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The daily Alaskan. [volume] (Skagway, Alaska) 1904-1924, October 07, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014189/1914-10-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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®he SJoilu Silashan
i .--i----.--'
No. "13 SKVENTEENTH YEAR SKAGWAY, ALASKA. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7. 1914 PRICE 10 CENTS
PARIS IS AGAIN REPORTED
IN DANGER OF CAPTURE
London. Oct. 7—The botnbnrd
meat of the inner forts is «(«ln im
minent knl pe»>ple who wish to
tlee fn»m the city h»v» been re
quested to letre m once. It U un
ikr»t«n)il UuU the sent of the KWmch
Kutmtnent will t<e returned to
l*arU front Bordeaux tomorrow.
tiKRMAX CAVALRY RKAl'PKAR
ALONG THK WHOLE FRONT
Fnria, Oct. 7—The German cav
alry ranppenrol today along the en
tire hattle front Une tmrroundin*
this city.
FRENCH LEFT YVIXG K)RCEI>
to rktrkat to savk itshlk
Merlin, Oct. 7—It was officially
reported l«U}' that the German
njtht «in* in France lii»<l forced
like left wing of the allies to re
•rent and to save th«n from an
nihilation (, on oral Joffre had re
initial front the <"«tter.
It is reported here officially that
the <•ermans liave won a decisive
»irturj over the Rtuaiaas near Lyck.
THK BATTLES IX FKWfE
MOSTLY AKT1LLKKY DUELS
I.omlon, Oct. 7—The liveliest
lion* f«iu»;ht in the prCNat Kun>
iwan war have htn battles in
which were l*T)!flj artil
l«Ty iliu-U with big guns. The
official list of In— recently pub
lished in Iterlin gim thiwe of the
ix'mun vruitK in France an«l Bel
irigm up to September 1st, at 117,
'*H>. The (.omian authorities ail
in it, however, that their total l«»s
i*i up m date have been 3(t0,00fl.
A lot-man turpedo destroyer
reported to have been *uak today
off Km* in the North Sea by a
t loafing mine.
The .Watic chimera is now said
to have broken out amonjj Uie
troops at Tarnow.
I \Ps IMTPY THK MOST
IMPORTANT ISLAND OF (iHOlT
IfVin, (Hi, 7—X«v» reached
here t<«lay that the forces of the
Mikado h.ul uik<ii p«**ewiion of the
most important island of the (Caro
line crouij yesterday.
COMPLETED ARHAN'Ci KMKNTS
FOR \ RAID OX KXGLAXD
The Hague. Oct. 7—<;crnuu» news
papers. o >pi«s of which were re
Icelved hero today, claim that Count
Zeppelin has completed his plan*
, for a dirigihlo raid on England at.
1 an early date.
CANADA IS CALLED UPON
FOR ANOTHER CONTINGENT
Ottawa, Oct. 7—In accordance
with * request from the British
war office another contingent of
20,000 Canadian troops will ho
raised within the Dominion as soon
as possible.
THREE GERMAN WARSHIPS
REPORTED TO HAVE SUNK
I
Tukio, Oct, 7—Tlie news of. the
I sinking of three German warships
j by vessels of (he Japanese anil
I English fleet* in the bay at Kiau
t Ctiau was received here today.
.GERMANS ARE TRYING TO
Cl*T ALLIES COMMUNICATION
j I*aris, Oct. 7—Fighting to the
northeast as well as to the cast of
this city is still going on, hut notli
1 lag decisive has been achieved by j
eithe* side as yet. The Germans are ;
acting <ai the offensive un<l are
trying to cut off communication of
the allied with the coast. Tlie |
fierce night attacks are wearing
down the already nearly exhausted
<roup* on both sides.
Captive balloons, with powerful
searchlights, are beiag used by the
(iermans to discover tlio allies*
positions.
I T'Wo COMPANIES file
ARTICLES OF IXOOUPOKATIOX
The Yakutat and Southern rail
way company filed articles of in-1
corporation with Secretary of the ■
j Territory Charlts E. Davidson last
week at Juneau. Ttie incorpora-j
tors are Henry W. Hardey, Henry
J. Aaron, Albert Betteeher, A. L. |
l.etterman, a. C. Ide, all of whom i
are Chicago stockyard men. The
capital is named at $250,000 and \
the object is to operate railroads |
and engage in the fishing business.
| On the same day, the U. S. Whal
ing company, of Huron, South Da
, kota, filed articles with the secre
tary of the territory. The capital be
ing named at $100,000. P. Bogen
was named president of the com
pany and E. Abrahamson of Port
Armstrong as Alaska agent.

LADIES
We now have a New Lot of
MILLINERY
See Our Window Display
Our New Fall Sample Book Has Arrived
We Take Your Measure For
Suits, Coats, Dresses and Skirts
FIT GUARANTEED—PRICES RIGHT
It will pay'you to see our line before'ordering your Fall supply
H. J. LYNCH
Hie Up To Date Haberdasher
and Ladies' Furnisher
PHONE 41 ' SKAGWAY
AiaSKA FIELD DIVISION
IS COMING TO JUNeAC
The Alaska field division of the
U. S. general land office is to be
removed from Seattle to Juneau.
