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Daily Kennebec journal. [microfilm reel] (Augusta, Me.) 1870-1975, September 29, 1870, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014248/1870-09-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. L AUGUSTA, ME., THURSDAY MORNING. SEPTEMBER 29, 1870. NO. 232
- —■—— ■ --—.-. ■ ...
, , 'll*'. , -.4
JUnnehfc $raml.
Published on Water, Foot of Court Street,
AUGUSTA, MAINE.
IT SPBAfiVE, OWEN £ NASH.
§ailg |Uniute Journal
Is issued every morning, except Sundays.
Contains ths latest news by telegraph and mail,
gives reports of the Markets, and has carefully pre
pared political and local articles, ami a generous
amount of farming, home and miscellaneous read
lug with a full compilation of State news.
Terms. $7 per annum in advance; $$ it payment
i * not made within the year, eingle copies 4 cent*
to be had at the bookstores and at this office.
Advertisements one inch iu length, three in
sertions or less. $1.00; 25 cts. for every subsequent
insertion. Longer advertisements, or those inserted
for any considerable length of tune, w ill be in»ei u-d
Xi lavorabie terms to the advertiser.
Special Notices 25 per cent, additional.
Amusement Notices, $2 per square per week.
uSeehli) liennelict Journal,
Published evwy Wednesday morning,
li'tu* Unseat folio paper Id the -Hate, coutaiuiDg
uews, politiaal article*, agricultural and scientific
matter, tales, poetry, anecdotes, hou-ehold recipes,
markets, Ac., Ac.
Terms $2 par annum m advance.
Transient Advertisements, $1.50 per inch ro»
first week; 25 cents per week for each subsequent
insertion.
Special Notices, $2.oo per inch tor first week;
5o cents per week for each subsequent week.
Business Notices, in reading column.*. 20 cent#
per line for first insertion ; 10 oen»s per line for each
iubsequent insertion.
All transient advertisement* to be paid for in
advance. _
FIRST CLASS
EATfNC HOUSE!
riiHK subscriber would inform the travelling pub*
X lie that he has opened
A First Class Katina House,
- AT
XO. a# WATER 8TREKT
Gardiner, Maine,
formerly known as Somes' Saloon.
The rooms hare aU beep refurnished in the best
possible manner. The Ladies' Boom, up sUurs, is
large and elegantly arranged. Meals will be fur
nished at all hours.
fa^le Boarder* Accommodated
By the week at reason.-hie rate-.
And by strict attention to business, the l*rop ie
tor hopes to merit a liberal share of the public
patronage. 4>* V*
tiardiner, July 16,1*70._flm-)ulylH
. PLUMBING!
rfjr Subaciibor Iivm leave to inrorm the i-iHremi
ot Augu.ta ami vicinity that ho is prepared lo
do all kinds of Plumbing work at the shortest no
tice. Those about to have wider introduced lino
their buildings w ill do well lo call on him before
going eltew here. n R STBATT()Jf>
Corner Bridge a ml Water Streets.,
Satisfaction guaranteed. Wtf
Pare Meiiciaes aai Cbemicals!
Brashes, Combs, Soaps and Perfumery;
CBOICB T01L£T All flSCI ARTICLES!
Physicians' & Apothecaries’ Goods
Fit* Sftra, Lvd, Let.ttit ud X.iUfoot OiU.
Charles K. Partridge,
DRieeiST AND APOTHECARY,
Water Street, corner Market Square,
(UNDER URANITK HaYl,)
Has on hand a Largo Seleotod Stock
kept fresh by constant additions,
AND BILLS AT
The Lowest Market Hates !
FOR GENUINE UNO RELIABLE GOODS
F«rtri4jt#,i Brag Sion, fitlr Sued, eontr lerltt Squir
tljan701y _ _
Prairie Weed Balsam!
SOLD BT
)uly30-tsteod L. II. TITCOMB, Apothecary.
STEREOS COP IC VIEWS,
Mr. A. F. Morse
ha. just returned from Boston with a very large
and desirable assortment of
Stereoscopic Views,
which will be sold at Boston prices, lie also makes
and keeps constantly on hand
Views of Holiowell and Vicinity.
