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Sacramento daily record-union. [volume] (Sacramento [Calif.]) 1875-1891, July 14, 1881, Image 1

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IIAILY I\lO\ SKiJUS-VOl. LV.— \O. SMS.
IHII \ UiIOKU SKItIUS-VOL. XVIH-VO. W,t.
SALE BEOS. & CO.
The Greatest Bale
'.il.'^ ■'?'■■:.-■.• ' " - .',"-- -' ' "" •
OF
HJIP REMNANTS
— TO TUE^
People of the State !
i
________
SEVEN DAYS' SALE !
OF
1 1REMNA-fTS |
1 | -at- .
HALES |j
j V
Grand Central Depot
These REMNANTS are the accumulation of an ever
increasing business, and they will be
Marked at Prices that Cannot Pail to Clear !
WE HAVE MADE UP OUR MINDS TO LOSE
BY
This Great Remnant Sale
But the loss will not deter us from closing right out every
vestige. These REMNANTS are from every part
of the House, representing all Departments,
i
From Silks to Domestics !
And we wish it to be clearly understood that our sole
object is to close irrespective of cost.
We also wish our patrons to understand this REMNANT SALS
Include all fractional parts of
Hosiery,
G-loves,
Buttons,
Its., and all Goods Soiled or Damaged, Tie whole of which will
to MARKED IS PLAIN FIGURE?, and ready for sale on
SATURDAY AND FOLLOWING DAYS.
Let us counsel yon to see us early and avoid disappointment,
for moat assuredly at the prices the goods will be marked, they
must soon move. i
DON'T PROCRASTINATE,
Eat enter into the thing at once, and you will be amply rewarded.
One visit will convince that m mean every wjrd we say.
SATURDAY, JULY »th, IS THE FIRST DAY OF THE
GREAT SALE OF REMXAXTS, AT
Grand Central Depot,
CORNER OF NINTH AND X STREETS.
SACRAMENTO DAILY RECORD-UNION.
SACRAMENTO. THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 14, 1881.
MECHANICS' STOEE.
For Advertisement of WE IN-
STOCK & LVBIN, sec Second
Page. It will be changed daily.
SAN FRANCISCO CARDS.
SAN FRANCISCO
Business Directory
ARTISTS.
Bonseworth— Optician and Photographer, No. IS |
Montgomery street. Established in 1851.
' ARTISTS' i MATERIALS, ETC.
Saiilmrno, Tall A Co.— lmporters and Manufact-
urers of Mirrors, Moldings and Frames, Chromos,
Ensrrarinijß, Brackets, Easels, Statuary and
Artists' Materials, Ho. 867 Market street _ .
BUSINESS COLLEGES.
Scald's Business College (of the Itr.vsin! A
Stratton Chain of Colleges). E. P. HEALD and
V. C. WOODBUKY, Proprietors, No. •_»( Post
street, near Kearny, S. F-, CaL Terms-810 per
quarter, payable in 30 days.
Pacific Business College and Trlesraplile
Institute— (Life Scholarship, for full Business
Course, 870). - W. E. Chamberlain, Jr., and T. A.
Robinson, Proprietors, No. 320 Post street, oppo-
site Union Square, S. F., Cal. Send for Circulars.
CLOTHIERS, ETC.
J. W. Cnrinany (successortoCarmany&Crosette
Dealer in Shirts and Men's Fumishiner Goods.
Shirts made to order a specialty. No. 25 Kearny
street, between Market and Poet.
DENTISTRY.
T. 11. Ffrsunon. D. U. ».— Operative and Me-
chanical Dentist (graduate of Baltimore College of
Dentil Surgery), 34 Keamyßtreet, near Tost. *
The only place In tills State where the
making and git ing of pure gas is made a specialty
of from the formula of the Celebrated COLTON
DENTAL ASSOCIATION, New York, originators
cf the use of gas for POSITIVELY Extracting
Teeth without rain, is at Nos. 925 and 927 Market
street, above Fifth, opposite Mason.
DRY GOODS. '.'■.':
The White House -The oldest Dry Goods House
in San Francisco. We import direct from the
principal marts in Europe, consequently can sell
lower than any other house in the trade. Country
orders attended to. J.W.Davidson & Co., Nos.
101 and 103 Keamy street. San Francisco.
Kerne Bros. t Nos. 107 to 115 Kearny street, arc
now holding their regular Semi-Annual Sale. Im-
mense reductions in Si k«, Cloaks, Dre^s Goods,
Mourning, Domestics, Hosiery, Parasols, Laces
and Notions. Simples on application.
DRUG3,~iOHEiynCALS. •
lansli'v A Michaels- Wholesale Druggists, Im
porters of pure French, English and German drugs
Northeast corner Front and Pine streets.
A. F. Downing A Son— Wholesale Deale
in Druggists' and Proprietary Specialties, No. 14
Second street. Grand Hotel Building.
Justin Gate*.— Pioneer Druggist, removed to 722
Montgomery street. Country orders solicited.
DIAMOND AND WATCH BROKER.
Uncle Harris. 221 Kearov St., between Bush >ud
Sinter. Established 1851.
EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATIONS,
Albert ljner A Co.— Publishers " Pacific School
and Home Journal ;" monthly ; $2 per year, in
advance. voted to Educational interests of the
Pacific coast. Official Organ State Departmen of
Public Instruction. No. 838 Market street.
EDUCATIONAL.
School or Practical, Civil. Mechanical and
Mining Engineering, Surveying, Drawing and As-
saying, 21 Post st. a. Van il r ji:en, Principal.
The Berkeley CjmnnsliiJii— Flr*t-ela<*
Academical Institution, affords a Classical,
Literary, Scientific cr Basinets Education. For
catalogues or particulars, addrees JOHN F.
BUKfcIS, Superintendent, Berkeley, Cal.
HATS.
31. 3lcu«.*«l«rSTßr— Manufacturer and Importer c!
ilits and Hat Materials. Wholesale and Retail.
Northeast corner Montgomery and lixuii streets,
and 402 Kearny.
nerrainnn, The Halter— No. S3oKeansy strict,
near Pine. The Brest hats at the lowest prices.
Factory : No. 17 Bulden street.
HARDWARE, IRON, STESL, ETC.
