OCR Interpretation


Daily Kennebec journal. [microfilm reel] (Augusta, Me.) 1870-1975, July 15, 1870, Image 2

Image and text provided by Maine State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014248/1870-07-15/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

“Omer ” said he to him. “for your sake,
I forgive’him. The probity of a Turk is
more solid than stone. Let that Jew un
derstand thoroughly what a tribunal is. and
also the sentence of a Cadi."
And the Jew paid the Cadi thirty purses.
The latter invited him afterward to em
brace Oilier.
“And to put an end to this after, I am
going,” said he, "to enter it on the great
book.” ,
After having kissed the Judge s shoes,
and the carpet under him. the two parties
thanked him for his equitable sentence and ]
paternal goodness, and left the tribunal.
One door closed, another opened.
The true Cadi entered, splitting his sides
with laughter.
*‘Bv rav bpaitl* woman, I £66 nothing in
the books wiser than you ! If you were a
man, in truth, there would be no ( adi
equal to vou in Constantinople.”
Meria thanked him for his kindness to
her in yielding his own seat, and ofTeied
him fifteen purses of the Jew’s money*.
The Cadi refused, and gave her one!
more purse. She kissed the flap of liis
coat, thanked him, left the tribunal and
returned home before Omer, who had
stopped at the coffee house.
On seeing him arrive from her window,
she began to jest.
“Ah! ah! here is Omer with his tongue
cut off,” said she, stammering like.
“You are mistaken,” said Omer.
She, pretending astonishment, asked
him ;
“What has happened then ?”
"God and the wise Cadi (he is as hand
some as an apple, God keep him from all
harm!) have saved me and fooled the
Jew.”
“Is the Cadi handsomer than I ?” re*
plied Meria, showing him the JO purses.
Omer wept for joy, and thrice kissed
the brow of his skillful spouse. Seeing
how wise she was, lie loved her three
times more than before; lie listened to
her good advice, attended closely to his
business, and acquired great riches.
. Jlailg Jkmubff $ournaL
AUGUSTA,
FRIDAY MORNING, July 15, 1870.
Republican nominations.
FOR GOVERNOR,
Sidney Perham,
OF I* AKIM.
fob REPRESENT ATI VKS TO CONGRESS,
1st District-—JOHN LY NCH.
2d District—WILLIAM P. FRYE.
3d District—JAMES O. BLAINE.
4th District—-JOHN A. PETERS.
For Senator#,
Oxford, - - - THOMAS P. CLEAVES,
OTIS IIAYFORD, Jib
For Sheriff,
Oxford,- • - LORENZO 1). STACY.
For County Attorney,
Oxford, - - ENOCH FOSTER, .In.
For County CominUeloner,
Oxford, - • - ALBION J*. GORDON.
For County Tro*nrtr,
Oxford, - • FREDERIC E. SHAW.
Republican Count) Convention.
The Republican voters of Kennebec, county nre
requested to »eud delegates* to a Convention to be
held at
Granite Hall, August*. Wedncsdaj, August 10th.
at 11 o’clock A. M., for the purpose of nominating
three candidates lor .Senators, one County Comini*
iioner.Conmv Altorney, County Treasurer, Sheriff,
aud to transact all other business that may proper
ly couie before the Convention.
The hasis of representation will be m* follows :
Each city, town and plantation will be entitled to
one delegate aud an additional delegate for every
seventy-five vote* cast for Joshua L. Chamberlain
at the Gubernatorial election of IrtflH. A fraction of
forty votes will be entitled to au additional dele
gate.
The cities, towns and plantation* are entitled to
toe billowing number of delegates:
Albion, » rittston a
Augusta, 1* Headfle.ld, 1
Belgrade, 4 U.*me, j
Benton, J Sidney, 4
CheUen, - Vassalboro ,
Clinton, 4 Vienna, 3
China, 5 Wattwvdle, 1“
Farmingdale, 3 Wayne, 3
Fayette, 3 West Gardiner, 4
Gardiner, JO Windsor, 3
Hallonell, 8 Winslow, 4
Litchfield, 5 Wintlirop, «
JIauehe ter, 3 Clinton Gore,
Monmouth, A I'nity Pluututloii, 1
Mt. Vernon, 4
Total 13*.
W«. H. Libbv. Augusta, 1
L. T. Boothiiy, Waterville, I Republican
J. L. SroDiuKu, Gardiner, > County
JosECH T .Woouwahi*. Sidney. 1 Committee.
Chaklk* Jewett, Clinton J
May *7, 1870.
Lincoln County Republican Convention.
The Republican voters of Lincoln County nre
requested to send delegates to a Convention to he
held at the
COURT HOI Hli, AVIMCAMSKT,
on Thursday, August *’>th, 1870, at 10 o’clock A. M.,
for the purpose of nomin ating candidates for Sen
ator, Sheriff. County Altorney, Register of Probate,
Countv Commissioner, County Treasurer, and to
transact all other business that may properly come
before the Convention.
