both for their own
good In preventing a further loss of
wages and for the good of the nation
that commerce may- be no longer im
peded for. that reason. It may be a
vain hope but it will show magnifi
cent progress in the wdrld of labor
- whsnsthe adjustment of all such tron
. . ties can be depended upon from the
start through just such an avenue.
"S THE CENTRAL POWERS' REPLY.
' There-- is nothing tihusual or unex
pected in -the response which has been
- made by Germany and Austria to the
peace proposals-, of Pops Benedict.
They are in accord In their replies
looking for a peace which will be fa
, vorable to them and In that connec
tion such a reply as each haa sent
might just as well have . been made
' 1 'within a few day of th proposal.
- Germany - tn4 Ac-rtrla - bar, bong-
What tUt allie have taatated aanot
b , brought about. In, the notof
Friditt Wlbft. it wag made plain
that Uir caa'b no Itttthar negotia
tions with the elting German gov
ernment, and therefor the arranging
of any - term peace with It can
hardly ft rxpeated. . But t-b central
powers are seeking .through. tBe terri
tory of the allies, which they occupy
to secure an advantage In a discussion
of peace regardless of -th principles
for ; which the entente patera stand.
Thus the acceptance of. a programme
WhichV bad. been - previously, turfce
dwn W the Other side aflea not. la
dies A early ending of the war.
Tne central powers 10: as. they al
ways nave to make, jiny definite state
ments retarding peace. In a general
way- the proposed plan 1 . favored but
in viear . of ,the ipMence with Ger
many ndne of the entente nation cava
enter ny, negotiations ttt titer ia now
no greater faith ;Inr the German prom
isee thah there lias been in the recent
past. -Whn th German - people be
come their own masters a settlement
mayTS reached :ut hot until then. .
NEED : MQRE: VESSELS.
The Claim Is beig mMe that lnas
mneh 'as there ' is an unprecedented
cohgeetlen on- the railroads -. of the
country,' tie demands for transporta
tion being greater than the facilities
available can handle, greater attention
ougttt to be 'given to the -development
of tha inland waterways. -
There can- be little question . but
whit the waterways jMong the Atlantic
coast are ot great-value to tidewater
and other shipping ; . there can be ho
doubt but what there is a big oppor
tunity through such canals, rivers and
sounds a are mad Suitable for coast
wise trade to give valuable assistance
jo- the ' transportation problem, but it
ia -,a question, whether" millions which
are so - necessary In other directions
should devoted tosthis development
at the present time... . " ,"--
The fact of the matter Is that water'
transportation through many -, of , ths
protected- arms of the sea is .not what
i should be. It Is costing more to get
coal by barge thaq by fail at tide
water points, when if. the fleet of. coal
carrying vessels was doing all that
was ' possible m this particular the
needs of New England in thia direc
tion could hm better, served than they
are. It la thus useless to spend a lot
of money developing the waterways
until sufficient vessels for using them
can be provided. ' There la a, crying
need far' Increasing our coasting ves
sels of all kinds and when that is ac
complished 4. bigr load can be removed
from the railroads, but thopening up
of the waterways without, having any
vessels will "not do it.
; AN EYE -OPENER.
- While, there were reasons ro believe
that, the representatives of Germany
:n. ibis country were exceeaing tnei:
i tgiits and working against the neu
traiity of this country for a long time
before there- was a severance of diplo
ma tic relations, th disclosures which
have just been - mad by th state de
partment relative to such '. operation
make it evident that th government
was well in touch with what was go
ing on. "' ; . -
The dismissal , of certain attaches
and evn the handing of passports to
Count Bemstorff did not put an end
to the eltver Intrigue that was under
way. There-were there in ou. midst
who .were . equally danaercus. This
was because some of them were not
openly 1 suspected and because others
were carefully covering their tracks. If
anything was necessary, to convince!
this nation of the necessity of striking
thi element anA, Striking it hard, it
was ' provided in, the diaclosures which
have Just been mjde. , Bemstorff had
an organisation - in tfhis - country or
which he eould depend to get his work
done, to bring an inflftenoe to bear
upon xiT; congrsei and to Operate for
the benefit' of German-.. Ari when in
bis message h asked for I SO. doe with
which to Continue this Wdrk It Is made
pppareht that he controlled those' who
were willing to work cheap.
