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Sacramento daily record-union. [volume] (Sacramento [Calif.]) 1875-1891, August 02, 1882, Image 2

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TliK DAILY KECORD-UMON,
WEWSFJItit AC*:r<T«. 18>8
M -r r ,.i ue trsl Observations — Taken at
Strfnal Station at the 8a me Moment.
Jf aacSAicurro, Aucust 1. 1882—8:02 P. ».
, . »S Sg&? ~~? fl Stated
r.aecsnfoh 5« { ?.! a 5 go the
»rr»tion. |£ . |i| ?« | 3|T weather
• •* i_ *"*■ j**p • £•»* •
O ran** . afoi'nHl S. W". IJ(rht.. .S('. Cloudy
riSSU.-Wiflßg CJm Calm .02 Clear
Ronbure JO.WWJ Ctlm Calm Clear
Sjcramento. 49. »! : 71 B. 8 r'resh Ocir
< Krancjco. nC«7WS W. 14 Fresh Ole»r
»*»B° NW - L « ht Clear
Ix Angles. ■99 B3 S 7 Kresh Clear
San Di^o^. ttKOIJBi W ■ Light Clear
K^ximmn tomperature, bo ; minimum, S7.
Rhor aboro low-w»ter niirk, I feet 7 lucbea
JAMES A BAKWICK,
Seiveant, Siirnal Ccrp*. U. B A.
SECOND ECiriOM.
\ second euitiou of the Kkcokd-Umoh i» ineued
»«ch <lav at 2r. M. bringia? the Eastern and coas
ew» op to tba". *)our. By this arrangement the
r.i«xißD-^Mo> »ili present the latest ni-wa obtain
•Me at all point* east ud north of Sacramento.
l'lir rt^mlar morning coition of the Reco&o-Uhiox
I" Mrriei bf ingrains trainj, anil is ahead of nil
("wpctitors ac far north as Cuico, on tht California
and Oregon Railroad; we* tc Benicia, and south to
Stockton, and east o Colfaz, Folsom and Placer
. ilie ai.d al! intermediate places. The second edition
mattvr will be found each aay upon the third i»)fe.
THIS MORNING'S NEWS.
In New York yeeteiday Government bonds were
quota* •■ 120 ih» in of 1907; 114 » for *$«; 101 \
(<>r H>; BttrJnj.-, (4 Bft&4 SO ; silver hats, 114.
Sine: In London, 62d ; consols, 99 13-IM; b
per cent. United bUtos bonds, extended, 103 ; is,
CS}; *i«, 117.
In Sin.Knntiaco half dol'ax' arc quoted at ) dls
cJtut to par ; Mexican dr.llars, 91(3911 cent*.
Mining stocks were quite active in Sin Francisco
ye»t*rJay morning, and t>iere was a fair advance in
loan descriptions. Prices were the hiirhest at the
early call, and ia some cues rose from 5 cents to 30
cents above the best ratos on Saturday. Free offer
[oca brought rallies down some at the second call.
Th<i Signal Service probabilities forecast fair
ncather for California. North Pacific coast regijn,
Icrti rains.
A tramp ra cut in two by a train near Brown's
Station, Mer.
Denver's great exposition opened yosttrday.
The iron and steol workers are in secret council at
Chicago.
A railroid collision and loss of lifo in Indiana.
Governor St. John, of Kansas, is assured of re
election.
Tb«; fortst fires in Michigan are under control.
Pin on the V \ a, Russia.
Tlioy propose to enforce the Chinese restriction
bill at New York.
The arrears of rent bill amendments have passed
the Lords. I'tfnell urges that they he opposed.
PpiLish citizens urgo Spain t<i strengthen her
nnva! force*.
Ihe dispatches give the leading features of the
naval appropriation bill.
Alfred Aylward, the Irish South African Eocr, has
1 reception in New York.
Yellow fever on the increase.
Kngland proposes to increase the Income Ux.
Heavy rains in Kentucky.
The Sultan sends t.-oopß to Kgypt to guard the
Khedive.
The murdered Christians in Egypt in a given sec
tion are Ko.
England declares the Porte muf>t obey her.
Italy, Germany and Austria refuse to ro operate
with England, and thf 1' ;ar dislikes England's atti
tude.
The nativeb in Alexandria arc very hostile in feel
ing.
The Egyptian situation grows more a - d more
complicated.
The Tariff Commission is still at work.
A water-spout causes damage in Cleveland.
CirlUon Hunt nominated for Congress by the
Democrats of the First Piutrkt of Louisiana.
Carl Schurz is talkoJ vi for Congress from a New
Yr.ik District.
Bafamtr is to df mind the surrender of the Abou
klr forte, or else bombanl them.
The Russian press is hostile to England.
Aiibi l";ish:i ia strengthening bis fortifications.
A sudden rite in the Licking river causes Jaiua-i
In the star n.ute trials the Court makes a very
imixirtant ruling.
The national debt was reduced in July nearly
■ *13,.'i00,900.
The President vetoes Uw river and harbor bill.
Patterson, the allcgeJ murderer of Cuniiuinj,'S,
near Nevada City in 1879, has been sent for from
Xt Louis by the authorities.
A sad caso of practical joking is rei«ortcd from
Walla Wnlla, W. T.
Tar litest new thing i» a composition cf matter
that gives a strong light, and is secured upon the
forehead ot driving horses. There is neither ilame
nor liquid :i!> .-.it it. But a >.;:;>i genius haa shocked
tin- world l>i the hnllilllMS o» 1 proposition to run
wires from thu vehiclu to a carbon point hi front of
ihe horse's head, and generate electricity for light
ing i>nr|>ntes through the revolution of the wheels
'if tlie carriage.
WHAT is called tin "pared* poet" is just about
'■l>e introduced, on a general system, in England.
I' ia a sort of package expicss business, managed by
the Government, by means of which packages of a!l
s*>rt« are to be forwarded and delivered jtitttaslet
tan are.
Tim Maryarillo Appeal sol}*: "There is no such
thing as a railroad question before the people of I
Cmiitornia. Buch railroad faatflaai as there had
licvn iv this State wire conclusively settled by the
adoption of tho new Constitution."
Arimna sends to the L cuver Exposition one piece
<>l copper weighing a ton. Very good exhibit that ;
but couldn't Arizona manage to put a real live cow
boy ai:d a genu'nc unadorned Apache in the exhi
bition as native products?
— — — — — » ■ _
Tut Napa Ilryittcr gay» : " Instead of a new trial
for Gray, thoje twelve men ' food and time,' who
drank so much liquor, should be made to serve a
tt-rni in the State Prison alang with the man they
oinicted."
A HUnm fact it discovered by the New York
Tim< n with reference to the imputation of the me
tropolis. Out of 1.E00.000 people, not more than
100,000 of them are members of Protestant
Churches.
Tm gait Uke Ttibune puts it thus, mittily :
" Yes," nUI the Georgia cd.tor, " I'm goiug to fight
a duel. Not that there's anything to fight about,
but (11 the other papers are advertising that way."
A<; r. ni. -i < cut HMi swallowed a calf the other day.
Thiß isn't much of a fieh etory, hut it is au en
rrmi.v.'mj'iii' ancc to»»rd estimating the capacities
of this rwiwhiskercd denizen of the muddy waters.
A lUMW and sixty men o[ Amitccountv, Mass.,
went to Jail for five days rather than pay their fines
for failure to wort out the road tax. We do admire
■tack. The world loves a martyr.
A Santa Clar* scientific pfofessor urges the
plnHting of eucalyptus along the San Joaquin and
Nacranicnto rivers iv the valley sections, as a prc
v t-n'ivc of m:ii iri.il diteases.
— -♦ ♦
QBi'-noi- Gilmovr, o! the Cleveland, Ohio, distri,;,
hu been summoned to Korae to give an account of
himnolf. He hu distinguished himself in a qnarrel
v.th the l&dies of his flock.
A membkr of the London Statistic-Hi Society s»ys
ihe labors of oneten'.h of the population of that
great city are devoted exclusively to the making of
alcoholic bev«r»ge».
. — »-^
Tick crop presets arc so good in France that the |
Paris CTMfli thinks there will h« no need to
import any food from abroad, for the tint time iv
many years.
THRU* are some Americans in Arabi Bej'« arm*,
and the question is rauxu cs to how they we uld lie !
treated should they he captured by the English
force*.
THr. Bed BlrtT >c rtfaarri urges it* people to plant
walnut in preference to any other fhade tree In
questionably the walnut is a tree rauc'.i to he f*.
vored.
W bex children run away from home it is because
h >me has no attractions. If you want yout hoy to '
Hiv at horor give him something to «ta> at home
fOT " ■ '
Okk bundled and fifty bushels of oats or. one and
a half acrw of land is the way they raise them a: j
Oecator, Oa.-that is, if wj are to believe tbe story !
Thk Buffalo Omm im a anxious to award the palm
as " moncmenul luu- of the age" to tbe Congrtr
rional fitetn-j. There is no violent protest.
Wall* Walla U iookuig eutward tor an enlarge.) j
market for h<-r products because of the extension |
cast of tbe Northern Pacific Kailroad.
Drleoatp Cannos has gone back to I'tah dis
gu«ted,but the four Mrs. Cannon arc probably glad
to get him back in any frame of mind.
Tv« puckering string of the Stoneoian tack it
»till tied iv a hard kcot, and the " bojs" are di»
'.-Quaolate.
A >RANS in the East is building an ark. He itll.i i
good man pf the nation, and expects soon to float
over as.
Tv« conversation pf most scholars with each other
is nothing rcorc than a mutual, private polite exam
ination.
y. A. Pkaler, Deputy County Clerk of Yclo, is a
Republican candidate for Secretary of State.
Tnr. Chribti&ncy divorce suit is to be compromised.
The public has every reason U> rejoice
The salaries paid to Kurcpeanj in Egypt aggregate
the neat mm ••■' njM.&K.
Mi.MXcj pr.wpettf at Tombstone were never more
enjounjtii'i.' thaa now.
Mr..v, like bucksts, slop over when too full.
THE DECLINE OF OUR SHIPPING
INTEREST.
A dispatch states that • petition to Con
grew, in relation to the revival of our ship
ping interest, has been largely »igned at
the Boston Merchants' Exchange. The
petition states "that the present decline
"ha»a depressing influence upon all the
" interests of the country, besides depriv
ing a class of employment who would
" seek the sea for a livelihood. The peti
"tioners ask that a Commission of Con
"gress be appointed to consider this sub
ject, with ability to sit during recess."