The basis of representation will la* as follows:
Each town anal plantation will be entitled to one
delegate, anal au additional delegate for every tiny
votes cast fur the Republican candidate at Ilia' Gub
ernatorial election of 1888. A majority fraction
will be entitled to an additional delegate.
Ani>kew LACY, Wisasasset, ]
Jamb* A. Hall, Daoinrlscottn. Republican
HAMI'KlL. MlLLEH, Waldoboro', > County
sami el J. Bonk, Jefferson, I Committee.
Hokace Fossett, Bristol, J
July 11,1870.
‘ap«rk**irr|inirsli n principle.”— Maine
Standard of June 3d, 1870.
The rulers in the democratic camp have
now been for more than two weeks vigor
ously beating the bush to liml some indi
vidual who is willing to become bait on
their hook, that peradventure, gudgeons
may swallow and be drawn into their
game-bag. The essential qualification
such an individual must possess, is—he
must not be a democrat. They have not
yet succeeded in discovering any such as
piring martyr. The difficulty is they ask
too much; they offer to merely swallow
one republican, and demand of such re
publican that he swallow their whole nau
seous concern. Such illilierality won't
succeed.
A letter written in Bath to the Lewiston
Journal, refers to our nominee as follows:
“The nomination of Hon. Sidney l’er
hatn as our standard bearer meets witli
genera) favor in this section, and none
m»/e cordially endorse the nomination
than the many friends of Gen. S. F. Her*
sey, who wilf labor with their accustomed
zeal to preserve tin- unity and integrity of
the party, and roll up the old-fashioned
majority for our candidate next September.
The Democrat* of Washington county,
Ohio, in convention resolved that the so
called adoption of the Filteeth Amend
ment was a shameless mockery, having
been consummated by fraud in the North
ern States, and by the tyrauny ot the Fed
oral army in the South," and that “this i
a white man's government, marie by whin
men for white men and their posterity,
GENERAL NEWS.
The father and mother of Bayard Taylor
: sailed last Wednesday for a three months
visit to members of their family residing in
Switzerland.
Tlie Pacific steamship Kcuador, employed
along the South American coast, has been
destroyed at sea hy the explosion of her boil
er. Stic hail twenty-six passengers and seven
were lost.
At Conneaut, Pa.. Tuesday morning, Ralph
Wright, a fanner, sixty years of age, mur
dered his wife by splitting her head open witli
an axe, set fire to his dwelling-house and
then hung himself in a stable. He was in- |
sane.
A Mexican piratical craft was lately attack
ed and destroyed by the United States steam
er Mohican. Knsign Wainwright and a cocks
wain were killed and five or six seamen
wounded.
The present wheat crop in Virginia is re
ported to be the largest and finest harvested
for vears. From all parts of the country wo
get about the same.
In New York, Tuesday, while the Orange
men were having a picrtic they by some means
got into trouble witli the Catholics and the
result was a terrible riot, in which working
implements and firearms were used with fatal
effect. Several were killed and scores
wounded.
A married couple at F’ort Dodge, Wiscon
sin, wanting a divorce, the woman consented
that the man should whip her before witness
| es. The dodge succeeded.
Among the recreations allowed to the con
victs in the Rhode Island State Prison on the
Fourth was jumping over a horizontal liar,
j “You jump very well,” remarked a bystander
to an agile convict. “Oh, this is nothing,”
replied the convict, “I expect to go over the
prison walls before I get through.”
The railroad from Terre Haute, Ind., to
the Indianapolis and St. Louis road was open
l for travel and freight a day or two since, j
i This makes two rival lines from St. Louis east,
| both passing through Terre Haute. There
; are indications of the liveliest competition,
j George H. Wilson, for eighteen years Su
; perintendent of the United States Marine
I Hospital at Portland, died of apoplexy at his
home ill Williamsburg, N. Y., on Saturday.
An underground railroad route through
1 Baltimore is now the subject of discussion
among the railroads centering in that city,
j The entire sum required to lie raised is esti
mated at *1,588,000 represented by bonds, j
and *000,000 bv stock, and the important
point for consideration is the proportion of
aid that should be extended to hy each of the
seven companies interested in the city of
Baltimore.
The Chinese shoemakers at North Adams,
Massachusetts, trade more freely and regu
larly than was expected. Already they have
spent several hundred dollars in buying
clothing, provisions, boots and shoes. Con- i
j sidering their wages and their necessities and
1 wants, they will probably spend in tile vil- .
lage as much of their earnings as others, i
They are pleased with their quarters and .
their employment, and are as unconscious'
as children of the commotion which their ad
vent has caused.
James O’Neill was hung last Sunday night
on Brown's Bridge, nine miles from Denver, |
by unknown parties. A placard was attached
to the body with the inscription of “Cattle
Thief’ upon it.
