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The daily republic. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1853-1853, July 11, 1853, Image 1

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THE DAILY REPUBLIC.
JOHN O. SARGENT, EDITOR..
PUBLISHED BY GIDEON A CO.
TERMS.
T*a Daily Republic will be furnished by earriem
to subscribers in Washington and its vicinity
fl>F TWELVE and a half cents fer week.
' To mail subscribers, per annum $5 00
Advertisements inserted at the lowest rates.
/ OFFICE OP THE REPUBLIC.
NINTH STREET,
near pennsylvania avenue,
WASHINGTON, D. C.
By tbe President of the (Putted Ctetea.
IN pursuance of law, I, FRANKLIN PIERCE,
President of tbe United States of America, do
hereby declare and make known that public sales
will be held at the undermentioned land offices in
tbe State of Wisconsin, at tbo periods bsreinnfter
designated, to wit:
At Ike land office at WILLOW RIVER, commencing
on Monday, tbe third day of October
next, for tbe disposal of tbe public iauds situated
in tbe following named townships, vis:
ui A7tm*#A a/ fha Use line a?A tttssf an? ikm /V?iL*th DFtn.
~ V*? ............
? wmmammmmmmmmmmrnrnm \\ \ -j .. , mil. -h ?..,. - j , , , 1. jn
(Tl)i: M ai l]i It qm blic
_ ' .. J'. . - 1 ~!i- - 1 1 ' hi i . i i i i . . i Vol.
V. WASHINGTON : MONDAY MORNING, JULY 11. 1853. No 5. 1
- - - - - -- - . . ... . . . . ... . ^ ----- - ... -
cipal meridiem'.
Township* thirty two, thirty three, thirty four,
thirty five, and thirty six, of range five.
Towuahip* thirty one, thirty two, thirty three,
thirty four, thirty five, and thirty *lx, of range
ix.
Townships thirty one, thirty two, thirty three,
t thirty four, and thirty five, of range seven.
| Townships thirty one, thirty two, thirty three,
f and thirty four, of range eight,
i Townships thirty one, thirty two, and thirty
G three, of range nine.
Township* thirty one, thirty two, thirty three,
and thirty four, of range sixteen.
Townships thirty three and thirty four, of range
seventeen.
At the land office at MKNA8HA, commencing I
on Monday, the tenth day of October next, for the
disposal of the public lanqs within the undermentioned
townships and parts of townships, to wit:
North of the bate line and eael of the fourth principal
meridian.
Townships twenty five and twenty six, of range
twelve.
Fractional township twenty one, west of Wolf
river,.and townships twenty four, twenty five, and
twenty six, of range thirteen.
Fractional townships twenty one and twenty
two, west of Wolf river and Bayou, and towhshipa
twenty three, twenty four, twenty five, and twenty
I sis. of range fourteen.
F Fractional township twenty two, weet of Wolf
river, townships twenty three and twenty four,
and fractional townships twenty five and twenty
six, west of Wolf river, of range fifteen.
Fractional townships twenty two, twenty three,
twenty four, and twenty six, west of Wolf river,
L of run sixteen.
f At tEe land office at LA CROSSE, commencing
on Monday, the aeventeenth day of October nextj
for the disposal of the public landa within the following
named townahipa, to wit:
North of the bate lint and weit of the fourth principal
meridian.
Townships twenty and twenty obo, of range one.
Townships seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twen[ly,
and twenty one, of range two.
Townships twenty one and twentv two, of range
eleven. muuu
Townships twenty one and twefrtytwo, of range
twelve.
Townships twenty one and twenty two, of range
| thirteen.
| North of the bate line and eaet qf the fourth principal
meridian.
Townships twenty one, twenty two, twenty
three, and twenty lour, of range one.
Township twenty one, of range two.
At the land office at STEVENS'S POINT, commencing
on Monday, the twenty fourth day of
October next, for the disposal of the public lands
situated in the following townships and parts of
townships, to wit:
North of the bate line and eatt of the fourth principal
meridian.
Township twenty six, of range four.
Township twenty six, of range five.
Sections three to ten,'fifteen to twenty two, and
twentv six to thirtv five, in toumthio txoentv tix:
township twenty seven, (except sections thirteen,
twenty four, twenty five, thirty five, tifcd thirty
ix,) end townebipe twenty eight, twenty nine,
and thirty, of range eix.
Bectiona one, two, eleven to fourteen, twenty
three to twenty five, and thirty eix, in township
twenty six; sections thirteen, twenty four, twenty
five, thirty five, and thirty six, in township twenty
seven; sections five to eight, seventeen to twen- j
ty, thirty, and thirty one, in township twenty
eight; township twenty nine, (except sections twen
ty five to twenty eight, and thirty threeto thirty
six,) and township thirty, of range seven.
j Sections one to five, eight to fifteen, twenty two
to twenty seven, thirty five and thirty six, in
township twenty four; township twenty Jive, (except
sections six, seven, eighteen, nineteen, thirty,
and thirty one;) township twenty six; townships
twenty seven, (except section six,) twenty
tight, (except sections six, seven, eighteen, nineteen,
thirty, and thirty one;) and townships twenty
nmefintl thirty, of range eight.
'Otwoshipitwenty five and twenty six, of range
nistt - \ '
Township twenty six, of range eleven.
At the land office at MINERAL POINT, commencing
on Monday, the second day of January
next, for the disposal of the following, being re
Biduary tracts of the reserved lead mineral lands,
which were not included in the proclamations of
the 20th November, 1846, and 28th April, 1861, to
be sold under the act of Congress entitled "An act
to authorise the President or the United States to
sell the reserved mineral lands in the States of
?" - - ? ; 1 it
Illinois ana Armniu, iou i?inivu? u> nuwnsin
and Iowa, supposed to contain lead ore," approved
July 11,1846, to wit:
North of the bate line and eatt of the fourth principal
meridian.
