OCR Interpretation


Daily Kennebec journal. [microfilm reel] (Augusta, Me.) 1870-1975, December 20, 1870, Image 2

Image and text provided by Maine State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014248/1870-12-20/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Jails Jitnntljct Journal
AUGUSTA.
TUE8DAY MORNING. DEC. 20. 1870.
The election in Georgia commenced
yesterday and. continues through to-ihu
and to-morrow. Seven Congressmen are
to be chosen for the remainder of the pres
ent Congress, and the same number lor
the Forty-Second Congress. Members ol
the State Legislature are also to be elected.
This will close the elections of 1870.
The Senate Committee on the Judiciary
reports that the fourteenth amendment
has no effee* whatever upon the status ol
the Indian tribes within the limits of the
United States. The Indians in their tribal
condition have always been treated as
nation;, and Congress has always respect
ed their right to govern themselves in
their own way.
The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg,
which is about to be absorbed by Prussia,
lies east of Belgium, north of France,
and has Rhenish Prussia south and east.
Its area is 1228 square miles, and it has a
quarter of a million of population. It
gave an Emperor to Germany, in the per
son of Henry VII, early in the fifteenth
century; was then erected a duchy; tiien
joined Burgundy, and soon after incorpo
rated with Spain. A portion was ceded to
France in 1659, and three-quarters of a
century latter Austria acquired the whole.
It was wrenched from her and resnnexed
to France, in the wars of the Republic and
Empire, at the close of the hist century.
But when Napoleon fell, it was parted be
tween Holland and Belgium. By the revo
lution of 1880 Btdginni incorporated her
share as a distinct province—about 1700
square miles, with 200,000 inhabitants. In
1867 the Grand Duke agreed to sell it to
Louis Napoleon but Prussia objected and
the bargain was broken up. Now King
William intends to secure it while lie can
as one of the conquests of the war.
THE WINTER SEASON.
The greatest objection which some have
to a residence in New England, particular
ly this eastern part of it, is to its season of
frost and snow. They admire the genial
breath of our summers, but are taken
with catarrh or reheumatism when they
think of the rough winds and icicles of
winter, and fall to dreaming of tiiat im
aginary land where the skies are always
bright with sunshine. Even to read of a
New England winter without a hot brick
at their feet and something warm at hand
to take inwardly, gives them a chill and
threatens them with galloping consump
tion. How they pity us poor mortals who
have to endure the ills they dread ! They
take Cowper’s picture of Winter, the “ru
ler of tho inverted year,1’ his hair tilled
with sleet, his breath congealed upon his
lips, cheeks fringed with frosty heard,
forehead wrapped in clouds, his sceptre a
leafless branch and his throne a sliding
car, and this thev believe to be all there
is of Winter, notcaring to remember that
the artist who drew the picture referred to
said of Winter in closing it,
“I love thee, >11 unlovely ns thou scein’st,
And dreaded as thou art!”
We have had for several days past a
touch of winter as it is in southern climes.
First a day of sunshine, redolent ol violets
and roses, followed by leaden clouds,
absence of the sun's face, fog, drizzle,
shower, rain and snow, lasting a fortnight,
with mud half-leg deep, and travel except
by rail almost prohibited. Tile pleasant
effect upon our people of this taste of
winter as they have it in the mild latitudes
is witnessed in aggravated and general
catarrh, throats that relus< to speak except
with pain and in discordant notes, uncon
querable neuralgia, all faces in the streets
wearing a look as If the world were going
to ruin and they cared little how soon, and
aloud call for physicians and nurses, with
fierce execrations of the weather. Per
haps they can endure this sort of thing
better in the land of the orange and pome
granate, or is it only “distance” that
makes it appear so charming to us “down
South ?” The South has a reputation for
pleasant winters, but they prove a bad
article when imported here and subjected
to experience and common sense criticism.