General Howard has written a letter se
verely commenting on the conduct of the
white cadets at West Point toward the color
ed cadet; he says significantly; “If West
Point has not power enough to protect such a
young man ns cadet Smith—quick, able, hon
est, noble-spirited us he is—then West Point
will have a hard struggle against the return
ing tide of feeling that will hreak in from the
people.”
It is very trying, after yoa have stated on
oath your opinion,—supposing you are a
landlady,—that a certain corpse is that of one
of your lodgers; and after it is buried, witli a
verdict of suicide, and you’ve overhauled his
trunk, and settled with the Coroner, and
made up your mind to the loss, to have the
man himself, six months afterward, call in
upon you and deny the fact. Vet such was
the case in Springfield, Mass., one day last
week, and although the landlady has pretty
nearly gone crazy about it, Anton Ethinger,
the lodger in question, insists that lie was
never a corpse, and neither the Coroner nor
any one else can for the life of him say who
it was that was buried as Anton Ethinger last
winter.
A Washington correspondent says : Our i
new Police court under Judge Snell of Maine, ;
organized and began business Monday morn
ing. The people who wunted to see how he
would manage things were so numerous that
his rooms were completely packed. He
worked off about twenty eases, and the crowd
got an idea that he believes in high fines and
strong punishments.”
Thp Hon. Bion in the Democratic State
Convention was exceedingly “sweet” on
a few gentlemen outside his party whom
he styled “liberal.” There is an old leg
end which relates that a terrible giant, in
a loving mood, one day killed a favorite
eourtier, merely by patting him on the
back.
Secretary Fish authorizes the statement
to be published that he lias not tendered
his resignation to the President, to take
effect next September or at any other time.
He has rented his house till next spring
and expects to occupy it—as a member ot
the Cabinet, we presume.
The favorite organ of the Mieawber
Democracy continues this week its imbecile
attacks on Mr. Blaine, reminding one
very forcibly ol an artillery discharge of
I inflated bladders at the mountain of (lib
eral ter.
Sixteen election districts in New York
city, by the recent census, have a popnla
tion of about 87,000, but they cost nearly
70,1)0) votes at the last spring election.
The receipts on the Provincial end of the
E. & N. A. Kailway for June were £19,748.
s 33, against £17,467.02 in the same month of
B ; last year, and against 16,324.55 in that of
1808.
COMM rlXCEMEST AT BOWDOIX COL
LEGE.
The Close of fommrncrmfDl Week.
Bri nswick, July 14, 1&70.
Class Reinion.
The class of ’66 held a reunion at the Ton
tine Hotel last evening. A grand supper was
prepared for them by tbe famous proprietor of
the house, Mr. II. B. l’inkham. The meet
ing broke up about 12 o’clock with loud cheers.
Class Day.
The morning opefied bright and fair. A
large crowd of both young and old arrived in
town on the early trains. The hotels are con
sequently crowded to overflowing. Among
the arrivals at the Tontine are lion. Win. I’.
Frye, Hon. John A. l’oor and a host of other
celebrities. Mr. Pinkham has provided (or
them in the best manner, and his tables afford
a display of every delicacy which the market
affords. This morning the Phi Beta Kappa
Fraternity held their annual meeting at Adam's
Hall when several new members from the
present graduating class were elected. After
the meeting the Alumni formed in procession
and were escorted to the church by the Ger
mania. after which they listened to an address
by Prof. W. fit. Barbour of Bangor, which
was in every respect a line effort.
Afternoon Session. '
Before the hour of two, the Congregation
al church was again filled to "its utmost ca
capacity by an audience who were eager to
hear the oration and poem. The oration was
delivered by Wm. K. Spear of Rockland,
subject “Power.” He said that power was
the attribute of every existence and illustra
ted its presence in the works of Nature. He
combatted the naturalistic idea that man was
evolved from nature. Said that nature was
but the necessary condition to life, holding
the same relation to it that the material ob
ject does to the sight. Take away nature
and there could be no life. Take away the
material object and there could be no sight.
Yet neither one creates the other. Each is
virtually dependent upon the other. Each is
entirely different from the other. Said that
physical grography did not exert a perma
nent influence upon man, illustrated by ref
erence to the condition of China. Said na
ture was controlled by physical forces, brutes
were guided by blind instinct, but man had
power to govern himself, and as he has this
power he is not dependent on circum
stances. Said that it was man’s duty to de- I
velop himself, and that development consist
ed in being true to God, true to his fellow
man and true to himself. The oration was j
an able and scholarly effort.
Next in order came the Poem by A. G.
Whitman ot Auourn. we give me iohow
ing beautiful extracts:
Four years we’ve meet within yon classic walls :
Here on the closing scene the curtain falls.
Through labyrinthic shades we’ve sought the light,
l util upon our vision lair and bright.