The facts about the decline of the shipping
interest ought by this time to be familiar
to every schoolboy, and unless Congress is
prepared to act in the premises we do not
see what good a Congressional Commission
is likely to do. The merchants of Boston
certainly cannot expect to obtain from
such a source any recondite information on
the subject. It is thoroughly well known
now that the shipping interest began to
decline in IS-JO, and has been declining
ever since. -In I SOO American ships car
ried 75 per cent, of all the experts and
imports of the country. In ISBI no less
than S3 per cent, of our exports
and imports was carried in foreign
bottoms. The causes of this state of
things are not simple but complex. The
primary cause was that revolution in ship,
building which substituted iron for wood
as the material of ship*. When that
change took place Great Britain possessed
all the facilities for iron ship-building, and
therefore she took the lead in that indus
try. We were not ia a position to com
pete with her at once. Our forte had long
been wooden ship-building, and all our
yards were adapted to that kind alone.
Nor, even if we had possessed the facilities,
could we have built iron ships as cheaply
as England. But we might have prevented
our shipping interest from decaying by
buying English vessels and hoisting the
American Hag on them, had not Congress
made that impossible by the enactment of
the navigation laws.
These laws tied the hands of our mer
chants and shipowners. They could not
build iron ships for themselves, and they
were prohibited from purchasing them
abroad. Then came the tariff and the re
bellion, to complete the work of disor
ganization, and between these agencies the
American shipping interest has been
brought to its present]moribund condition.
And it muat bo realized that as the case
stands it is beyond the ability of Congress
to restore the dying interest. After so
long a period of decadence recovery would
be slow under the mo3t favorable circum
stances. We have allowed our principal
rival twenty years of monopoly, and
we cannot now take the trade we have
lost into our hands again at will. By re
pealing the navigation laws and modifying
the tariff Congress would remove some
of the most formidable barriers, but it
could not turn capital into the abandoned
channel. As to what the Km ton petition
ers say about the injury to our seafaring
men, that is past praying for. As a
matter of course there is no class of Ameri.
c*n seamen who are languishing for ships.
That class ceased to exist nearly a genera
tion ago. The plain truth is that if we
could restore the shipping interest to-mor
row we should have to go abroad for men
to man our merchant marine. For it must
be realized that when, as in this case, a
; whole class find themselves thrown out of
employment, they do not sit. down and
wait tor better times, but they at once
look about for some other occupation.
This is what has happened with our sail
ors. They have become landsmen. They
had to live, and so they took up whatever
means of livelihood offered.
And it must also be remembered that
while the men who were the pride of our
merchant Davy twenty years ago are by
this time either too old for work, or dead,
the succeeding generation contained no
element which has been bred ,to the aea.
The Boatea petitioners are therefore uuder
a delusion when they talk of the injury
done to the class who would seek their
living on the sea if they could. That class
has ceased to exist, and it will take years
to supply iU place in any event. If the
navigation laws wero repealed, no doubt
our merchants could begin to buy foreign
built chips. If the tariff also were modi
tied it might become possible to build
them in the country. But capital has
been diverted from that form of industry
co many years that it would be hard work
getting it b&ck again, and unfortunately
there is vary little probability that Con
gress will recognize the necessity of re
moving the obstructions which exiet. It
is more likely that the result of a Con
gressional Committee would be some
recommendations looking to the establish
ment of a system of bounties ; which
■would be like tying the legs of half the
community, and then taxing the other half
to buy crutches for the cripples. There is
only one healthy, economical and rational
way by which our shipping interest can be
restored, and even if that way were fol
lowed it would be the work of time to
bring about the revival. By simply re
moving ail obstructions to the building
and to the ownership of ships, capital
would be encouraged to return to this
form of investment. But there is no royal
road to the rehabilitation of our shioping
interest, and least of all can Congress, by
any new enactment, change the situation
for the better.
FL OUNDERING WO FULLY.
The Examiner is floundering wofully in
its abortive efforts to overcome the force
of the statements of Mr. Stubbs and Mr.
Prucht ou the contract system. In its
desperation it has conceived the possibility
of escaping from its false position by pre
tending that the Central Pacific Railroad
ought not to be managed on ordinary busi
ness principles, because there is a " public
use "in railroads. This will not do. The
fact that there is a public use in railroad*
is sufficiently recognized in the legislative
restraints imposed upon them. The public
right of interference takes that form, and
cm only take that form. When the L?cis
lature has performed its part, however, the
right and duty of the corporation to -juard
'ts own interests by the methods whuh all
business men adopt, are indubitable. The
public have no right to expect or demand
' unbuEiccssi ike arrangements from railroads.
But the foimißT has from the first per
si&tently ignored or willfully missed the
! very pith and ceuter of Mr. Stubbs' ex-
I planation. He has shewn that the dissat
| isfaction of the heavy importers has been
incurred by the corporation because —
lin deference to that theory which the
j Ezamhifr keeks to stretch so absurdly — it
has refused to discriminate in favor of that
class, by apportioning its rates in relation
to the amount of tonnage. Had it agreed
; to do that it would have laid its;-!f open to
i censnre, and might have been accused of
assisting to make the rich ricber and the
poor poorer. But it has refused to do
what the heavy shippers demanded, and so
it has displeased them. Why does not the
Examiner discuss this point ?
THE NEW FALSE PROPHET.
Arabi Pasha has undertaken to raise a
holy war, and by himself assuming the
s&cred green robes has evidently sought to
forestall that new. false Prophet who is com
ing out of the Soudan, and who, if the re
porta concerning him are true, must now
be within five or six hundred miles of
Cairo. Thu individual calls himself El
Mehdi (the Guide), and claim* to be the
long looked- for Prophet,alleged to have been
foretold by Mohammed himself, who is to
restore Islam and subdue the world. A
great many utterly incredible stories are
told about El Mehdi; as, for example,
that bis physical peculiarities currepond
precitely with an old prophecy, which de-
clared that the coming Prophet would
have his right arm longer than his left.
The conclusion that this alleged prophecy
has been manufactured for tbe occasion is
all but irresistible, but none the less is the
so-o*lled false Prophet eagerly accepted by
the credulous and zealous Mohammedans
of the Soudan. He has already had
several encounters with Egyptian troops,
and though his followers , are for the most
part mere savages, armed with spears and
swords only, they have overcome the regular
troops every time. El Mehdi had at the
last accounts passed Khartoum, and was j
descending the valley of the Upper
Nile, accompanied by a wild and en
thnsiastic army, of nobody knows what
numerical strength. It is obvious
that such an apparition on the scene
of Arabi's exploits cannot be to his
taste, for he and hi* projects would be
completely overshadowed by the new
Prophet, and though he would no doubt be
permitted to assist the latter, he would
have to yield the command to him. What
the new movement may amount to it is at
present impossible to conjecture. It niay
lead to the repudiation of the Sultan as
Caliph of the Faithful. It may lead to
a great war, in which the principal Moslem
races shall take part, and in which Eng
land seems destined to bear the brunt on
the side of Christendom. The Sultan U evi
dently nervcus concerning the new Prophet,
and the Moslem of Africa at least are
greatly excited. That El Mehdi will ex
ercise a decided influence of- some kind
upon the Egyptian situation appears well
nigh certain, nor is it possible that Arabi
should succeed in supplanting him. Al
together the plot is thickening in a very
strange and interesting way.
GETTING COMPLICATED.
The relations between IE. de Lcseeps and
the Bedouins and Arabi Pasha appear to
be assuming quite an extraordinary aspect.
If we may judge from the terms of the dis
patches, M. de Lcsseps is at present acting
very much as if he was second in command
to Arabi. He is said to have an inderinite
number of Bedouins at his back, and to be
able to grant passports which operate as
safe conducts as far up the country as
Cairo. How he ia going to maintain this
perilons situation does not appear. Of
course it is not thinkable that he should be
permitted to control the Suez Canal with
his Bedouins, nor ia it likely that these
latter will maintain their present attitude
when the Eoglish force lands, which will
be in a few days. No doubt M. de Lcsseps
has at heart simply and Bolely the safety
I of the canal, but just now it looks as though
he was in some danger of drifting into a sus
picious relation to Arabi, and though it
may serve his present purpose to be on
good terms with that enterprising rebel,
future events may render such a connec
tion embarrassing.
VETOED.
The President Vetoes the Hlier and Har
bor Appropriation BUl— The Veto Mes
sage In Fall.
[SI'XCIAL BT TELBOIUriI TO THE RECORD-IXIOM. |
Washington, August Ist.— The Cabinet
today decided on a veto of the river and har
bor appropriation bill. The President- sent
his message to Congress this afternoon. The
following is the meseage in full :
To the House of Representatives : I ! v■ r.
watched with much interest the progress ot
House bill No. 1i.242, entitled "Au Act
making appropriations for the const ruction,
repair and preservation of certain works on
rivers and haiboia, and for other purposes ;''
and having since it wag received carefully ex
amined it, atter mature consideration 1 am
constrained to return it herewith to the House
of Representatives, in which it originated,
without my signature, and with my o^ections
to its passage. Many appropriations in the
bill are clearly for the general welfare and are
most beneficial in their character. Two of
j the objects r'or which provision is made were
I by me considered so important that I felt it
my duty to direct to them the attention of
Congress in my annual message of December
la3t. I urged then the vital importance of
legislation for the reclamation of marshes
and for the establishment of harbor linss
along the Potomac front. In April last, l.y
a pp'cial message, I recommended an appro
priation for the improvement of the Missis
sippi river. It is not necessary that I say
that when my signature would mike a bill of
appropriations for these and other valuable
national objects a law, it is wilh great
reluctance, and only under a ssnse of
-duty tbst I withhold my signature. My
principal objscti in to the bill U that it con-
I tains appropriations for purposes not for the
common defense or the general welfare, ami
which does Dot promote commerce amoDg the
States. These provisions, on the contrary,
are entirely for the benefit of particular lo
calities, in which it i§ proposed to make irn
provementc. I regard Ruch appropriations cf
public money as beyond the powers given by
the Constitution to Conjjrets and the Presi
dent. I feel all th« more bound to
withhold my signature from the bill
I btscauee of the peculiar evils which
1 manifestly result from this infraction of the
Constitution. Appropriations of this nature,
to bs devoted purely to local objects, tendirjg
to increase in number and amount. As a
citizen of one State, I find that money is to
I be raised for which others, in common with
I tue whole country, are taxed, and it h to be
expended for local improvement in another
State. These others demand similar'benefits
for themselves, and it is not unnatural that
they should seek to indemnify themselves for
such use of public funds, by secur
-1 ins; appropriations for similar improve
ments in their own neigborhood. Thus
as the bill becomes more objectionable,
it secures the more support. This
resv.it invariably, and necessarily follows the
neglect to observe constitutional limitations
imposed upon the la wmaking power. Appro
priations for river and harbsr improvements
have, under the influences to which I have
alluded, increased year by year tut of ail
proportion to the progress of the c&uitry,
great as that hai been. In 1870 the aggre
gate appropriation was S3 975 900 ; iv 187.")