Cnrul.-in. Cory «i C«. — Importers of Hardware,
Iron and Steel. Agents for the Pituburg Steel
Works, Northwestern Iloive Nail Co., and South-
melon Cutlery Co. Nob. 120 and 122 Front street,
and Nos. 117 and 119 California street.
Will it Flccli— lmporting and Manufacturing
Cutlers and Bellhangers, No. 709 Market street.
.Harms C. Ilawley «1 Co.— lmporters of Hard-
ware and Agricultural Implements, N'os 301, 303,
305, 307 and 309 Market red, San Francisco.
IRON WORKS, BOILER AND MA-
CEINERY MAKERS.
SaTnmenfo Boiler Works- Xos. 214 and 2H
Beale street. 1. F. Hall, Practical Boilermaker.
Manufacture* Marine, Stationary and Portable
Boilers, and all kind* of Sheet Iron Works.
METALS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC,
W. W. Sfoniasue «V Co.— lmporters of Stove*,
Ranges and Sheet Iron, Marbleized Mantels,
Grata and Tiles. Manufacturers of PI ihl,
Japanned and Stamped Tinware. Nos. 110 11?,
111, HO and US Battery street.
MILLINER?.
The nnn«ll>ox-The popular Millinery Establfer.
nkiit. B. S. Hirsch A Co., No. 743 Market street
Strict attcntioa to or Jen from the interior.
TEA IMPORTERS.
Siegfried A Itnit'tlrntfcln— No. 210 California
street. P. O. B9S 2,103.
RESTAURANTS.
Original llnlinn ItrMnnrnnt— No. SI? Clay
et., bet. Lei(lei»d"rif and yansomti N. (li&mbonl,
Ute Manager of Campi Restaurant, has taken the
management. It will be run in best Italian style.
Svtitln'* Family Itnkrry and Dlnlns
Saloon— No. C 36 Market street. Wedding cake*,
ice cream, oysters, jellies, etc., constantly on bend.
Families supplied.
RUBBER AND OIL GOODS.
Davl< A Kelloss— Pioneer Manufacturers of Cape
Ann Oiled Clothing, Hats, Covers, etc. Importers
and Deale 'S in Rubber BooU an.i Woolen Goods
No. 31 California street.
The Cnlla Perrhn and Itubber Mann fact*
uring Company — Manufacturers of Rubber Goods
of every description. Patentees of the celebrated
"Ma?tes9 Cross Brand" Carbolized Hose. Comer
First and Market streets. J. W. Taylor, Manager.
Geodyenr Rubber Co.— Manufacturer* of all
kinds of Rubber Belting, Packing. Hone, Springs,
Boots, Clothing, etc. No. 577 and 579 Mai kot street
STATIONERS, PRINTERS, ETC.
Cooper*• Book Store— No. 740 Market street.
All kinds of Stationery cheap. ... . .
Methodist nook Repository and National
Temperance Publication Society.— Key. J. B. Hill,
Agent. Agency for Stylotrraphlc Fountain Pens
and Stylographic Copying Rooks. No. 1041 Market
street, between Sixth and Seventh. ; --■ --
11. 8. Crocker «1 Co.— Importing and Manufact-
uringSUtinner*, PrinUrs and Lithoeraphnrs, Nos.
215, 217 and 219 Bush street, above Saosome.
SPRING MATTRESSES.
California Spring Manufacturing Com-
pany, A. 8. Warner, President. No*. 147 and 149
New Manttromery street, San Francisco, Cal., and
No. 221 First street, Portland, Oiegon. Manu-
facturers of the Star Spring Bed Bottom, aud all
kind* of lie.l and Furniture Spring*. Alio, deal-
era in Upholsterers' Tucks, T»ine, Webbing,
Curled Hair, Ticking, Mo-s, Tow, Exeelaior, Bur.
laps, Spring Staple, Bed Lace, Eureka Hair.
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
WHlninn. reek A Co.— lmporters and Whole-
sale Grocers and Dealers In Tobacco and Cigars, ;
Nos. 126 to 132 Market, and No. 23 California
Taber, Marker Co.- Importers and Wholesalf
Grocers, No*. 10S and 110 California street.
SACRAMENTO RECORD-UNION?
Sun I r:i:r< Km Oilier. So. 208 M ontsomcry
street.— A. 11. Micdonald Agent.
SSHTsiI
No. 830 J Street ........ ...Sacramento.
WARKROOMS '■;■
No. S3 Dapont street - - Ban Francisco,
L. K. HAMMER,
SOLE AGENT FOR THE V PACIFIC : COAST.
Pianos sold on Installments, U desired, and tot
rant. Old instruments taken in exchange for per.
Orders for tuning carefully attended to. ■-. jtt2o-lplm
; WANTED, LOST AND FOUM).
.Advertisements of fire lines In this department are
> iserted (or 25 oents for one time ; throe time* for CO
.ant* or 76 per week. v
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE.
WANTED— KINDS HELP, MALE AND
f V Female. Particular attention paid to Fur-
| nishing Hotels, Private Families and Fanners with
| Help, free of charge to employers. HOUSTON &
CO., one door south of Fourth and X streets, Sac-
rameuto city. _' -: ■ mlSlptf
TO LET 0B FOB SALEr
Advertisements of fire lines in this department are
! alerted for 35 cents (or one timo ; three times fur 50
Mate or 75 cents per week.
fTKM! SALE— THE lIRST TEN VOLUMES OF
P the Encyclopedia Britannica, bound in calf and
perfee Ij- new, and will be sold cheap, on account of
party leaving for Europe. The Encycl pcdla Bri-
tannica is conceded to be the most perfect dictionary
of art*, sciences and general literature e.xtant. Ad-
drees K. X., this office. JyO-tf
T^OR BALE-A RARE CHANCE FOR ONE OR
1" two ?ood men, with a small capital, a COFFEE
AND CHOP HOUSE ; doing a good cash business.
Reason for selling, on - account of other business,
nquire at this office. Jelstf
3KAA ACRES FOR SALE— CONSIST-«oi
• OUU ing of Furiniug:. Fruit, Vine andvyr
Garden Lands, in farms and !ot3 of a size to*"**"
suit purchasers, from twenty acies upwards, lying
from 2} to 5 miles north of Vacaville, Sulano county.