With mingled hues auroral beau tic* dawn,
And robed in light, the ro?*y-tinge red morn
Dispels the shadows from the Eastern skies,
And tints the clouds with rich Vermillion dyes.
With a-pirations high we sought the palm,
And Time, with bu>y hand, dispelled the charm,
Till on the common earth «e walk again,—
Seniors with students, Freshmen still with men.
The Poet next refers to the Court of Jus
tice, where punishment was often meted out
to Freshmen :
Old days om^more we pass in swift review.
And many curious scenes again renew.
The gloomy hall of Justice we recall.
The frowuing rostrum and the blackened wall;
Hope, axe and pulley, blanket, pail and horn,
The ghastly, grim ami ghostly skeleton.
* * * * * * *
A stern decree the hoary judge imparts,
And many gentle hands and heavy hearts
Surround the culprit, and inspired by dread
He takes a queer position on his head ;
When m the name of father, son and daughter.
Into his trowsefs leg they pour the water.
* ******* j
Alas! that solemn court is known no more,
And its impressive walls are whitewashed o’er.
And Freshmen now are trooping unconcerned,
wiicre once our altar fires with iucense burned.
Our Lares and Fenates sought no more,-—
Our pride and glory in the days of yort—
To dark and secret places have been borne,
Their power departed, and their glory gone.
The following passage has reference to tin*
expulsion of several students during the past
term on account of class troubles :
But there were others, brave and noble boys,
Who loved to blow a horn and make a noise.
Or spill a pail of water so ’twould hit
A loud-mouthed Freshman loafing under it —
But these were foibles and we’ve yet to learn,
That ’twas expedient or just to spurn
Our earnest efforts and t«. sternly send.
Them to an exile that will never end.
Just at whose door the ghastly plunder lies.
We don’t assume to say, ’twoulu be unwise.
There’s rottenness in Denmark, and we pray
That Time and Fire may purge the filth away.
* * * * * * * * *
At length our college years are passed away,
Their hopes and liieir’cndearing memories,’
Their disappointments and their sad regrets,
Are graven on the tablets of the past.
Records that ever seem to stand above
The grave of Time,—sad monuments.
As o’er the buried past to-day we chant
The requiem of four more years,
Tombed with the countless ages gone before.
How fitting then that in their memory
We raise a monument, and sculpture there
The epitaph. These days can never die.
As pass away the swiftly hurrying years,
Let each its impress leave upon the mind.
Thus being wedded to a deathless spirit,
The dying years in turn will live again.
*'* • * * * * *
But as the crimson hues of Autumn tinge
The forest leaves with beauty lovlier fur
Than art can give or genius can conceive,
A transient beauty yet surpassing all
The charms bright spring or joyous summer boasts,,
.So let us hope that these our early days,
May to u rosy twilight sweetly melt.
After the above exercises at the church the
erowd despersed to the Old Oak Tree, where
the concluding exercises of the day, consist
ing of Class Chronicles, Prophecy, Parting
Address, and other ceremonies were given.
The chronicles were delivered by J. W.
Keene, of Bremen. From the same we glean
the following
Statistic#.
Whole number in class at different
times, 38
Number entered Freshman year, 32
Number joined the class during
the course, 3
Number left, 8
Number graduating, 30
Oldest man, 27
Youngest man, 10
Average age, 22 2-5
Tallest man, 3 ft. 1-2 inch
Shortest man, 5 ft. 2 1-2 inches
Average height, 5 ft. 8 1-2 inches
Heaviest man, 105
Lightest man, 108
Average weight. 147 11 11-12
Mustaches, 17
Attempts, 4
Failures, 3
Wear Glasses, 2
Engaged, undoubtedly, 7
Engaged, probably, 20
Own the soft impeachment, 0
Democrats, 7
Republicans, 22
Unclassified, Gooch.
Church members, 7
Christians, 4
Church goers, 28
Mohammedans, Gooch.
Mormons, Weston.
Shakers, Hobson.
Quakers, Timberlake.
Freelovers, Peck.
Skeptics, 18
Infidels, Gray. •
Heathen, Frost.
1 Smokers, habitual, 12
Smokers, occasional, 16
Smokers, constant, . Gooch.
Habitual drinkers, 0
Occasional, 16
Hardy intoxicated, Moore.
Number who propose to study
Medicine, 13
Haw, 6
I'hcology, 3
Farmer, Holmes.
Music, Gooch.
Business. 2
Teaching. 2
Champion Euchre player, Mocre.
Dance, 1?
.skate, 2X
Number who tlirt—muchly, O
Slightly, 1«
The prophecy, was given by J. A. Heb
erts of Waterboro. It was one of the most
pleasing features of the exercises and was
listened to w ith intense interest.
C. T. Torrey of Yarmouth gave the part
in; address which abounded with reminis
cences of college life. Many parts of it
were written in a touching manner. The ex
ercises were thbn concluded by the following
ceremonies :
< ide,
composed by E. C. Woodward and sung by
the class.