The west half and northeast quarter of the southwest
quarter, the northeast quarter of the northwest
quarter, and the southeast quarter of the
southeast quarter of tection' one; the east half of
the northwest quarter, the southeast quarter, the
west half of the southwest quarter, and the southwest
quarter of the northeast quarter of twelve;
and the northeast quarter, and north half of southwest
quarter of twenty nine, in townehip one: the
northeast quarter of section thirteen, in townehip
two; the west half of the northwest quarter of
section eleven, in townehip three; the east half of
the southeast quarter of section twenty Ave, and
the east half ot the southwest quarter of thirty six,
in townehip Jive, of range one.
The west half and northeast quarter of the northwest
quarter, the east half of the northeast quarter,
and the east half of the southeast quarterol section
two,in townehip two, of range two.
The easthalf of the northeast quarter, and the
northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section
four, in townehip two, and the northwest'
quarter of the northwest quarter of section five, in I
toumiJiip three, of range three.
The east half of the northwest quarter, the northwest
quarter of the northeast quarter, and the east
half of the southwest quarter of section thirty, in
townehip four; and the west half of the northwest
quarter of section thirty five, in townehip five, of
range four.
North of the baee line and weet of the fourth principal
meridian.
The west half of the northwest quarter of section
three, in townehip two; the east half of the
northwest quarter, and the southeast quarter of
the northeast quarter of four; the west half of the
southeast quarter of sis; the southeast quarter of
the southeast quarter of twenty seven, and the
southeastquarterof the northwest quarter of thirty
four, in townehip three, of range one.
The northwest quarter of section ten. and the
west hall of the southeast quarter of thirty, in
township three, of range two.
At the SAME PLACE, commencing on Monday,
the third day of October next, for the disposal of
the public lands within the following sections, and
parts of sections, to wit;
Nvrlh of the bate lint and wetl qf the fourth principal
meridian.
Section one, the east half and southwest quarter,
the west half of the northwest quarter, and the
northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of ten,
in townehip nine; and the east half of the southwest
quarter of section twenty six; the west hair
pf twenty-seven; the east half of twenty sight,
-' '
.....
*
m
and the north half of thirty five, in township (en,
of ran re five.
Land* appropriated by law for the uae of achoola,
military and other purposes, together with "those
swamp and overflowed land*, inade unfit thereby
for cultivation," if any, granted to the 8tateby
the aot entitled "An act to enable the State of Arkansas
and other States to reclaim the 'swamp
lands'Witbin their limits," approved September
28,1850, will be excluded from the talet.
In accordance with the provisions of the act of
11th July, 1846, hereinbefore referred to, preemption
claims will not be allowed to any of (he
above-mentioned lead mineral tracts to be offered
at Mineral Point, until after they have been offered
at public sale, and twcome subject to private en
try. And these tracts will be sold in such legal
subdivisions as will include the mine or mines at
not leas than two dollars and fifty cents per acre;
and if not sold at the public sale at such price, nor
shall be entered at private sale within twelve
months thereafter, the same shall be subject to sale
as other lands.
The.offering of the above lands will be commenced
on the days appointed, and will proceed
in the order in which they are advertised until the
whole shall have bjen offered, and the sales thus
closed; but no sale shall be kept open longer than
two weeks, and no private sohry of any of us lands
will be admitted until after the expiration of the
two weeks.
Oiveq under my hand, at the city of Washing'
ton, this twenty-first day of June, Anno Domini
one thousand eight hundred and fifty three.
FRANKLIN PIERCE.
By the President:
John Wilson,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
rwrun tillul (n ih< riarht of nrc-tmn.
tion to any of the lands within the townahips aud
parts of townships above enumerated, is required
to establish the same to the satisfaction of the register
and receiver of the proper land office, and
make payment therefor as soon at practicable after
teeing thit notice, and before the day appointed for
the commencement of the public sale of the lands
embracing the tract claimed,otherwise such claim
will be forfeited.
JOHN WILSON,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
June 23?lawlSw
MAYOR'S PROCLAMATION.
\\THEREAS by the act entitled "An act relatihg
VV to dogs," approved 25th July, 1829, and the
act amending the same, approved 27th April, 1838,
it is provided that "whenever it shall be made appear
to the satisfaction of the Mayor that any animal
of the dog kind within this city shall be
"deemed and considered mad," it shall be "the
duty of the Mayor to issue his proclamation requiring
that ail animals of the dog kind shall be
kept confined for such number of days as he shall
deem expedient and proper, to state in said proclamation,
not exceeding ninety days; and it shall
be the duty of the city constables, and lawful for
any other person, to kill and bury all and every
dog going at large contrary to the said proclamation,"
&c.
Now, therefore, it having been made to appear
to my satisfaction that there are "animals of the
dog kind" mad within this city, 1 do hereby give
notice, to all whom it may concern, that "all animals
of the dog kind" in this city are required to
be kept confined for and during the term of sixty
days from the date hereof; and the police officere
of this Corporation are required to enforce the law
in respect to all such as may be found going al
large contrary to thia proclamation.
Given under my band at the Mayor's office, in
the city oi Washington, thia 29th day of June,
1853. JOHN W. MAURY,
July 6?law6w Mayors
GidbonB. Mason,by hie") Bill in circuit court for
next friend, William } Worcester county,
Mason, ^ State of. Maryland.
vs | May term, 1853.
