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Daily Kennebec journal. [microfilm reel] (Augusta, Me.) 1870-1975, August 27, 1870, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014248/1870-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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Pailj lirnnclirc Journal.
AUGUSTA.
SATURDAY MORNING, Au*. 97, 1870.
= REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS.
FOR GOVERNOR,
Sidney Perham,
OP PARIS.
FOR REPRESENTATIVES TO CONGRESS,
1st District—JOHN LYNCH.
2d District—WILLIAM P. FRYE.
3d District—JAMES G. BLAINE.
4th District—JOHN A. PETERS.
5th District—EUGENE HALE.
Far Nfn*trtlr».
Androscoggin, • • IjANiEL HOLLAND.
Cumberland, • MARQUIS D. L. LANE,
cum HENRY CARVII.L.
SAMUEL F. PERLKY,
CHARLES ,! MORRIS.
Franklin, EDWIN R. FRENC H
Hancock • • • HIR-VM S. H.WtT.ErT,
SYLV ANUS T HINKS.
Kennebec. * * JOSHUA GRAY.
GEORGE E MINOT.
REUBEN FOSTER.
Oxford, - • - THOM AS P. CLEAVES,
OTIS IIAYFORD, Jh.
Penobscot, * • * TIMOTHY It l.I.ER,
CHARLES BUFFUM.
JOHN It SICKLES,
Piscataquis, * • JOHN G. MAYO.
Sagadahoc, * - JOS. W. SPAI I.DING.
Somerset, - • • FRANKLIN R WEBBER
MOSEs FRENCH.
Waldo, • - - T. W. VOsK.
NEIIEMIAII SMART.
York . . - JOHN B NEALLEY,
JOSEPH C. ROBERT?.
JOSEPH HOBSON.
For Sheriff.
Cumberland, • • KBKN S PEItUY.
Franklin, * ORRIN TI l Ts.
Kennebec, - * * ASHER II. BARTON.
Oxford. - - LORENZO l>. STACY.
Penobscot, **' • JOHN 11. YY ILSON.
Piscataquis, • • EDYVAIill JE A EIT.
Sagadahoc, * - P. K MILLAY.
Waldo - - • IRVIN CALDERWOOD.
York, ... EDMUND WARREN.
For County Attorney,
Cumberland, • ■ CHAS. P MATTOCKS.
Hancock. - • • LUCILH S A. EMERY.
Kennebec, - - - VVM P. YVIIITKIlOlSE
Oxlord. - • - ENOCH FOSTER. Jil.
Penobscot, • • CHARLES P. STETSON.
Piscataquis, ■ ■ WILLIAM YOUNG.
Sagadahoc, « * FKAN1 IS ADAMS.
Somerset, • • • S. J. WALTON.
York, ... GEORGE C. YEATON.
For County Commissioner,
Androscoggin. • - DAVIS E. LOTHROP.
Cumberland, * * GEO. E.CHADBOLRNE.
Franklin, - - - J. O. KYES.
Hancock, - ■ • J.T. HINCKLEY.
Kennebec, - - NATHANIEL GRAVES.
Oxford, - - • ALBION I*. GORDON.
Penobscot, • JESSE II1NKS.
Piscataquis, - M. MITCHELL.
Sagadahoc, - - BE.NJ. E. .YIARBLL.
Somerset, * - * JOHN RCSSELL.
Waldo, • • •• STEPHEN STRUCT.
York, • • - ALBERT G. HUSSEY,
CORNELIUS SYVKETSER.
For County Treasurer,
Androscoggin, • - A. F. MERRILL.
Cumberland, * THOMAS PENNELL.
Franklin, - * I. YV. MERRILL.
Hancock, • • - C. W. TILDES.
Kennebec, ... ALANSON SlARKs.
Oxford, ... FREDERIC E Sll A YV.
Peuob-cot. • • HORACE J. NICKERSON.
Piscataquis, • - N. HINDS.
Sagadahoc, - ■ HEN RY M BOY EY.
Somerset, • * * JOHN M. YYOOD.
Waldo, • • - GEO McDonald.