Any views which his customers may want whirl
are not in his selection. Will b»
ly. Ho has a great variety of I’ICTL Ufc. * HAMhs
on hand. . 11L . . ,
All order* for foaminy done with neatnea* and
despatch. Pictures of every style, made cheap.
Tne Public are invited U> call at lua rooms on
Water St., corner 1'iuon St., Hallowed. and ex
amine his stofkv_ljuli-ttt
Shooliiiii Tackle.
M.
SUCCESSOR TO L. if. LELAA’D, \
OTJIM SMITH
And Dealer in
Shooting Tackle of Every v ariety
Hides and Shot duos made to order and war- j
runted, old Shot (Suns rimmed out smooth and i
made to shoot thick and strong. Also, Ammunition
of the nicest quality.
Repairing dent Meatly and Promptly.
niustlnR Powder.
Thebes! quality and largest stock ever kept in
this market. For sale at Factory prices Country
Dealers supplied In any quantity or quahty anils
20c. Initial Stttionery. 20c.
24 SHEETS i’AI'EKAX» i4 ^VELOPES
put up ia a neat box, ««
.41 fbipp & North’s Book Store.
1W WATER STKEET, Al'OP.TA. MAINE.
nngflttfl
Harnesses and Harness Hoods !
Horse Clothing, Lap Robes, Saddles,
Bridles, Whips, Curry-combs,
I Brushes, Cards, All hinds of Intofcrlng, Ituco
Boots and Trotting Boots.
' And Everything pertaining to a Well regulated Stable
COLLER & GARDINER,
(Opposite Cony House.) 1A3 Water Street, Augusta.
Don't pay two profits on your Trunk*, but buy at the only place in Augusta where they are manufactured
And sold at Manufacturer’s Prices,
AT COLLER & GARDINER’S
Augusta Trunk Factory!
Sign of* tlio “ BIG TRUNK/’
U A VIM. engaged n Fir*t-rl:is-Workman on >olc Leather Work, we arc now prepared to furnish
Note X^eutli«*r Truukn of* flit? l*«»Nt Qmilltj’.
Tiie oul} place in Maim* where a lii>t-cla** trunk is made. CALL AND EXAMINE.
.\o. 1 Fngrnir, Sai atogl, MottlMr, /.ink ( ai . Trunk* of all rlaum, Ladies* l»rr»x,
Common Dress, YAI.I>K>, boti> sole leather and common, TlMTKTd.lN’G it SHOPPING 11A(«$
>11 AN' I. >THAI*^—In fact everything in the way of convenience to ihe travelling public.
Collor tfc Grard-iner,
14:i Water Street, AUGUSTA.
*epf!b-Uf __^_
JVC AGEE’S
NEW PORTABLE RANGE! !
THE LATEST AND BEST.
Combining the Advantages of All Others !
With man, HEW un«l PATEHTED Feuturos.
BBAUTIPUL IN’ DESIGN !
DEHEECT 11ST OPEUATIORT !
CAIiTi AND SEE IT !
Every Range Warranted in Every Particular !!
For Sale by A. X*. GOULD,
One Door A'ortl) Railroad Bridge, AI'Cil’STA.
AIho lor sale tbu \rWand Improv ed “I’EIUILESS" Cootofeitove,
For Coal and Wood—The Best Stove in the Market. The “Golden Eagle Furnace,**
For Coal, constantly for sale. ang&Vttf
James H. Leigh,
DKALKlt IS
Foreign and Domestic
DRYGOODS
AI.M), AGENT FOB
Wheeler & Wilson's
Sowluc machines !
\i:i.UI.i;s mnt ull Tuolu nilnjitml to Uio M.i
chiuea, conutantly on burnt.
Water St., llallowell. Me.
♦tapr-tf ___
CUSHNOC HOUSE.
Corner
WinthTop
ana
State Sts.,
.A ucrusta, iSXe.
T. B. b/\LLARD, : : Proprietor.
Quests taken to and from the Cars
and Boats Free.
HORSES AND CARRIAGES TO LET.
fljau7(M>m
Mass. Institute of Technology.
11KTKASCB EXAMINATION THI'HSUAY, SEPTKM
j uku 21*. Fur Catalogues, apply to Piiokf.ssok
Samuel Kherland, Boston, Masa. nep7-eodi»t
BATH TIBS, COPPER BOILERS,
Water Closets, Wash Basins,
a
IIIIAHH »V PIATED WARE,
Caul Iron Pipe,
Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead,
And overv article pertaining to Plumbing kept con
* etantly on hand and Cor sale at
H. R. STRATTON’S,
Corner Bridge A Water Streets.