56,0J8.517 50; in 1880, SS 970,500; and in
1881, $11,451,350, while by tho present Act
there is appropriated SI 8. 743, 875. While
feelii g: every disposition to leave to the Legis
lature the responsib: i,y of (le^erciiniug what
amount should be appropriated for tho purpose
of the bill, so long as the appropriations
are c >nriue<t to the objects indicated by the
grant t.f power, I cannot escapa the cunelu
nion that, as part of the law-making power
of the Government, a duty devolves upon me
to withhold my signature from a bill contain
ing appropriations which, in my opinion,
greatly exceed in amount tha need* of the
country for the present fiecal year. It being
the usage to provide money for these parpo?es
by ainaal appropriation bills, tbe President
I i«, in effect, directed t> expend so large an
amount of money within so brief a period
that the expenditure* cannot be oconomic»lly
and advantageously made. The extravagant
expenditure of public money is an evil not to
be measured by the value of that morey
to the people who are tixrd for it.
They surtain a greater injury in the demor
alizing effect produced npen those who arc
intrusted with official duty, through all the
ramifications of the Government. These ob
jections could be removed, and every consti
tutional purpoie readily obtained, ehou'd
CoDjrrees enact that one-ha'f only of the ag
gregate amount provided for in the bill will
be appropriated for expenditure during the
fiscal year, and that the sum so appropriated
be expended only for each object named in
the bill as the Secretary of War, uh^er direc
tion of tho President, shall determine ; pro
vided, that in no cases shall the ex
penditure for any one purpose exceed
the sum now designated by the bill for this
purpose. I feel authorized to make this tug
geation because of the duty imposed upon
the President by the Constitution to recom
mend to the consideration of Congres such
measures as he shall deem necessary and ex
pedient, and because it is my earnest desire
that public works which are in progress shall
t:: tier no injury. Congress will also con veße
again in > few month?, when the whole sub
ject will be open for their consideration.
Chestm A. Arthub.
Kxecutive Mansion. August 1, 1882.
The President's veto of the bli crested
much excitement in Washington. Senators
»nd Representatives betreed for the approval
of the bill. Senator Edmunds and other
strong men arced the veto of the bilL Tte
House received the veto with great astonish
ment, snd, after adjournment, an extranrdi- !
nary s.-ene was witocssed on the ■ ti >or. !
Members, especially the friends of the bill,' I
gathered in groups and discussed the veto. '
In the heat of pasnon tbe most violent
demonstrations against the President were
poured out on all side: by friends ot the
measure. Democrat* and Republicans alike
were loud in expressions of anger, and the
members of the Commerce Committee out
ranked all ethers in their violence.
Regarding the veto of the ri> er and h»rbor
bill the House Commerce Committee held a
meeting last night and agreed on a policy of
action. The committee was unanimously of
the opinion that the President h»d mado a
blunder, and the committee refused to rec
ommend his suggestion for a lump ram to bs
expended under the Secrt-Ury of War. Tbe
committee believe the bill can be pajwed i
over the veto, and an effort to that end will I
b» made. The cooiniittee say if the ?5,£00,- <
000 for the Mississippi and Potomac Fiata is i
deducted, the amount will be but 81 350,000, I
every item of which has bsea indorsed hy i
the Engineer Corps.
—« • ,
Sbsaior Josbis, of Nevada, is peered to death I
by applicant* for Federal positioci ,
HOME AND ABROAD.
Sadden Blue ol a Blvrr— CullUlan tml Lang
<>f Life— Tbe Di-nvcr ' ! \pi-lllini -Carl
srlmr/ ror t'oncrrM— The Irl-li QarHtlon
In Parllauirnt-Feitures at tbe Naval !
Appropriation Bill— lbr Iran a»d Steel
W«rker»-Tlie Star Uoatr Trial—ttedne
ii.jh »f ibe N'mional I- iii rrorredinKi
In i'ongres*.
isrrciiL bt TKLEO&irn to tub rscorb-ihios.j
MMMiM.
i
Hare of Ihr Star Unatr Trial.
Washington, August l«t.— ln the star i
route trial to-day Senator Maxty te-titied '
that in 1876 9 he was Chairman of the Post
i lii ;•:• Committee. The prosecution objected
that none of the rout<H named in the iedict
ment were in Texas. Ineereoll said the pur
juse was to show by the witness and ex-Post
mseter-Geni-ral Key what was the policy
regiinjiig route", and th.it Brady was influ
enced. Dot by personal or mercenary motives,
L-ut by the whole administration. The Court
avid the Court was established to try the
question of Uw, but did cot propose to allow
the defendant to defend himself by produc
ing Postmaster-Generals and Senators ami
Reprt-sentatives to sbow the policy. He hau
tbe power to establish new rontcp ; the policy
of the Government was to b ■ found in its
law*. The Supremo Court hid interpreted
ti tn. Brady dtfei.dfd his .ic's by paying they
were right. Suppose they war?, if they were
not legal what had that to do with the case?
Lord lii.-o.in defended himself from the charge
of bribery by saying that his decisions bad
always bean right, yet t^e wa3 convicted if
brihe.y, and i.'ot his g^wu, very properly. Sap- i
pwe the policy was right, ttudjet the charges j
are sustained, what bscjinea of the piiicy?
Suppose all the members of both bouses of
'.;.;■. K-t'S asked the Second Assistant I'.-.-t
--maeter Genera! to increase certain route."; if
he had received a bribe to 60 ii cren-e it
wcuM not help him to show that he had
acted on the advica of Representatives. I
must positively rule cnt the evidence.
An exception was rioted. Gererjl Key w»b
olieri acd questioned as to the general policy
■)i tha Government. Hultd <ut. Ingersoli
-aid ho wanted to show Key. aui uot Bradv,
wjs really responsible fox the expedi
tion ordered; Braiy simply fallowed tre
p flicy if Key. The Cuurt, however, i tiled it
out.
Wil'.iam T. Sherman, G;reral of the Army,
was the rext witnese. Ha recognized Lii in
dorfiemect upon the petition for increase of
expsuition upon route 38,113. He wiß asked
if he had not urged au increase generally
upon the Department, saying it would do
more than anything else to set'le' the ever
lasting Indian question, but obj«c ir>n was
male by the prosecution, acd sustained by
the Court. General Sherman was then asked
to detail the facta which icrluenced him in
makii'g a reccrnrcendalion for increase. He
said that personally he knew little of the cir
cumstance", but in his cffijinl cipAoity l.c
had haard much of them. The Indian Agent
at Wnite River Agency had been murdered
and his family carried eff, and a fight had
taken place between Maj >t Thornburg and
the Indians, and the entire country between
KiT.iii s and White River Agency was over
run by hostile*, and it was regarded as a
measure of national importance to keep
open every pos-ible commuuication with the
rear. Consequently the establishment of a
daily Btage servico ia that section had been
rec iinmendeJ. He was u- kid what waa the
■ ii ■ ■ cf frequent u.,.ii< upnn tbe maiuten
a*e* cf peaceful relations with tha Indianr.
lie taid nothiEg bettor enables an i fficer to
kte;> the peace than fr:quent communications
wi h the diff rent tiibes in the Indian coun
try. At least one-fourth cf the appropria
tiors rnp.de for the support if the army is ex
pended for the cornier servica on different
lice 3of communication. The Pnstoffice De
partment was alao n: i ■ 1 to establish and in
crease their service. Quick communication
of intelligence was thus secured, and the com
manding officers were enabled to antici
pata the movements of hostile Itdiane.
IHe recommended a tri- weekly service
lon the Bismarck and Fort Keogh route
in the winter of 1878. Bismarck was then
the tsrenfama ol the Norlhfrn Pacific Rail -
read, and the r;;ii*e was intended to aid in
the oticection of railroad and ct&go line.
The Postc-tfices couetitu'ed an effectual
picket line, which was nf great servica to the
military past*. There would have ! c.-n an
er farced efttabli-hed picket lire at great cost
if that jrro.ind had not been covered by the
sbage line?. Speaking of Arizona, route*,
Gen. S.;erman said that in that Territory
there were 1,500 Apache Indians of peculiar
character. They eotertaiu everlasting hatred
towards the Fpjniah rice, and were
kept corralled !>y the military to pre
vent them teaming depredations npou
settlers. Scmet ; :is~ they brnke away from
thoorral, after '. fishion of Animals. In
a recent case l'.*o Apaches broke out &nd
killed 40 settler*. Mid escaped into Old Mex
ico, where they hay« been wiped out by Mex
ican troops. Frequent mails gave warning
of such OuUllKks hd(l gave the esttlers an
opportunity to m.-ika a defense. On ctos'
exHinins'i -n Gener-il Shsruiß)) said he would
prefer slow daily nidi's to tho less frequent
though f*3ter service.
In answer to an inquiry fr;:n Ingereoll, the
Court saM that the question at i-sue was not
whether the expedition had been rightly or
dered, for the pu.l lie t:fßc?rs are presumed to
have acted honestly in interpreting the law.
Th<? real question on trial w»e>, whether Brady
had received nnney from contracting for or
dering the expedition, and the question of j
policy did not enter i:.to it.
The records of "expedition orders "were
brought i'jto Court, cemprbi )g twenty-four
lar^e volume?, but they were not put in evi
dence.
J. L. Frpnch, ex Chief Clerk and Second
A-ii.->*n'i( Pobtmaster-Gentral, w.is recallei.
After detailing the business routine of the
contract tffice, the witness was asked who
was Ac.iog Second Assistant Postmaster-
General December 28, 1880, the .lite of the
Brady-Walsh interview. French said that I
upon that day ho was ActiDg Second Assist
ant Postmaeter-Gereral. During most of tha
latter part of D.ceoiber hs acted cs Second
Assistant, oocnprteß the desk of that
officer. General Brady did not act as Post
master-General in hecember of that year,
(ieneral Br*<iy riad a white b->y nameJ Ge3ig3
Adsrus-ag hi* ra,c, and wit.ueps believed he
was ro'. iv the < ffi^s in December, 1880. It
was the c mmon practice for extractors to
have agtnta to attt nd to their bnaiuess bi f >re !
the Department, and their communications
were recognized aa Bute tho anlhorily of the
principals.