Arrangements are bing made to
have the new quarters iu close
proximity to the Juneau land office.
It is expected that the change will
be made aoout the first of next
January.
A Christensen, chief of the Al
aska field division with headquar
ters in Seattle, who was in Juneau
recently, refused to affirm or
deny the foregoing statements, but
the facts are known that negotia
tions for the removal of the offices
to Juneau and for securing quarters
for the offices have been pending
for some time.
.Alaskans gentrally have been try
ing to have the Alaska field divi
sion of the general land office as
well as all other institutions of Al
aska located in the territory for
some time. The movement to make
the change mentioned is in line with
the administration's policy to carry
out the desire of Alaskans in this
regard, and at tho same time to se
cure more efficiency in the adminis
tration of official business.
Additional reason for the removal
t' this division of the general land
office to Juneau is furnished by the
fact that the new policy of opening
up the resources of Alaska will de
velop much larger business, and the
government desires that the field
force be in direct touch with its
work and the people of Alaska,
tor whom the work is done. The
land office and surveyors general's
office, both beinsr located in Ju
neau, make the Capital City the
logical place for the headquarters.
—Juneau Umpire.
KUVIKIK MYSTERY MAY
SfJOX BE CLEARKD I'I*
The Ruby Record Citizen says:
Captain J. J. Donovan has been
successful In finding eyidenc© In
the "Blueberry Tommy" alleged
murder case. Cap. left here about
two weeks ago on his way to the
upper Koyukuk. His intentions
were to spend several days in
the vicinity of where the launch
belonging to "Blueberry Tommy"
ivas found. Capt. Donovan is look
ing up the case in the interest of
the widow of F. C. Adams, one of
the supposed victims, in order that
'he can collect the life insurance.
It is stilted by passengers ar
riving from Koyukuk on the steam
er Caribou that about lo miles
above where the launch was left,
Donovan found old camp fires. Up
l»ii close examination ho observed
bone ashes as well as pieces of
very badly charred bones. The
fishes were carefully collected and
panned, with the result that a
button, a nugget and a bullet that
had been shot was recovered. These
articles, taken In connection -with
the fragments of bones found in
the ashes, will doubtlesg prove of
material evidence and is thought to
be a clue at least pointing to the
fact that one or more human
bodies had been destroyed in that
fire. This being so near to "where
the launch was left, leaves little
doube that this was the last scene
of this Korukuk murder. From
this as a beginning the ghastly
f"cts may yet be unraveled.
Sweet
Cider
Our First Barrel of the Season is now
^on tap. Qualiiy Unusually Good.
PRICE 50c per Gal.
: P. H. GANTY. GROCER
BUREAU INVESTIGATES
I
THE POX INDUSTRY
Ruby, Sept. 5—Harry christof
fere, agent of th« Bureau of Flsh
ories, under which bureau the fur
iudustry of Alaska is placed, came
down the river with H. J. Atwell
thlg weuk on a tour of inspection 1
and gathering Information through
out the Interior.
The question, so often asked,
whether or not the government will
require foxes taken out of season
to be turned loose, has been defin-!
itely settled, and thla Is not re-1
quired. The department is doing
everything in its power to pro
mote the raising of fur-bearing ani
mals as purely an Alaskan industry.
The regulations have now been so
devised that wild foxes for domesti
cation can be taken any time during
the year, except from May 15 to
June 15. This Is for the purpose
of protection of the young when
they are too small to be taken from
their burrow.
A license, which costs nothing, is
required of those engaged in the
business in crdar that statistics can
be procurred and so that foxes ac
tually raised In captivity will he al
lowed to be shipped out of the
territory. No foxea born wild can
b« shipped out of Alaska.
Mr. Christoffer* states that he
las visited quite a number who are
engaged in the business, several of
whom are making extensive prepar
ations. The corrals that are being
built by Morrison at Hot Springs,
Vachon & Co., at Toiovana, and the
Alaska Silver Fox Co., at Fairbanks,
will be completed this season and
will cost from $7,000 to $10,000
«ach.
Anyone interested in the fur
raising business will do well to
meet Mr. Christoffere. He will not
only give pointers about the raising
of the animals, but much other in
formation bearing on these lines
what is lndispensible to the beginner
In the business. He wishes to
impress upon all who are Interest
ed that the government is interest
ed and he as agent is willing to
give any assistance in the way of
beneficial Information possible.
He will go down the river as far
as Holy Cross, returning on one of
the last boats to Fairbanks—Ruby
Record Citizen.
ACCUSATION OP IDLING
LED TO FATAL KOW
A Mexican will be tried in Sew
ard at the term of court next
month for the murder of another
Mexican at Kodi&k. Judge Whittle
sey, assistant district attorney, says
that the occurrence arose from the
peculiar fact that one man accused
the other of not doing sufficient
work. The exact dotal la hare not
been learned, but It 1b known that
one of the parties to thg dispute
stabbed the other fatally while he
clalra* that the other hit him with
an Iron bar or had threatened to do
so. Judge Whittlesey has learned
that similar dispute^ are frequent
in the canneries among the people
of foreign nationalities who are us
ually employed In them. When one
man is doing leas than another, the
latter—how different from the
whl>« brother—getfl gore and tells
the boss.