Apply at the banking-house of JAMES I . ENGLISH,
southwest corner of Fourth ami J streets, Sacra-
mento. ■ .-;■-'.. jc2 If
T7IOR SALE— A" \VELL-FrRMSHEDj£p^£»
MJ Brewery doing a good business, ISiSjsJ
with saloon and dwellincr-house. K"r r;ir- JcSJ^ggfi;
titulars address MRS. SI. BLASAUF, Nevada City,
Cal. •..■■■. m2l-2m*
IP .A. 3E& j^d: 2S
FOR SALE.
NOW IS THE TIME TO LOOK UP THEfflSgi
vineyards and farms if you want to buyVoV
one. C»ll on CARL STROBEL, the Land—
Broker, No. 321 J street, Sacramento ; you will eet a
full description of the propeity, and the most direct
route to see It. Je2s-lptf
FOR SALE^ BARGAIN.
A FARM OF 1,052 ACRES OF PATENTED**
land, situated on the stage road in NapaV^Nr
county, California ; 12.'> acres rich, level land,— "~
under cultivation, now sown to wheat and hay ;
garden, vineyard and orchard, and a comfortable
frame dwelling on the premises ; school-house and
poetoflice in the vicinity; climate unsurpassed.
Title perfect. Terms ea»y, and possession (riven
when required. For particulars call on or address
CADWAUAHER & PARSONS, Real Estate Agents,
corner Third and J streets, Sacramento. jy2-Iplm
SEE THE COMET!
A GENUINE SOLOMON'S TELESCOPE, E^UAL
J\_ te showing all the chief Planets, their moons,
rings, etc., and the nue'eusof the comet clearly, sun
spots, moon mountains, etc, with tcrrestial and
celestial glasses, sun glass, etc., for sale very cheap
at DALE'S, if applied for soon. , - ■ Je2Btt
BEEWERY FOR SALE.
THE FOR YEARS WELL-KNOWN
tit. tools Brewery, r-^tegj
Situated on corner of Sixth and 0 nfr. • ** J*£2saßSfc
in tho city of Sacramento, is, on account of the
death of the proprietor, for Bale cheap. Inquire of
P. BOHL, 525 J street. . Je2o-tf
DENTISTBY.
it. 11. hum:, n. D. 8.,
DENTIST. 80. <;« J STREET, BE-pSTS
tweeu Sixth and Seventh, Sacramento. SrSES
Jyll-lplm
W. « pOD,
DENTIST.— TO O,ClNN'S*gges.
BuiHin;, Fourth and J streets) -GfnS}
Artificial Teeth inserted on nil bases, lirpruved
Liquid Nitrons Oxide tor the Painless Kxtrac-
lion Te^th. .•■:--■ Je2-ttf
; im*. BBBWSB A SOCTimoKTII,
DENTISTS, SOUTHWEST CORNER OP/ggßb
8/ Seventh and J streets, in Bryte's newtga-riJ
buildin;. up stairs. Teeth extracted without pain
by the use of improved Liquid NUrous Oxide (.'»«.
J'jlC-lplm
WATOHES, CLOGES, JEWELEY
J. B. M.UXIV
.Late with Wachhoret, and successor to Flobcrg,)
WATCHMAKER A>D JEWELER, -o
J V No. 60 J Btrect, between Second and CJK-.
".l'rd. l>ealerlit Watches, Clock?, Silver- ti~-';'g
rare, Jewelry, etc. Repairing in all itSM_i_3
iri.ica.'S a "pecialty, under SIR. FLOBEU ).
jyi-lplm
vnixiAjn SI. niM.KM
* (Late with Floberg), "V 0, '
628 J STREET, NEAU SEVENTH, <
I Watchmaker and Jeweler. Importer G=r*
»nd Dealer In Watches, Silverware, Jewelry, Jt-/ V»
itc. Repairing a specialty, under RobortSJjiig
il»rth. All country orders promptly attcudod 'm
■c2:)-lct<
FBUITB. SEEDS AHDPBODPOF,
VV. R. STRONG & CO..
Wholesale Commission Merchants
ASH SSALKSS IS ALL. KIM>3 OP
i.ii!i(i::\!A a.v:> DKIED PBVm
NUTS, HONEY, SEEDS,
And General Merchandise.
rST All orders promptly attemled to. Adilrcss :
W. R. STHONO & CO.,
JrBlplm Nos. 6, 8 and 10 J street, Sacramnntn.
M. T. BBEWKR A CO.,
CommlftsCon JHcrchants nn<l Whulisnic
DXALISKS IK
GREEN FRUIT, DRIED FRUIT, PRODUCE.
Vegetables, Honey, Seeds, Al'alfa Seed, Etc ,
(To*. 30 and 33 .1 f>treel, Saeramenlo.
■■■ „ JyB-lttf ..■ „. ■,-. .
A. MOOHKR. S. m»O« .
S. GERSON & CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND
I Dealers in
Imported and Domeatle Frnlf«, Trsrln-
bles, \iif-. llr.,
No. 220 J street, between Second and Third, Sacra-
mi-nto. ■"■-' '■'■• ■■■■«- ]>-J-lm
I.VOX A BAKXE9,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND DEALERS IN
Prodnre. Vesetaitles, natter, Esc*. Clieese,
Poultry, Green and Dry Fruits, Honey, Ccans, etc
ALFALFA SEED.
CSC Potatoes in car-load lots or less.
Je23-Iptf ' ~ Nos. 21 and 23 J street.
D. DEBERNARDI & CO.,
WIIOLrSALI COMMIFSION IXALKR.S IN
Butter, Eggs, Poultry, Vegetables,
Fruit. Fish and Ceneral Prodnee.
SST With the experience of Tears in this business
and every facility to prosecute it, and by the use
the very latest improvements in j<ack.i)rc«, wi
respectfully state to the trade, I that feeling out
ability to select the best of (rods, at prices suitablt
to the present time, we solicit their patronage
shall endeavor to merit a preference for all favor*
they may be pleased to extend to us. RaspSjgtfßOr,
D. DkBERNARDI & CO.
VT With pleasure we notify the public
that we are H£Min in the Kctail Departmcct of the
Sacramento Maiket, No. SOS X street. : We shall en-
deavor to make this market one of the neatest in
the State. Noihins but Prat-clawi article] will be
kept, such as FRUIT, VEGETABLES. POULTRY,
GAME, FISH, etc. :, We wiil be able to accommodate
th 3 largest purchaser as well as the smallest, as we
have In connection a larjr •: Wholesale Pcrartmorjt.
m25-lm ' :. r P. I:r:nEr.NAHDI &CO
EDW. CADWALADER.