Smoking the Pipe of Peace.
Music.
The Farewell.
Music.
B'.l TER VIL LE ('LAS SICA L ISS TI
TU'TE.
Watk.kmu.e. duly 13, lf*70.
Dkak dot KNAt.:—The annual exercises of
Waterville Classical Institute occurred this
week, comprising an exhibition on Monday :
evening, of which the following is the
OBDElt OF EXERCISE,'.
1. Music. .
2 Death of tin* Old Year. Charles E. W illiams, 1
Waterville.
Kssa\ Dellniteiier*** of Purpose Essential to
Success. Ellen M. strout, Limerick.
4. The Flight of Years. Abram It. Cates, \a.-sal
lioro’.
E-sny. Weaving. .Julia W. Pearce, Eubtport.
0. Musie.
7 Kssav. Beauty in Nature. (Second prize,
olfie W. Smifey, Sidney.
8. Hannibal at the Altar. (First prize.) Henry
VV. Dudlev, Vassalboro’.
0. E-wav. >igha and Songs. Addle 1*. Barnes.
I.ee.
10. Execution of Montrose. Willie II. Kelly, Au
gusta.
1J F.sav! Thoughts on the study of Natural Ills
tori . Ella M Maxwell, Waterville.
13. The traitor’s Death. Edward O. Howard, " in
S10 VV .
It Essav. Ruins. Nellie II. Barrel), Waterville.
13. Mu-ie.
pi. irjjius. Ilenrv M. lleywood, M inslow.
17 K-suv. Mistakes. Mary s Irish. Waterville.
is E--ay Waiting. Hattie Low, Waterville,
l!i Music.
20. I niu-t National Aeipdsttions. (Second prize
Charles E Young. Comma.
21. Essay. Musir. (First prize.) Estelle E. Saw
\er, Waterville.
22. Tlie Light-Keeper’* Daughter. Cassius M. Fer
guson, Dixmont.
23. Music.
Tuesday afternoon the exercises of the
graduating class, of which the following is the
ORDER OF EXERCISES.
1. Music.
2 D im s. Alteinina C. Grecmvoocl, Fairfield.
3. The Oonllic t of Ages. Ada IV Steveus. Water- |
ville.
4. Mountains. Thalia Howard, Winslow.
5. Music.
Poetrv. Jennie K Tavlor. Waterville.
7. Walls' must bear the Weather-tains ere they
grow the Iv\. Sarah C. Rigby, Kingaclear,
X. IV
8. Temples. Annie G. M ood, Mudison.
9. Mu-ic.
10. Battlefields. Isa M. Billing.-, Clinton.
11. Image Breaking. — Valedictory Addresses.
Alice E. Gould, Waterville.
12. Music.
13. Conferring of Deg.ees.
14. Music.
Tuesday evening the exercises closed with
I concert by Chandlers Band of Portland.
The parts at the exhibition were well per
formed. Those of the graduating elass were J
very fine, which, with the excellent music they j
provided for the two occasions, made a last- j
ing and pleasant remembrance of the class of ^
70. J
For the Journal.
RECOLLECTION'S OF .1011X HURRA Y.
In a late number of the Gospel Banner, j
Isaac Wheeler of Amherst, known as Father j
Wheeler, who died recently at the age of 91,
was spoken of as having been tho last man ;
living who had seen and heard the Rev. John
Murray. In the Springfield Republican he is
alluded to in the same way. This is a mis
take.
As Mr. Murray is held in reverence by a
large sect in this country, as the first promul
gator of their peculiar doctrines here, it may
not be uninteresting to state, that my father,
Nathan Weston, heard him preach in Boston
frequently. This was at various times when
my father was in Boston, between fifteen and
twenty-three years «f age, and staying at the ;
house of Mr. John Fillebrown, a brother of j
the late Col. Thomas Fillebrown. He was \
also introduced to him when he was calling
upon Mr. Fillebrown, who was one of his
parishioners ; and lie remembers Mr. Murray’s
saying very impressively, during that visit.
“O, that men were wise, that they understood j
this, that they would consider their hitter 1
end 1” He also saw him at the Grand Lodge, j
where he was treated with great attention.
He lias a lively recollection of him, and says
his person now presents itself to his imagina
tion as strongly as that of any one he ever
knew ; and that he was a man to be remem
bered. My father at first recalled him to his
mind as one not so old as he finds he must
have been at the period when he saw him;
and he accounts for this by saying, that his
i appearance indicated great vigor, in conse
i quenee of which he seemed younger than he
was. He further describes liini as eloquent,
and preaching without notes in a strong, pow
erful voice. L. M. Divuisox.
Domestic Nctos.
The eastern section of the State is jubilant
over the result of the boat race, which has
taken place on the St. Croix river between
the four-oared crews of the St. Stephen, N.