Ik( 4pprnpr!aU«n I'ur Mnrc Islantl. *
Washington, Ausinst lit —In the Senate
to-day the California Senators objected to
the committee aiuaudmcnt lo the naval ap
propriation bill in regard to the material to
be ufed ia the oLetructiou of the dry dock
at the Mare Island nsvy yard, and pursuant
to the sn^geatiors the clause was amendt J so
as to oispenue with the Secretary of the. Navy
having control over the subject, and to direct
the U39 of granite for the entire works. The
incrcaso reported by the committee of §50,.
000. making tho appropriation for the work
5300.000, was adopted without objection.
nonar of Itrprrßrnlatlvr*.
Washington, August Ist.— llobesoc, from
the Committee on Appropriation?, reported
back the naval appropriation bill, recom
mending non-c ncurrence in all the Senate
amendments, except delaying the ccmipietioD
of the monitors until the Advisory Board re
parts to Congress. Thiu they recommend
concurrence in.
Williams of Wisconsin, Chairman of the
Committee on Foreign Affurj, submitted a
report upon the Chile-Peru investigation.
Piared on tho House cileadar.
Williams of Wisconsin, from the Confer
ence CominfttM on ths .Japanese indemnify
bill, reported that the ommittea waa unabfe
to ngrce. Further conference was ordered.
Auderar.n of Kansas offered a resolution
providing for Ihe final adjournment of Con
gress «t noon, AugU3t 4th. A motion to refer
the resolution to tho Committee on Ways
.>ii.' Means was lost.
Tha Committee on Printing reported back
tho Senate bill appropriating $G73 624 for
printing acd binding tho tenth census. Bill
Tlassed.
At this point a message was received from
the President, anniancing his disapproval of
the river and harbor appropriation bill.
Read and ordered printed. Reading only
once interrupted, and thit waa when a hearty
laugh trreetad the sjnter.ca, "Thus, as thU
bill becomes mir" afej c'ionable, it receives
more support" Bsyond this, there was no
mioifestatioa of approval or disapproval.
Arjjurnsd.
Ending MMM of ili< .Naval Appro
priation Kill n* Pa»«rd.
\Vashikotos, Anyust Ist.— The salient i
legielstive features of the caval uppropria !
tiou bill, as it passed the Ssnats to-day, are
• as follows :
Appointments from the Naval Academy
are to be mido whon neccs-ary to fi!l vacan
cies in the lower grades of the line of the En
gineer Corpj and Marina Corps, bat not in
number less than ten in each year. Gradu
»tea who do not receive appointment* are to
b« s;iven & certificate of gradujtion on honrr- !
abie discharge, and ore year's i>ca pay. The !
list of the Medical Corps cf the ntvy U i
made to consist of 15 medical direct- '
or?, 15 medical ir.cpjctois, 50 surgeon.", and I
90 assistant atrt pi'stdasßiataat sunjeonß. !
The active liit of th« pay c:rr» i
hereafter is to ciinprisa 13 pay directors, 13 |
p»y inspectors, -10 paymasters, 20 passed as- j
tUtant paym»atvrs, and 10 bfsiatftnt p»y- |
ruMter*. The active Hat of the En.in«*r i
Corps U 20 chief erginfers, with the rMttive
rank cf Capi»in ; 15 cbi=f engineers, with the
relative rack of U<.mm»cd*r; 45 chief en
gineers, with the relative rack cf Lieutenant
L'CTmao'.'er or L'.entenaiit ; 4 passed a*»i«t- ',
ant engineers wid 40 assistant engiceera, with i
the relative rauk for each as now fixed by I
law.
The Secretary of the Navy is to appoint
& Comminrinn to consider and report to the
next eesaion of Congress upon the question
whether it is advisable to sell »ny navy
yard, and if so, which ona.
For the general purposes of coDrtruc'.ion
and repair, tbe appropriation of |1 750,000 is
mada, bnt co partof tuttnin U to b» applied
to repairs cf wojiden ships whea estimated
c>?t of the repairs exceed* 31) per cent, tha
estimated cost of a new ship. Any portion
of this sum cot required for the purposes
aforesaid, must be applied to the construe- ',
tion of two steim cruisjr vessels. The ap
propriation of .$400,000 i§ made to baild and
tit tnrret« and pilot-honse l« the irctclul
a o^r.i^r Miastoc^mih, acd tn launch to the
b-*t advaatage the monitor* MonedrcV, Puri
tan, Amphitrite, aad Terror. It is made the
duty of the Secretary cf the Navy to make I
an inventory and appraisal of all the etores
and supplies of the bureaus of the depart
ment, and repirt tha san-.e to Congress at its i
next session. He is also directed to csuao an
ex»mt. ation of all vessels, and if any of them
are unfit for fnrtber service, nr if any which
are lyicg utfinifhed in the na~y yards cannot
be hnuhed withon' (treat and disproportional
expense, he 6hall Birik* the n»me of such
veaw.l or ves»els from the navy register, and
report the same to Cocgre?*.
Bednelng the Xatlonal Drbt.
Wasrikgton, Augvut lit.— The national
debt stats ment shows a decrease during July
of 513,560,027. Cash in the Treasury, $241,
--098,031; g<-W certificates, $50,117,040; silver
certificate,-, $G7.ll'i 210 ; certificate deposit*,
$12,730,000; refanoing certificites.
750; lfg»l teDdcra. $34,068, 0Ki ; fractional
I currencr. ?7,04r, 4GO. The total rit-bt is
! $1, '."05,225. 510 Total interest, -310 9i« 91&
Debt less ciish in Tre»sury, $1,675,054,433.
Tbe assets include Londa issued to the Pacific
Railroad Compatie*, interest piyab'.e iv law
ful mor ey ; principal ou'atandiog, 164,633,
--51 2; iuterest cccrued aad net yet piid, $823,
117 ; interest paid by United States, |86.<
344.682 ; interest repealed by the companies
by transportation service, tU.Vl.Btt ; b
cash payments of five per cent, of the net
earnings. §055. UtS; balatce of itterftt paid
by the United States, $3,'.Uti,448.
The Mining E\panltlon at Denver Opens.
Denvkk, August Ist.— Tbe National Min
ing Exposition evened to day at IS o'clock.
Nearly every Western State was represented.
Tha military from Leadvillo and iitbsr towas
of the State participated iv the opening eier
cises. The city is crowded wita etrstgers.
Hon. William I). Keliey, cf Pencsyivaiiia, id
now makiu,-; the opening address.
rSECOND DISPATCH.]
DrNvtß, August Ist.— The National IMn
ing Exposition was thrown open to the public
to-day, acd the oeremonies were of a charac
ter befitticg such an event. AH d>y jeo^.er
day, aud during early hours this luorcjiig,
regular ami epe;ial railway trai.-is brought
larye crowds of visitors, until the city waa
filled to oveifljwing. Denver presented &
holida'.' appearance; business was f,)r the
most part suspended, and the building*, both
public and private, were i?ayly and beiuti
fu'ly die ratod Bith the r.alif-nal colors. Tbp
procrssici) moywl about 1 o'clock, nisrehiug
through the principal (breed. The i-idewalk ,
and windows, and roufa sloag fed ruute were
throDgod with thousands of s,.'fctat.>is. Pla
tnonß of police wete f illowed by Governor F.
W. Pitkin, Adjutmt-Ger.trJ R. M. Bt m
son ani othtr military crHccrs. Then came
tho different military orgauiz-.tiar.s. Nsarly
every i:.i!i:ij coxpany ia the .Staie whs
in live, acd altc-selhcr prrsenled a «(len
did .|- •.-.-■■-. The civic eocieties and
iflioials in carriages follower 1 , ircl'-di;;v' tbc
Mayor an.ci Aldermer?, c&u.tv rthjers, Liu
tenant-Gjvornor H. A. W. '!\»b:r, ii. E.
Bnrnhirrl, Director cf the Miut, and Hon
W. D. Kelicy, of Pencfy!vani», th« orator of
the day. The exeicires at tha < -position
buillini; opened with the plijiii;-; et "Amer
ica" l;y tiie b«od, foUovad by a prayer, and
then " Hail Columlia "by the band. Mary
distirKiUhcd panotM occupied seats on the
platform, lion. W. D. Kel ey was introduced
to the vast audience, end dvlivtrei the ora
tion of the diy. At the couclusioa of Judge
Kelley'u aJ'res-, Hon. H. A. W. Tabor,
President (f the Kspjsiti >n Association,
madea bii f speech, formally decUriag the
exhibition open, and then ftarfed the ma
chinery with hi.-! o.vn hand. Tha stars and
stripes were iu3tai;tly run up ou the main
fliß«tsif, while a sa'.u'.e waa fired by a b.sttery
stationed at sume di-itance. The utmost en
thusiasm was u:auifestcd throoghoat by the
15,000 people in attendance, end the m»t.age
ment c insider the succ S3of tbe expotlliou m.
assured.
Kailroa<l tolll-io:. ..r.ci to s »r Life.
Chicago, Auiusi Ist, — \ optcial friiln
South Bend, Ll<l , to tha Enniii^ jottmml
fays that two freight trains c.ili:«-i' on the
Lake Shore Kiiirood, just Wc-st of this city,
thiu morning. The cars, to the nuuiber of
sixty, were piled upon the ecKines, aed, tsk
ing tire, burned up. The engineers were
buiied under the debris, but were rescued be
fore tie fUrues reached them. Th?ro ware
tramps on the (rain, and four of them insist
that seven of their comrades are in tb« l-urn
ing^mass._ The lona v estimatad at $150,000.
The diswter eeems to have be<n dua to
criminal careles^nets. An Tuter-Ocettn Sjuth
Becd epacial says thst tha acciileiit war owing
to the failure to deliver the train dispatcher*
order to the east-hound train to side track at
Palmer. Both trains were runuirg fjsty
miles an hoar through a heavy fog. Charl* s
Stanton and William Htninp, the two enti
neerr, both have bruiitiu legs and iuternal ii -
juries, and the former had an arm literally
cooked by steam. The cries cf tbe tramps
confined in the burning b^x cars were sgouiz
iug in the extreme.
Chinese from Cuba— The Antl (blnrse
Kill.