Under Hunt’s Hit Store.
N. It. Plumbing in all Us bram-he* done in n neat
an.’ thorough mnun<,T.
Particular Attention Paid to Jobbing,
tliepr-tf____
HARDWARE I
At WILLIAMSON A ORKKNWOOl
MOSES M. SWAN,
Watchmaker and Jeweller,
:
I
His Stock embraces a tine line ol
American and Swiss Watches,
in gold and sliver case, including the celebrated
National or Elgin Watch, Waltham, Trcmont, Bor*
• min, Bonnett, Bordeaux, .laeot, Ac., in both La
dies’ and gentlemen’*«Uca.
Pino Gold «T owolry,
Solid Gold Leoniton
Vest and Neck Chains,
STERLING A- COIN SILVER GOODS,
FINE PLATED WARE, •
SPECTACLES AND EYE GLASSES,
of the most approved kinds.
CLOCKS or ALL KIXDS,
including the celebrated ITHACA CALENDAR
all of which will be sold at the
Lowest l*riecs and Warranted.
Particular attention given to repairing all kinds <>|
1'me Watches. Chronometer Balances applied and
ad justed to temperature and position fljan70-tf
S. F. Davenport,
Agent for the Mile of the celebrated
Si NG ER
SIEVING tlAI IIIMiS
- \L"0 Ai.KNT fon TBK —
f i. o it 1: \ ce
SEWING MACHINE
Hallowell, Maine.
I
I Place of business has been removed to nearly
opposite Western t'nisn Telegraph Ollice.
1 Maohinrs Repaired and Exchanged.
ttfdnneT
SOMETHING NEW
rpHE HALL TREADLE to be attach to
I X any be wing Machine. Takes but very ttie
strength to run. Always starts the right way; .• er
backwards. No starting or stopping the machine
i with the hands. Call and see it in operation.
seplMtf G. VV. JONES, Agent.
DENTISTRY !
j New Dental Rooms,
IIL'NT’S BLOCK, next door North of
Post Office,
IIGISTA, : : Maine.

! AITE beg to inform the public that we have estab
▼ V lished this office permanently for the practice
of Dentistry in all its branches. Our long experi
ence in both Boston and New York enables us to
execute all operation* in the best possible manner
We give our patrons the benefit oi all the latest and
best improvements without extra charge. Our char
ges H ill be very moderate in all cases.
Artificial Teeth inserted at the following greatly
reduced price* for ovc month
Beautiftil Beta of Gum teeth $15 to $20.
Temporary “ Plain “ $10 to $16.
Partial set* in proportion.
Tef.th kxtkacted irminn Pain.
F. II. FALL* & FO., Surgeon Dentists.
septlFf
WANTED!
I>1 unexperienced teacher, a situation to teach
J > the coining winter, where good wages are paid,
or as assistant. Languages taught if desired.
References given. Address
*ept;-‘lw Box B, South China.
a.
HAVING returned to Ills old stand, next door to ^
the Journal Rlock. would inform hi* friends
and the public that he is ready to manufacture
HOOTS & SHOES,
either PEGGED or SEWED.
REPAIRING!
done cheaper than at any other shop on the Ken- i
nebee,
A. Littlefield.
Augusta, >ept. 14. l»7o. biro
HEURY 6. & A. A NICHOLS.
MASONS AND SLATERS.
ALL work in their line done promptly and in a
good, workmanlike manner, by the day or job.
Puiticular attention paid to repairs of slate roofs,
cementing cisterns, cellars. Ac.
Orders left at A. 1\ Gould's stove Store, first door
above Railroad Bridge, promptly attended to.
II KNKV O NIC HOLS,
ALBERT A. NICHOLS.
Augusta Jan.l lSbh.
VMER1CAIV BROILERS, Table Cutlery,
Piated Forks and Spoons, and Hoiisekeeniiig
Goods at Williamson A brrrnwood’i.
aug*27-ttf
ISE REWE’S PAIN RILLEVG
MAGIC OIU
“It Works like a oharm.”