B., and Calias, Me., rowing clubs. The
i crews engaged had previously rowed upon
\ the Fourth of July for a purse offered by the
! city of Calias, upon which occasion the Amer
ican crew easily won. The Knglisli crew im
i mediately challenged the victorious crew to
row tlu'iu upon the morning of the 7th
over u three mile course. The Americans
again won. The men composing the latter
| crew were Charles Davidson (stroke), John
Whiteneck, John Wallace, George Davidson
(bow.)
Intelligence comes of the death of Capt.
John Curtis of Brunswick, at Bermuda, July
3d, of typhoid fever. The sad intelligence
reached his home after his wife had left to
join her husband, having heard of his sick
ness. Capt. Curtis was one of the. most
prominent ship-masters of Brunswick, and
universally esteemed.
A correspondent of the Whig says YVater
ville has reason to feel proud of her institu
tions of learning. With the University and
Institute situated in the village with an excel
lent system of public schools, none of her
children need grow up in ignorance. Vet it
is a disgraceful fact, that a large proportion
of the children of foreign parentage can nei
rcad nor write. Scores and even hundreds
of these children are growing from childhood
to manhood under the very shadows of these
institutions who will never take the first step
towards enlightenment, whose education will
be rather in the school of intemperance and
evil. This fact, alas, is apparent in many
towns.
We see it stated that a number of small
pieces of gold have recently been taken from
Sandy river, just below the falls at New Shar
on. by Mr. II. H. Beard. That there is gold
in the river at that place has long been I
known, as small particles have been picked
lip by several individuals at different times;
but whether it can be obtained in quantities
sufficient to pay for milling lias not yet been
ascertained.
The editor of the Maine Farmer saw re
cently in the bands of one of our Augusta
merchants, a two dollar bill on the Kennebec
Bank, Hallowed, which 'failed' as i( was then
called, now known as •‘suspended." nearly
fifty vears ago. The bill is dated Oct. i,
]S24. is payable to A. Nourse, and signed by
,1. Bohinson, 4'ashler, and 1). Y\ . Warren.
President. It is very much worn.
The Whig says Timothy Wall's boy. aged
nine years, stole 873 from a bureau in bis
father's house in Bangor and went on "a
good time" with it, buying'all sorts of knick
kaeks. hiring horses. ,Ac. He distributed it
liberaljy among his companions, as a preven
tative from exposure. A policeman recover
ed 823 of the money.
We are glad to be able to congratulate our
friends, the publishers of the Daily Kennebec
Journal, upon the successful results of their
enterprise. The paper lias been published
six months, has proved itself a public and
business necessity, and may now be regarded
as an established institution of our city. We
hope it will continue to receive a liberal and
paying support.—Maine Farmer.
The American says the North Ellsworth
Farmer's Club will hold their first exhibition
at Tyler's Hall. North Ellsworth, Tuesday
and Wednesday, September 27th and 28th.
Launched in Addison, 7th inst., from the
yard of J. (’. Wash & Co., a fine schooner of
200 tons, called the J. C. Wash. She is to
be commanded by Cupt. A. L. Crowley.
IVotiee. j
TilK co partnership heretofore existing between j
Martin A I)ow and Lewis C. Demon, under
the firm of DOW & DINTON, ha.- this day been
dissolved hv mutual consent. Said Dow will nay j
all liabilities against said firm, and is authorized to
collect all debts due to said Arm
M. A DOW.
L C. DUNTON.
Augusta, July 7, 1870.
MR. DOW continues to do business at the old ;
stand, where lie is ready to serve his friends. He
will furnish h? good a
TURN-OUT
as can lx gotten up in the city. jolyl3-t3w-*
Knickerbocker
Mutual Lire Insurance Company
OF NEW YORK.
ERASTUS LYMAN - - - I’kesim nt
r|N ms is one of the oldest, most reliable, and best
J. dividend paying companies in the country.
ASSETS OVER $7,200,000!
Liberal arrangement.* will be made with Agents, :
and they are wanted in all parts of the Mate.
Apply at AUGUSTA9
130 Water Htreet, (up-Htuli’M; to
CHARLES WHITE,
Manager lor Maine and New Hampshire. ,
March 2*2,1870. _h22mar-t
HOUSE FOR SALE !
'JM1K undersigned will sell his
house on Lincoln Street, in j
Hallow ell.
( HAS. K. NASH
ANEW ‘SUNDOWN FOR SALE.
IT in as of thorough and stylish make as has been j
offered for sale in this*city, having a patent'
changeable top. It will be .-old at a reasonable
priee. It may be seen at the brick .“-table of I>«»w
& Dunton. R. M. MANsl/K.
July 1st, 1870. t4t*
Buy the Best!
EUREKA RANGE
For Wood or Coal!
For Economy, Durability, Beauty of Desifcn
and Finish,
THIS HAS at: HAS SO EQUAL!
Ferfoot In Every Respeet,
It commends itself to every one in w ant of a
First Clam Cook .Stove !