Now while every body is in love with
oar New England summers, and persons
come from all quarters to pass the warm
months at the seaside resorts from Cape
Cod to Mount Desert, they fail to under
stand the value of our New England
winters. These winters,frozen as they are,
give to New Eugiaud physical, mental,
moral and social characteristics not found
in southern latitudes. Possibly “brown
bread, cider, and bean porridge," may aid
in giving growth to body and mind, but
the rough winds have an exhilarating ef
fect, and arouse the energy necessary to
overcome with will and strength the rigors
of the weather. The very act of resist
ance to the sharp attacks of Winter, facing
him in his fiercest mood, defying his pres
ence out-of-doors, and expelling him from
the fireside where the coals sparkle and
flowers bloom, fits the character to st nfc
gie lor supremacy in other arenas. Health
comes on the icy breeze, and character
grows in the boy as he slaps his chilled
hands or rubs his frosty face and sticks to
his coasting or skating let tiie wind blow
ever so .high. There is no one who does
not know that the intellect is keener in
winter than summer. Iu July anfl August
the mind works wearily and poorly, drag
ging out with the greatest effort what it is
obiigedtodo, but iu December and Jan
uary the wits need no stimulus and work
is a delight. Of the two seasons, summer
and winter, the latter docs the most for
the character, building it up in mental and
awnletraagth, and to this it is doubtless
iargelv due that New Englaud stock in
men and women commands a premium
the country over, except perhaps in those
States which have not forgotten or for
given the result of their conflict with New
England ideas and manhood. In social
delights winter is also preeminent. The
poet is right when he says:
“I crown thee king of intiinnte delight*.
Fire-side enjoyment-, homeboni happiness,
And all (he comfort* that the lowly ioof
Of undistuibed retirement, j ml the h-.urs
Of long, uninterrupted evening, know.”
As the cold comes on sociability in
reases, the latch string is always out, and
charity is quickened into greater activity.
The pulpit, school ami lyceum do theii
best labor in the frostiest days. “Tin
light fantastic toe’’ is not neglected, and
tile ice which keeps warm hearts apart i>
oftener broken about this time, and tin
sacred pledge given that links them to
gether tor weal or for woe till death do
them part. For the winter season of New
England let us be thankful and make the
mo. t of its blessings. No weak race
comes from such a climate. Italy is de
generate. The northern nations of Eu
rope are the arbiters of the destiny of tin
Eastern world. The United States an
supreme on this continent, and New Eng
land thought and energy wields the force
that controls the nation.
SENATOR DRAKE'S REPLY TO MR.
SCIWRZ.
On Friday the Senate resumed the consid
eration of the amnesty resolution of Mr.
Schurz, and Mr. Drake took the floor to re
ply to his colh ague.
After alleging that for the introduction of a
personal controversy and local political con
test into the Senate of the United States his
colleague was entirely responsible, he said
that his motive in replying was not merely
with a view to his personal vindication, hut
that of as noble a party as ever held the des
tinies of any State of the Union. The ex
traordinary and remarkable speech of his
colleague was without provocation, lie could
not conceive whv the hosts led by his col
league, who had their victory when they
trailed the republican banner of Missouri in
the dust, should not have been content with
their triumph upon the soil of that State, but
seek to carry it before the nation. Criticising
the reference to himself, that, years before,
he had acted in the slavery interest of a polit
ical candidate in Missouri, he attributed tin
motive for the statement to the desire to hold
hnu up before the Republican Senate and na
tion asun object of condemnation and distrust.
Rut supposing he had been a pro-slavery man
in 1807, did that constitute the justification of
his Collegue’s act, in 1870? Though for ten
years penitent, his colleague could not pardon
him his sin.
Mr. Schurz here desired to interpose for a
word of explanation.
Mr. Drake declined to give way, remarking
that his colleague had over four years of sen
atorial life remaining in which to answer him
after be had gone hence.
Mr. Schurz—I merely want to tell my col
league 1 forgive him. [Laughter.]