TheraT has been i crying need for
the rooting out or all tha .spies, the
shutting to. them of all means of com
munication ith the enemy and the
Mocking of the-advantages .which they
have been enjoying, but new emphasis
is added to It by the- disclosures which
f.he- stato . department have just made.
They ought to open tha.-eyee of some
people. , . j ' . . -
5 EOltORrAL -NOTES.'
The man on the' corner' says:. Many
a chap is confronted with tha problem
of breaking a habit or going on the
rocks. ' , '. ' .
Wlii farmers .' of -Oklahoma " fed
wheat to the flwine, it it quite evi
dent that: all th hogs do not eat. at
the troagh:" :'.''.. i , '.'
Those who are bemoaning the pass
ing of (he warm-weather ars not over
looking the fratifyiag fact that Indian
summer is still en -the schedule.
Those in, th army, cantonments will
now have, a ehanee to appreciate more
deeply just What those : little atten
tions at home Were" really worth.
.'y 1 r . 11 , .-"
From- Wieotn-fBii cOraes the "report
that lee cream has been found which
contains glue. That is probably one
of the kinds that ktlck to "the ribs.
With ;M ;divlsj;on .'f the kaira
army .f orced w to reorganise, it . can b
appreciated that thft; recent British
advanc. wa no . ordinary raiding;
party.; : , '
Inasmuch as- the- --pacifists In Hart
ford are -planning another gathering,
it looks . as if the o-tcharge' of the ar
rested speakers was looked upon' as
an invitation to repeat.
If Folk CronBolm, the ax-Swedish
charge -if. Stfextco; cannot be located
Germany should enter the search. Sneh
valuable man ought; not to be al
lowed to, go unrewarded., .
From the Increase ia the number cf
small ships Sunk: It Is barely possi
ble that the submarines have - come
to the conclusion that it is safer ' to
tackle something more nearly their
sis. ' - " " ' "
Those Who thought that the ' fllas
were scare or tor some, reason or Other
were disappearing Have had a chance
to change their minds du-jng the past
few warm days, and -the swatter are
busy again. v ... -- . ' '
The ork , -arbidV they, win be . called
upon to perform is going to- be a. de
cided change to maay of those who
itavd, 1 Cam looviuk. Wit it
ought to b a kiad wWch -wjn -ftl
WOMAN IN LIFE AND IN THE KITCHEN
SUGQESTIONS FOR,'. ,. x
V- -. THE HOUSEWIFE
' Hard bailed igg chopped ftne and
mixed with nutatad, - a Uttl cream
and seasoning will make a delicious,
sandwich. "
It is a good idea to save, if possible,
a definite sum for. furniture replace -mants.
This appUes eapeeially to th
keeper of a new house. ..
"New blanket should be shaken atnid
soaked in cold water overnight ta take
out tha sulphur dreaamg and make
them more easily trashed.
i . , . .. .
Whenever posstbl, save th."grean
leaves of a headof lettuce" for egg Sal
ad, while th hearts are kept for the
tomato, fruit and other salads. "
A weak solution of turpentine pour
ed down the water pipes ance a week
will -drive th water bugs away.:;
Shabby oak should be brushed over
with warm beer and when tua&roughly
dry polished with beeswax and tur
pentine. " Furs that have become fat and Oily
looking about the neck may be made
fresh and lflte new by rubbing the fur,
the wrong way with' a. hot iren. Furs
that have been wet should never be
hung in front of -a stove H'n open
fire to dry. ' -
For mud stains en dresses, dissolve
a little carbonate of soda in watef and
with it wash the mud stains. Another
plan is to rub the stains with a rut
raw potato, afterward removing the
potato juice by rubbing it with , a
flannel dipped in watar.