Sold in Augusta by
WILLIAM H. WOODBURY. j
Also some of the
BEST WOOD AND COAL STOVES
in the Market, and a variety of
Ilousc-Furnlshlng Goods !
A few Doors south of Railroad Bridge.
tl2mar&w-ly
A LOT OK
Organs & Melodcons
Jl'ST RECEIVED, TO RENT, OR
SELL AT THE VERY LOWEST PRICES !
A1HQ now Him Ejccvuu*auim
Pianos. Kent free to those » ho
thing of buying. A new lot and
kind of Melodeon Stool* as low
I IS $3 each Please rail very
soon or write for further par
tic tarn. Also ror Bate, a extra nitrgaiii* iwo nice
}*ii i oh. anti to let or be lit our or live Second-hand
unos. a. M. MANSUR.
•Inly lstf._ ttf-Jnly'l*
PIANO TUNING.
mHE Subscriber would inform the
X citizens of Aujfusta snd vicinity
that he will (five vertoiuil attention to
tuning Pianos. Ordersleltat his res
idence, 1*7 Wlnthrop Street, will receive |>roin]>
1 attention. M. C. MIDI.IKES',
fl»b6-tr Teacher or Piano and Organ
BRUSHES
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION AT
JOHNSON BROTHERS.
I W, L. HALL, M. D„
I’hysician A Surgeon,
GARDINER, MAINE.
Office, over PARSONS & HALEY'S Dry Good*
store.
Hours from 0 to 12 A. M and 2 to 0 P. M.
I* \ I)K. G. K. KUH KBTT, / Vmrimta*
References. ] I)R ,, H L j Au*WMU
• tlin-June2‘t*
IB O S "W O RTH
HAVI.Mi REIIOVED TO
(11 Doors south of Bridge street,) which has been expressly fitted up lor bis business, where
will be found a VERY LARGE STOCK of
SPRING WOOLLENS!
OF tlie Latest Fashions,
WHICH WILL BE CUT AND MADE UP TO ORDER IN THE
Very Latest Style.
ALSO, WILL HE FOUND
A LARCE STOCK OF
Ready Made Clothing,
-AND
Gents’ Furnishing Goods
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
It. T. HOS WORTH.
August i. Msr. Tilt, 1X70. t7mar-tf
NEW GOODS! NEW GOODS!
WE IIa\ K II xT KECKIVKD. AND AHE NOW OPENING,
One of the Largest anti Best Assorted
STOCKS of DRY GOODS!
Ever Opened in Augusta.
Splendid assortment of BLACK SILKS,
of the best manufacture.
PLAIN, PLAID & STRIPE SILKS
IN GREAT VARIETY.
IRISH AND LYONS POPLINS in ail Shades.
# A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OE
Organdie Muslins, Iron Bareges, Grenadines, Lenos, Pongees, Mohairs, Alpacas, French
and American Cambrics, and an endless variety of common DKESS GOODS.
White Goods, Woollens; Shawls, Toilet Quilts,
C O T TON GOODH, & c .
OCR USUAL FULL LINE OE
Parasols, Sun Umbrellas, Fans, Hosiery, Moves,
FANCY ARTICLES, SMALL WARES, Ac.,
All of which were bought for ( Axil, and will be sold at the lowest market rates.
Fowler, Hamlen & Smith.
ttf-june23
MANSION HOl'8 E,
STATE STREET, : s AUGUSTA, ME.
f 1* 11 IS House is provided wita Bath Rooms,
X where Hot and Cold Baths can be had at ail
times. It has also a First-Class Billiard Hall, for
Guests only. Connected with the House is a large
and commodious Sample Room, on Water Street
centrally located, where Sample Agents can show
their goods, free of charge.
The Proprietor, thankful for the liberal patronage
which the above House has enjoyed since its open
ing, takes pleasure iu informing his patrons that he
will run Free Carriages to and from the Cars and
Boats until farther notice
Connected with the above House is a Livery Sta
ble, where good teams can »k* had at reasonable
rates. W. M. THAYER, Proprietor.
G. P. Cochrank. Clerk.
A. P. COULD,
-DEALER IN —
STOVES,
WOOD & COAL FURNACES,
&c.
Particular attention paid to setting HOT AIR
FUtS ACES. Also Agent for the new
PEERLESS COOK ISO STOVE,
THE SAMPLE COOK, ami
CMOS PORTABLE EAXGE.
STOVE REPAIRS,
Vumps and Lead 1 ape. Tin, JJnltannia,
and Toilet Ware.
«„ TIN ROOKING, and all kinds of JOBBING
promptly attended to.
1 Poor North of Railroad Bridge,
Water Street, Augusta.
janl8-t&w4t__
RICHMOND PORTABLE RANGE
-AND
Hanging Dome Furnace!
At WILLIAMSON 4 GREENWOOD'S.
iHallowell House
I SECOND STREET,
HALLOWELL, : : MAINE.