OFFICE, CjRNER THIhD AND J STREETS
residence, corner Tenth »ud N streets, Sacra*
Tiento, CaJ. *-.'- >-. ,-- - ,t~- ■ : :;■' ". ":
Notary Public. : .
, United States Commiss'oner. i. • .
Commissioner of Deeds for the States and Tcrri.
Tories, and Conveyancer. y : -■• " ; ; „^ ■ v. *
Deeds, Mort-affcc, Leisee, Contracts, etc,
drawn aud acknowledged, - . mi I -
TELEGRAPHIC.
SPECIAL TO THE REC ORD-CNI ON.
THE DAMAGING FLOODS IN IOWA.
Das Moines Under Water and Isolated
from tbe World.
PROGRESS OF THE HUDSON RIVES TUHKEL
Heavy Insurance on the Life of a Mary
land Colored Han.
niM'i:iLi\i:flis i oki n.v \i:» > items.
The Italian Embassador at Paris Presents
His Letter of Recall.
»«<• Etc Etc.
domestic am,
The President. .
Kxecctit_ Mansion, Washington, July
13th— 7:30 a. m.— Dr. Bliss seems cheerfn!
and happy this morning. - lie ' thinks the
President's general condition better than it
was yesterday at this hour. His temperature
has fallen during the night, and is now abovt
the came as it was yesterday morciDg. The
mnrning consultation and examination is now
progressing, and the official morning bulletin
will goon be prepared.
[SECOND DISPATCH.I
Washington. July 13th— 8:30 a. m —
[Official bulletin.!— The President is dob*
.welt this morning. Pulse 90, temperature
98.5, respiration 20. His gradual progress to
ward recovery is i.>ar.iiuot, anil thus far with
out serious complication!).
o. w. Bum.
J. J. WoOIAVARI),
•". K. R\RNEB,
Rout. Kethlrn.
The; ■Mill— Family- What 11 Brother
. J-Vi . to Say. j
New Yor.K, July 13th.— John Wilson
Guitteau, a brother of the assassin, Rives a
short family history in the lioaton Hi >■<'!•!.
He denies that there has been insanity in
either hU father's or rnothet'ij family, except
the single case 'of Us father's brother, who
died in an insane asylum from remorse at
having killed a rival in a duel. He has but
little personal knowledge of his brother's life ;
thinks he w*s to a certain extent insane—
whether insane to the extent of not
knowing the moral character and i effect of
his own act or of losing the power to restrain
h:a criaioal intentions, if he had any desire to
do co, will undoubtedly be properly investi
gated, in the | light of ail the facts, by the
proper tribunals. He resents the deed
as a mest atrocious, foul and Moody
murder, and a . crime sga'cst the nation
and the progress of Christian civilization*
throughout the woild. He concludes as fol
lows : " I respectfully, and in deep humilia
tion and sorrow, request the prayers of all
who know God in spirit and in truth, that the
Father may cause my brother's darkened un
derstanding to be opened ; that the evil spirit
which now possesses him may be cast out,
and that he may in true penitence and sorrow
turn, while he yet has life, to the God whom
his father, mother and his ancestors for so
many generations have loved and worshiped."
The A*«n»ftln'» First Shot— A Man who
Claim-, to have the Bnltet In III* IV.-
session.
Washington, July 13th.— The following
communication has been published here : -
Axxapolin, July 10,1881.
Editor Star: As 1 was an • eyewitness »f the
shout : n; of President Gariield, and being able to
explain which shot entered. the Chief Maoist rate's
body, and the course and presen' whereabouts of
the ball that missed liiin, I - deem it proper to
impart to you the information . I possess
of the traced v, as it will : clear away the
mystery of the lost builtt which the
newspaper men ore trying to solve. In the Haiti
more Sun on Friday I noticed a few lines that KpoKe
the difference cf opinion as to whether it was the
Er»t or second shot that struck President CarfleM,
and the mystery that surrounded the bullet that
entered his coat sleeve, as do trace of it could be
fouml, thontrh the most diUjrectcearch was made for
it. They may search till doomsday, but without suc
cess, for the bullet thatentcred the President's sleeve
a second af'i i" passed into my possession, and is
■till retained by me as a rd ; c, not akmc bee: use of
it.j connection with the President, but principally
because it very narrowly escaped BDt.-rinK my bo !y,
which it certainly would have done had its l rr>»ress
not been checke 1 by a largo filvcr medal, which I
wore suspended from my neck, and which was pre
sented to me by Key. Father '/.': itajr, formerly r.as
(or of St. Mary's Church in this city.
On the roaming of the 2.1 of July, being in (be
vicioHy of the Baltimore and Potomac depot, an
hearing that the President aid Cabinet would soon
be nt the depot, I Mid my friend, Samuel Frazer,
concluded to stop and see the treat man of whom
we had heard so mv h but bad never before seen.
We had not Ions: to wait, for soou the President and
a gentleman whom I was told was Secretary Rlaino
entered the depot, accompanied by a number of
ladies. Two gentlemen walked to and fro
cn^atfcd in conversation, wh le my friend
and I sat on h bench and watched
them. Soon the sharp rrack of a pistol burst upon
the air, which was fo lowed alorost instantly by a
second. On the instant that tba report of the first
shot was lome to my cars I felt a stinging > crsation
on ray ■■'.jest. ■ I left the place in a hurry, believing
that Ili 1 1 been fatally shot. As noon an 1 could i
stepped my chest hare and found that my life hail
been saved h\ the medal that I hare worn I r
twelve years. The f|>ot where the medal had rested
felt sore and *vag very red. The bullet I found in
my shirt bosom.
I left Washinwtnn with my friend at noon, and
arrive lii Annapolis at 2 o'clock r. M. I enjoined
strict secrecy upon my friend, for I knew what
trouble would follow if 1 was detained as a witness.