Have you Headache? Use Renne’s Magic Oil. |
Have you Toothache ? Use Renne’s Magic Oil.
Have you Neuralgia ? Use Renne’s Magic Oil.
Have you Rheumatism ? Use Renne’s Magic Oil.
Have you sore Throat ? Use Kenne’s Magic < >il.
Have you Sciatica ? Use Renne's Magic Oil.
Have you a Bruise? Use Renne’s Magic Oil.
Have you < ramps ? Use Renne's Magic Oil.
Have \ou Cholera Morbus ? Use Renne’s Magic Oil.
Have you Lameness ? Use Renne's Magic Oil.
This is the Best Family Remedy, to cure all kinds
of Pain, vou ever tried.
It is clean, safe and delicious to use. anti if you
use it faithfully, IT WILL 1)0 YOU GOOD.
Directions oh each bottle. Buy it of the Druggist
or Merchant where you trade. If they have not got
it on hand, thev will send for it. at voiir request, ami
sell you Genuine Renne’s Pain-Killing Magic
Oil, at the manufacturer’s lowest price at retail.
Sold by Druggists, Merchants and Grocers.
It is put up in three sizes, and called “Trial Size,”
“Medium Size,” and “Large Family Size” bottles.
WM. RENNE, sole Proprietor and Manufac
turer, Pittsfield. Mash.
Wholesale and retail in Augusta by Marshall
Whithed Grocer. lytW-eow
Wanted :
ITLVRMEKS ami Hunters having prime Mins Skins
1 on hand will find a ea>h customer at highest
market price bv sending them to
J. II. WJBUJI A CO.,
first Lclter Foundry In New England.
Commenced in 1817.
Boston Tvpe Foundry
Always noted for its
Hard and Tough Metal,
And its large varieties ol
BOOK AND JOB TYPE,
And lately for its unrivalled
N p >v k p tip o l- Fuoen.
Elf ('trot) ping Hone In nil Us Rranrhfs.
Address orders to
J. A. ST. JOHN, Agent,
55 Water Street, ----- Boston
i
SUPERIOR TYPE METAL.
Long experience and the utmost rare are neees
sary to ensure good metal, even with a knowledge
of the best combinations—therefore, the safest way
is to buy of the oldest established Foundry.
NEWSPAPER STYLES.
Our Newspaper Faces (body, two-line, and dis
play) are of our own cutting, and the beet made, ns
a glance at the papers we lit out n ill prove.
BOOK FACES.
Our special Specimen of Book Pages shows grea
variety, adapted to all kinds of work, including our
Revived Old Styles, the most perfect embodiment*
of the letters of the lar«t century yet presented.
4 "*t f
ELI G. JONES,
ECLECTIC
Physician & Surgeon
May lie consulted on ull forms of disease at
his oflice in I
CHINA VILLAGE, ME.
Graduate of “The Eclectic Medical College, Pa.,”
tnemhei of the “Eclectic. Nalioual Medical Asso
ciation, also member of “The Maine Eclectic Med
ical Society,” and graduate of the “Pennsylvania
Hospital" al Philadelphia.
Special .#Ilenlion paid to Surgery, Mid
wifery, and iH»ea*e» •/' IIVmo n
and Children,
49* All calls promptly Attended to night or day. :
Rki EHF.NCKS in PHILADELPHIA : Prof. John Bu
chanan, M. 1> . 2*27 No. 12th st.: Prof. Joseph Site-,
M. lb. M»2 N >. 6th -t .; Prof. James Cochran, M. lb.
514 Pinest.; Prof. Win. Clark, M.lb, M4 Pine ^t.
augWwMv
FOR SALE.
I JOB SALE in liallowell. about Thirty acres of
tillage and Sixty acres of wood land and pas
ture. For particulars impure in Hallowed of
*ppt*S'tty THOMAS H. HIBBARD.
DAVID CARCILL’S
CIEKERAI.
Insurance Agency,
Granite Block, sooth side Market Si
AUGUSTA, ME.
CAPITAL KEPKESENTED,
Over $85,000,000.00 !
jElna Life Icscraece Company,
Hartford Conn.,
Chattered lbl9. Charter Perpetual. Loaves paid
In M years. $27,000,000.00.
A eat-tv. July 1, 1870, $5,7 I ft.376l.Ott.