For Clerk of Courts,
Franklin, • ■ • 8, H- LOWELL.
Penobscot. • * EZRA C. HkkrT.
Sagadahoc, * - JOSEPH M. HAYES.
Waldo, • - - 'V. G. FRY E.
For Register of Probate,
Penobscot, ... AMBROSE C, FLINT.
For Jndga of Probate.
Piscataquis, * E. J. HALE.
York, ... A-YIOS L. ALLEN.
••CARPET BAGGERS."
The Democratic papers of the North,
true to their old toadying instincts, have
joined the rebel papers in crying out
against Northern men who go South to
live, or to enter into business. The North
ern Democrats have never yet gotten rid
of the idea that the South is holy ground
upon which it is sacrilege for the foot of
a Northern man to tread. Before, the war,
following the bidding of their Southern
masters, the Democrats howled about abo
litionists. Now, playing lickspittles for the
favor of their old masters, they raise the
cry “carpet bagger,” “carpet bagger,''
at every Northern man who chooses to
live in a Southern State, forgetting that by
the Constitution and the Civil Bights Bill,
enacted in pursuance thereof, a citizen of
one State is free to live in any other State,
and to enjoy all the rights ami privileges
enjoyed by any other citizen. The reason
of rebel and copperhead dislike of North
ern men moving South is easily explained.
They tend to neutralize the efforts of the
traitors of the South, aud to assure the
oyaity of the districts in which they live.
They go among the people, and by their
efforts prevent the uneducated masses
from being driven like cal lie by the aristo
crats who have hitherto ruled the work
ingmen of the South with a rod of iron.
This hurts the rebels of the South and they
curse the carpet baggers. That which
hurts the rebels hurts the Northern cop
perheads, and they curse the carpet bag
gers. But the people do not join them.
The people do not forget that these North
ern men, who are so unjustly reproached,
were good men North. They know that
these “carpet baggers” were Generals,
Colonels, Captains, Lieutenants and sol
diers in the army of the Union, and they
do not believe that the mere fact that they
choose to live in the South makes them
bad men. On the contrary, they feel Lliat
every Northern man hi the South makes a
Southern citizen who is true to that govern
ment which the North was obliged to sus
tain by force of arms. They know that
inauy of these men carried South more
thousands of dollars than the editors who
assail them * re worth hundreds. The very
fact that every Northern citizen is abused
by the Southern Democrats and Northern
copperheads, but proves to the Northern
people that these men are doing good in
the States in which they have settled.
We see that the Maiue Standard feels
deeply on this subject, and that it abuses
carpet baggers. We are both astonished
and grieved to observe this because we
like consistency, aud in this attack on car
pet baggers the preaching and practice of
the Standard men fail to correspond. If
there ever was a carpet hag paper that
paper U the Standard. Both of its pro
prietor* and editors are of the rankest kind
of carpet bagger*. They have tio respect
for county lines. Like locusts they have
stripped their native country and have pre
cipitated themselves upon the unhappy
people of Kennebec. They have forced
themselves upon a people win. don’t want
them. They have set themselves up lor
offices to which, according to the Stand
ard, none but natives have a right to aspire.
They have plunged into our politics, and
have sought to represent a people to whom
they are strangers, and whose character
and wants they, of course, cannot under
stand. They have incited us to political
strife that they might fatten upon the popu
lar distress. They have enriched themselves
at the expense of the inhabitants of Ken
nebec. And yet they talk of carpet bag
gers! We feel obliged to remonstrate and
to remind them that before telling of.the
mote in their neighbor’s eye they should
first pluck the beam from their own eyes.
We do not, however, wish to treat them as
they declare they should be treated, but
we are willing to allow them to live where
they will, comforting ourselves with the
reflection that what is our loss is Frank
lin's gain. t
REDUCTION' OF TAXES.
To the false charge and clamor that
nothing was done hy Congress to reduce
taxation, we reply by the following state
ment :
Special taxes, including those on bank
ers, will cease May 1, 1870, except those
connected with fermented liquors, spirits,
and tobacco. .
Taxes on gross receipts will cease Octo
ber 1, 1870.