The loss of my situation would surely follow if I was
kept from my work, us my employer would have
filled my place with some one else if i was detained
in Washington one day. I will surrender the
bullet if I am assured that it trill be returned to me
if the District Attorney shall have no further use
for it. Pleaao have this shown to C'orkhilL Any
f urllier information you may desire, which I can
give, I shall be happy to furnish yon with.
NICHOLAS JACKSOX,
No. 20 Cornliill street, Annapolis, Md.
The linrficld Fund.
New York, July X3th.— The Garfield fund
now reaches 8134,000.
«. :i!t(i-n:i'-. De.xisiK.
" New York, July 13tb.— Th« Tribune's
Washington special says : It is said upon
good authority that one of Guitteau's letters
now in possession of the District Attorney
reflects bitterly on ] Maine, which leads to the
inference that Guitteau entertained designs
on the life of the Secretary of State as well
as upon the President.
The End of (.iKr \ la-l.
Chicago, July 13ih.— Grisccm's Ion? fast
was concluded at noon yesterday. In 45
days he has lost Just 50 pounds weight.
About 200 people were present to gee him eat
his first meal. The table was spread I with
the bill :of . . fare - already mentioned
in these dispatches, t Qrttoom - stated
that he had procured . everything hu
fancy . suggested, not because he L ex
pected to eat it, but to satisfy liU imag
ination and have just what he might want.
lie thought be could eat a full meal without
injury, but did not intend to do so. He be
lieved there was great virtue in fasting,
and he was going to . fact ' longer
than ■' necessary iv ' order -to : show
that it was a good' remedial agent.
It had once cured him when his physicians
had Mid he must die. He did not believe
is indiscriminate nor unnecessarily prolonged
abstinence. At the conclusion of his speech
he took a goblet of milk, and with the since
deliberation that had marked ; bis motions
all the I morning ■ while superintending the
preparation of hi* breakfast,- drank slowly of
its contents, which seemed to tempt him a*
little as any of his observer?. Thea he era
tiously dissected some milk toast, after which,
preening hi* hand to his head, he complained
of a slight headache. . This passed away, and
he resumed his practice at the table, drinking
coffee, and little by little taking a nibble at
the contents of most of the dishes. , Although
hungry i.nd possessed of a good appetite; he
was not ravenous. The crowd lingered an
hour or more, and thea left the wonder to
himself. . .... .... ... .■.....;:. : ';■: '■■;-'■
The lown Flood*.
Drs MoiNie, July 13;h. — lUccoon river
continues ti> me. South Dcs Moioas v hd
der water, and sixty families have been
driven out of their houses. The track of the
Chicago, Bnrlington and (J'lincy llailroad
has RuccumbeJ, and Dcs Moices is now out
of connection with the east. It was the
heaviest rain-storm ever known in this sec
tion.
The §tran<lcd simmer FloUri?.
New York, July 13th.— The ajeute here
of the Britannic, which wm reported yester
day as l>eing sunk in the sand on the Irish
coast so that only her masts were visible,
Btate that she is safely floated and will pro
ceed tu-day.
The llmlson River Tunnel.
Hlff York, July 13th.— General William-
Smith has been appointed engineer of the
Hudson liver tunnel. The new work is now
orogresting at the rate of about five feet daily.
The arch ia thirty feet under the bed of the
tiver. The length of the tunnel from shore
to shore will be 5 400 feet The work now
extends about 300 feet under the river from
the Jersey shore. The Tunnel'Cnmpsny ex
pect to have it completed in about three
years.
The not Wave.
Mkiiphis, July 13th.— Tha thermometer
has marked 00 to '.<> daily for over a week.
There were five fatal sunstrokes Sunday.
Cincinnati, July loth.— The heat is in
tense. The library is closed owing to the
three attendants btiujr prostrated.
A neavlly Intnred Life.
Baltimore, July 13th.— A letter from
Westminster, Carroll county, says that Kobt.
Bell (colored) died last night, aged somewhere
in the eighties. His life was known to have
been injured for a large aggregate bum, and
his death and the insurance policies were the
chief topics of conversation yesterday, t^aite
a number are interested iv the policies, and
tho whole amount is estimated at over $200 -
000. It is said that 8171,000 has been taken
on his life in the past two or three weeks, one
syndicate investing $55,000.
FORF.IC*.
The Murderers of Abilnl A/I/ not to Suf
• r;' . fer l»r;llll.
Constantinople, July 13th.— Sultan
bag decided to commute the death sentences
of the murderers of Abdul Aziz.
; . . Loin r ofßrrall.
Paris, July 13th.— General Caldini, the
Italian Kmbaß3ador, has presented his letter
of recall to President Grevy.
. ' No Successor* . .-<-■
Berlin, July 13th.— It is state! that no
successor to General Caldini, of Italy, will
be sent to Paris.
- Great Land flip la Switzerland.
New York Julyl3ib.— A cable special from
Pan* says : The (Treat land slip . rear Signs
weil. Canton of Berne, which was reported
on the 29ch tat., Ls steadily • moving toward
Lake Thun at the rate of three meters a day.
It is three miles Ion?, one mile broad, and of
unknown depth.' The houses in its path are
deserted. Sigrisweil and neighboring villages
are fortunately out of danger.
A Destructive Fire.
New York, July 13 th.— A cable special
from Paris. of July 11th says: A great fire
broke out early yesterday morning in the goods
station of the Chemin de Fer dv Midi, at
Cetteo, and, spreading with - frightful ra
pidity, soon destroyed nearly 1,000 trucks and
passenger cars. The ;! a:nes have not yet been
extinguished. No lives were lo=t. Between
two and three rquare miles , of sheds and
warehouses are reported to have been burned.
* A Murder In Montreal.
Montreal, July 13th.— A terrible murder
took place at Tongua Point Asylum Monday
morning. Two . women, named Gertrude
Roberts and Delia Poirier, occupied the same
cell during tha night. Poirier, who was known
to be a religious monomaniac, fancied she
saw a frightful dragon, and for the safety of
herself and all the other inmates attacked it
with a piece of board by pounding it on the
head. The dragon was her companion, Ger
trude Roberts. ■ i.i-:
San Francisco Slock Sales.
Sax Fbancisco, July 13, 1881.
. mounts'! SESSION.