New Yobk, Angwt Ist.— Tho steamer
Niagara froui H .vana brought among its
passengers tweue Chinamen. The 'teaiher
firm notified tho EbniM »gt"n!a n»>t ti> hill
any more Chines.} passenger? fcom the na:)
ment the act went into operation, for bd far
as they could pee thtra was no pjfiibility of
e_v*din? the law. A custnrr.-house instrnc
tioa hu been received reapcoling the enforce
ment of the law. Th- law requires certifi
cates to be secured in order to enable Chinese
who wore in the country withiu niuety days
afte.r its pasßcg?, Red who wish to g> abroail,
to return if thy il. sired to no m, These
provisions aro being vow enforced ; only
eleven return cenitio»tei>. however, have
bssn issued at the port of New York. Ttie
prohibition of all eutry of Caineit! laborers
into the country was not to go into effect
until after ninety days after tbe Cfcincss bill
became a law. Trie bill waa passed on May
ii-.h, ar-il iliv Custom-hoii^e authorities boU
that they have no occasion to enforce it
until August sth. The matter 13 in the
hands of Deputy Wynkoop, < f the Navi^a
tion Divieinn. All yiolaiiona of the UW
which may recur will hi repnrted to the
Division of Fines, Prralt'ei aud Foifeiturea,
where the cases will bj piepjired for the ac»
tion of the District Attorney.
The Kail road «.-!-.
Boston, August Ist.— President Perkion,
of the Chicago, Burlington and Quiricy It»il
road, and Vice-PrtHdcnt Atkinson, of the
Union Pacific Riilroad, with i- <.■;:!, and
mernbsrs of both directories, held a confer
ence hero with reference to *he eet'.lement of
the Cclirado difficulty. Another meeting is
t > be held Wednesday, wi'h President Di!l< n
i:i attendance. Ia tha meantime bath pir
ti'B are forbidden any cutting rates on their
lines.
The "L'cklns" Sett Ha Bark I p.
Ci.ncinnati, August lit. — Ab^ut noon the
Linking river at its mouth, opposite here, Rt
sumed alarmirg pr; pjrtioiis. The rise from
above lushing into the O&io caused great
damage. Twenty-one barges tied along the
shore were swept from Swifi's Landing. A
ton of coa!, one cf stone, one of coke, and
oce of Dana's Baet, were l;>Et. Of tLe barge*
four were sunk on (he railroad bridge pier ;
Golchell lost a coal bc-uje ; Chap. Shink lost
three barges of stone, and Brosoiner lost two
barges. Ihe hull ( f the steamer Champion
euuk. Charles Fordes' boating-house was
carried down tie river, apd various other
losses swoil ihe total to $50,500. The liver
has risen 28 feet since last night, aud ia now
rusniog furiously. .
The Forest Fires in Michigan.
East Tawas (Mkh ), August lit.— The
rain has extinguished m ist c 5 tha forest firsr,
Thos. on East Tawas Uk^ and north cf Wil
ber, ...urted again Sucdey afternoon, burn
icg with great violence. They were confined,
however, to (he back pine timber and cedar.
Bat two farmers have burned out since last
report. J. Smith, on E.si Tawss road, lost
his house, barn and crops, and ilr. Wright,
«n Hemlock load, lost his hnufp, feucas nnd
crops,
The Iron antl Slec-1 Makcrtt' «onv nllon.
Chicaoo, Außmt lit.— About Iwo hundred
and^fa'fly delegates U. the Ani.iißainjted Ahso
ii >'i is. of Iron Workers convened this morn
inz, rcprc.^en;ii;g every e< c ion cf the conn
try, and b-irg in appearance a mont inteili
gent d\ss of men. Mayor HarriioD, in
welcoming their, announced that ho waa in
thorough sympathy with them. P:eudcnt
Jarrett made a brief fpeech, and Wiliiam
C»rp:nter, cf SprintrfiJd, II!., urged the ne-
CEtsity of organization, aad p:e ented the
benefit to be derived fßmj the wcrkingmen
taking an ncUve interest and part ia poliUcs.
The Asf-ocir.tion then e!:>cc-d its doors ana
the secret session began.
Wenlern Crop**.
Bismarck, Angast t*t— The harvest of
wheat in the Missouri Mope befits quite gen
erally this morning. Eaonuous rains have
been equally distiibated, and grain of all
kinds i» heavy. This Cinnot be said of Red
River valley, where '*l>e ground is perfectly
level, as there has been too much moisture,
ai:d thoiHauds of acres of wheat havj been
drowned out. From Jamestown we«t to the
Missouri river the prairie is rolling, apd crops
conld Fcirely look better. Barley already
harvester! averages about f?rty bushels, oits
av.rage in tbi< te-;tion sixty to seventy five,
wheat twenty-five to thirty-rive, aud in Eomo
places it v much higher.
IVihII. rr.;i »boa!d be Hn.pj .
WAsnixoTos.AaxnitK— The till author
iziog the Secretary cf the Interior ta cjuse
to bs eurveyed and laid > ut in lots as much of
i the Uinatilla reservation in Oregou, cnntfcu
i oui to the town of Teudhtir, as is n;ee?s»ry
I to allow said town proper and needful exteu-
I sion anil growth, not exceeding 040 acree,
wm tak?n up Monday on motion cf Mr.
Georg*, ami pwsei in tLe Hou«e of Repre
sentatives.
rrr.c.-j-.iinjn «r tbp Tnrlff <'omiuls»lun.
tiOVi IJranch, Atijjujt l«t.— Tho Tariff
G,)iuojin'.'>n i££tim»d in se«»ion to d?y. A*
«irt»nt !r<»crstaiy Fret.eh cave hia views as to
the iinp'uUnce of the tr— tfal of a ttibunw
! for the rpcedy determination of Jhynteil
j qaes*ion» arista? from time to time i:i
j costan: houses. Owing to the ceith of Gar
field and a change of Cabinet the pUns for
euch a tribunal had fallen through ; it hid
beer, opposed also by lnwy?ra, who were ia
tere«t*d in f he numerous litigations pendicjf.
He favored a plan for the creation of a Cus
toms Court, compased pariiy of experts and
of one or two eminent lawvera; member* of
the Court to receive a aalsry of from 55 000
to 96,000 yearly, and to sit permanently in
New York. He would hive the decision cf
the Court tinsi and anat<peaUb!e. He then
gave a Me lory cf the wh..le sugar ',ucsti in.
1 After recwe John D Ti\x, of New York, wai
; heard in the interes ,f the dnss trade. A
represtntative ef t! New Otle»cs Cotton
Exchange was aiso h<aci,
ProsreM of the Canadian ParlOr.
Chicago, Au<rost Ut— lf. C. Vac H .me.
G*ierai Manager cf the C»nadi»Q Pacing, is
in the city. In an interview bs raid th«
compsny will build 500 mileg of tha main
In 9 and liiii miles if brunches this year, the
track being Uid continuously between Win
nipeg and Lake Superir.r, a di.-tance of 436
miles. The road will be completed to the
Rcjcfcy Mountains by Aucmt, 1883. It has
7,700 men at work, and ie laying three and a
half niil?s per day. The great land sale of
5,000,000 ceres from its grant from the Cana
dian Government, to the Erglinh syndicate,
with the Duke of Manchester at its head,
was completed Saturday last, when the syn
dicate, paid to the road §15,000,000. The
lands are not in one continuous blcck, but
take every fifth section throughout the
grant. Arracgemtnts are being perfected to
colotiza these li»nds with English farmers.
I'rohlbttlontst* on Top.
Topeka (Km. ), Auguit Ist.— Governor SJ.
■'.■(:u- nomination, and consequent election,
for a third term, id now assured. He has
already I!*; votes out of 370 delegates, and
bis vote will likely exceed 220.
Water Spout and Smlden Flood.
Cleveland (O ), August Ist —A Millers
burg speciil says : A water-epout and sudden
flood to-day swept away a great many bridges
ami some buildim-p, and drowning numbers-
# of live-stock en the bottom land. A small
stream c •!!-«! Scapps rose rapidly acd
overflowed hundreds of acres, carrying off
and destroying hay and other harvested crops.
Houses in various pieces were wholly or
partly submerged, and families narrowly
escaped by hurrying to the highlands. It is
feared foma peaple have been lost. Rlin is
still falling.
The Winning Ticket* or Ihe LoalsTllle
Lottery.
Louisville (Ky.), August l,t.— ln the
forty-seventh dr&wing of the Commonwealth
Distribution Company, ticket G3 o'.'9 drew
the capital priz*. 830,000 ; ticket 82,090 the
second priz», $10 OCO, acd ticket 33 22G the
third prize, $5,000.
Carl -chnrx to be Nominated for Congress.
New York. August Ist.— The New York
Sun savß : There appaars to bs some talk
about taking Carl Schurz as the Republican
candidate for Congress in the np-town dis
trict, which is now represented by Mr. Dngro.
This is a pretty close district. If Mr. Schurz
should be nominated it iright be rather hard
to beat him.
Tbe Ford Brother*.
Chicago, August Ist.— Bob Ford, who
killed the Dotariom outlaw Je^se .Tamt-e, and
his brother, Charlie Ford, are in th« city, en
j >yug lifn in spending the 510,000 which
ttey received as a roward for ri.lding the
cjuntry of the outlaw leader. Ia an interview
ti?-ri.'ht they said they would stay here about
a »ft W and then go to Cincinnati. Bob Ford
says Ft ink James was in good health when
he latt caw him. He dots not believe Frank
will ever attempt to reorganize the gang.
Death* from Heat.
New Yobk, August 1-t.— During the
twenty-four hours endod at noon today,
thero were 138 deaths from heat.
Turned Over to Ihe California Officer.
New Yolik, August lit.— Deputy Sheriff
•Acljermap, of Siu Frmcisoo, ariived here
to-d»v tj take charge of tha prisoner Will
iam Watte, first mate ot Iks Bhip Imperial,
recently extradited from Eaglau;). Watts
. wa3 turned over to the California official this
evenitf, heavily manacled, and he left the
city with V.H cuitoc'Un toon after.
An Ocean Itaee.
BosTOJt, August Ist— The ship North
America and the y.--cht America, the latter
owned by General Butler, left B >ston to-day
for a 500-mile race.
roiti:iu\.
The Mkh Qnc.illon In Parliament -Opin-
ion ;:f the ItatMi standard :ki<J Kcws.