Mr. Drake expressed his appreciation of
his colleague's unexpected outburst of clem
ency, adding that, in his opinion, it was better
to be a new republican uml a faithful one,
than an old and treacherous one. [Applause
in the galleries, which the Vice Fresident
promptly suppressed.] He did not consider
that the title to slay the party in cold blood
could be derived from longevity within its
rank* If it could, then he was thaukful that
before he could attain his colleague’s pe
riod ot longevity, at which men learned such
wick.-d and murderous purposes! he would
have gone beyond the reach of those influences
into a more healthful sphere of action. He
did not wonder that his colleague had at
tempted the vindication of himself before his
republican colleagues in the Senate, whose
hearts were not now touched by his chilling
presence. Whether or not his attempt at
vindication had succeeded would appear by
the verdict of the Senate which would follow
at the end of the discussion, llis colleugue,
before he was two years warm in his seat, had
etiuckat those who sent him to the Senate,
'and had acquired that taste of blood which
the possession of power could enable a man
to shed in the household of his friends, feel
ing perhaps that he did hold the destiny of
the great republican party in his hands to do
with as he would. He [Schurz] hud come to
the Senate to sow seeds of dissension which
were to ripen by splitting the party in twain
from one end of the land to the other. That
purpose his colleague entertained. It would
tail here, and his would be the fate ot him of
old, who would
"Iti'ml thu oax anei inuianoioi me uougn
Mr. Drake then eulogized the history o(
the radical union party of Missouri during the
last ten years; ils instrumentality, with the
aid of disirachisement measures , in saving
tlie State to the Union; its sagacity in
foreseeing the necessity of removing disa
bilities when warranted by public safely, the
iTedit of which was unfairly usurped by the
new liberal movement. To these measures
the loyal men of Missouri were indebted for
the piotcction which was denied to the loyal
element of Kentucky Htid Tennessee. His
colleague's victory, therefore, bad been at the
expense of the loyal ii.cn of Missouri, to whom
he owed his elevation to the highest office lie
could ever hope 10 attain under the Constitu
tion of the United Stales. His mode of thank
mg them was not original. Some better
justification than he had y et attempted was
necessary, else it would have been better lor
him politically bad he never been lorn. The
disruption of the republican State convention
and the so-called liberal movements were re
ferred to by Mr. Drake us features of the
Presidential scheme to givu thu Suite to the
democrats, the ostensible cause of the con
troversy arising from the determination of
the majority to make the franehiseinent a
part ol the platform, in advance of any ex
pression ot popular sentiment lor or against
the proposition. The amendment to the
Constitution being then before the people for
independent action, the minority, led by his
colleague, refused to submit to the will of tile
majority, and not only seperated from the
party but began a war against General Grant's
administration, ignoring it in tbeir platform,
and his colleague ridiculing us fulsome Mattery
the language of the resolution on the subject
adopted by the convention. Ills colleague’s
attempt to defend Ills course upon the high
ground of principle was answered by the tael
that be bad made a single point ot policy a
pretext for striking a blow at the fundame nt il
party principle llmt the w ill of the majority
should rule. Independence ot thought and
action were well enough in their place, but
not as the means of the party destruction.
Quoting from the* campaign speeches of the
liberal candidate lor governor [Gratz Brown],
to show his antipathy to the republican cause,
the speaker dismissed the subject with the
remark : “He lias gone to the democracy, ami
oiay the Lord have mercy on bis soul.”
[Laughter.] In answer to the assumption
mat the party taithwauple'dgedto enfranchise
ment, lie said the general amnesty resolution
ot the national republican convention ot lblJti
was merely an expression of opinion that dis
abilities should be removed upon the happen
ing of a contingency— to wit when they were
no lunger required by public necessity; that
such an expression could only have a national
bearing and was of no effect in the regulation
of the internal policy of individual republican
States like Missouri. Among the probable
consequences of Ills colleague's course was
tile election of a democrat to succeed him
[Drake] and a possible republican defe at in
me next presidential elect, in by the loss of
the electoral vote of Missouri. In regard to
the President's interference in Missouri poll
tics, lie [Drake] cheerfully accepted the re
sponsibility for his advice to the President in
the matter; that he believed no man had a
right to a position under a party while warring
against it. Upon the question ol'n new party
he understood Ins colleague s position tube
that while the republican party was dead in
trespass and sin, it yet contained tl e element.