230Ophir ......EJ(SSJ 150 Belcher .....2 8- r (rt-2 80
200 Mexican ll<S7i\ 570 Sierra Not 9J
310 G. 4 83 1 140 Utah bi.aSJ
4AO Best ft Belch... Vj-nnj: 220 bullion [email protected]
1&0 California. 75c 150 Exchequer 1 15
2280 BaTaee 2 S>«i, 30) OTerman. . . . 1 [email protected] 15
965 C. Virginia.. l 95(3l 85 185 Justice [email protected]
100Ch0Uw...., 2 31)1 175 Union. 77T..9i
eOPotoxi 2 35<a2 53! 525 AIU 3 [email protected] 8)
425Hile* N. ...3 35<r?3 40 220 Challenge Ssc
100 C. Point ...2 0511000 Sutro 25c
201) V. Jacket... 4 [email protected] 801 151 Andes 1 45
30J Imperial „.20(p!l5o 300 benton 93c
130 Kentuck 2 25 10) Occid< utal 105
120 Al.lia 2 [email protected] 7j! 500 N.W^lLi Fargo 2.'0
irrir.sooN sf.i«io.s.
EOE reka 32 2!0 K0die............6Jig6|
19 Belle ...194 310Bechtel 1 [email protected] 53
10 Manhattan 2 5. 100 Summit ..3€c
100 Prize 40c 2;0 *rudicat< 350
700 Amenta 5c Champion 15c
800 Star [email protected]»c 63-) lil.irklm»k [email protected]
250 Day 2 15 150 Boston fOe
HOD Belle Isle 25ft»45- 530 (Jro 80c
1335 Albion 3 B*<f3 70 2.0 S. Bulwer 35c
lfOOWa'cs. [email protected] If. 10 Tiptop 475
SO ML Diablo. SJ 10 Silver Kin? 21J
100 E. Jit. IJiabo 10< 200 11. Centre 1 20
coo domes 60<a35c
COAST CHIPS.
Crops on dry soil in Coos county, Oregon,
are unusually large this year.
Near Wiilov.3, in Colu3a county, says
the Joii.viwl, ttn acres of alfalfa produced
47 tons.
Los Angeles county furnishes sn average
of four crazy persons per month to the la
sane Atylum.
The population of Bodie is smaller at
present than at any time Biace the first
strike iv Bodie Con.
Tiie sawmill at Mono Like is fast ap
proaciiinc completion. As soon p.s finished
the machinery will be started up.
The hop-gvower3 at Hopland, Mendocino
conu'y, assert that there will not be more
than half the usual crop this season.
The Etna Weekly Post is the name of a
bright, spicy, four-page, six column paper
just issued at Etua, Cal., by R. Burs'oos.
Major Long has joined the railroad sur
veying party, and takes his departure with
them to-morrow morning. — [Eureka Senti
nel.
The Supreme Court of Nevada has de
cided the Asylum bill to be constitutions .
I!euo is happy. The building of the asy
lum will proceed at once.
Fivs of the largest locomotives ever
brought to Oregon were unloaded from the
bajge Atlas at The Dalles last week, and
are now being put together.
The Eel river Agricultural .Society has
resolved to establish a factory for the man
ufacture cf cheese. It ia to be located
within one mile of l'erndale.
The railroad company luvs found an ob
stiuction to their lino to P.:iker City, Or.,
in the shape of a line of basaltic rock,
which will take thuia two months to over
come.
At stations on the new Southern Pacific
llailroad the following signs are seen in
front of tents and uooi'tu shanties : "One
meal, •_'."> cents ;'' "Square meal, .">0 cents ;"'
"Gorge, 7"' cents."
Lakeview Herald: A little two year
old child of Mr. Todd, of Tale lako, was
bitten by a rattlesnake last Thursday, but
its life was saved by a timely application
of salt, saltpeter and turpentine.
Ten different crewa will be engaged in
surveying the line of the new railroad.
The gradiug will be commenced within the
next ten days. The work is to be pushed
energetically at all points. — [Hureka, Nev.,
Sentinel.
The Los Gatos WttMff Next is a new
ciuht-pago, live-column paper just issued
at Los (i.itos, Santa Clara county, by W.
S. Walker. It makes a creditable- appear
ance and starts out with strong advertising
patronage.
The hodi Stiithf! is the title of a very
neat-appearing, newsy, well managed and
altogether pleasing weekly paper, just is
sued at 1-odi by W. Ellis and J. \V. Me
Quai.l. It is of four pages of seven col
umns each.
The Orcjonian speaks of a Yamhill man
bringing in a bunch of cherries 1 foot long
containing 7- cherries. We can bent that
all to smash. Ed. Dnggar has a bunch of
cherries 8 inches long, weighing 3!: pounds,
containing 1 16 cherries, Whoop tor Walla
Walla.— [Walla Walla Statesman.
The majority interest in the Olympia
and Tenino llailroad has again changed
hands, J. W. Sprague, of New Tacoma ;
F. K. Brown, of T^pino. and R. Wingate,
of Carbonado, being the purchasers.
Among the principal ones selling are Ward
& Mitchell, £. N. Oaimette, Jas. I'attisoa
and Thomas M. lteed.
About half-past 11 o'clock on the night
of the 7th the people of Dixon were aroused
from their slumbers by the cry of " Police!
police ! " Investigation proved that a man,
who refused to give his name, had been
seriously stabbed. Drs. Harvey and Evans
were summoned and reported a cut abont
twelve inches loDg, extending from the
neck and making a semicircle, terminating
under the left arm. They put ten stitches
in the wound, and yesterday morning he
was doing as well as could be expected.
The assailant is known as "Shorty," and
has just served out a term for stabbing one
Dunning, living near I >I> on.
Why be so fearful over disordered kidneys ?
Kidney- Wort will cure it.
SAN QUENTIN.
Fifth Session of the State Prison
Investigation Commission.
THE MOBAL INSTBUOTOR'S HOUSE,
Director Chapman Tells What He
Knows cf (he Matter.
EVIDENCE OF A CONTRACTOR ' 3 FOREKAIf.
The Difference Between the Labor of Con
victs and Free Ken.