JEtna Life Insurance Comp'y,
Hartford, Conn.,
Asei'ts, January 1, lt<70, over $1A,000,(XK).00.
It lia» over 15,000 membert,
AND
An Annual Income of over Six
Millions of Dollars !
Traveler’s Insurance Comp’y,
Hartford, Conn.,
Lifb and A.ooldoiit.
CASH ASSETS Sl.457,719.04, Jan. 1, 1970.
fh AJJKiijiKr
Fire Insurance Company,
Philadelphia,
A«9ft9, January 1, 1*70, 82,825,788.08.
City Fire Insurance Co.,
IIAKTFOIU), COXX.
Huger Williams Ins. Cumpany,
PROVIDENCE, R. I.
Merchants' Insurance Comp'),
PROVIDENCE, R. I.
Atlantic Fire Insurance Co’y.,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
Eastern Insurance Company,
BANGOR, M .
Marine Risks
Effected on reasonable terms in Reliable
Companies.
septl'j-ttf
NOTICE
OFFICE OF THE AMERICAN WATCH CO. )
WALTHAM, MASK.. Nov.. 1S68. f
We have appointed
EDWARD ROWSE
124 WATER STREET. AUGUSTA,
DJULKlt IS
Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware,
And SPECTACLES,
our selling Agent f»r the city ami vicinity of AUGUSTA
and intend to keep m his possession at &1 times such a
s toct of
GOLD AM) SILVER WATCHES,
.f.ro i»vf Ten .n o rif.Tiif.rTs
as will enable him to supply any demand, either at
Wholesale or Retail,
which may be made upon him, and
AT RATES AS FAVORABLE
as are offered at our Kales Rooms In
Now York or Soston.
FOR AMERICAN WATCH COMPANY.
R. E. ROBBINS, Treas’r.
J. W. TOWARD, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office on Wintlirop Street,
| Las of State Street.—Opposite Court House.
I A n&Sfi&wtl _
Picture Frames!
CHROMOS, BRACKETS, ALBUMS!
Ac., Ac., Ac.,
i
In Large Variety.
Picture Frames of any size made t«» order at short
notice at
| Hcndee's Photograph Rooms,
Opposite Post Office, Augusta.
tjune2-tf
Salts and #fcrtcbts.
THE LITTLE MATCH BOX MAKER
i Sketch of London Life.
“1 made 'em myself!—myself'’'
A bony, baby hand holds up the rude
box of matches—a fleshless, baby frame
■ shivers in its scanty rags, as the piping,
pleading little voice repeats,
“I made 'em myself!”
The wan, pinched face is raised pit
eously to that of each passer by: such an
old, old face, that looks familiar with
care; eyes large, and hollow, and lustre
less—and yet it is the tiny face of a child
: of four years. She stands at the corner of
a crowded street of a London suburb.
Again and again, and still again is the
thin, small baud extended; again and
again the shrill, supplicating voice reiter
ates the sad statement that this little mite
made the wares she offers lor sale herself.
lint the moving current of life, upon
which she is an insignificant item, rolls on
without heeding her. The silken gar
ments of a lady, as she rapidly turns the
j corner, sweep against the fragile vender,
I and almost brush the box from her feeble
j hands. The lady draws her rich dress
; from the contact, and hurries on. Yft
■ she is a mother—about her fireside rosy
; boys and girls are shouting and gambol
ing: in her hand, at this very moment,
she is carrying a jewel case, with a coral
necklace, for the last, chubby nursling of
her household—a necklace the cost of
which would have fed and housed and
clothed the little match-box vender
through more than one winter and
summer; yes, that lady is a mother, and
she could see without noting, the aged
baby face—the frail, extended linnets—
could hear the tremor of that beseeching
baby voice, and could flit by unmoved.
Preoccupied men—idle or busy women
—gaily dressed, laughing children, with
meek-looking governesses or sturdy
nurses, pass without a word, without a
look, and the poor little match-vender has
stood shivering at her post since morn
ing; her thin, bloodless lips framing, ever
and anon, those four words that tell such
a solemn history.
They did reach one heart at last. A
young seamstress, poorly clad ami pale
faced, has, at least, a sorrowful look to
bestow: she half pauses as her eye rests
on the child—she tries to go on, t/ut can
not. How can she give anything whose
every farthing is needed for daily food
and shelter ?