of the regeneration of a new parly. This re
minded him of the county court that wanted
to build a new jail and p iss, d three resolu
tions,—first, that they would build a new jail:
second, that they would build it out of mate
rials composing the old one: and third, that
the old one should stand until the new ont
was built. [Great laughter.] Who was to
regenerate the republican party? Possibly
that was the purpose ot his colleague's mis
sion to America. After a refutation of the
charges that he had never spoken disrespect
fully of the Germans, Air. Drake added that
his colleague, in his recent bolt, had carried
with him almost the entire Genian vote ot
Missouri, and he believed that his colleague'.*
intention was to carry that vote over to tli
democracy. 11c also believed that his col
league had conceived the more damning
thought of becoming a political dictator ol
both the republican and democratic parties,
through this control of the great German vot.
in this country of both parties. This was tin
secret of his colleague’s bold self-confidence.
In conclusion Mr. Drake took a formal fare
well of the Senate preparatory to entering
upon bis new office of chief justice of tin
court of claims. For years, he said, he had
represented on the floor a noble State, and ii
was not unfit that his last effort should be
addressed to the republicans of that State in
this the gloomy hour of their betrayal by
those whom they had trusted and honored—a
time had proven, too confidingly trusted and
honored. He expressed to his colleagues hi
Hppreciation of their many evidences ol
personal friendship and partiality, and closed
with an allusion to the sincerity and fidelity
of his efforts in behalf of the political princi
ples upon which lie had hern elected to that
body. His concluding remarks were de
livered with some emotion, and were received
by the Senate in profound and respectful
silence.
APRON SALK,
THE
I.ADIES' SOCIAL. AID
connected with the
Wlnthrop St. Univcrsalist Society,
will hold an Apron Sale at the room of
Chase Bros., in North’s Block,
over It. Kimball’s dry goods store, on
Wednesday Afternoon
AND
Kvening. Dec. 21st.
A variety of articles suitable for Christmas gifts
will also be offered for sale.
Acimistslou Free.
de 17-fotwlt
Thank Providence l
WHAT FOR ?
I
-WHY, FOR THOSE
Splendid Providence Oysters!
-WE GET AT
I) ’ Artlieoay’s.
dec20-flm _
The Most Valuable Present
-to be rnado is a nice
SEWING MACHINE !
The most reliable, most simple, the best made
and easiest learned and kept in older, is u
WEED
Family Favorite Seiii MacMte.
You will And them at
JTOWEB’,
tile Oldest Agency in town, and the Best Machine
in the United States. NO GAS I NO HUMBUG!
__decitO-tlw
Fruit Knives,
a fine assortment at E. UOWSE’S. 124 Water
St.wtf
REOPENED JULY 4th, 1870.
HALLOWKLL HOUSE,
J. B. HILL, Proprietor.
A FIRST CLA^S HOTEL, NEWLi’ FURNISHED
AND EASY OF ACCESS.
In connection with the House there is a
LIVERY AND TRANSIENT STABLE.
Hallow ell, Dec. 25th, 1870.
To the members of the Senate and House of Rep
pruitativoo .— S>v ii known that the Halioweii 1I< use,
Htllowell, has been opened lor the accommodation
of Boarde a and Transient. The House has been
newly furnished throughout, and is being run with
out a Bar. Is one and a half miles from the State
House, ami the proprietor will furnish Transporta
tion free tor as many of the members as may And
it for their interest to obtain board at the House.
This House offers a grand opportunity for those
who prefer a Temperance Iiouse, to show their
readiness to sustain one. declU-flni
Nice Oolong Tea !
FOR 80 cts. PER POUND, at the
| Mnrkoi Squnrc Groeery Htore.
Sewing Machine Oil !
l’ut up expressly for Sewing Machine use,
W holesale and Retail, by
L. 11. T1TC0MB, Druggist,
WEST END KENNEBEC BRIDGE.
docl7-flw
DELL SIMONDS*
Fashion a hie Ilair Dressing Rooms
Opposite Parrott & Bradbury’s,
Water Street, : Augusta, Me.