Velvet suits, coats, or. in fact, any
velvet surface may be cleaned beauti
fully with' not a particle .of dust re
maining: on them by taking- a small
piece of crinoline -and rubbing against
the nap. This is much, better than
brushing. Or brush first and then
use the crinoline. This method was
-commended by a very good tailor.
' ' " WHAT! OF WHEY.
Apropos, of the economical use, of
food, a word mojre regarding pour milk,
may be timely. Should the milk be
come' thick, let stand until Whey sep
arates from the curd. Pour into a
clean cloth and hang by the points of
it until it has drained thoroughly.
Add salt and an eighth teaspoon of
caraway seed to the curd. - Mix with
fresh cream or milk before serving
Use the 'whey for coi-nmeal, oatmeal,
hominy grits, flour or bread griddle
Cakes, with baking soda, aa raising.
Serve with honey or stewed fruit.
WORN BLANKETS.
Lay smoothly upon the thin place a
piece of used merino underwear and
pin amply and securely. Then begin at
the lowest edge and stitch with the
sewing machine, row after row sue
cesslvely, a quarter of an inch apart,
Until the extnt';of th patch is reach
ed, withdrawing the Bins as you pro
ceed. This is quickly done. , and is a
most satisfactory method. Do not
work around and around, as the goods
will bulge in the ' middle, antJnalf the
design of the patch, that of neatness,
will be a failure. . Should the selvage
be frayed, turn the merlns) over it, in
cluding it, and stitch as directed. It
is not necessary to break th machine
thread for each row. Stich the way of
the stripes. . . : m
HEALTH AND BEAUTY.
The excrutiatlng: pain of an aching
ear will be soothed by droping into
it equal parts of - glycerin, laudanum
and sweet oil. .
When the skin cracks between the
toes it is annoying. Excessively dry
and hot feet ar particularly suscepti-
oie to this condition, and so are feet
of an acidy condition. . Zinc ointment
spread oven the cracked surface will
be found to fee healing. '
If a poultice Is needed in haste and
there is no time to go to the drur
store, a good - home made substitute
consists of lard ' spread thickly on a
cloth and sprinkled heavily with black
pepper.
a . -. -
A remedy for boils, so Simple that
it it often overlooked is water as
warm as can be borne. Apply wet
linen to the affected part and fre
quently moisten it.
To air the hair take out all the
pins and shake the hair loose. Stand
before an open window, shaking fhe
hair until it has been thoroughly air
ed. Then arrange it for the night.
Never let remain massed on the
head. This will soon take all the .life
and fine texture from it. Instead,
part it in middle of the forehead down
to the
neck and make two loose braids
ot it.' each beginning just behind the
ear. This will divide the hair so
morougniy inax cue scajp at me mid
dle, usually covered, will be free -and
may be well aired.
HOW TO INDUCE SLEEP.
The following hints may be of help
to those who suffer from sleepless
ness: - -. .. -
Anything which soothes the nerves
will, as a rule, induce sleep.
it is well to have a glass of milk
standing by the bed. If wakefulless
cones itMs should be sipped "vea-y
slowly.
Lack of sufficient ventilation In a
room often causes sleeplessness, but
the air should never he permitted -to
blow directly en a bed.
One of the nbest remedies for a
nervous woman is to take a hot bath
Just before going to "bed. The body
should be immersed lor fifteen min
utes in water that is hot'without be
ing exhausting. v
TO WASH VELVETEEN.
Velveteen can be washed success
fully, some people to the contrary
Make a lather of pure white soap.