Taxes on sales will cease October 1.
1870, except those on sales of tobacco,
spirits, wines, and those paid by stamps.
Taxes on income, including sahtries,will
be 2 1-2 per cent, on incomes over $2000,
instead ofo per cent, on incomes over
$1000.
Taxes on legacies will cease October 1,
1870.
Taxes on passports will cease uctouer
1, 1870.
The use of stamps will cease October 1,
1870, for promissory notes for less than
$100, for receipts anil for canned and pre
served fish.
The receipts from these sources in the
fiscal year 1870 were estimated at $8:1,
010,000. The reductions have been offi
cially estimated at about $60,000,000.
And besides this the duties on ten, coffee
and sugar have been largely reduced, and
the free list increased, so as to cut off some
twenty millions more of taxation. Still
the democrats continue to repeat the false
hood that no burdens have been removed.
THE STANDARD AND ITS PARTY.
The Maine Standard has a three quarter
of a column allusion to our article relative
to the course pursued by the Northern
Democracy in exciting anew‘the rebellious
feelings of the Southern people. We say
“allusion" because the Standard's article
contains nothing that entitles it to be con
sidered a reply. On the contrary, it care
fully avoids any reference to the subject
matter of our former article, and con
tents itself with a dissertation upon “Car
petbaggers,” together with some slangy
attacks upon the writer who has excited
its ire.
The fact that it has chosen to abuse us
we regard with comparative indifference,
for we knew our adversary and expected
nothing better; but that we should be as
sailed with such an amount of slang ex
pressions injures our feelings! We are
not used to such things, having never be
fore had any exper enee of the Standard’s
polished style of conducting an editorial
controversy. We therefore must decline
to undertake to compete with it in slang
and rest content with viewing its emi
enec in an art which would win it the admi
ration of the fishwives of Billingsgate.
The beginning of the Standard's edito
rial is an expectation. This is eminently
proper and Democratic. For the last ten
years Democracy has been continually
expecting, but its expectations have al
ways failed to be realized. The Stand
ard's expectations are somewhat ludicrous.
It expects to see Republicans “howling
and trembling before the march of the
great and victorious Democratic army!”
Considering the fact that the Democratic
army is by no means great, and not at all
victorious, the expectations of the Stand
ard would appear to the unprejudiced
reader to savor more of political bragga
docio than of good sense. When we con
sider that out of thirty-seven states the
Democrats control only eiyht it is some w hat
difficult to decide where the victories of the
“great victorious Democratic army" have
been won. Under these circumstances we
feel obliged to decline to "howl” or “ trem
ble" until we can see something toaiarm us.
Until that time the Democrats can contin- 1
ue to do all the howling and tremblin" ““
they have done during the last dec......
The next proposition of the Standard |
is presented in the following chaste and
elegant style:
•Seriously. “Dagger” don't believe any
of the iwosh he writes. If he knows any
thing he knows that the people of the
South are as law-abiding and love the
government as well as the people of any
section of the country, and that as tew
disturbances occur there as anywhere in
the land. If this is not true, then re
publican reconstruction, for which so
much credit is claimed by radical presses
and speakers, is a dead failure. Is “Dag
ger” or any other “loll” pap sucker pre
pared to say this? We rather guess not.
Without pausing to analyze the mean
ing of the word “swosh,” we will state
that all that we have written we knoiO to
be true ; and the Standard knows it to be
true for it has been unable to deny our
statements, or to give even a plausible
answer to any one of them. We know
that the people of the South do not love
the government, Mr Ackerman to the con
| trary notwithstanding. That they hate
the government is surely no secret for the
“Conservative" papers of the South have
been loud iu their avowals of hatred of
: the Union. That the Southern people hate
the government is an established fact and
i one too well kuuwu to be denied. That
; the Democratic party is responsible for
this state of things we haveahvady shown,
; and the Standard has not dared to deny
the statement. It could not deny it, for the
facts are known to the Northern pcopfo,
and no Jinny lie of the Standard would
avail to lessen the detestation in which the
true men of the country hold the cojijier
liead Democracy. It was a traitor to it
country in the hour of'trial, and no false
hoods can ever make the American peo
jde forget its treachery or efface the re
membrance of actions that will ever be
the foulest blot on the jiagcsof American
history. Again we tell the Standard to
remember these things and not attempt to
jilaei* the sins of its jiarty upon innocent
shoulders. If reconstruction should prove
to be a failure it will be owing to the ef
forts of the copjierheads ot the North and
to them the guilt belongs.