Maria Mason. J
THE BILL in thia cause states that the complainant
is a resident of Worcester county,
State of Maryland; that he hath resided in said
county and State two years next preceding the
filing of said bill; that heretofore he intermarried
with a certain Maria Ellis, now Maria Mason, a
resident of said coun ty and State. The bill charges,
that the said Maria, previous to her intermarriage
with the said Gideon, was guilty of illicit carnal
intercourse with another man and men, and that
said illicit carnal intercourse was unknown tocomplainant
at the time of his said intermarriage with
said Maria; that since said intermarriage of said
Uldeon Wlin saia marii one nam uueu ^;uuiy ui
adultery at tbe State aforesaid, and hath forfeited
alt claim to the respect and support of the said
Gideon; and the complainant pray* to be divorced
from said Maria, a vinculo matromonii; and it appearing
to the court that the subpoena issued in
this cause against the said Maria has been returned
by the sheriff of said county ntn e$t, and the
court being satisfied that the said Maria was at the
time of filing said bill a resident or supposed resident
of saia county and State, and tbat she hath
avoided tbe sheriff of said county to evade the service
of the process of this court issued in thiscause:
It is thereupon adjudged and ordered, that the
j complainant, by causing a copy of this order to be
I inserted in some newspaper published at tbe city
of Washington once in each of five successive
weeks before the first day of August, eighteen
hundred and fifty three, give notice to tbe said
Maria Mason of tbe object and substance of this
bill, warning her to aDpear in this court in person,
or by solicitor, on or' before the third Tuesday of
November, eighteen hundred and fifty-three, to
answer the premises, and show cause, if any she
has, why a decree ought not to pass as prayed.
Test: EDWARD D. MARTIN, Clerk.
True copy. Test:
EDWARD D. MARTIN, Clerk.
June 14? lawSw
ROFESSOR ALEXAHPBH C. HARRY'S
TRICOPHEROUS.or Medicated Compound, for
beautifying, curling, preserving, restoring and
strengthening tbe Hair, relieving diseases of tbe
Wn /-iirtncr rheumatic naina ana healinsr external
[ wounds. Bounded by no geographical lines, the
reputation of Barry's Tricopherous pervades the
Union. The sales of the article of late years have
increased in a ratio that almost exceedB belief.
Professor Barry, after a careful examination of his
sales-book, finds that the number of bottles delivered
to order, in quantities of from half a gross
upward, during tho year 1852, was within a trifle
of 950,000.
It is unnecessary to present at length tho evidences
of the wonderful properties of the Tricopherous
when the public nave furnished such an
endorsement as this. The cheapness of the article,
and the explanations given of its chemical action
upon the hair, the scalp, and in all cases oi
superficial irritation, first recommended it tq
the attention of the people. Thip was ail that
the inventor desired. Every bottle advertised
itself. The effects of the fluid exceeded expectation.
It acted like a charm. The ladies would
not be without it. Country dealers in every
section of the United States found they must
have it; and thus was built up a wholesale
trade of an extent hitherto unheard of as regards
articles of this kind. The highest point has no]
yet been reached, and it is believed that the sales
this year will be a million and a half of bottles.
Depot and manufactory, tfo. 1?7 Broadway, New
York. Retail price, 25 cents a large bottle.
Liberal discount to purchasers by the Quantity.
Sold by all the principal merchants and druggistc
throughout the United States and Canada, Mexico,
West Indies, Great Britain, France, &c., by
S. PARKER, Penn. avenue,
And A. LAMMOND, 7th street,
Juns 4?rtAtriwfim* Washington.
Ranke's civil wars and monarchy
IN FRANCE in the 16th and 17th centuries;
a History of France during that Peri'od. 1 vol.
Tho Life and Letters of Doctor Olin, late Presi
dent of the Weeleyan University. 2 vols.
Tor sale at TAYLOR & MAURY'S
June 39 Bookstore, near 9tb it,
By the President of the United States.
IN pursuance of law, I, MILLARD FILLMORE,
President ol the United States of America, do
hereby declare and make known tha* public sales
will be held at the undermentioned Land Offices
in the State of WISCONSIN, at the periods hereinafter
designated, to wit:
At the Land Office at WILLOW RIVER, commencing
on Monday, the second day of May
nest, for the disposal of the public lands situated
' within the undermentioned townships and frac
tional townships, vis:
North of the bate line and west of the fourth principal
meridian.
Township lorty nine and fractional township
fifty, on certain islands and themainshoreofLake
Superior, of range three.
Fractional township fifty, on the main shore of
Lake Superior, of range lour.
Townsnip forty nine, and fractional townsmps
fifty and fifty one, on the main ahore of Lake Superior,
of range aeven.
Township forty nine and fractional township
fifty, on the ahore of Lake Superior, of range eight.
Fractional townships forty nine and fifty, on the
shore of Lake Superior, of range nine.
Townahips twenty nine, thirty, thirty one, and
thirty two; townahfps forty seven and forty eight
ahd fractional township forty nine, on the shore
of Lake Superior, of range ten.
Townahips twenty eight, twenty nine, thirty,
thirty one, and thirty two, and fractional township
forty nine, on the ahore of Lake Superior, of
range eleven.
Townahips thirty, thirty one, thirty two, thirtythree,
and thirty four, and fractional townahip
forty nine, on Lake Superior, of range twelve.
Townships thirty, thirty-one, tbirty-two, thirtythree,
and tbirty-four, of range thirteen.
Townships thirty one, thirty two, thirty three,
and thirty four, of ranare fourteen.