Souse the velveteen jup and down at
number of times,, then put it through
two more hot lathers, and finally rinse
thoroughly in clear, warm water. Do
not wring it Out, but hang it od th
line and let it remain until it is half
dry. Remove from th line and iron
on the wrong-' side. The steam will
raise the pile and make It look like
new. A - tea'spoon of salt to a quart
of water should be used In the rins
ing. '-;-,' .' ...
'' - SAVORY STEAK.
Cut round steak into three inoh
squares, roll well in floor and fry un
til brown in a skillet, -adding a large
onion, cut up fine. : Cover with hot
water and simmer slowly for one and
one-half hours.- Use half . butter and
half lard for ' frying. Season with
salt and. pepper to tast and serve.
DICTATES OFFA.HION
Buttons are used freely in decorative
ways. . .
""Long silk Jerseys, in bright colors ar
CaVOTd - .;.-:'.- ,. j. , -.'
evening frock.
. Blaek and white ta in high favor for
evening gowns.
The Partsienne clings to her suit
and dress ot Jersey.
Very many new' frocks have three
quarter sleeves.
' Pink shantung is used for a vest In
a blue serge suit.
Foulard Is combined with
charmeuse or linen.
serge,
The gayerly tailored hat ha,s gone
out of vogue for anything but sports
wear. Ribbon, ostrich fancies and par
adise ' are favored for trimming the
more elaborate models.
The new fall suit skirts are' ankle
length and slightly narrower than last
season's models. The accompanying
jackets are wrist and finger-tip lengBi,
and same of them slip on over the
head.
The favorite, suit shades are"' navy,
beige and all ehadri of brown, from
the light tan. to the darker tobacco
nes. , A great deal of green and
blue is being used for separate dress
es, and evening froeks show an exten
sive use of spangled effects.
EMERGENCY BASKET.
In view of the possibility of occa
sional accidents in households, it is
Convenient for mothers to have a
small emergency basket containing
articles likely to be useful at such
times. The contents of such a basket
should consist of -.some lint, cotton,
wool, old linen, a few prepared band
ages, . varying in widths from one
half to three inches, a roll of ad
hesive plaster, ff some safety pins, or
dinary needles and thread, some oiled
silk, a pair of scissors, a, nurse's dress
ing forceps, a bottle of carbolized olive
cjl of the strength ef tme part of car
bolic acid to eighty of oil, a bottle of
vaseline and a bottle of tincture of
iodine.
' HOMEMADE FIRELESS.
.procure- a lard firkin with a cover
from your grocer. Nail the hoops on
firmly. Line the bottom and . side
with six or seven thicknesses of news
papers evenly tacked on. Procure a
tv-quart pail with cover fitting tight
ly. Put excelsior or hay in the bottom
or nrjem to a aeptn or about six
Inches. Set vour pail in and put ex
celsior around" the sides in a sort of a
nest packed down solid. It will set
tie i-rslf more firmly as used. Make
three pads from an old comforter cut
round to fit the firkin. These are to
lay on top of pail when in use.
Peel the potatoes or not. as" faney
dictates. . Put them in pail;with just
enough .water to cover and boil them
On th gas stove for five minutes.
Then put the cover on the pall and pufc'
It In the nest of excelsior.
the sides, then put in the three pads.
Tuck a newspaper on top and down
tucking them down on the siles.. Then
put on your firkin Cover and in from
four to five hours your potatoes will
be done, ready '-toy serve smoking hot.
NTTse this flreless for string beans,
small pieces of meat, and for stews it
is fine. The whole outfit only costs
fifteen cents for the firkin and" ten
cents for covered pail, twenty-five
cents in alii and it has saved many a
dollftr. .
NEEDLEWORK NOTES.
A satisfactory way of fixing hangers
to light weight dresses or blouses is
to crochet, them on. Insert the crochet
hook into th cloth on the inner seam
of the sleeve and make a chain stitch
of the desired length, then fasten like
a loop.