The Standard calls the men who have
triumphed in the South “good and jieace
ful citizens,” and claims fellowship with
them, and declares them to be in full com
munion with the Democratic party of the
North. That these men have made mur
der their prineijtal means of obtaining
political victories is a fact now too well
known to be denied. Even the Standard,
which never acknowledges such truths
until forced to do so. has not dared to de
ny that the “good,” “peaceful,” and
"Christian” Conservatives of North Car
olina, organized bands of secret assassins,
to, by murder and outrage, so terrify the
colored voters, as to carry the State for
the “Conservative Democracy.”
If, knowing these facts, it still claims
fellowship with the jierpetrators, it en
dorses their deeds.
If it is of their party and they of it's, the
creed of the one must necessarily be the
creed of the other.
The following is the creed of the South
ern Democrats, or "( onservauves, as
laid down by the Mobile Tribune—one of
the leading Democratic pujters of the Stale. '
It says:
“If a true southern man has any politeal
status in a national sense,lie is a Democrat.
The only men at the North with whose
views hi* honestly eoincidbs, are those who
during the war were called ‘copperheads,’
and who since the war have protested and
voted against all the enactments of a cor
rupt Congress. The true Democrat be
lieves that the reconstruction law ought
to be overthrown at the point of the Fed
eral bavonet if necessary, and that the
negro should be deprived of the right of
suffrage illegally conferred upon him.”
“When we abandon these principles we
abandon the Democratic party and with it
the forlorn hope of restoring the govern
ment as it was."
This is the political creed of the men
with whom the Standard claims fellow
si,ip—consequently it is the creed of the
Democratic party of Maine.
To “restore the government as it was" 1
means to restore slavery and to do away
w ith all the results of the war. To this,
the Democratic party of Maine, according
to the Standard's own avowal, is pledged
And the above must also be the principles
of the gentlemen nominated for office by
the Democrats and concerning whose in-1
tense loyalty they have so much to say !
even while their papers lose no opportuni
ty of showing their hatred to everything
loyal by distorting it into a term of re
proach, as is done in the last article of the
Standard.
Now that the Democrats have, through
their organ, so plainly and unmistakably
declared their purposes, no future sophis
tries or open falsehoods can avail them.
They stand confessed before the world as
traitors, not only to the government, but
to their own people.
The Southern Democrats or “Conserva
vatives.” declare that the only men
in the North with whom they can
affiliate arc the copperheads, and the
Standard declares its principles and
those of its party by claiming these unre
pentent rebels as being in full fellowship
with the Democratic party of the North.
Let the patriotic people of Maine,a State in
which there is hardly a family which was
not represented by some brave soldier light
ing for the preservation of the government,
remember this declaration of the organ
of the copperheads of Maine. Let every
honest man in the State, reflect upon its
words, and remember that a vote for the
nominees of such a party is a direct inju
ry to the nation and an insult to the heroic
men who have given their lives to preserve
it. t
POLITICAL.
lion. 15. W. Norris has been nominated
as a candidate for Congress in the Third
District, Alabama. The district is regard
ed as a close one, but the Republicans
are confident they can elect Major Norris
by a handsome majority.
A Republican convention assembled in
Cheyenne, Wyoming territory, on Mon
day. to nominate local officers. Many
women were present. Among the can
didates nominated were Mrs. L. II. l’ick
ctt, for county clerk; Mrs. M. II. Arnold,
for superintendent of public schools.
Mrs. M. E. Post is a member of the Re
publican Committee.