! Shaving, Shampooing, Hair-Pressing, Cutting, Col
oring, Ac., in the most approved style of the art
Particular attention paid to cutting and curling J.a.
dies* and Children’s lu.tr. All kinds of Hair work
made to order in the Citest style. Ijan70-ly
20c. InltUil Stationery. 20c.
QA SHEETS of PAPEU and ENVELOPES to
mutch, 80 cento per box.
Same amount KO*E TINTED and PEKtUMED,
80 cento per box.
Also, a tine assortment of
STEREOSCOPIC VIE U S,
And tho unproved Scopes and stands, for sale by
CLAPP A NORTH,
BooksoUers and Stationers,
ocUfittf_ ISA Water Street, Augusta.
BATH HOTEL,
By O. 3VX. Plummer,
IS A T II, M E.
Board, - $1.25 per Day.
tUlui-Pr
RICH MO N D
Hanging Dome Furnace!
-AT
Williamson & Greenwood’s.
GRANITE HALL,
One Night Only.
Friday Evening, Dee. 23d.
Cal AV ag n er’g
Minstrels and Brass Band,
-under the sir ervision of
J. H. HAVERLY.
Introducing a CHOICE ANI) SELECT Entertain
ment. On which occasion four (4) talented Com*,
liana will positively appear. Including
JSr. Hurry Hobinson
in his great specialty, entitled
A Man With A Silver Horn
Prices ji- ui-uaL (leclflfSt
The Red Sign, opposite the P. 0.
IS WHERE
J. B. DYER’S
NEW STOCK OF
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS
CAN BE FOUND,
And which hr will sell at the Very Lowest
Bottom Pricks FOR CASH.
He keeps constantly on liaml,
Choice Porto Rico Molasses.
New York Syrup, Flour, Pork, Lard (in tierce o j
caddie), Dry Fish, Mackerel, Pickels iu
Jars or by the gallon.
Apple*** *>y the ISnrrel,
Kerosene Oil, Candles, Soaps, Table Salt,
Granulated and Extra C. Sugars,
Muscatel and Layer Raisins, Canned Fruit, Teas
Coflees, Spices, Rice, Dried Currants,
Citron, Ilorsford’s Self-raising Bread Powders,
STONE WARE.
And all other articles generally kept in a Grocer}
Stoic.
Remembor, the place to buy your Gro
ceries cheap is at
J. E. DYER'S, No. 115,
Angnsta, Nov. 1.1*70. Opposite the PoelOtlice.
novl-ftt
Do, Mi, Sol, Do.
MR. G. W. LANCASTER will open a class i»
this city on SATURDAY EVENING, Dee. 24
1*70. lor t e purpose of teaching a thorough court**
of the elements of Vo .-al Muse; and he will als«
give particular attention to the cultivation of th<
voice.
As a Teacher of Vocal Music. Mr. Lancaster ha>
no superior in our State. Tickets for the course
LADIES. - - -
GENTLEMEN, - • 2 00.
(iecl4-f2w_
JSI IE ^7*7*
Millinery and Fancy Goods!
Misses SAGER & WHITE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A LARGE STOCK OF
Jfiuier •'IMittiuery A* Fancy Uoodi,
Consisting of
Frencli lints and Flowers*
ROMAN SASHES, RIBBONS&TIES,
REAL LACES,
And FEATHERS of all descriptions.
Corner Bride?nnd WulcrSlrrcis.
OCtl9-ttf
.Yew and Select Stork
at E. ROWSE’S. t«wtf
New Jewelry Establishment !
S. W. FAIRFIELD,
HAVING taken the North p ut of the Store oc
cupied by S. P. PLUMMER, Opposite the
POST-OFFICE, AUGUSTA, ME.,
Will keep constantly on hand ami for sale, a good
assortment of
WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY,
-AND—
F\A.3STCY GOODS.
ALSO, A FULL STOCK OF
Spectacles & Ej-e Glasses.
Watches & Clocks Cleansed and Repaired
in a Thorough Manner and at Reasonable Rates.
All kinds of Jewelry neatly Repaired.