Townships .thirty one, thirty two, thirty three,
end thirty four, of range fifteen.
At the Land Office at LA CROSSE, commencing
on Monday, the sixteenth day of May next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the following
named townships, to frit:
North of the base line and west of the fourthprincipo
meridian.
Townships seventeen, eighteen, and nineteen, of
range one.
Townships twenty-oneand twenty-two, of range
six.
Townships twenty-oneand twenty-two. of range
Seven.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty,
three, and twenty-four, of range eight.
Townships twenty one, twenty two, twentythree,
and twenty-foor, of range nine.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty:
three, twenty four, and twenty five, of range ten
Townships twenty four and twenty five, of range
eleven.
At the Land Office at STEVENS POINT, commencing
on Monday, the ninth day of May next,
for the disposal of the public lands situated within
the limits of the undermentioned townships, to
wit:
North of the bast line and east of the fourth principal
meridian.
Township twenty five, ot range four,
i Townships twenty five, twenty seven, twenty i
eight, twenty nine, thirty, thirty one, and thirty ;
two, of range five.
i Township twenty five, of range six.
Sections eighteen, nineteen, thirty, and thirty ,
i one, in township twenty five, of range seven.
Townships twenty five and twenty six, of range
ten. 1
Township twenty five, of range eleven. 1
i At the Land Office at MENASHA, commencing 1
i on Monday, the twenty third day of May next, for >
the disposal of the public lands within the follow- i
ing named townships, viz: l
North o/ the base line and east of thefourthprineipal meridian.
\
Townships twenty two and twenty three, of \
rnugu luirieeu. ,
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military and other purposes, together with "those 1
swamp and overflowed lands made unfit thereby 1
for cultivation," if any, which shall be selected by 1
the State authorities before the days appointed for <
the commencement of the public sales respectively, <
under the act entitled "An act to enable the State i
of Arkansas and other States to reclaim the \
'swamp lands' within their limits," approved )
September 28, 1860, will be excluded from the j
sales.
The offering of the above-mentioned lands will j
be commenced on the days appointed, and will pro- 1
ceed in the order in which they are advertised, with
. all convenient despatch, until the whole shall have ;
been offered, and the sales thus closed; but no sale 1
shall be kept open longer than two weeks, and no t
private antry of the lands will be admitted until <
after th? expiration of the two weeks. |
Given under my hand atthecitv of Washington, i
this first day of February, Anno Domini one thousand
eight hundred and fifty-three. i
MILLARD FILLMORE. ,
By the President:
John Wilson,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PitE- EMPTION CLAIMANTS. '
Every person entitled to the right of pre-emp- <
tion to any o; me lanas wiinin ine townsnips ana ii
fractional townships above enumerated is required 11
to establish the same to the satisfaction of the reg- j
ister and receiver of the proper land office, and t
make payment therefor at soonat practicpblt after t
teeing thit notice, end before the day appointed i
for the comment men f the public sale of the 1
lands embracing ictruc claimed,otherwisesuch J
claim will be f . leiled. ?
JOHN WILSON, I
Commissioner of t be General Land Office. t
Feb 3?lawl3w t
POSTPONEMENT OK THE PUBLIC LAND (
SALES IN WISCONSIN. ,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the public {
sales of lands ordered by the proclamation of
the President of t|)p United Stales, dated the first
day of February, 1863, to be held at the following- '
named Land Offices in the State of Wisconsin, to '
wit: at the Land Offices at WILLOW RIVER, (
LA CROSSE, STEVENS' POINT, and MEN A- <
8HA?to commence on the 2d, 16th, 9tb, and 23d t
of May next?are declared to be postponed until 1
the 4th, 11th, 18th, and 26th of July next, ie- v
epectively. t
Given under my hand at the city of Washing- .
ton this 18th day of April, Anno Domini one thou }
Band eight hundred and ^hre.^ pi?RCE .
By the Pre?ident: {
John Wilson, ,
CommiBsioner of tho General Land Office. '
April 20?law!3w '
LIBERTY 8TOVB WORKS & HOLLOW- ,
j WASH VOVHOEY, Philadelphia. .
The UNDERSIGNED respectfully inform the .
public, that having still further pnlafged and '
improved their WORK8, and increased their facil- *
1 ities, they are now prepared to execute orders for 1
stoves, hollow-ware, &c., on the most reasonable
! errae. c
They invite the attention of SOUTHERN and s
* WESTERN MERCHANTS to their large and ex- ?
t tensive assortment of NEW PATTERNS, all ot t
. which have been got up at great expense, combin- ]
ing originality and beauty of design, with dura- r
bihty, utility, and economy in their operation, r
comprising the most complete and varied aesort,
ment of STOVES ever offered for sale; consisting "
of Liberty Air-Tight Cook, for wood or'coal; Com,
plete Cook ; Star Air-Tight; Star Franklin ; Star
Radiator; Fire King Radiator; Improved Jenny
Lind ; Cannon Stoves; Bases; Bare Cylinders;
Bar-Rooms; Radiater Plates; Tea Kettles; Ranges;
G?u Ovens, Ac., Ac
COUNTRY MERCHANTS desirous of ordering j
; by lettar can have a list of prices sent by mail, con- *
talning drawings and descriptions of all flje differ- N
ent varieties of Stoves, Jtc. ;
ABBOTT Jt LAWRENCE,
Brown St., above Fourth, Philadelphia. t
Feb 28?Uw6m*
THE REPUBLIC.
Mount Vernon?The Howe and Grave
of Washington.
Correspondence of the Mto York Daily Timet:
Washington, Saturday, July Si, 1853.