The entire House in the present Con
gress, chosen under the census of 18(50,
which is also th6 basis of the coming elec
tion for the Forty-second Congress, is com
posed of 242 members, including Georgia
and Louisiana, not fully represented. Of
these 242 the Republicans have 128 in the
North an 1 West, including Missouri and
West Virginia, alone, without counting
Maryland, Kentucky, Delaware, or the
late rebel States. A majority of 242 is
122, so that the Republicans call lose the
whole South in the coming elections and
yet hold the next House. Rut it is morally
certain that they will hold their own in
South Carolina, Mississippi,, and Alabama,
with a fair chance for a proportion in each
of the other States, and a reasonable pros
pect for a gain in Maryland of three and
in Delaware of one.
New Hampshire is the last of the New
England itatei to establish a normal school.
MO.XTHL 1' MAGAZINES.
The following Magazines for September,
have been received and are for sale at the
bookstores:
The Atlantic Monthly, with an article from
C.. S. Hillard upon Hawthorne, and transla
lations from Longfellow, to attract special
notice.
l’utnam's Monthly, a solid and interesting
number.
Hours at Home, in w hich nrc unpublished
letters hy Charlotte llronto.
Harper's Monthly, has the usual piquant
sketches of travel, talcs, illustrations.
Appleton's Monthly, surpassing all in size,
and behind none in well made up contents.
The Lady's friend, a monitor in fashiona
ble and household matters which the ladies
like to rnfrr to.
Arthur's Magazines, always welcome at the
fireside, and suited to all ages.
Oliver Optic’s Magazine, the hoys' and
girls’ favorite.
Our Young Folks, an interesting and in
structive publication for youth.
The lliverside Magazine, also claiming the
front rank among periodicals for the young.
The Nursery, rightly named, the smalli r
children can understand i s pictures and sto
ries.
Good Health, which tells us how to live in ,
order to be healthy, and gives good advice for
the sick and bodily afflicted.
The Galaxy, well tilled with thoughtful ar
ticles.
Lippincott’s Magazine, containing a variety
of reading prepared hy skilful hands.
A story is told, illustrating how the cities •
are built up in the West, to the effect that a
traveler laid down on a vacant lot in Chicago i
to sleep and in the morning lound himself in
a cellar with a five story building built over
Hint.
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, is reported to |
be excited over the discovery of a gold mine ;
there. The chief obstacle to the mining is .
that they are obliged to blast through four
feet of solid silver to get at the gold !
Domrstic Nrtos.
The Farmington Chronicle says : “We are
constantly hearing of the devastating works of
grasshoppers in this county. Some localities
are being greatly overrun with them. A
lady in a neighboring town, a few days since
said she could not get out of her house or
into it without crushing them beneath her
feet. They are devouring grass, potato
crops, corn husks, in many cases even eating i
the kernels; and unless frost or something !
else kills them off. there will be absolutely '
nothing to harvest in some sections of the
county.”
The Observer says that a dwelling house
about 3 miles from Foxcroft village, belong- I
ing to Mr. Eiastus Harmon, came very near
being destroyed by fire on Wednesday last,
together with the outbuildings and a barn till
ed with hay. The fire caught on the roof by
sparks from the chimney, and was not discov
ered until well under way—but by prompt as
sistance from the neighbors it was saved at
ter burning the roof entirely off. Considera
ble clothing was burned in the house, belong
ing to Thomas Chase, its occupant.
A young man named Edward Prentiss, em
ployed in Oilman's mill at Veazie, in some
manner fell upon a circular saw in rapid mo
tion. Thursday alternoon, and was horribly
mutilated, his thigh Ik ing gashed so that a
hand could be laid in the wound, one bone of
his right forearm sawed off. and the flesh
torn in a shocking manner. A resection was
made of the shattered bone, but the prospect
of saving the arm is very doubtful, says the
Whig._
The following is a copy of the inscription
on the monument erected over the remains of
Win. Pepperrell, father of Mir William, near
the old Pepperrell mansion at Kitteyv Point:
“Here lies the Body of the Honorable Win.
Pepperrell, Esq’r, who departed this life the
loth of February, Anno Domini. 1733. In
the 87th Year of his Age. With the remains
of a great part of his Family.”