Losdon, Angast 1 \— ln the House of
Lord^j Mor.uc.r, oa motion to go into Com
mittee of the Whole oa the arrears of rent
bill (Ireland), E*rl Campertown (Liberal)
i- k-' : for nonie assurance that no further im
portant changes relative to contracts between
landlords and '■eiiaata iv Iteland wculd be
proposed.
Lord Carlingford, Lord of the Privy S*al,
said he could answer affirmatively. The
present bill, lie said, wag not a precedent for
changes in the L»ad Act.
The Marti via of Salisbury moved an amend
ment, tho ttfect which would be that a land
lord could refuse his consent to his tenants
•ppljiag for relief, und«r the bill, in esses
where he disbelieved the tenant's inability to
pay.
Lord Carlingfcrd opposed the amendment.
He naid the resuit would be to utterly stultify
the Government's land legislation.
The Marquis of Landsdowoe (Liberal) and
j Lord Derby (Liberal-Conservative) opposed
i the amendment.
Vit count Cran brock (Conservative) de
clared that lha Government ought to give
sumo tvldeuce that would satisfy Ireland,
which all coccessions hid failed to do. Blood
. I iinor Ireland, hs Bait!, should be subject to
Uw and urder instead cf cub-Commissioners.
1. >rd Solbern, Lord High Chancellor, re
plied to Vbccnnt Cranbrook and Salisbuiy.
The amendment was adopted by ll»9 to '.>s.
S.iU-h'.ry also moved an amendment to the
j effect that a tenant who has taken advantage
• of Ibe arrears bill and subsequently sold his
farm, llitn the landlord should be able to re
cuvd out of the sum the teuant received the
amount h» had been deprived of by action of
th-> MB.
L:>rd Cariiiigford opoosed the amendmciit.
Hf declared that its effect would be to revive
dabti man rsaw«ldL The amendment was
carried — 120 to 45. The remaining clauses in
the arrears of rent bill were agreed to, and
the House atlj rTftni
Tho Timis Bays : It is hardly to be Blip
poied the Hou36 of Lords will itaist on the
Best amendment to the arrears of rent bill.
The, third readiug afford* the Ministry an
opportunity for rnakinj; a statement in regard
1 1 the bill, and ab must be frankly recog
nized. Lord Salisbury's first amendment is no
moie than a protest, the second amendment
may be mide ths basis for negotiations and
compromise.
Th« Standard believes the Government will
advise tte Uummonß to refuse absolutely to
accept the amendment t-j the arrears bill, re
quiritg landloid? to concur in the application
tor scti!eu;ent cf arrears, aa tho quastion is
not one wh?ch admiU of compromise. Re
garding thn amendment relating to tenants in
interest, the Stdndard says : " It is probable
that Bom 9 arraD?euieut will be arrived at."
The Dailn A'ctcs B»yj it is believed that
Parliament will be prorogued, with a view to
pa=B ; .rii,' the arrears bill in the autumn session.
Gladstone will move in the Commons ol
Thursday boih amendments to the arrears of
r t -nt bill adapted by the Lords.
The JV'eic.i cays there is no reason to believe
that a majority of the Peers followed the
M"iti|iii<ot Salisbury on the distinct under
standing that there is to be no cspitulatioc .
Fire on the Xeva.
St. Petersburg, August Ist.— Fifty bouses
and a wooden bridga have been burned on
Krestoufky I-luui, in the Neva, on the
i:- lan us OS] which that city is built.
Caution in 9pnin.
Madrid, August Int.— At a meeting of
2,000 persons at the Alhamhra Thursday, it
was decided to appoint a committee to urge
the Government to iccrease and strengthen
ths uavsl forces of tbe country.
EGYPT AND TURKEY.
Ensl.-Uid Demand* Iliat Tnrhrj Act Sub
ordinate to Her— Russia Hostile to
\ I iiuiiim! Hal), <-<Tiii;-.n.v and Austria
, . Will Sol Co-operate— The Viiinlicr ol
f'brl«tians lonicrnl Hun 1 Wblle I iac>
i —Hostile Egyptians- More Roiubardlnu
Threatened -I'nacttled Slate ol Affairs
Generally— Rusxia Itcjuin, the Confer
| euce.
i "
ISrECIAL BY TF.UMRAFH TO TUB RF.CORD IXIOK.)
To Demand tbelr Surrender.
1 IxiNnox, August l»t. — The Daily Nefs uu
-1 iier.-r.ir ■'■* that Admiral Seymour hag be -n in
- dtrueted to demand 'he surrender of the
1 Abonkir fort?, and in the event of a refusal,
' to bombard ti.rin.
( A !<|uadrcn of the First Life Gu«ds, -with
' horuei, embarked *t Liverpool early yes
: tertiay morniEg.
More Troops Sail Tor Egypt.
Qukesstown. August Ist. — The second bit
talion of Grenadiers yesterday for Egypt.
f Letters hzva the (^aeen and the Prince of
\'i >'•■ ■ were read, expier-sicg regret at the in
' ability to witness the departure, and a belief
I that the men would do their duty gallantly.
Th 3 letters were received with enthusiasm by
' the sailors and soldiers.
The »:ii —I in Press HoMlle to Easland.
Sr. Phtebsbubc, AugnßtHt. — Theßuatian
| prcee, with Ihs exception of a few minor
journal?, continues hostile to England, and U
, tirnily persuaded that England will now have
Is account with Turkey.
MrcoKthenlng '!"■ l-'ortlfleatloiis.
I'okt Said, Auijust lit. — Arati Pasha is
working incessantly on the fortifications all
a'.onp Ina (Matt, especially at Damietta and
K.aatta.
From Alexandria
Alexandria, August l»t.— There tretroopg
enough here to bold Alexandria against any
attach by Arab: Padha, though scircely
enough to drive ctM enemy back to Cairo.
A: bi has orirrav/.rd a committee of
fi?e oificers ie C.-.ir.i to prepare for defense.
Many peacefu! nwv.-s have been arrested for
lukewarmness in Ar»bi's cause. There »no
hope of ;r r ' i results from the negotiations
bet«»tn the KheJive nnd Arabi l'a^ha. A
bVf« number of the worst clasf of Bedouica
arc marc'iini,' from M:iri>: toward Alex
".D'lrii. 3'.e'.ki Pasba, a more p<jpalar and less
fanatical man, has been appointed Governor
T.ce KtffiA", Pnaha. A deputation of Notable •
from Cairu, who came to ascertain the true
-.'.ite of affairs return 1 1 m;>rr.nv via Kaffir
d-Dwar. The French gnnboat-> sailed yester
day, the Consnl-Geaeral "f France having
been ordered to withdraw tl.e entire fleet
from Egypt.
Ttirkfj Mxl Obey - The Thunderer
Speuks— Murder* <'omi>u!cd.
Losfuos, August Ut. — A correspondent ol
the OuaHinn says he understands that if the
I Turkish contiogent sUrto without the Sul
tan previously compiyiEg with the condi
tion* demanded by EnxUnd, Admiral Sey
u ur wiii be urJered to conduct it back
again.
The Times says : The tirr.e has gone by
when Tuikey cnld bi ailoi'ed to t&ke tbe
whole nii'.ter in 'mi own hauda If Tiukay
>."."■» to E yp'.. the rcuft n>t y-> t» &n ally,
but as a su> rdia.;!.: of Ecgland.
Xbe camber of Christians that have been
murdered at Dawiohear, Tantah and Nlhalla
is now estimated it 550.
la Alexandria tbe fears of a failure of the
water supply have subsided.
Italy, Germany and .luMrhi will v.i
Co-operate with England— Bnatla'* in,
ftlllon.
Bkblin, August Ist.— The refusal of -'ltaly
to co-operate with England in putting down
Arabi Fa>ha may be taken at representing
the attitude of Germany and Austria. High
authorities at Berlin assert that Russia in
about to quit her passive attitude, because of
Gladstone's reported declaration that Eng
land, voder certain circumstances, would
undertake the ta«K of restoring order in
Egypt
The ttar Dislikes England's Altllnde.
Constantinople, August Ist.— According
to intelligence received from a diplomatic
source, the action of Ruesia is due to the
personal initiative of Czar Alexander, who is
dissatisfied with the independent attitude of
England, and ia directly hostile to the Eng
lish pretension in Egypt.
A -I. Imi Mi Hip Wolfe Flag .4 sain.
Ka.mi.eh, August Ut — Tbe detachment
searching f >r midshipman Dc chair was fired
upon by Arabia men outsida cf lUmleh.
The Arabs fled on the approach of the cav
airy. One of the Aboukir forts is stated to
be the rtrongest of its kind. White flags
were flying at tbe Aboukir forts all day Mon
day. A reconnois ar cc ia about to be etfecUd
to ascertain the meaning of the white flag*
flying on the forts.
Major-General Allison is here.
Affair* In Alexandria- Bitter Feeling*.
Alixandria, August lat.— The state of
tbe town iB causing serious disquiet. The
natives who remained are incendiaries, and a
majority of thrse who returned are looter*
looking after their concealed plunder. It iJ
impossible to mistake the bitterly hostile atti
tude of tbia class and of the native police.
The Action or Turkey - Making Haste
Slowly.
Constantinople, August Ist.— Kussia has
sent a circular to the powers, embodying the
aubataDce of Onou's declaration to the confer
ence. The Sultan sent wcrd to-day to San
derson, Secretary of the Btitish Legation,
declaring that Lord Buffering demand for el
proclamation (gainst Arabi Pasha concerns
the conference, snd advising him to confer
with the Ottoman delegate on the suhjec*.
Tbe Porte is negotiating a loan of 100,000
Turkish pounds, and coatracling for the
equipment of 6,000 troops that are about to
proceed to Egypt. A snail contingent of
troops will strrt for Alexandria shortly, to be
employed as a*guard to the Khedive.
Hurrvlng up Military Preparations l ii<-
Conference.
Constantinople, August Ist.— Orders have
been given to accelerate military prepara
tions, with a viaw to the immediate departure
of troops for Ejypt.
The Conference will meet Wednesday or
Thursday, to receive Onou's commuuicition
explaining Russia's motives in abstaining
from the deliberations of the Conference.
The Porte, replying to Lord 1 > :f rir. - de
mand for the Sultan to proclaim Arabi Pasha
a rebel, states that such proclamation can
only be issued according to the exigencies of
the situation, and after the arrival of the
Ottoman troops in Egypt.
Enrolling Volunteers for Arabi Pa.sha.
Romi, August Ist.— Ricciotti Garibaldi is
enrolling volunteers for an expedition to aid
Arabi Pasha, but the movement is not likely
to succeed.