MR. J. II. HILL would respectfully inform his !
friends and the public that he has opened the
above named house, and has fitted it up as
A First Glass Hotel.
This house is about two rods from the depot, and
is within a few steps of the express office, and the
business street of the city.
In connection w ith the house there is a
LIVERY A TRANSIENT Stable.
Hi is house w'lll be opened to the public on the
Fourth of July. Th&ukful for the favors which lie
has received at his funner place of business in Lew
iston, the snbscribeifguarantees to give complete
satisfaction to the travelling public.
J. B. HILL, Proprietor.
ttf-july!!
ALL MINDs" OF JOBBING
AND
repairing: Done at
ispr4-:iin Williamson & Greenwood^._
STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS,
Mr. A. F. Morse
has just returned from Boston with a very large
and desirable assortment of
Stereosoopio Views,
which will lie nold at Boston prices, lie also mukes
and keeps constantly on hand
Views of Hallowell and Vicinity,
Any views which his customers may w ant w hich
are not in his selection, will lie ordered immediate
ly. He has a great variety of PICTURE FRAMES
i on hand.
All orders for framing done w ith neatness and
despatch. Pictures of every style, made cheap.
The Public are invited to call at his rooms on
Water St., corner Union St., Hallowell. and ex
amine his stock. ljuly-ftf
F O R IS O STON !
Spring Arrangement!
T1IE STEAM KK
STAR of tie EAST,.
CiOMMENCED her regular trips IVoin the Ken
j nebec, Till TODAY', Mav 15th, 1870, and will,
until further notice, run as follows :
Leaving Gardiner every Monday and Thursday
at ;i o'clock, Richmond at 4, and Bath att> 1*. M.
THE STEAMER CI.ARIO*,
Will leave Augusta at 12 M.. Hallowed at 1 45 P.
M . connecting with the above boat at Gardiner.
For further particulars inquire of W. J.
Tuck, Augusta; if. Fuller A Son, Hallowed;
T. B Grant. Gaidiner; T. Robinson, Richmond;
.1. E. Brown, Bath.
Gardiner, April 11. 1870. tlOapr
STEAMER
ELLA!
CAPT. WILLIAM MITCHELL.
/ \X ami after Wednesday, June '22<I. the Steamer
l / Ella will leave Augiifta at 8 o’colock A. M„
everv MONDAY, WEDNESDAY nnd FRIDAY,
t'or ilallowell, Gardiner, Richmond, Bath, and
Portland.
Returning, will leave Portland for Augusta, and
intermediate landings on the Kennebec, every
TIESDAY. THURSDAY and SATURDAY, at
7 A. M.
F'ares :
Augusta to Portland, $1.50
Ilallowell to “ 1.40
Gardiner to “ 1-25
Kirhmond to “ 1.00
Bath to “ >15
! FROM AUGlSTAto NEW YORK.
Passengers by this route will be ticketed through
to New York by the Steamers FRANCONIA and
, DIKIGO, w hich leave Portland for New Yorkevery
I Monday and Thursday. Baggage trucked in Port*
j land free of expense. Fare from Augusta to New
i Y'ork: Cabin, #<>.50; meals extra; Deck passage,
! #5 50.
The Ella connects also at Bath, each trip, with
the steamer Spray for Boothbay.
| This boat will stop at any of the iee-honses oil the
j river on display of a white flag as u signal.
For further particulars apply to
HI-juntas B. F. MORSE, Augusta. Agent.
Portland & Kennebec Railroad.
Summer Arrangement, 1870.
Passenger train leaves Augur.ta daily for Port
land and Boston at 5.45, 11 A. M , ami 3.15 P. M.,
and w ill In* duo in Boston at 1.45, 8 and 10 P. M.,
! Returning, leave Boston at 7.30 A M. and 12 M.,*
and Portland 7.10 A. M., 12 45 and 5.15 I*. M., and.
will be due in Augusta at 10 A. M., 3.30 and 8 1*. M.
Augusta for Vnssalboro’, Waterville, Kendall’s
Mills, stow began, Dexter, Bangor, Ac., at 3.40 P.
i M. Returning, will be due in Augusta at 10.50 A.
! M.
Augusta for Ilallowell and Gardiner (dummy
car) at 7.30. 11.30 A. M., 2.15, 0 P. M. Returning,
i will be due In Augusta at 7, 8.43 A. M., 1.30, 6.30 P.
j M.
Through freight trains leave Boston daily at 4 P.
M.. arriving in Augusta the following morning at
8.45.
i A Refrigerator ear is run on the through freight
j trains (both going and returning) carrying fruit,
j meat, eggs, vegetables, Ac., in good order In the
; warmest weather.
L. L. LINCOLN. Superintendent.
roTlTCLOTH CARPETING !
AT
; WlUluniKon * Cireonwood'n.

xml | txt