For mending buttonholes In the
neckbands of shirts, stich pieces of
tape flat alon? each edge of the but
tonhole, bringing them together at its
ends. The tape on each side should
be just wide enough to extend to the
edge of the neckband, where it should
aJso be stitched. This new button
hole will outlast the rest of the shirt.
Children's sleeves often have ' to be
lengthened and the best way to' pro
vide for this is in the cuffs. Cut the
cuffs about one-third wider than want
ed, then stitch one side to the sleeve
and sew sleeve and cuff seam togeth
er before sewinr the other side of the
cuiT or sleeve. Turn sleeve wrong
side out and turn the extra width of
the cuft in and win to sleeve. When
the sleeve is to be lengthened, it is
it easy matter to take out the whip
Mvhfp 'pe Thi.
.
ping attaches, let down the cuff and
STRINGING BUTTONS.
Instead of stringing your sets of
loose buttons on threat for safe keep
ing use fine wire. A three inch
length of picture wire unwinds easily
with five strands, enough for several
strings.
The 'wire Is stronger than thread.
does not tangle, is fine enough to go
mrougn tu smallest button without
trouble ot threading needle, and if
only one or two buttons re to be re.
moved the ends are easily untwisted
for the purpose instead of having to
break thread and restrlng.
FIND OUT WHY HE CRIES.
To discover th obscure pain In ba
by's ear is not .always a simple mat
ter, even for the alert and observant
specialist True enough, the little
hands find their way at times to the
neighborhood of the'sensitlve srea, but
this is by no means as common a slg
al of earache as one might expect.
It Is only when th baby's cries, as
well as the presence of fever, cannot
be laid to other portions of the In
fant's anatomy, that the ear falls un
der , suspicion. Then the nurse or
parent, by gently pressing in front,
over and behind the baby's ear will
discover a tender point by the increas
ed intensity- of the child's cries, or by
some other overt act of pain. Ones
convinced that the trouble Is in the
ear, temporary expedients of relief -and
comfort should be followed as apon as
possible by consulting with the fami
ly -doctor. I-j this way much subse
quent disturbance of bearing may be
prevented.
HOW TO DRY PEARS.
Pare, core and cut into eighths.
Or core and slice In rings, using fruit
or vegetable slicer.
Dd" not let stand long before dry-,
tng.
. To . prevent discoloration, dip the
fruit, as it is prepared, for one min
ute, in a cold salt bath one ounce of
salt to ene gallon of water).
Place in colander and set in contain
er of hot water. Place cover on eon-,
taisttr and steam for ten minutes. .
Remove surplus moisture fay plac
ing fruit between towels or by expos
ing to the sun and air.
Spread thinly on tray or earthen
war plates. -
: Pry in th sun. ta oven, over kitch-
-v or before an eleetrto fan, un
ci U per or tougft and onurvhat
Otto Used to be Cray
Th well-known society leaders hair
was gray, just lik your. But Mrs.
B heard of Q-Ban Hair Color
Restorer how thousands had proved
that Q-ban would bring a. natural,
soft, even, dark shade to grey or faded
hair and make it soft, fluffy .and beau
tiful. Q-ban ia all ready to use a
liquid, guaranteed harmless, v50c a
large bottle money back if not satis r
fled. Sold by Lee ss Osgood Co. and
all good drug storea. Try Q-ban Hair
Tonic; Liquid Shampoo; Soap.
Hair Color Restorer
leathery.
Stir frtrni time to time. The finished
product will not look like fresh fruit,
tut it's good to feat,
sruo arti-Onyofdpf
CONCERNING WOMEN.
One-half of all th girls between 16
and 28 years of age in New York state
work for wages. -
Mrs. JIaude Samuels, town marshal
of Riverside City, Ind., is the first wo
man to hold such a position in that
state.
Fifty women medical students in
New York have offered their services
to the United States government in
case of war.