The friends of the Theological Seminary at
Bangor will regret that the venerable Uev.
l)r. Pqnd, who has been connected with the
Bangor Theological Seminary for about forty
years, occupying some one of the Professor's
chairs, has resigned, the resignation to take
effect when a successor shall be found, lie
retires with an annual pension of MUXtO and
the use of a house through life.
The trot tor the 8200 purse at Waterville,
Wednesday, was won by Lady Fairfield,
owned in Skowhegan, defeating Lady Bur
leigh, owned in Fairfield. Time 2 :374, 2 :38,
2 :3'J. The race was very close and exciting.
A correspondent of the Boston Herald says
A. H. Evans, formerly pitcher of the Eon
Base Ball Club of Portland, was offered 81500
at the opening of the seuson, to play with a
celebrated Chicago club, but he declined the
offer.
The fall term of Colby University will
commence Aug. 31st, and the examinations
for admission are on the same day. The old
chapel is undergoing a thorough remodelling,
in order to improve the recitation rooms.
The Lewiston Journal says that Mr. Oren
Griswold, whose ankle was disilocated two
weeks since, was forced to submit to amputa
tion midwa^between the ankle and knee, on
Tuesday.
The Univcrsalist Society in Dexter have,
recently had set up in their new church a fine
toned and elegant organ manufactured in
Boston, which cost sixteen hundred dollars,
and is all paid for.
Farmington, according to the Chronicle, is
unusually crowded with summer visitors, en
joying the unsurpassed scenery and delightful
drives.
The Frenchman in Foxcroft who took to
the woods to escape conscription by the Cen
sus Marshal, is reported to be strongly en
trenched near Canoodling Point.
The Whig says that several young ladies
who have adopted the two-queue style of
wearing their back hair, attract considerable
notice when they appear on the streets.
Mr ,s. 1’. Srnilli, formerly connected »ill)
tlie (Iospel Manner office, now a student at
Canton, is supplying the Universnlist church
at West Waterville during his vacation, and
his services arc highly appreciated. The
afternoon of each of his Sabbaths is devoted
to the wants of the society in Sidney.
School Books!
,l'l: IIAVK .tr>T ItKCKIVKHOt'K I'VVT.T,
H arm**.** of .»*.*. tti.vatt of
SCHOOL BOOKS,
Which we a c selling on
The Most Favorable Terms !
« 1,11*1* A NORTH.
ItwoliMi*] Is'i’n timl Mailoners,
(S3 Water St., Augusta, Mo.
aug2*>ftt
House for Sale!
V MODI .Its TU’O-STOltV liorsi: with I..
and welt finished. will be sold ala baigain it
applied for .**oo»». s ti I hou*e i* pleasantly situated
on >KWFLL >TULLT in Augusta.
For further particular* inquire of the subscriber
on the i»roini*e*. I'llA UI.H.S NV. IIAKUl .
Augusta. Aug. la, 15*70. ftt*
nfsHallowell House
second street,
HALLOA ELL, : : MA1XE.
Ml? .1. TV I1ILL would respectfully inform lus
liiends and the public that he has opened the
above named house, and hat# lilted it up ub
A First Class Hotel.
This house is about two rods from the depot, ami
is within a few steps of the express otliee and the
business street ol the t irv.
In connection with the house there is a
Lit EliY .1 TliASSIEM' Stable.
This house will be opened to the public on the
Fourth of July. Thankful for tlie favors which he
has received at his former place of business in Lew
iston. the subscriber guarantee* to give complete
satisfaction to the travelling paid
J. B. HILL, Proprietor.
tlf-julyS
S. F. Davenport,
Agent for the sal** of the celebrated
SINGER
SEWING MACHINES I
-ALSO AGENT TOR THE -
F J a O H E \ C 13
SEWING MACHINE
Hallowell, Maine.
Place of bn-ines- has been removed to nearly I
opposite Western luiwii Telegraph Uflice.
Machin's Repaired and Exchanged.
ttf-june?
WAR MAPS OF EUROPE.