A Reconnolssiinre.
I." ami.kh, August Ist.— A reconnoissance
made en the Aboukir road to-day repo:ted
that Arabi Pasha's videttes are in close prox
imity to the work?. The display of white
flags on the forte is a mere farce. Tha re!;els
are strengthening their lines near Lake M ..i —
otis. Scouts report seeing Arabi Pasha in
camp, with several European prisoner*. A f . S
v. M. the guns on our right opened fire.
Various Hems from Alexandria.
Alexandria, August lit— A dispatch was
received at tbe palace to-day stating that the
first coatingent of Turkish troops was eai
barking at Salon ica and the second was ready
to »t?it, under Dervisch i'asha.
Kamel Pasha has gou» on a steamer to in
tercept and treat with the Bedouin s march
ing from Mariout toward Alexandria, who
are not yet under Arabi Pasha's influence.
Cherif Pashi had an interview to-u'ay with
the Khedive Both are of the opinion that
the landing of Turkish troops will lessen the
resistance of Arabi's soldiers.
Arabia military council have caused the
arrest of twecty-teven Pashno and Beys, who
are more or less friendly to the Kliedive.
H. M. S. Monarch and Iris left today for
Port Said, and the Bittern has gone to Abou
kir.
Stone Patiha's Family- The Kebel t'nni|».
Alexandria, Augu,t Ist.— Arabi Pasha
has ordered a troop of civalry to escort Stcne
Pasha's family t > Ismailia. Stone Pasha is
greatly relieved thereby.
The rebel camp has bsen moved five miles
nearer to vw, with outposts two miles iv ad
vauce of the main body.
NEW ADVEBTIBiIMENTa
Tbe Pranen Tcretn or th<- Cerman
Luthei-an Church will meet THIS (Wedoesdayl
AFTERNOON, at 3 o'clock, at the Church, corner
of Twelfth and X streets. By order.
au2-lf MRS. C. A. ZKH, Pretideiit.
Xotlcr, Pnrinc Sportiiinen'g t_.
Club. McetinirTO N'KiHT, at B', o'clock TSSr 6 *
shar|>. Every tneraber requested la K -^&«js^s
present By order of
an2lf ti. P. HOPPER, President.
WANTED-A SUUATION AS SALESMAN BY
a young man with 10 years' experience ax
grocery and genenu msrehmdise salesman. Ad
dress Pogtofßce Bi \ 10, Willows, Cal. au2-l\v
OA| ACRES FOR SALE-CHOICE FOK.gs*
O" 1 fruit, vineyard or grazing ; well &$?
watered and fenced ; title, U. S. patent ; loca- «*•
ted one mile from railroad station. Apply to W.
M. HATCH, Tenth and J streets, Sacramento, or to
W. A. PATTERSON, Stockton, Cal. au2-lm
First Ward Republicans !
ALL REPUBLICAN ELECTORS OF THK
First Ward are requested to meet at the
Uh<»les & Towneend House, corner of Second and J
streets,
J hi-. -.Vrtlii. -,.;.■)> • EvcnlßK, August t, IKg->,
At S o'clock, to auree upon Delegates U> represent
said Ward in the Republican County Convention.
A. J. RHOAHS.
Jlembsr Republican County Committee, First W-iril
au2-lt ■
Q. W. MARTIN^
CANDIDATE FOR
PUBLIC AI»MIXISTRATOF.
SUBJECT T<) DECISION OF THF. KEPL'BLI.
can Countj Convention. au2 istd
G. W. HANOOCK~~
exnmn% tor
MKIBni «F THF. AvKHBLV,
SIU.IECT TO DECISION OF THE REPLBLI
_ can County Convention. au-i-isul
D. GARDNER,
Bumn Fr.K
SIPEHVI4OK, lIU-T MVKItT,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THK KBPDBLI
cm County Ccnventimi. i.U--fetd
M. t. SNIITH7
CIXDIDATK FOR
Bi;p:nviF<>K fiitb i»:<ii{>t r.
SUBJECT TO THE DECISION- OF THE I»EM
ocrat;c Cminty Contention. airj t.l
OIRTIFIsJATS OF COPARTNERSHIP,
THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE UNDER
signed have this day formed a p^tnerehin under
the fl-m name of A. LKONABD fcSoX, for the mir
porc..f earning on the Keal Estate and Insur'incc
busii.css. That the principal place of busir.c-s of
said Hi ru is the city of Sacrr.menU, State of Califor
nia ; that the full names ami the place of residence
A 1 SSri ivMton*" l?, Bai<l Brm are M ' ollons :
ALBhRT LXi >NARD, residence, city of Sacra -rento •
BENJAMIN LEONARD, residence, rity of
mento - ALBERT LEONARD
n t , . BENJAMI.V LEUNaKD.
Dated August 1, 1832.
State of California, county of Sacramento -ss
On this first .layol Auguv. in the year one thous.nd
eight hundred and eighty-two, before me (■ U Cae
gins, a Justice of the Peace in and for raid co'untv
r «°| n v ' V"lf fSf , ALBEIIT LE JKARI) and BEN!
JAMIN LEuNARD, known to me to be the persona
whose names are subscribed tn the within in-'tru
nient, and acknowledged to mo that they executed
!■ iwtncw whereof, I have hereurto set mv hand
the tUy and year in tins certificate first alxiv'e wit
ten. P. H. COOGINS, Justice cf the Peao\-
Filed August 1, ISS2. *««.
THOMAS H. BERKEY, Clerk.
»"2-lm By Cha3. M. CcaLAMjje Pu tv.
The Pioneer Box Factort
SUll » <i.-iiit of all Competitor*.
ooo«kx3 ja son
ri,R>SR of
Fron and M Slreel* Sacran«nto
!»U-2-«t)tf
TIITT S
lafWlllllll' |l||l| I __U i _[
SYMPTOMS OF A
TORPID LSV^R.
Loss of Appetite, Bowel? costive, Pain in
the Head, with a dnll sensation in the
back part. Pain un ler the Shoulder
blade, fullness after entine, with a disin
clination to exertion r,f body or rr.ind,
Irritability of temper. Low Fpirits, with
a feeling of haying ne-lectod duty,
Weariness, Dizziness, Fluttering at the
Heart, Dots before the <?yes. Yellow Bkin.
Headache generally r -. er the right eye
Bestleiwness, with fitr-.il dream° hiehlr
colored Urine, and
■njTT*S PllXSaro . ! < riallya.luptfd to
«ach oa««, 03.« do.. PfTecfa xotb n changn
of ferlinj; a» to not-.i,i-li th<- snffrrn,
Tb*r Inerema* th«- Ar>p<-<l(r,&iid cause the
body to Tnk* on kj —:- thus the ■ t* :n b
■mrMeA. and by i'i-ir Tnnie Anton on the
Dl«««tJT« Onciim. Rt-snlnr -Slo»U pro
:;iced. Price » <-.-:.;<. 35 Murray S!.. K. T.
fOTFsliilfE;
3 bay Haik ok V.':i:~i:i i. - crunrtd to a Glossy
Black cy 't '.. itinnoftbUDnt Itim
parts a natnral olor. ucts IFwlai taneously. Sold
by Druggists, or rent by exj:' - - >jn receipt of 11.
i>ffice, ss tiikbay st., sew torh.
(Dr. TtTT-i <lA>CIL «T V »!,!(,;. UhnuUos ud\
(Mil «mI»H win W HIM Ttlt «• ir»Ucstln J
KEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
8001 Jk.3Sr«XI
AT WEBTMIHSTEB PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
THIS (Wrdneiiday) EVENING.
g£T There will be a pleasing programme of exer
cises, followed by cake and ice cream. Come and
bring your friends. Atlmiaaion, 25 cents. [B.C.]t2-lt
TALU&BLE PROPERTY FOR SALE.
THE UNDERSIGNED OFFERS FoR«£S£a
sail- his »ci! known Brewery. cstab-lSa^Xx
lishril at North San Juan. Cal. Situated VBMBg
in the great minine rtjfion of California. Estab
lished in 18SB, and supplying a lan;e section of coun
try. Complete in every detail for the manufacture
of a good article of Beer. A Urjre spring supplies
the trtwery with c ol natcr. W'itl: tbo property
will be gold the jriod will of the burines", wagons,
horses, and everything nt-cessaiy to carry on a first
cla^s business. Also residence and the title to eight
acres of land, almost entirely under cultivation. All
persons dcsiriui; such property, address O. W.
KOCH, North San Juan, or inquire on the premises.
au°2 Jplu.
PRQF. JOSEPH BORRA'S
CONSERVATORY o: )IIM(
HAS M6VED-TO 513 X STREEr, CLOSE BY
Orand Army Hall. Ihe membern of his class
are respectfully requested to met!t THIS fWedues- I
day) EVENING, at 8 o'clock. All lovers of music I
a. c also cordially invited to be present au2 It*
I C. HOSTFOK.T. K. C. lIIVUO. 1. A. VAN VOOHmra
A. A, VAN VOOBHEES & CO.
(Soeceroon to B. STONE & Co.).
322 AND 324 J STREET,
IMPORTERS, MA-S UFA CTUKKBS AND i*—*k.
Jobber j of ill kinds of fcAaBR
Sa^lery and Carriage Harawars,
LEATBF.B AAI» SHOE FKDIN4IB,
GAkRIAQE TR I M M I N Q S.
Keep constantly on hand a full stock of Imported
and domestic licmeta, taildlef, 'Jollara, etc.
Our manuftiiture^ »-.r utei unsurpassed by an}
bouse on the c ist au2>4plm
CANDIDATES.
For Justice of the Peace.
I. S BROWN
rill B X A CA S II IDA T X
BEFORE THE REPUBLICAN CONVENTION
for nomination for Justice if the Peace. jy24-tf
BOOTS!
try 7»t; ron Litt am» I'ttocßesuvE
ONE-PRSCE
Boot and Shoe House
— OF
LEWIS BROS.
411 J STREET,
Between Fourth and Fifch.
50 Uni.cn Infant*' Bntlon *hofH (nil
color*). • .1 ill.:-.
20 l>i/,-:i int'iniis 1 Sprlns-hrrl Shoes
<liHton), ;."> rents to si •_'.-■.
90 Pozrn Infasii.' l'r< nrli kid, Itnlton
."hoes <> i •■::!- lo #l.
I.OCO fairs f hllilreu's Voal. Bntlon
>tluc>, $M.
60 Duzru ■||it>osT*l>l)lc Bullon Mi...- »
II lo i, SI ,*O.