Miss Annette Moore, who was re
cently graduated in law with sixty
four men in Kansas City, is an ac
countant in the building and repair
Separtment of the board of education
in that city. -
Miss Margaret Carnegie. only
daughter of Andrew Carnegie, Is ac
tive in philanthropic work, especially
as an' officer of the Armstrong league,
which - is devoted to the welfare of
ths negro and Indian races.
Miss Kathrine XT. Haun of Phila
delphia is said to be the highest sal
aried woman in financial circles. She
is treasurer of the E. F. Haughton
company and receives a salary of $12,
000 a year.
TO SHRINK WOOLENS.
To shrink woolens wet a sheet and
spread it over the table. Place one
thickness of- the goods lengthwise of
Viesheet. arid roll sheet and material
together. In the" morning unroll and
press the goods with a hot Iron. "
KEEPS CAKE FRESH.
A slice of wheat bread placed beside
cake when put away will keep the lat
ter fresh. Tha cake absorbs the mois
ture which you will find in bread until
it' has become very old and. stale.
RECIPES.
Southern Batter Cakes: Even bet
ter than "a stack of blues" the south
ern man likes to see ft stack of beau
tifully browned, smoking hot Wtter
cakes besides his morning coffee.
What the , thick, oosy, florid griddle
cake is to the northern breakfast ta
ble, the thin, delicicate, luscious little
batter cake is to the southern break
fast table, where It is sometimes eat
en with the morning eggs and bacon.
Sometimes it is eaten as sn after
breakfast delicacy with honey or "gol
den -syrup" or New Orleans molasses.
A good old recipe for batter cakes fol
lows: One pint of milk, two eggs, one
half pint sifted cornmeal (white), one
pinch of salt. Make a batter, not too
thin, of the milk and meal. Add the
eggs, thoroughly beaten, and the salt.
Drop the cakes on a hot griddle and
bake till both sides are a delicate
brown. Serve smoking hot.
Maaaroni and Cheese: One-third
package macaroni, one and one-half
pints of milk and -one-half pint water,
one-half cup- grated cheese, butter sise
of walnut, four level tablespoons of
flour, salt to taste. Make white sauce
of milk, butter, flour and salt. When
partly cooked, stir In grated cheeso
and finish cooking, stirring . well to
mel cheese. Ccek macaroni in boil
ing water until tender. Stir cooked
macaroni into .hot sauce and bake in
slow oven about thirty minutes.
CANNING
Tonjato Sauce.
Canned tomato sauce is a tasty
relish to use for seasoning meats, says
today's bulletin of the National Emer
gency Food Garden Commission, which
is offering $5,00 in prizes for the best
canned vegetables.
In making tomato sauce cut the to
matoes into fair?? small pieces and
add one large-sized onion chopped and
YOUR BUSINESS
There is a FEDERAL TRUCK for every
commercial use. 4
1, f9 2, 354 an5 5 To Capacity
Alto light and heavy duty Tractors. i
Thelmperi
CHESTNUT & WILLOW STREETS
I
TODAY AND
66
FROM THE
PEARL WHITE in
'fTHE FATAL, RING"
Bargain Matinee Daily at
one cup chopped wet red pepper
to one gallon of tomatoes. Cook until
tender. Put through a sieve and add
a mixture of one-third salt and two
thirds sugar in proportion of one tea
spoon .to each quart-of the mixture.
Cook until the consistency of the ket
chup, stirring constantly. Pack hot
into sterilized jars or bottle. Adjust
rubber and cap; place the container
on 'false bottom in. a. vessel of water
sufficiently deep te reach aimst to
their tops. arid allow to. remain at a
boiling temperature for Z5 minutes.
Remove jars from the water bath and
tighten the ilds immediately.
Water used for home canning should
be pure, soft ana a free from sedi
ment and excessive mineral content
as possible. Clear drinking water is
generally usable. Softening, harden
ing or discoloration of vegetables be
cause of the character of . the water ia
an exception to th rul in horn can
ning. ...