I embraced an opportunity a day or two since
to visit Mount Vernon, so long the cherished '
liome and now the honored grave of Washington.
It was the fourth time my feet had pressed that
tallowed soil. Eaeh occasion presented somehing
of new interest; and my emotions of reverence
increased, rather than diminished, on
(rowing familiarity with the scene. What Amercon
is there who does not listen with deep interest
to any thing associated With hiin who was
he Father of his Country? Visitors have often
published brief notices of Mount Vernon; but I
have thought a more elaborate description of the
mansion and tomb, with the surrounding grounds,
20uU not fail to be of interest to your readers, especially
on the anniversary of our national independence.
It was a lovely spot when Washington
died; and though the ravages of time and
neglect have made many an unsightly mark, no <
other changes have been made since the patriot
honiinfitit tr? liio annrmounru
Mount Vernon is situated upon the west bank
of the Potomac river, fifteen miles from this city,
and seven from Alexandria. It is accessible either
by the river or by a road from Alexandria, which
lies through alternate forests and cleared land,
the latter generally quite sterile. The road is a
lonely one, scarce a human habitation being found (
along the entire distance. Until within tbo last
year or two this was the only mode of reaching i
the sfccred spot. The road runs along the old 1
Washington estate for two miles before we reach
the entrance to the outer grounds?a sort of forest
park, Years since a few unsightly ruins were all ,
that remained of the former neat and substantial
fenc*. No one answered the summons as our ,
carriage rolled up to the porter's dilapidated and (
empty lodge. All was silent as death. Our party
was deeply impressed by the spectacle presented.
The vacant lodge; the levelled fences; the pros- ,
trato gate lying across the threshold of Mount
Vernon, no longer opening to welcome guests, or
shutting out the wandering herds; the unmistakable
signs of neglect and decay all about us bespeaking
the absence of tho master-spirit, enkindled a ,
feeling somewhat akin to solemn grief, quite in
unison with the reverential awe that impressed ,
us as we first entered the historic grounds. How ,
sickening to every patriotic heart the reflection ,
tliat these relics of the noble, good, and great are
crumbling into ruin, instead of being cherished
and preserved by a grateful country, in remcm- j
brance of him wo hail its Father. j
A few minutes involuntarily passed in such re- ,
flections as these, and, crossing the prostrate gate, j
we entered the noblo forest, consisting aliieny of .
white and black oak. This road?about three ,
quarters of a mile in length?-is, without oxcep
tion, tlio worst I ever saw. For years it seems to
liave had no care. Streams of water flow into it
during heavy rains, washing deep gullies, which
ire strewn with great stones, laid bare by the
Hoods. The carriage-way is almost impassable;
yet few resist the temptation to brave its dangers.
It is beautifully divereifllBif, running over hill and
lown dale?now crossing a babbling brook, and
then a deep ravine; while for nearly tho whole
distance tho elevated branches of the forest lords
meet over it in graceful arch. Passed in safety? ,
which sometimes happens?the road brings us to '
Jie dilapidated brick wall of Washington s flowir-garden,
near which stands the inner gate, ad- t
nitting to the grounds belonging more especially j
to the mansion. Just inside of tnis stand the hot- f
louses, and the workshops where tools for use on ,
the estate are made and repaired. But I do not (
jropose to visit the mansion now from this di- {
action. j.
The picasantest and readiest method of reaching g
VIount Vernon now, during the summer months, i
s by steamboat. You leave Washington city in j
lie morning, and after a delightful Bail of an hour g
>r more down the Potomac, are landed at a wharf j
iclow t|ie pension, The site of the mansion is a 1
iteep bluff rising an hundred ffeet above the river. (
Many forest trees, and a profusion of wild shrub- j
bory and flowers, fringe the steep hill-side towards
the water. The front of the house is about one
hundred and fifty feet from the brow of the bluff?
tho space between laid out in a gently-sldping
lawn, skirted by a few venerable oaks, which partially
screen the mansion from the river, but only ,
mfficiently to givo it the air of modest retirement j
ind quiet, suited to the countiy seat of a gentle- (
nan of refined tastes. Instead of entering the I
lonored mansion immediately, let us pursue the
oad which tho reader will take, if he should have fi
uturo opportunity to visit these cherished scenes, j
Itepping ashore from tho steamer, wo fbllow v
l planked path laid tnrougli a deep ravine? t
he same, I suppose, through which General e
^afayette, his son George, and Levasseur r
he gifted Frenchman, passed when they paid 0
earful tribute at the grave of Washington, not v
ong after his death. A walk of perhaps an hun- j,
Ired yards brings us to the tomb, where now re- t
>oses all that is left of tho form of him whose 0
nomory wo love. Sacred spot! The associations c
:lustermg around thee, and the historic memories a
vhjch crpvyd so thjck and iqst, as \ye gaze upon
,hine honored ashes, inspire us with purer patri- r
>tism and nobler ambition than all the busy scenes t
>f gay, l)ustling, worldly life. Tis a pity that jj
he emotions of reverence which so impress us j
lere, should Iks disturbed by the negress who n
ilands, the only sentinel, at tho vory door of the t
omb, olTcring irfi canes Ihr purchase at a dime a
lioco! From Greenwood wo exclude everything t]
hat oan distract (lie emotions of reveronoo and j
orrowing lovo so natural and so becoming in a j,
dace of sepulture. No traders are permitted _
here. Parties are even forbid taking with them f
>askcts of refreshment for use within the ground. ,
'ublic sentiment approves these rules and rc- ^
frictions; but the very gravo of Washington is I n
nadc the stand-point for this trader in canes, and ^
he glance nt the receptacle of tho great man's n
islips takes in also the negress and liCr caries! I j
tnow not how others view it; but to ipo ^qoh proanitv
is more than unpleasant
TTlfe ioriil) in wliicli tfto regains now repose is ^
ireeted at tho edge of the threat, tn tho bank of a L!
light acclivity fronting to the south. Its walls 0)
tro of stone, very thick, and fucod with brick? q
ho entire structure being about thirty feet front t|
>y fifty deep. In style it is severely simple, ^
I he front is about twelve feet high, and presents
10 trace of ornamentation. Over the ontrnnee is
lot a plain iparhjo tablet, wbioh infpnns us that? t|
Within this enclosure
Rest a
Tho remains of ?