«:ison. l !!:■<! or MtaiK' >T«ti- Leather
■kaw, ii tp t. $1.
20 «>»Mn LadKVSlronnLenlhrr Shoes,
'i to ;, 91 ?.'..
500 Pain l.sniii «■ Pebble Goal. Button
Shoe*. $2.
1,500 Pairs Ladles' kid, Bntton Shoes,
s .' '.'■'. to .s-.' <H>.
125 Dozen Ladles' French Kid, But
ton Shoes, s:: in s. :,«.
200 Dozen Ladle*' kid and Cloth. lace
Shoe*, 9.% centa to 91 •>.">.
20 Dczrn Indies' Tno-Blrau, Sandal
Slippers : price. 91 30.
185 »oz?n Men's Elnstlr-slde, ronsrc&s
Kfllfrs «i to Jl : price, $«•».
140 D«f» Men'n !»•>•« Pedro Alexis
Tlr* ; prire, $2 lo •*.-. :.().
CONSTANTLY ON lIANP, TH?
j Largest and Best Assorted Stock
— or—
HAND-SEWED
IN SACK4MENTO.
One Price— Plain Figures,
ANT
FAIR DEALING TO ALL !
smx) c sj
GAQWALADER & PARSONS,
T>EAL ESTATE A\D INSURANCE AOFNTS,
Corner Third nnd J Mrrrti.
.•.GKNT3
UNION MWR! CO. OF SAM FRANCISCO,
tire and Marine.
EDW. CADW.vI tun!, NoUry V >'■ >, Commis
oioner of Pods «nq Oaanyuteu. j!2-2jitf
OOLLEOTION COMPANY
528 CALIFORNIA STREET,
SAX FRANCISCO.
TJROSirT ArrKSTION GIVEN TO TilE COL
t~ !<•■■:;. hi of Accounts in this city and the whole
Pacific cn«t.
JHU» :ti i ti-Mri» I . Manazrr.
RsnißKxrKs:
COL. C. L. WELLER, OOUIAI BROS ,
lIAGAN * MANHKIM.
jy2ti.2plw
rt/vA TONS COKE FOR SALE CHEAP, AT THE
CmplUl Can Works, snrramrnto.
A flret-eUw Fuel for Smelting Pqrpo»e». m27-2pU
THE GRAND GENTBAL HOTEL,
LAKE TAHOE.
JS NOW OPEN FOR THE l^Jto—^v
SEASON. ISRM2
A. 3. BATLEY. Proprletor.^^SJi^S-
T»hoe, C»l., Jane, 1882. ]el9-2ptf
SAN FRANOIBOO ABENCY
THEIGENERAL AGKNCY OF THE
DAILY RECORD-UMON,
A!fD THI
SACRAMENTO WBEKLY UNION
IN SAN FKANCISCO
« AT
Se. 8 Hew H»nlgomtr> Hlreet,
I»A.r.ACB HOTHE,,
mls-2ptf
BTEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS.
AHKDfAN, SOLE AGENT. ij.jJ*..
. rtrett, bet. Sixth and Seven th,K*=»=*3p
opposite Court-hcose. PIANOS TOf | ¥ TT
LIT. PUboc told on ln«UUtnenU mj.jplm
CANDIDATES.
For Senator.
W. A. ANDrRSON,
(mwn ior
Stath -i.ni t <> i: .
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THB REPIJB-
Mean County Convention. jjliialm
J. ROUTIER
IS a CANDIDATE FOR
- s * r r > i \ • i «) i- .
SUSJECT TO THE DECISION OK THK RE
publican County Convention of Sacramento
g 0 ""^- Jy24-td
For Assemblyman.
R. S. LOCKETT,
HXMBiTE FOR THE
ABSEMBLT.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE BEPUBLI.
can Cuusty Convention. j124-lm"
For District Attorney.
S. SOLCN~HOLL.
CANDIDATE fOX
district • riiißvn.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB.
lican County Convention. jylO-islm
HEN RY L. BUOKLEVT~
CAKDIDATB FOR
BISTIirt ATTOK.VKY,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE RKPUB.
lican County Convention. jylli»lm
robtT t. oevlinT"
CAXDIDATI FOR '
DISTRICT ATTOKNEY,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB
lican County Convection. jylitd
For Sheriff.
T. H. BE R KEY.
CIKDID9TE FOR
nißirr,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB
lican County Convention. jyll-Mlm
A. HEILBRON.
CANDIDATE FOR
8 H X X I F F.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THK REPlB
lican County Convention. jyl2i»ltn
For County Olerk.
W. B. HAMILTON,
CANDIDATE FOR
COIJHTW CLBBK,
SUBJECT TO DECiSION OF THE REPLB.
lican County ConTention. JylO-inlin
CHAS. M. CCGLAN.""
CA.NDIDATB FOR
COIIKTY CLFKK,
SUBJECT TO DkdUKM OF THE REPUB
lican County Convention. Jyll-ialm
For Treasurer.
A S. GRr.ENLAW ' American To»Ti§hip),
■ AMIOm FOR
COF.NTY I let i»!(!E»r,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPIBLI.
can County Convention. J29 :std
For Auditor.
WM. E. GERBER.
CANDIDATE t>'K
< <>l NT". A 111 IT aB,
SUBIECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB.
lican_County Convti.tion. Jjll-Ulm
J. H. MILLER,
(of the Capital Hotel, I
CA.N'tIIOATX FOR
e*(KTI IIDITOg,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB.
lican County Convention. |yl3-lm
For Assessor.
FRED. A. SHEPHERD,
CANDIDATE FOR
e>HII ASSESSOR.
SUBJECT TO THE DECISION OF THE REPUB.
Mean County Convention. jvB-ttlm
J. W.~HOUSTON,
CANDIDATE FOR
COIiTT! ASSESSOR.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB.
lican County Convention. * jylllflm
N. J. TOLL,
IASLIUATE FOR
fOIVTT A» 8 EBS O R .
SUBJECT TO I'ECISIy* v OF THJE REPUB.
lican County Convention. jyllbJiß
J. T. GRIFFITTS~
CANDIDATE FOR
COVXTY ASSESSOR,
SUBJECT TO DFCISION OF THE REPU3
lican County Convention. ]yl2i»td
JAW ES~M«CLE&hY,
CANDIDATE FOR
COISTV ASSESSOR.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPlB
lican County Convention. Jy3l if
W. B. DAViES.
CA.MIIHATF. FOR
ASSESSOR.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUBLI.
can County Convention. aul istd
For Sup't. of SchoolsT"
CHAS. C. BISHCP.
CANDIDATE FOR
COrNtY SFP*T. OF PUBLIC BCIIOOLS,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB.
lican County Convention. jyll-lalm
JOHN O. MEDLEY,~
CANDIDATE FOR
COUNTY SIPT. OF : ! !:i II 5C1104.1.4,
SUBJECT TO DECISION' OF THE REPUB.
lican County Convention. Jyl2islm
J. E. BLA' CH FIV
***""<> I I FOR
COISTY S| iiKl\rv.l' \T OF SCHOOLS,
SUBJECT TO DECISION- OF THF REPUB.
lican County Convci.tiiti. j)l3islm
S. H. JA-KMAffT
tnmia m>
coi'nty tmummm of scuoolh.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE BEPUBLI.
can County Convention. j>2oUtf
For Coroner.
A J. VERMiLYA,
CANDIDATE FOR
c»e«m:b,
subject to decision of the repub
lican County Convention. jylO-blm
R. W. PARKER,
CANDIDATE FOR
< O R O N E X,
SUBJECT TO THE DECISION OF THE RE
publican County Convention. JylS-iatd
JOHN MILLER.
CANDIDATE FOR
C O R O N B R ,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OFTHE DEMOCRATIC
tj County Convention. jy 20 illtd
J. FRANK CLARK,
CANDIDATE lOR
CORONER.
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB
lican County Convention. jy22-i«td
For Public Administrator.
H. S. BEALS,
CANDIDATE FOR
II Mill ADMINISTRATOR,
TO DECISION OF THE REPI B
|k3 lican County Convent:on. Jill-i»i.|
F. H. RUSStLL
CAHDMIATE FOR
prmic iiMii'i>i!riTfli:,
TO DECISION OF THE REPUBLI
IO can County Couvintion. aulutd*
For Supervisors.
JOSEPH VVISFMAN,
CAKDII ATI FOR
SUPERVISOR I^KIIIVn DISI'KICT,
SUBJECT TO m MHUItMI OF THE RB.
IQ fubiican Contity Comontion. jyl4-i*tf
W. D. STALKEP.
I V.XniPAT* FOR «
"irri:U*'»lf. *HUM> UISTKIt'r,
SUBJECT TO THE DECISION OF THE BE
puhiir-an Convention. jy-tstf
EZRA PEARSON,
CANDIDATE FOR
»; ITi-M-oi: THIRCi DISTRICT,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THF. REPLBLI
iTj can County Convention. Jy*4 td
SAMUEL BLAIR,
CUDIDATI tOR
Sl'P. RVISOR, TMIKD JJIHTBICT,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUB
lican Coupty Convention. Jt2s isM
M. BA RB ER,~
CANDIDATE FOR
MlUllhiii:. THIRD DISTRICT,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPCBLI
can County Convention. Jv.'s-td
OTTO WALTHER,
CANDIDITE FOR
SCPERVIKOK, THIRD DISTRICT.
TO DSCISION OF THE REPUBLI.
|Q can County Conveation. jj26 td*
H. D. RODE,
CAVDIBATE FOR
.MPl.l(\lMiv. tiill'll! (DISTRICT,
SUBJECT TO THE DECISION OF THE RE.
IO publican County Convention. Jylß UJm
A. H. POWERB"
CANDIDATE FOR
BI'PEKVI»OR, FOURTH DISTRICT.
CJUBJeCT TO DECISION OF REPUBLICAN
jj County Convention. jyH-ialm
ANDREW AITKEN,
CANDIDATE FOR
MrtKll-lii:, HIIKIII DISTRICT,
OJUBJECT Ti DECISION OF THE REPUBLI-
J5 can County Convention. Jj23 istd
PHILIP OVER,
CANDIDATE lOR
supervisor, Firra district,
SUBJECT TO DECISION OF THE REPUBLI
can Connty Convention. j)2B-l>td*
QEO. C. McMULLEN,
CANDIDATE FOR
BCPERIL4OB, FIFTH DISTRICT,
SUBJECT TO DECISION Of THE REPUBLI.
can County Convention. aulistd*

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