[SPECIAL BT TELEOKAPH TO TIIR itnCORDCSIOX.I
Pan Quistm, July 13th.— The fifth ses
sion of the San Joaipiin State Prison Investi
gation Commission opened this morning at
10:30. Present, Commissioners Mills, Gibbs
and Watt. Directors Neff, ISchell, BfWMa
and Chapman, and J. J. Owen, of the San
Jose Mercur;/, were also in attendance.
1 The reading of the minutes of the previous
day were dispensed with.
Judj;e Ames asked that the published state
ment that Mr. Sheppard was a convict be
corrected. He waa not, but was employed as
a gaefitter and plumber.
STATE PBISON RIHECTOR CHAPMAN
Waa the first witness c»llecJ, and testified :
Am one of the Prison Directors ; kcow of no
order passed by the Board to build a home
for the Moral Instructor.
Mr. Owen here read a paper from Governor
Perkins to Mr. Cummings, the Moral In
structor, in which the Governor stited that
he learn; d from Director Chaprain that the
Board were going to instruct Judge Ames to
bui'd a house, but as the statutes did not
provide for a house for the Moral Instructor,
it would be necessary for the Instructor to
pay a rent lor it.
Witnes3 — Xo ord;r or appropriation to
build a housa was made by the Board ;
there was some conversati>n on th* Bul»je> - ;,
but cot at a basiaefs meeticg. I mentioned
what we had said to tUa Governor, but as no
order was passed the Governor probably
misunderstood what I sai 1 ; did not lead tho
Governor to believe that an order to build
the house had been passed ; I told him that
we had informally dhcusrej that] at the
regular meeting of the Board. Some objec
tions were raised in regard to the style of the
house that it had been proposed to build, and
the subject was dropped. It had been pro
posed to build a bouse in the style of the
Berkeley College. The Governor probably
thought that the Board would carry out the
idea we hud dtscussed, and on tl c ttrength of
it wrote that letter to Mr. Cummings. The
letter was written by tbe Governor before
knowiug that no definite action had been
taken in the matter.
A COSTEACTOR"s KOEF.WAM.
E. A. Falby was the next witness called,
and testified : I am employed by Armes &
Dallam, wood and willow-ware manufactur
ers ; have been here in that capacity three
years and ten months ; am familiar, as an
objsrver, with the prison matters; think the
front-gate keeper incompetent, and that he
discharges his duties irregularly ; he frequent
ly leaves the gate open ; the management of
the gate is altogether in his hands ; the keys
of the double gate are kept by him ; ciu't spec
ify any other irregularities ; know nothing of
his treatment of officers ; never have seen the
Warden drink but once, but have caen him
when I thought him under . the itiluence cf
liquor ; when I taw hi;n drink, at the time I
refer to, is was outside the prison limits ; in
regard to the beef, it was very bad ; when it
was being cooked I could dutiniruiib. tha of
fensive smell in my shop ; my pUca it at ;
least 150 feet from where ths bc-ef was cooked ;
any cruelty to the convicts is from the fore
men ; the convicts are often disposed to be
insolent ; convict Traven was insolent to me ;
I reported to tha Captain of the Yard about
this man ; saw the same man often ; spoke to
the officers about a convict I have with me
now, who is often insolent and Uzy.
To Mr. ?>lilU— l reported the case of inso
lence, and he was confined in the dungeon for
two days ; he always tried to beat the chop ;
that i?, avoid hw work ; I knew of a convict
named Spencer; he was not reported as a
workman of the State for two days, although
he was working all the day ; his time was
transferred to another prisoner ; Arnie3 &
Dallam paid for the work done by thU pris
oner, but the amount was paid to another,
whoee time was nearly out, and be would be
soon discharged ; the . discharged prisoner
would receive the money and cot the State ;
the present discipline of the prison is not so
good as under the last administration, speak
ing as a foreman ; wo got more work out of
the men during the last administration than
we get out of the present one ; have reported
this to Captaia Kis.in repeatedly ; have nine
men under me at the present time ; have had
one of them three years ; he is a good work
man ! had a Chinaman two years and a half ;
ha was a bad worker ; under the previous
administration my complaints were always
attended to (com no attention being paid
to them, the value of the convicts' labor is
depreciating.
To Mr. Watt— ln the shop thera is a tally
board ; when tha men come they are checked
off, and the report compared with that cf the
Captain of the Yard, to see that th<-y are all
there.
To Mr. Mills— The day's work is nine
hours and a quarter ; we pay half a dollar
for the labor of some, and a dollar for others ;
convict labor, as compared with free labor,
depends generally oo those wbo have control
over the convicts ; under any conditions,
convict labor is less productive than free la
bor : the percentage would be about three to
five ; the stock represents more than the la
bor ; the stock would represent about 75 and
the labor 25 per cent, of the total cost.
\To Mr. Gibba— The wages of -free men,
using a good many boy?, would be about
$1 25 a day; for convict labor we pay 50
cents for some and Si for others ; our firm
allows tobacco to convicts — one . plug a
week ; the general moral " condition of the
prison is, in my opinion and from my obser
vation, fair ; have noticed that the men are
less disposed lately to manifest that vicijus
ness I at first noticed ; the labor they are en
gaged in here has a reformatory tendency;
they at first ridiculed the efforts of ,* the
Moral Instructor ; at present they do not—
at least ito " the same extent ; if the convicts
were bossed by another convict , the result
would be bad ; have heard many of them say
they would not be bossed by a convist. "I
' To Mr. Watt — Have not seen any gambling
d urine I the ; present ! administration ; ''■■ under
Governor Low there was plenty of it ; it was
done quite openly, and ■to a : very large ' ex
tent ; have seen large sums . of , money ex
change hands ; did not see any under Gov
ernor Johnson'^, nor any under this adminis
tratien.
THE TRISON CLET.K SWORN,
"' J. G. ''Hanks Vai'jcext sworn," but was
withdrawn before any; material ".testimony
was! elicite ', i and W. V. Ellis, clerk of : the
prison, v as placed on the stand [and interro
gated by Mr. Mills in" reference to a coayict ,
in i i.i ki:«:»i:i> i m»\ >r.Rt>.
by the name of Sheldon, who hail incurred a
bill for whisky at the saloon of . one : Farrell.