8. W. F. would respectfully call the attention c1
citizens of Augusta and adjoining tow us to his NEW
STOCK OF GOODS; and lie feels confident that by
'ti n t attention to business and honorable dealing
with all, lie will merit and refeivo a fair share of the
patronage of the public.
Any particular article in the Watch, Clock or
Jewelry liue, obtained at short notice.
8. W. FAIRFIELD.
Augusta, Oct. 28, 1870.2m
Look! Look ! Look !
-A NEW
MEAT MARKET
HAS been opened nearlv ooposito PARROTT
& BRADBURY’S, where
Messrs. Small & Butler,
the Proprietors, are prepared to furnish those who
may favor them with a call, with anything in their
line, at
Prices Which Will Suit ! !
Give them a Call.
_ n»v2l-*3t
Writing Desks, Backgammon
Boards, Cribbage Boards,
Dominoes,
nmt many other French Goods, nil suitable for tlic
Holidays. For sale low at
CLAPP At NORTH’S
3.55 Water street, - - Augusta.
flii* Sign of the “Big Ledger ” dre.l-t.’lw
Silver Uanry Ware
in cases being particularly adapted for bridal
gifts, at E. R0W8KS. t&wtf
W. N. FISHER,
FILE MANUFACTURER,
TEMPLE St., - - WATEBVILLE, Me.
| Ail kinds 01 Files and Rasps, made IV m the best
I Cast Steel and Warranted. Particular attention
given to Re-Cutting old Files ami Hasps.
a# - Files and Hasps kept constants on hand to
exchange or lor sale. Cash paid for Old Files.
Orders by Express or otherwise wi.’l receive
i prompt attention. decl.V.'tm
€lmii«ll<*r A Hourdm an,
! at the MARKET SQUARE GROCERY STORE, are
selling First Class Groceries as low ns can be
bought in the city. declMtawlm
Rare Inducements
at E. BOWSES, 124 Water St. Uwtf
FO IF SAI^E !
1MIE undersijmcd. the f-urvlving Partner, of the
linn oi J. HEDGE A CO., offers for tale the en
tire
STOCK OF GROCERIES !
now In store at Williams* Block. Alto
STORE FURNITURE
-and
FIXTURES,
•fforing a rare chance to any one desirous of goint
ato the business, l'be Goods are mostly
NEW AND FILESII J
and ol' FIRST QUALITY, with a
FIXE It IX of BUSINESS.
-ALSO THE
TWO STORY EOUSE
n Orchard Street now occupied by me, togctbei
v ith the Furniture.
Asa W. Iledsc.
CliAxicllcr & 33oarclinnn,
t the Market Square Grocery Store, have the f
V. Smoking Tobacco, the Indian Weed and tin
Flounder Tobacco. Best in the Market.
deck*) flaw 1 in_
Cheese! Cheese!
Another Nice Lot of
Livermore Cheese,
FUST RECEIVED AT
Richards & Hall's,
No. 3 GRANITE IIALL BLOCK.
Nov. 14. IR70. _Hf_
A I.AKGE STOCK OF
SILVER NAPKIN RINGS
at ROWSE’S. wtf
Kennebec Trunk Factory.
Messrs. Hamilton & Turner,
[135 Wstcr Street, Augusts,
Having enlarged their Till NTv FACTOttY.are now
fully prepared to furnish
Trunks, Valises, ere.
to the public and travelling community generally at
Price* which Defy Competition.
They also make to OKl>Ktt different styles, consist
ing of SARATOGA, EUGENIE, &c.,
ind in fact anything w hich the public may want in
the Trunk line.
They also keep constantly on hand a Full Line of
Ladies' and Gents." Travelling and
Shopping Bags.
to which the public are invited to call and examine
before purchasing elsewhere.
Headquarters for Blankets & Robes
At Wholesale anil Retail, at Very Low Trices.
HAMILTON & TCRNEU.
1:» Water Street. Aiimi>ta, Me._novis-tf
Rich ami ve .Stock
SILVER GOODS
at 124 Water St. t&tf
HOLIDAY
GOODS!
—— AT
PIERCE’S
BOOKSTORE.
decl3-t*2w
GENERAL
Insurance Agency,
Granite EM, senli side Market St
AUGUSTA, ME.