Most vegetables a well as meats
are injured in flavor and quality by
an excessive use of salt for seasoning
in the canning process. A little salt
is very palatable, and its use should
be encouraged, but it 13 better to add
no salt In canning than to use too
much. -It can be added, to suit the
taste when canned goods are served.
Readers "of
THE BULLETIN
By sending this eeupon to th . .
National Emer-fssey Feed Garden
Con-ir-nlssion,
210 Maryland Bidg, WasMftgton,
D. C
with a two cent stamp' ts pay post
age a canning and drying manual
free of charge. All you have te do
ia fill out ths space and enclose th
two cant stamp, for postage. These
are twelve page manuals fully il
lustrated and are aent out in co
operatlan wHH thie paper a a part
of tha personal service we at all
time aim to give our readers.
v.
Nam .....
Street
City
. ... Stat ;
LETTERS TO THE EDIT01
Hasn't Asked and Doesn't Intend to
Ask for. Exemption.
Mr. Editor: In the Willlmantic col
umn of your Thursday's paper my
name appeared among those refused
exemption. Now this is a misstate
ment, as I haa-e not or do no; intend
to ask for exemption.
Will you be so kind as to publish
a denial of your statement and oblige
Tours respectfully,
RICHARD LEGRAW.
Abington, Sept. 21, 1917.
OTHER VIEW POINTS
It is an impressive statement which
has been made by the Yale auhorities
with regard to the part the institution
is taking in supporting th govern
ment in its prosecution of the war. Not
only have elaborate plans been made
for instruction in field artillery among
the undergraduates- but the teaching
force has responded superbly to the
government's can for assistance in va
rious fields of research work. One
looks in vain for a suggestion of he
brown study in it all. We encounter
rather the passion of the workshop.
The eounry has prepared itself for
the changes which will follow the end
ing of the war and we have no -doubt
the Yale management realize that the
university itself will never be again
what it has been In its outlook: upon
life and its obligation to the youth of
HDTri To) Vqj v7
U sU U U U
m -asssass' m m m m m aMr m jmkr m m
. . ,
al Garage, Ants.
TME THEATRE .WHERE
-T QUALITY R&LEC "...
TUESDAY JOSEPH M. SCHENCK PRESENTS
FAMOUS NOVEL BY CYNTHIA STOCKLEY
I
CONCERT
ORCHESTRA
2:30 All Seats 10c Evenings,
If
mm
- KEITH VAUDEVILLE
ANGER and KING SISTERS
Comedy Skit "THE ROAD TO HOKUS" Special Scenery and Effects
TOG AN & GENEVA
Presenting Their Sensational
Novelty "Mid-Air Daneing"
ENID BENNETT in "THEY'RE OFF."
Th Story of a Girl, a Hors Raoe, a Man and a Million Dollars
- Five' Big Acts
HIS HIDDEN TALENT, Kemady
ADDIT0BIDK
TODAY AND TUESDAY
Priscillia Deane, Eddie Polo and Harry Carter
in THE CRAY GHOST
ALICE BRADY ia "THE DIVORCE GAME"
CONCERT ORCHESTRA UNIVERSAL WEEKLY
COUNTRY STORE jTU E SD AY Mat. 2:30, 10c; Eve. 7, 8:30 10-15e
the nation. Surely th young men who
have felt tha stimulus ot the past year
and who will feel it in the yeai- te
come will have raaaon to look 'back up
on their experleno with a vary Urge
feeling of gratitude. Th roost signifi
cant thing about It all is the ability
of Yale to respond efficiently to a na
tional crisis. New Haven Journal
Courier. .