The atnonnt of the debt had subsequently
been deducted from money due the convict
and in the hands of the clerk. The witness
denied all knowledge of the liquor tmnuac
tion. He had received from England a check
for Sheldon, which Varrell had cashed in his
presence, deducting therefrom the amount
due him, but the witness did not know how
the debt had been incurred.
the PROSECCTIOS BESTS.
The prosecution here rested its case, and
Mr. Owen asked for an expression on the
part of the Commissioners justifying him in
the publication made in the San .lose
Mercury concerning the State Prison.
After consultation the Board announced that
it deemed it inexpedient to make rack an ex
pression of opinion at this stage of the pro
ceedings. Coaniisstonera Watt and Uibbe,
as individual members of the Board, stated
that they deemed Mr. Owen's coarse perfectly
justifiallr. Mr. Mills said it was seldom
that journals were as careful as Mr. Owens"
had been, or were in possession of as much
information upon which to base charges
against public institutions.
SENATOR SSARS TKSTinKS.
Win. H. Sear.', a State Senator, was called
by the Commission and questioned in refer
ence to hi* knowledge of a law passed by the
U«t l«~>Utare *Uowin|r the Prison Directors
$100 per month for expense*. Witness said
the object of the law was to define ami
specify the obligations of the State, it being
more desirable that the people of the State,
should know what they had to pay, rather
than that it be left undeteruiinate. He be
lieved he was the author of the bill. No in
fluence had been brought to bear on him by
th 9 Warden or Directors in the matter ; had
conversed with thorn oa the subject, but did
not think it was until after the bill had been
introduced. Was of the opinion that the
measure waa constitutional. Witcess was
interrogated in reference to the pur
chase of lands from Dsvid Porter by
tbo Prison Directors for brick yard.*. The
land had been bought for $300 an acre ; he
hid advocated m appropriation for that pur
pose, in the Legitlatuie ; was attorney for
Porter in the transaction, and was his legal
adviser in other matters. He thought the
land hid been purchased for a reasonable
price. The testimony of Mr. Seirs mm in
terrupted by that of
J. D. XARRELL,
A saloon keeper, who had fold liquor to Shel
don, a< hjfora related above. lie did not
think that Mr. Ellis knew that Sheldon owed
him for liquor. Hid commenced writing a
receipt for Sheldon after being paid the in
debtedness, but refused, on account of tha
impudence of Sheldor. Ha 1 n1 i liquors to
convicts ; waa never informed by the prison
authorities that such t ales were contrary to
law, but once, and that was by the Captain
of the Guard of a former administration.
William H. Sear?, recalled — Was the au
thor of the bill making an appropriation tii the
State Prison fur the establishment of a jute
manufactory ; took an interest in prison mat
ters ; had studied but little on reforma
tory prisons, and waa not prepared to atate
by what system reformatioi could ba best
effected. Had known Warden Ames for
fifteen years ; had never seen him intoxica
ted ; had drank with him on two occasions ;
once the Warden draak onsets water and
one: cider.
DONALD BOVTHKRtAXU,
Foreman in the prison shops for J. G. John
son &Co was call*! by the Commission.
Had worked in the prison fjr seventeen years'.
Formerly had been in the employ of Stone &
'■ Haydon as general manager. v He had be
tween fifty and s:xty convicts under hi*
charge, whom he paid fifty cents a day after
they had been a certain length of time at tho
business, lie was of the opinion that prison
discipline was as goo] cow as under past ad
ministrations. I'endirg the further ex
adication of Sontberlan'l,
WILLIAM IHVISE
Was sworn for the defense and testified that
he ha I known Waiiljn Ames for seveial
years, and f cr the last three years intimately ;
, had seen him under a variety of circumstances,
: in the political canvass, in Court proceeding?,
at eating and drinking place?, and at hi; own
house, and had never seen him under the in
fluence of liquor. Ha bad known him to
drink wine and other intoxicants, but had
never Feen him drink twicj on the same occa
sion. Mr. Seminarian:! was then recalled.
He testified that
_
prison la iion
Was only half as valuable c? free labor when
compulsory ; when compensated in any de
gree for their labor, however, they did more
work, and he knew some convicts equal in
capacity to f roe men. It was the habit of
contractors to give convicts a premium en
goo 1 work. Under some previous administra
tions compensation in money had sot
been permitted, but the prisoners had always
received tobacco for their services. Even
this had a tendency to increase the value cf
their labor. Witness had not much con£
deuce in lha efficacy of moral instruction
upon convicts ; they were inclined to cccut
at religion ; if separated from each other,
this might not be tha case. The influ
ence of labor lie considered benefi
cial. , Religions teachings alone, . with
out work, would, in the majority
of cases make prisoners worse when they left
the penitentiary than when they entered it.
Moral instruction, combined with, labor,
might exert some beneficial effect. Witness
had known of convicts who pretended to have
been converted, but the majority of such
prisoners had returned to prison after their
discharge, and he doubted that their regener
ation was real. Most criminals did not ex
hibit any conception of religious principles.
As a class they were
SOT ILLITERATE.
Nearly all could read, and were fond of read
ing. He thought prison libraries exerted a.
good influence. Men who entered prison
whet under 23 years of age were rarely re
formed, and generally were convicted of a
second offense. Had known cases of older
men who seemed ; to have undergone a gen
uine reformation ; he also remembered cases
of convicts who had led honest lives for three
or four years after their discharge, »nd then
reoffended. They attribute their fall
in most cases to ;■'" the influence of
other criminals. Many prisoners have
been discharged whom he had never seen
again, but it wag probable that they had left
the State and had been incarcerated in other
penal institutions. , He thought it likely that
other States also contributed their quota to
the criminal population of this State. Men
who ; have been convicted of burglary, ' and
then discharged, were generally, leincarcer
ated for burglary.
CRIME IS DIVIDED IKTO DIFFERENT CLASSES,
And criminals of one class rarely change to
another. Thus a man convictel of (■' age
robbery would keep on robbiDg B'ages, and a
forger would keep on forging. With persons
convicted of manslaughter and offensea which
might be the result of violent ebullitions of
passion it was citferent, and the man who in
the first instance n as confine! for an assault
to murder mig'.t le convicted the second
time for some other crime. This would prob
ably be the res alt c f prison association. As ft
whole, the witness was not much inclined to
[COSUHVSD 9H USI PAOB.J

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