“I made 'em myself!" repeats the
childish voice.
“1 dare say ! Poor little dear!”
How many, glancing at that small waif
of humanity, would have doubted the
story ; the pale-faced seamstress did not;
she knew too much of poverty and of the
London poor. With a sigh, she draws a
penny from her pocket, lays it gently on
the box of matches, without taking the
latter, and passes on. The sigh was for
the child, but, perhaps, a little for herself
also;—that penny was to have bought the
bunn to break her mid-day fast—she will
go without her luncheon to-day.
The child closed her little fingers over
the copper eagerly, questioning!)', as
though she doubted its reality. Then
putting back the box, w hich was sold not
taken, drew the tattered bit of faded
finery which served for a shawl more
closely around her, and with an unchild
like expression coining into her old, little
face, the look of making up one's mind,
turned down the narrow street, tottering
along with numb limbs, until she came to
a still narrower, darker, filthier street,
where the houses were all huddled to
gether, regardless of shape and size.
Entering one of the poorest, she climbed
up to tlie top story. There was a straw
mattress upon the floor of the small room
and on it lay a scarcely animate female
form.
••‘Uiuy tins, Ai mimic . Ami tur little
girl laid the copper on the bed. “I came
back soon as 1 got anything. Nobody
wanted matches—1 couldn't sell 'em.”
The mother opened her mournful eyes
at the child's voice—but the heavy lids
quickly dropped again. Her long illness
had been the result of sorrow, want, ex
posure, almost famine, and was followed
by that seldom-recognized blessing, a half
stupor, free from the dreaming ills of
sleep.
The child put the copper carefully in
her pocket, laid aside her ragged shawl
and shapeless bonnet, and sat down noise
lessly upon an old candle-box, placed in
front of aboard raised on rude props which
served as legs. A broken pair of scis
sors, a pot of paste, and some bits of card
board were spread before her, and iu a
few moments the busy lingers were at
work making match-boxes, and making
them so neatly and deftly that it was easy
to believe those lingers, small and tender
as they were, must have fashioned hund
reds. * And they had, not hundreds but
thousands. By making thirty-two boxes
she earned .just one half-penny (sterling).
She could make two hundred in a day;
there were long summer days in which
she had made three hundred; and this
baby worker earned the rent of the room
which she and her mother occupied.
These are actual facts, not fiction,—not
even colored, dressed-up truths,—but bare
and most solemn facts.
This babe had slipped from her mother’s
breast that yielded her scanty sustenance
—from her mother’s knee that could not
cradle her softly, upon her feeble feet, to
become—a worker—her mother’s milk
was almost the only food she had not
earned by toil. And she was only one
among many of a class. There were oth
er children, residing in the same house,
whose little lives were passed front baby
hood, like hers, in constructing match
boxes. Oh! most unnatural thing iu ua
; ture 1 Children who were taught to work
j before they had learned to play! who
knew what paste and scissors and card
| board meant, but not what daisies and
j buttercups and green Helds mean! to
; whose ears “toy” and “play” were unfa
I miliar words, and to whose eyes there
j was no sight so familiar as the hundreds
^ upon hundreds of match-boxes in endless
rows, that might have made a child’s brain
giddy with their maddening monotony.
Upon the day on which this narrative
commences, our little match-box maker
had actually conceived a small specula
tion of her own, for incessant toil had ren
dered her precocious in her trading art.
She had purchased matches enough for a
farthing to fill half a dozen boxes, and,
quite unprompted, had sallied forth to sell
them for a penny each. True, she had
never studied arithmetic, but she knew
that she must fashion thirty boxes for a
half-penny, and, without waking an exact
calculation, she had a vague idea of im
mense profit to be gained, if, by the out
lay of a farthing, she could fill six bone#
nas Deen wasted oelore me sow one frame
box ' and with the first penny gained she
had returned home, discouraged, and pru
dently substituted a drudging certainty for
a pleasant, possible gain. Many n lnigrr
speculator has shown less wisdom.