This week has thus far been pro
lific in automobile fatalities in .this
state. Because of reckless driving sev
eral persons ar dead and others are
In the hospital. These, things make
our new automobile law look as fool
ish as the old One. Weak laws weak
ly enforced are an abomination. The
Connecticut automobile law does not
give the protection that was hoped
for, but this state has never been
deeply concerned over automobile kill
ings. There is excitement only when
a criminal is about to pay the penalty
ior muraer in tne nrst degree. Then.
and only then, is there a roar of pro
test to the governor. When little, chil
dren, women and useful men and citi
zens are struck down in he streets by
the modern -juggernauts the only pro
test comes from their families and an
occasional newspaper. We submit that
this condition Is a deep disgrace to
Connecticut. Bristol Press.
New .England food administrators
are going ta ask the people of the New
England states to do without white
bread durine two days of the week.
There should be a universal compli
Don't You Want Good Teeth ?
0aes ths dread of ths dental chair cause you to nsyieet them? Ye
need have no feara. By our method you can hav your teeth filled,
crowned or extracted ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT PAIN. .
CONSIDER THESE OTHER FEATURES ,
STRICTLY SANITARY OFFICE v ' ' -
... STERILIZED IN3TRUV2NT8
CLEAN LINEN
ASEPTIC DRINKING CUPS
LOWEST PRICES CONSISTENT WITH BEST WORK
It th ppa! to you. call far Kminttion and estimate. M
charge for .consultation.
OR. F. C JACKSON OR. D. J. COYLS
OENTISTS
... (Successors to the King Dental Co.)
103 MAIN T.
A, M. to
Lady Aslatan
AN
EXCEPTIONAL BARGAIN IN
nr. nr
ONE LOT OF ROOFING (ALMOST CLEAR ASPHALT)
AT PRICE OF REGULAR GOODS.
This roofing was made to order for exportation but owing to
lack of shipping facilities could hot be delivered. If in need
of an extra good roofing at a low price call and examine this
lot. You will see the best roofing you eer saw at price of
regular goods.
1 ply, 108 square feet, per roll $1.75
2 ply, 108 square feet, per roll $2.25
3 ply, 108 square feet, per roll $2.75
We have a good Roofing, Nails end Cement in roll at $1.2b
for 1 ply, $1.50 for 2 ply, and
Tlte M
BULLETIN BUILDING,
A Powerful Photo-drama That Tell
of the Road to Happiness Through
Blood and Tears.
Latest War News
Hearst Pathe Weekly
6:45, 8:30 All Seats 15c
MONDAY
TUESDAY
I WEDNESDAY
JACK FITZGERALD
SONG, 8TORIES, MIMICRY
Some Comedian
CONCERT ORCHESTRA
imm i.. .ii-vjjftj.'M.i.ji' mms?
UNIVERSAL'S
GREATEST SERIAL
ance. To substitute other foodstuffs
will not be difficult. The change may
even be healthful and enjoyable. There
Is corn meal, which makes excellent
dishes. Corn meal mush, Johnny
cake, and fried mush were once sta
ple articles of diet throughout all this
part of the United . States. Most
tasteful and pleasurable these items
were. They have gone into disuse
largely through the failure of the mercantile-community
to promote the
sale of meal. Most ef the time it has
been easier sxnd more profitable to
sell flour. Potatoes will be very plen
tiful, It is no trick at all to substi
tute a potato or two for a slice of
bread. The' wheat is needed abroad
America has many other things to eat
and can spare the wheat.- Bridgeport
Farmer.
Sometime when there Isn't any
strike on in Danbury Sve'se going to
send oud apecial reporter up there to
give a description of what the town
looks like when tis' quiet. Waterbury
Republican.
..There are 5,400,000 worth of steel
and wooden vessels under construction,
or contracted for, in British Columbia
today, while a year ago there was not
a large ship being built.
Children Cry
FOR FLETCHER'S
C A S T O R I A
NORWICH, CONN.
8 P. M.
Telephone
TTn rvi
$1.75 for 3 pi v.
74 FRANKLIN STREET

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