Gonoral GtioROE Washington," J
Massivo double gates of iron are hung in the 1
'ront wall guarding the entranco. Looking si
hrough these, wo see a room about twelve feet e
jrjuqr??Us Wa"s whitewashed, and its floor of n
{ravel. And here, exposed fully to the view, n
ire placed the mnrhle sarcophagi containing tho s<
ishes of Washington and his excellent consort, fi
That on our right is his resting-place, We need c
not be told that it is bo, for on its marble top, t
finely sculptured in alto relievo, are the arniB of 1
tiie States whose independence he did so much to c
achieye. Beneath this device we read thejiame of \
' Washington." "* 1
Tis enough. There can be no error here. One J
Washington only has lived, and it is hie ashes that J
are before us. The other sarcophagus, at our left,
is perfectly plain, bearing upon its lid the simple *
inscription?
'Martha, consort of Washington." t
Over the centre of the rear wall of the apart- t
meat in which these sarcoplvagi are placed, is an- t
other tablet, on which is inscribed a text of Scrip- t
ture, so obscured, however, by time and dirt, as e
to be quite illegible. The reader will have already <
discovered that the tomb is divided into two parts, i
The rear apartment is closed, as usual, with se- ?
pulchral vaults, and is the burial place of the i
Washington family. Here already lie the re- t
mains of Judge Bushrod Washington and others, f
Just in front of the tomb, at the distance of a few <
feet, stand two plain marble obelisks, each twelve 1
feet high, and surrounded by an iron paling. From <
the first of these we learn that "Within the tomb lie 1
the remains of Judge Bushrod Washington and <
his wife Anna Blackburn. He was son of John 1
Augustine Washington, and nephew of General t
Washington, who appointed him one of his exe- 1
cutors, and bequeathed him Mount Vernon." r
The other shaft is reared to the memory of "John t
AugUBtine Washington, son of Corbin and Han- h
nah Lee Washington, and nephew of Bushrod t
Washington, who appointed him one of his exe- c
cutors, and bequeathed him Mount Vernon." c
The present proprietor of the Mount Vemon c
esiaiu is jonn n. vv uoinnan, son or nun wnose c
memory is recorded on tne last-mentioned shaft, i
At the side of the tomb, and between it arid the >
river, stands a smaller shaft, erected to the mem- <
ory of "Mrs. M. E. A. Conrad, wife of Charles i
M. Conrad, of New Orleans, daughter of Law- 1
rence and Eleanor P. Lewis, and grand niece of
General George Washington." C. M. Conrad o
will be remembered as the late Secretary of
War.
The tomb cannot be seen from the river, liecause
of tho intervening forest. Its sight is not so ti
pleasant as several others in its vicinity. But it p
was chosen by Washington himself, whose mod- d
esty and love of retirement found expression even fj
in selecting his grave where it would not present f
itself unsought to the eye of tho passer. A little n
effort at improvement, however, would develop
those touches of beauty and natural adornment
with which a refined and tender sentiment so naturally
seeks to surround the graves of the loved
and lost. Already several small red cedars have ;
shot up their graceful pyramids of green from the a
top of the toinnj the arms of the ola oaks, and the c
shelter of the broad-leaved sycamore, are stretch- 8
ed out to protect it from the sun's burning rays; fi
and the dogwood, in the spring season, presents jj
its pure offering of white blossoms at a little distance.
The ground itself is beautifully diversi- c
Red ; and a slight effort of art will suffice to clothe j
it in all the beauties of Mount Auburn or Green- ^
wood. These attractions are not wanted to give
interest to the scene; out would certainly be most tJ
gratifying to the heart of every pilgrim who drops a
1 toar at this honored shrine. a
But wo must move on to the mansion. A walk tj
of a hundred and fifty yards along the brow of the
mount brings us to its front. It is a venerable
struct uro, quite simple in its architecture, yet im- j,
messes one deeply the moment the eye rests upon w
t. It is of wood, cut in imitation of blocks of f(
itone, with the edges bevelled, the whole painted
l sort of grey, apparently, and sanded with com- f(
non grey sand to resemble freestone. The centre
>f the building was erected by Lawrence Wash- a
ngton, (brother of tho General,) who named the b
dace after Admiral Vernon, in whose expedition
[gainst Carthngena he served as a volunteer. a
The General added a wing on cither side, of n
lie same height as the centre. The mansion, as p
t now stands, is two stories high and ninety-six w
eet long, with a piazza extending along the
vhole river front, its roof 011 a level witn the ]0
saves of the house, and supported by plain timber 1
solumns; and its floor of small square stone p
docks, some twelve feet wide, raised a single a
itep only above the grassy lawn. Here it was 8|
Washington's custom to walk to and fro every
norning, with folded arms and precise military 8(
itep. Standing where he then stood, the visitor w
las a charming prospect spread out before him in ?