SHOWING every < itv, T«»i\n. Village and H un
let on the continent. Made from government
surveys, and used by the Marshal- <-i Flam e and
Generals ol Prussia* It shows c\a ■ llv where the
armies of F'ranee and Pru-.-in an■ ».«»w < "iieeiitra
ted. The Seat of War given i» full. u ith portrait
of the Emperor Napoleon ami King W illiam. Any
live man ean earn from $P' to per d;.y Agent
wanted in every town in the I'nit* d >t .lc- lit tail
price, 5o ct- per copy. Liberal discount lo agents.
Address immediatelv.
FLED A WALDRON*.
AUgi-tSw* NVatei ville, Maine.
Brushes, Combs, Soaps and Perfumery; ,
CHOICE TOILET .09 FANCY ARTICLES!
Physicians' & Apollicraries* Goods
Fur, Spun. Lard. Efrowtf and Votsfoot Dili.
Charles E. Partridge,
DRUGGIST AND APOTHECARY,
Water Street, corner Market Square-,
(L'N PER GRANITE II Al L,)
Has on hand a Lar^e Selected Stock
kept fresh by constant additions,
AMO SELLS AT
The Lowest Market Hates !
FOR GENUINE AND RELIABLE GOODS
PjrtridfM l*rn» Store. Water Street, turner Market Squar
LljauTUly
W hat Shall We Eat ?
1 LL regular phy-ieians will tell yon Hint Bee
J\ and Pork is md »o healthy to eat in spring and
summer a- £ood Fresh Fish. The same ean be ob
tained at
l!lSUING A HOLMES’ MARKET,
Near *K. K. Bridge, MValer St.,
Where al. orders will be promptly attended to
for
of all kinds in their season.
CL’SHING & HOLMES,
tinny 10-tf Water street, Augusta.
6 I L S ,
PL'KE SPERM, CASTOR, OLIVE. NEATS-FOOT,
■1,4 ESSENTIAL OILS of all kinds, lit
Johnson Brothers.
Shooting Tackle.
M . W~ I. O N
SUCCESSOR TO M. LELASD,
O TJTST SMITH
And Dealer In
Shooting Tackle of Every Variety
Kifles and Shot Guns made to order and war
ranted. Old Shot Guns rimmed out smooth ami
made to -hoot thick and strong. Also, Ammunition
ol the nicest quality.
lie pairing done Xratly and -Promptly.
niustlng Powder*
Tho best quality ami largest stin k ever kept in
tin- market. For sale at Factory prices. < "tin try
Dealers supplied in any quantity or quality at dis
count.
STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS.
Mr. A. F. Morse
has just returned from Boston with a very large
and desirable assortment ot
Stereoscopic Views,
„ liicli will l»' sold at Boston prices, lie also makes
and keeps constantly on hand
Views of Halloweli and Vicinity.
Anv views which his customers may want whirl
are not ill his .-election, will be mdered immediate
ly. He has a great variety of 1’ICTt BE t HA.ME a
j on hand. . .
j All orders for framing done with neatness ami
■ despatch. Pictures of every tdyle, made cheap.
| The Public are invited to call at his rooun* on
1 Water M., corner I'niou M., Halloweli. and $>\
amine his stork. Hnlv-ftl
Kiel 11 ’S
Vegetable Cough Cordial!
I I \NK. of the best remedies for Cough*, Colds.
: t / Croup, Bronchitis, and all affections ol tin
I Throat and Lungs, for sale by
JOHNSON BROTHERS,
Oim>. Post Office, Auguslu, Me.
IVT AGrBB’S
NEW PORTABLE RANGE!!
THE LATEST AND BEST.
Combining the Advantages of All Others Z
Willi n»any SEW anil I’lTESTED Friilmr,.
DEA.UTIFTJIj IIV DESIGN !
FEUFECT IIV OrERATIOKT •
OAIiTi AND BEE IT I
Every Range Warranted in Every Particular 11
For Sale by A. l*. GOULD,
, One Door Sorlli Ituilroad Bridge, IK.I ST4,
A Iso for hiiU* tl»<* \<*w tincl finprovetl Cook stove,
For Coal and Wood—-Hu* Bert Stove in the Market. The “(iwldvn Fagle Fsirnnre,'*
For Coal, con tantly fur sale. nttg25*ftf
BOS 'W O BL T ZEE
UAYlYUi REMOVED TO
(2 Doors south of Bridge street,) whieh lias been expressly fitted up for his business, where
will be found a VERY LARGE STOCK of
SPRING WOOLLENS!