CAPITAL REPRESENTED,
Ovor $25,000,000.00 !
Itna Fire Insurance Company,
Hartford Conn.,
Chattered 1819. Charter Perpetual. Losses paid
in 51 years, $27.O,',\900.00.
Assets, July 1, 1870, 815,741,378.60,
Etna, Life Insurance Comp’v
Hartford, Conn.,
Assets, January 1, 1870, over $14,000,000.00.
It lias over 45,000 members,
AND
An Annual Income of over Six
Millions of Dollars !
Traveler’s Insurance Comp’y,
Hartford, Conn,,I
Lire niul Accident.
CASH ASSETS 81,457,719.G4, Jan. 1, 1870.
—- ft
r>nAisriEXjiKr
Fire Insurance Company,
(Philadelphia,
Assets, January 1, 1870, $2,825,783.08.
City Fire Insurance Co.,
HARTFORD, CONN.
Roger Williams Ins. Company,
PROVIDENCE, R. I.
Merchants’ Insurance Comp’y,
PROVIDENCE, R. I.
Atlantic Fire Insurance Co’y-,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
Eastern Insurance Comuany,
BANGOIl, M.
Marine 3FLlsl£.s
Elfet'te;l on reasonable terms in Reliable
Companies.
septlO-ttf
New Cake Baskets
of elegant designs, at E. ItOWSE’S, 124
Water St.
row LIB, HAMLIN & SMITH
ARE NOW OPENING A
Splendid Assortment
OF USEFUL AND
ORNAMENTAL GOOD3 !
* --FOR TIIE
HOLIDAYS.
<lcc20-ttr
*
EDWARD ROWSE,
-DEALER IX
Fine Jewelry,
SILVER WARE and SPECTACLES,
124 Water Street,
AUGUSTA : : Maine.
HOLIDAY GOODS ! JUST RECEIVED !
Uecl3-tAwtf
HOLIDAY GOODS !
HOLIDAY GOODS !
RICH AA'D RARE !
CHRISTMAS
-and
NEW YEAR’S OIFTS !
IN GREAT VARIETY,
-AT
FRANK KINSMAN’S
Apothecary Store.
declG-tJtwti
NOTE THIS !
Holidays [1870-71
The Richest Goods
ever brought to this Market, in the line of
Toilet, Fancy, Ornamental
and useful Articles, Va
ses, Statuary, Ac.,
«11 imported direct or purchased from the Manu*
facturers, arc offered for
Very Low Prices !
-AT- »
Partridge’s Drug Store,
[cor. Market Square, under Granite Hall.]
I.nrties amt Gentlemen who wish to remember n
friend w ith an acceptable gift, can And it in my
.Store, with prices 1 *wer than New York or Boston.
Chas. K. Pnrtrldpe.
decU-t&wtf
NEW GOODS!
CLAPP <to NORTH
arc now receiving from New York and Boston a
large assortment of Staple and
FANCY GOODS AND STATIONERY !
suitable for the Holidays.
155 Water street, - - Augusta.
»W Sign of the "Big I.edgor.” deed f3w
Canned Fruits, Raisins, Currants, Citron,
Ac., for sale at the
Market Square Grocery Store.
0. C. WHITEHOUSE & CO.,
-DEALERS IN
Foreign and Domestic
DRY GOODS!
Ancl Carpetings,
NO. 173 WATER STREET,
AUGUSTA, Mk.
O. C. Whttbhocsk, Daniel Whitbhousk
ttnay£4*tf
StHIGHS ! StHIGHG l
SOLD CHEAP.
Union Made, Warranted,
Call and Examine
theso Very Superior Sleighs, sold by us for the last
ten years, and giving
Universal Satisfaction !
TO ALL THAT USE THEM.
COLLER & GARDINER,
143 Water St., : : Augusta.
Opposite E. C. ALLEN’S Publishing Department.
dec.l7-*tf
STITCHING
of all kinds done on the
Davis Sewing Machine,
-at the store of
B. KIMBALL, - • Water St.

xml | txt