:he nphlo Potomae, which just below expands to ,,
the width of a bay, and the varying snore and
hill and dale of Maryland, which skirt the hori- r
zon beyond. As we stand here and trace out each B
object, so familiar once to liirn who is continually
present to our minds, it does not require much c
effort of imagination to bring his majestic form fi
before us, and see him pacing, with measured r
tread, his morning beat, his eye upon the scene G
i i.?n ak. I *
[>?IOrtJ UW, III? UlUUglllO UjlUH UIC HHCrUBlH ut HIV fj
country of his devotion.
Over the contro of tho building is a modest on>ola,
surmounted by a vane with the devioe of a
love holding in his bjU tho olive branch of peace.
Vt either end of the mansion is a covered passageray
leading to ranges of out-houses, occupied l?y
he servants, (of which there are some seventy or
ighty on the place,) and for domestic purposes. ^
Lne whole arrangement of the main building and ^
ut-houses describes a semi-circle, with its arc toyards
the river, enclosing a large door yard,
ounded beyond by a grove of lofty shade-trooa? j11
he entire enclosure comprising, probably, an acre Vl
f land, ovular in shape, a carriage-way encirling
the whole plot, which reminds one of the w
rea within a camp or fortress. c.
But let us pass through tho front door. It is
lo freak of affectation which lifts the hat from ^
lie head of each visitor as he enters the spacious
tall; he feels that ho is treading hallowed ground. Hj
t tidy negrcss meets us here and informs us, in .
nswor to our interrogatory, that care has been
akon to preserve every thing about, tho house
nd grounds, an far as possible, in tho same posiion
111 whioh it was left by Washington himself,
ust over tho first door at our right hand, hang
L V. H
ig upon untw iiiHiivn, ww ?cw iiHiiiugiun s ?py- laBS,
used by him to observe objects upon the river, a*
t is a plain and substantial instrument! but we y
iust not touch it, for if visjtprs are permitted to
ike it down, some uareless hand may break and to
iiin it. Another glance and w? enter the dq?r 1"
eneath it, wliich brings us into a snt^M. sitting-,
jom, its window oucping mi the hrpad piazza.
.et- us take a seat at the Tittle oentre-tahle which
anda there in the farther corner, Washington "}l
flen sat hprp; add around it has frequently mot H1
leneral Lafkyette and many another nohle spirit
f '76. Who shall tell us how many of the reards
of wisdom he has loft us were penned here?
ould tho walls speak, what lessons of pure pa iotism
and virtues, learned from his lips, might ?f
ley not impart. Upon the little table in the. f>Or- b
er lies a book in which each visitor records his R
amc. Wo cnlcr flurs, a?u| pass ant again into N
>q hall. A
On tho opposite sido of tho liall our attention is s';
rrested by a nicturo?a French lithograph, aparetitly?depicting
the destruotion of the Bast ile. nt
ust over it, enclosed in a plain glass case, usualy
hangs the key of the gloomy prison, which was
ant to Washington, with the picture, by Lafuytto,
soon aftor the destruction of tliut terrible (fl
lonuniont of despotism. Tho key is not there on
ow, tho oase having been accidentally broken pi
inte tjmc since. I have seen it, however, on a cli
irmer occasion. It is a small, rusty, insignifi- sti
ant-looking affair; but when wo rcmeinbor how fa
k_2
~ " ' ' "^1
This journal has bean snip mwd, and is printed on
paper of a aupMinr nanllty. It b not a mare compilation
from tb Daily Rarvauo, but * well
conducted literary, political, and misrrdlsnaoiiii
periodical, embracing in ita content# a aaa&aary
of the News of the Week, carefully condensed;
Reviews of Passing Bronte; Tales, Sketches, Essays,
Poetry, &*., etc. It is our determination to
render it an agreeable and instructive newspaper,
alike worthy the patronage of every Ihmily, and
appropriate for the perusal of every reader.
TERMS:
Two Dollars per annum, payable invariably
n advance.
GIDEON k CO. Washington, D. C.
1 ! ". 11 1 1 t?Tn r~
ifieri it has turned the bolt which shut out from
iberty and life those guilty of the crime of patri>tism,
we can well appreciate tlie sentiment
vhich prompted the patriot JLafayette to send it to
Washington as a trophy of the people's triumph,
ind evidence that his beloved Prance had 'drawn
he first rivet from her chains. By the side oi
he place allotted to this relic is a profile likeness
./? 1 ?r. AA_ ?a 1 * l?
h iju.iu.yeiw fiiiiiseu, cui in pupori uuu stjui ity
tim to his great compatriot.
Beneath these objects of interest stands a subitantial,
old-fashioned writing-chair, with a let.er-desk
and drawer attached. This was used by
he General when he desired to write in the hall,
>r under shade of the piazza. We all seat ourtelves
a moment, as does every visitor. Several
>ld and fine engravings, hung in antiquated gilt
rames, adorn the walls. The subjects represent)d
are chiefly hunting scenes and quiet landicapes.
That plain, hair-covered, curved-end
lofa, the set of large arm-chairs to match, and the
leveral smaller pieces of furniture, ranged on
Mtker side of the hall, were all used by Washington
and his friends. In a back room at the right
if the hall, in addition to several pieces of furniture,
and a number of pictures possessing no spe'-'7""*
t,a ?11 nr'-tnw partnrf of
;he General on china. This was once part of the
lide of a china pitcher, sent to Washington from
England. The likeness, strange to say, is prolounced
the most striking ever made of the disinguishcd
subject. It presents but the head and
mst; and so far differs from* the numerous porraits
extant, in possessing certain exquisite shades
if expression, too minute to be individually dis:overed
except by the most critical eye, yet all
iombining to produce on expression of blended
lignity, wisdom, gentleness, and power, supe ior?it
seems to me?to the effect .of the great
ivork of Stuart. The pitcher was broken by accident,
and the miniature, which fortunately was
lot injured, was enclosed in a little frame and
lung in the parlor.