ALASKA MINERAL OUTPUT
NEARLY 20,000,000 DOLLARS
The mineral production for Alas
ka in 1913 had a value of $19,413,
094, according to the United 3tate3
Geological Survey. Of this amount,
$15,626,813 la to be credited to the
gold mines. This makes the total |
value of gold production of Aiaska,
Up to the close of 1913, $228,392,
640. In addition to this nearly $17,
000,000 worth of copper and Oyer
$2,000,000 worth of silver has been
produced in Alaska . The above
figures are taken from the advance
chapter of a report issued by the
Burvey, entitled "The Mineral De
posit of Alaska and the Mining In
dustry in 1913" (Bulleti, 592-A),
by Alfred H. Brooks.
In addition to presenting the I
figures on mineral production, this '
report also summarizes the distri-j
bution and occurrences of the min-j
eral deposits of Alaska. It shows
that gold is very widely distributed '
In the territory, that there are a j
uumber of important copper depos-'
Its, and also some valuable coal I
fields. This publication is the j
first report issued whicn covers all
y the mineral deposits of the ter- j
ritory of Alaska, it presents
summary of the many reports deal
ing with this subject in greater de
tail than have been issued by the
jurvey. A map accompanies the
volume, showing the distribution of
the mineral deposits in the terri
tory.
A copy of the report may be ob- I
tained free on application to the |
Director of the Geological survey,
Washington, D. C.
MARSHAL niSHOP NAMES
TWO MOKE deputies 1
U. S. Marshal H. A. Bishop last j
week announced the appointment of j
Henry James Wallace to be deputy
xiarshal at Wrangell vice W. D. ;
Srant, resigned; of Martin Kildai
to be deputy marshal at Peters- j
auTg, vice J. C. Allen, resigned.
k'AKt'TAT CANNOT HAVE
DEPUTY U. S. marshal
Marshal H. A. Ilishop recenty re
leived a letter from Assistant At
.orney General Graham denying the
luthority asked by him for the ap
jointmeut of a deputy marshal at
Ifukutat. The letter was dated
September 17, and gave as a reason
.'or the denying of the request that
.here aro no funds available from
;ha appropriations made, with which
•o pay for the services of a deputy j
that place. The letter stated
:hat the conditions were fully ap
preciated and the necessity of the
>eace officer recognized but ^hat
•he department was helpless in
•he matter, for the reason assigned
OUR STOCK OF
UTZ & DUNN'S
SHOES AND POMPS
FOR LADIES
Are now on display, and a large
stock ol O'Donneil Shoes for Men.
See Our Window Display of
LADIES' FUR SETS
A New Stock—Something We Have Never
Carried Before. Look Them Over.
WILL CLAYSON—Clothier
the alask salmon pack
TOTAL 3,000,000 CASES
Section Cases
Southeastern Alaska .. 1,501,000
Central Alaska .. .. 686,000
Bering Sea 1,000,000
Total 3,086,000
According to the estimates of
cannery men engaged in the business
in Alaska the total salmon pack for
ail Alaska for the season of 1S14
will exceed three million cases and
be dlstributd from the different
sections of the territory about an
the foregoing statement Indicates.
While Southeastern Alaska will
furnish nearly half of the total, it
is very probable that tb$ Baring
sea pack will be mors valuable on
account of It being 90 per cent
choice reds, which bring a higher
price in the market.
The run was much batter than
last year except In the southern
end of the Southeastern Alaska dis
trict, and the run of reds w»s hot
ter in all sections. Another fa
vorable circumstance for the cannery
men is that there axe signs of a
material increase in prices.- Nearly
all those engaged in the bualn8BS
are satisfied with the season's
work and the prospect of marketing
the product at a profit.
The Bering sea pack consist# of
the output of the; great plant* on
Bristol bay principally, and the pro
duct is all first grade and 90 per
cent choice reds.
Central Alaska's pack Includes
the Chignik, Kodiak, Cook Inlet,
and Copper river sections.
The pack of Southeastern Alas
ka Includes everything from Yaku
tat, south and east to the Canadian
boundary. !
The perc&ntage of reds taken in
Central and Southeastern Alaska is
greater this season than at any
time within the past three or four
years. -4 ■,, ,,
COLLECTORS' CONFERENCE
TltOVED VERY SUCCESSFUL
Writing from Washington, Col
lector of Customs JohQ F. Pugh,
says the Collectors' conference at
New York was very successful.
Theru were 87 persons present, in
cluding the collectors from 49 dls
tricts, department chiefs, and a
delegation from the New York
customs office, at the head of
ivhich was Collector of Customs Dud
ley Field Malone. Assistant Sao
retary of the Treasury Petrs w«a al
so present.
Mr. Pugh was In Washington, Sep
tember 23, and expected to remain
there a week, and then leave for
home via New Orleans and Los
Angeles.

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