OI' tlie Latest Fashions,
WHICH WILL EE CUT AND MADE UP TO ORDER IN THE
Very Liatest Stylo.
ALSO, WILL BE POUND
A LARCE STOCK OF
lleutly Made Clothing,
AND
Gents’ Furnishing Goods
OE EVERT DESCRIPTION.
1*. T. BOS\> ORTH.
Augusta, Mar. 7th, 1H70. t7mar-tf
V so'
« ^ O I « s
o — H ■
O s — 2 15 K (8
^ ~ w O -
« S ^ g i «
|ti. « B
I! i|
n <* §
xs .J
CONY HOUSE,
If\ITKlt STBBMiT,
AUGUSTA, MAINE.
riilil.t .u*w Hotel aflbicU accommodations -uperi
L or to any other in the city to the travelling turn
iuuuity, living located ill tile
CENTRE OF BUSINESS,
and very near the Depot.
Connected w ith and adjacent to the House are:
commodious and convenient
S a n i* ia i: It o omm ?
where CommercialTravellers can show their good* |
li ce of charge.
1 lie travelling public may be assured that no
pains will be spared to meet all theii wants, and
with the assistance of Mu. Trie nek, late ot the
Augusta House, we hope to merit a share of Hit
public patronage.
Connected w ith this.House is a
First Class Livery Stable!
«. A. A II. COSY, / roprietort.
*l4janAwl-tf
Feather Dusters l
Fine Sponges,
Carriage anti
Bathing Jo
AT
JOHNSON BROTHERS^
Edward Rowse,
124 WATER STREET
| q, DEALER IN
Watches, Jewelry,
AND SILVER WARE !
Agent tor the
Waltham Watch t’omp’y,
And I.AZAltl'S A MC l itl«’
l3©rfecte<i Spectacles.
Special attention paid to the repairing of all
kinds of
FINE WATCHES.
• Chronometer Ttatonrcs
applied nnd accurately udjuated to temperature
position and isochron ism.
TIN 12 TAKI-W BY TRAl^MTi
♦lJanTOtf
Printers Wanted.
Constant employment and good wage* will he
paid to three or t'oiir good book printer*, one good
d> printer, and several newspaper compositors.
Apply Immediately at the Kennebec Journal
olUce. ,__. ,
FIRST CLASS
EATING HOUSE!
'■MIL eubj-criber would inform the travelling pub*
J. lie that he ban opened
A First Class Fating House,
- AT —
XO. 1» WATER STREET
Gardiner, Maine,
[ formerly known as Somes' Saloon.
The room? hnvenll been rcliimifhcil ill the bc.t
possible manlier. '1 lie Ladies’ Kooni, up btnin*, Ift
large and elegantly arranged. Meals will be lur
uUhc-d at all uours.
Table B«.ard<-rs A«•«•<>niinoduU’d
IK the week at reasonable rates.
And by strict attention to business, the Prop if
tor Hopes to merit a liberal share of the public
patronage. ' A>- \v;
Gardiner, .fuly IB, ls"0. tUm-Jul) It)
New Goods!
New Goods!
We are now opening our stock ot
sum mEu
Dress Goods
Comprising all tho
NOVELTIES of the SEASON!
Wc call special atlciitioii to our Hock of
BLACK SILKS!
For Ladies’ Suits and Out
side Garments.
•'Also to our
JAPANESE MI.US.
In Plain, Plaid*, and blripci
X. B. -Always on hand,
Androscoggin Rem mints
OF BROWN COTTONS.
Burton & Bussell.
Juno IS, 1870. _Td_
For Sale!
rpHK HOUSE AND FUIIXITUHE on State Street
J. occupied by MILS. WM. K. WESI OS.
Apply to SAMUEL T1TCOMB.
augstti

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