It is scarcely possible to crash oat hope
in an infant's heart. The poor little pris
oner of a garret had found something ex
hilaratingin the free air—(we cannot call
it the fresh air)—something fascinating in
tlic moving sights, in lieu of the endless
match-boxes that filled, until they almost
blinded, her weary eyes,—something re
freshing to the ear in the varied street
sounds, in place of her mother’s low
moans; and, a few days alter her first fail
ure, when the winter sun streamed in
brightly through the small, uncurtained,
dingy window, again she was seized with
a strong yearning to go forth. Thera
were the six match-boxes ready filled;
what if she were to sell them all! all!
What if she were actually to moke six
pence in one day! What a fortune!
Her mother, too, had recovered a little;
shehad emerged from her lethargic state
sufficiently to speak, to suffer, to remem
ber the need of labor, to try to work; and
the child had brought her a bundle of can
vas, cut ready to be made into rude bags,
of all sizes; an employment she had ac
cepted because it was one found beneath
her hand, and she had not courage or
strength to seek any other, scanty as was
the remuneration for this.
The poor sufferer had lost the power of
feeling glad at anything, yet she thought
it well that the child Mould go out into
the sunshine; the streets were narrow,
and close, and unclean, but the sun shone,
and shone on all alike,—if the child could
but steal breathing space from toil, that
one lioon she might enjoy in common with
the rest of the world;—that one boon
which typified God's love shining upon the
vilest, and seeking out the darkest corners.
Alas! beings as joyless and comfortless as
this child might well have doubted that
God's love would ever find them out, had
not that very love implanted the undying
hope which sustains even weak natures,
and developes itself into all enduringfalth
in strong spirits.
Are the hearts in London harder than
elsewhere? Are the ears more deaf to a
child’s pleading voice? The little match
box-maker's fate on the second day seem
ed likely to lie a repetition of the first.
Yet was she stirred by a sense as sear
akin to pleasure as she had everyetkown,
while she watched the carriages and hors
es, ami noticed the colors of dresses, es
pecially those of children—a passing pet
clog delighted her, and when a boy came
by with a canary bird in a cage, the child's
eyes dilated with wild excitement. How
happy that boy must be ! What a grand
thing to possess a bird! Not that she ever
dreamed of the possibility of owning one
herself; she would as soon have thought
of owning that superb equipage yonder.
We hardly expect a child of four winters
to reflect, to calculate; but poverty and
misery nets as a forcing honse for the brains
of human plants—and by-and-by as the
day advanced, and she sold nothing, the
little sales-woman began to be sorely
troubled; she thought how many boxes
she could have made if she had remained
at home! The muscles of the wizened lit
tle face twitched nervously, but she was
hardly child enough, oryet woman enough,
to shed tears liberally efropped. Her little
hand was thrust out with sudden despera
tion, as she uttered more shrilly and be-,
seochingly than beiore,
“Mutch boxes! Match boxes! I made
'em myself!” She had not been taught the
professional match-vender’s cry, — that
there were match boxes and that she had
made them, was the uppermost thought.
“You don't say so? You didn't though,
did you ? Such a little midge as you r It
was the jovial voice of a sailor that spoke,
as his ready hand was thrust into his pock
et. “How much, eh?”
“A penny a piece.”
“Let’s see,—one two, three, four five ;
there’s live coppers for you. Now give us
you five mammoth boxes.”
Tim hands of the amazed, bewildered
child trembled so much, through sudden
and overwhelming joy, that she could
hardly hand him the live boxes.
"All right; just the thing to light my
pipe ; and he went merrily on his way.
Should she go home at once with her
treasure,—a mine of wealth,—her five
whole coppers? or should she try to sell
her remaining box ? The greed of gain
was strong within her,—how could it be
otherwise ? It was the first greed she had
been taught. She remained. And now
the diminutive hand was extended tnore
confidently, and the unchildlike face was
strangely lighted up as it looked unfeariog
ly into tin; benevolent countenance of one
who had passed in front of her.
“Matches, are. they?” asked a cheery
i «ilt r.
“Match boxes ! I made ’em myself!" re
peated the child, but less mechanically
than before.
“Yourself? You? Why. how old are
you ?’’
"Four.”
“And you made this neat little box?”
The gentlemau—we apply the designa
tion to him, though he would scarcely
have laid claim to It in England, for albeit
he was well dressed and had an air at once
genial and courteous, he looked like a m»"
who gained his own livlihood, a farmer it
might be, or a wealthy tradesman—the
gentleman took the match box in his
[continued on second faoe.]

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