In another letter 1 will conclude the narrative
if my visit to this interesting spot. S.
The Grinnell Arctic Expedition.
We are permitted to publish the following exracts
of letters from Dr. Kane, United States
iFavy, commander of the second America^ expeition
for the rescue of Sir John Franklin, jointly
tted out by Mr. Henry Grinnell and Mr. George
'eabody, formerly of Danvers, Massachusetts,
iovv a banker of tnc city of London.
[.Veto York Journal of Commerce.*
St. Johns, Nk.wfoundi.and, July 16, 1853.
n ?.i ......?.i r
vill delay at this place not one hour beyond abolute
necessity. Inglefield will soon be at Dis:oe,
and 1 am most anxious to catch him. My
tay, therefore, will only be until the oxen are
laughtered; and the butcher promises their de- (
ivery at four a. m. to-morrow.
The kindness of these good people surpasses
onception. The Governor gave me an elegant ?
[inner at his mansion this afternoon, and our |
'essel has been overrun with visitors.
3 p. m.?I have taken in nearly twelve hundred
iounds of prime, fresh beef, rubbed it with salt j
nd saltpetre, and then marled it down with twine,
nd hung it in the rigging, carefully shielded from
he sun with canvas.
The Governor, Mr. Hamilton, is a brother of
ic Secretary of the Admiralty. He take6 a great '
iterest in the expedition, ana has presented me
rith a fine team of trained dogs, accompanied by
>ur barrels of seal flippers, used for tneir food.
'his present is very valuable. I have purchased
?r them a set of harness and a sledge. 1
The Governor, his lady, the Surveyor-General,
nd the officers of the regiment, visit us at 9, and
y 10 o'clock I hope to be under way for Discoe.
Snow shoes and moose skin of very good quality,
nd cheap, 1 have also obtained, and also fresh, or
ither quarter-cured salmon, which costs but three
ence per pound, and will be, I think, a useful
dnter diet.
The Newfoundlanders are about to make a
irge contribution to your industrial Exhibition.
'he vessel leaves on Tuesday, with Messrs. Winer
and Moore as superintendents. The process
f seal-fishing' is illustrated by a model, and
tuffed specimens of the seals accompany it. .
The letter preceding this will tell you how well
itisfied 1 am with the officers and men. Both
rork with a will, and I think, and hope, are beinning
to get attached to me. I allow no swearlg
on deck or to the crew, and no threats as to
nocking down, 8tc., &c,, &o,, which I find to be
ather a favorite peribrmance in the merchant
ervice. Neither is any liquor used on board.
[Mr, E, Meriam, in a communication to us,
jomprising substantially the same facts as above,
ays: "Up to the present time but one vessel has
eported meeting with the Arctic ice between this
?ort and Europe; the inference therefore, is, that,
lie Northern soasyet retain the ice formed duringhe
last winter. "J?Eds. of J. of C.
Montgomery County Items.?The wheat barest
in our county may now be said to be over,
nd with n tow f'TOpntinnn urlinr* 1)10 nmnl ?...L. I
id, the crop is unprecedented]v large and the
uality of the grain very fine. Til# oat crop has
sen nearly destroyed by the drought, and corn
igins to droop from the same cause. Potatoes
re also suffering greatlyOur
town is entirely healthy, and, as far as we
tive been able to ascertain, no sickness of a sesre
character prevails in the country. ? Notwithanding
the intensity of the heat during the
hole of harvest, we nave not heard of a single
iso of death or sickness resulting from heat.
Major George Peter sent us a few days since
tme ashes of a shock of wheat consumed by lighting.
It burned within a few inches of other
locks in a field containing about two thousand
ushels of wheat.?Roekville Journal, 9th.
Suicide.?Mr. Junios Supple, an engineer on
ic gravel train of the C. & I'. 11. It., committed
liculo 011 Friday evening last by taking poison,
c had made application for divorce from his wife,
, the last session of the court of common pleas,
liich was successful. His wife, however, had the
;crce set aside. The husband remonstrated, and
Id ilia w ife to give him his (tapers (divorce pair*)
and all would be well.
She refused; he said to her, "then you will he
widow before midnight," and swallowed the
tal poiaon in her presence, and died before mornIf.
Mr. S. was an industrious man, and comoted
his day's work, aud put up his engine on
c day he committed the suicide.
[ fiumiia (Ohio) tf'hiffShip
Jknny Lini>.?Several pajicrshave spoken
the prohahlc loss of this ship, which sailed from
itatoli fhr Madras on the I3th of December last.
ov. Wni. W. Scuddor and his wife, and Rev.
at]iiui L. Lord and his wife, missionaries of the
merican Board, wero passengers onboard of this
lip. We are happy to state, for the relief of
ioir friends, that the Jenny Lind arrived safely
Madras on the 2d of May.
f l.\ v i. t. > n o.k
[yvcic i oris journal i;om., ",w?.
Mr. Blossom, senior publisher of the Htngham
rlasH.) Patriot f was in the act of loading a pistol
i the 4th, when a premature discharge took
ace. Both his hands were blown off. nnd his
loek-bone blown qui. He now lies in a dying H
ite. A Mr, Whenton was also injured, but pot H
J

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