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The Delaware gazette. [volume] (Wilmington [Del.]) 1809-1810, July 15, 1809, Image 4

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OLD CLOWTF.R and his MARE.
BY W. HOLLOWAY.
OLD Clowter was a man of Kent
Intent on worldly riches,
Who once a-week to market rode
Jn dirty boots and breeches.
The mare he rode was grey with age,
Toothless, and greas'd and founder'd,
With outstrecht neck, and holding gait *
Thro' thick and thin she flounder'd.
Nor always could her master's arm
With pulling hard and hauling,
Like the tir'd camel—on his knees
Prevent (he beast from falling.
One day he jogg'cTbeside the squire
Across tile fields of stubble,
And though he roiled, with might and main,
To save his bones from trouble,
Ah! nought avai ed, his blundering steed
Perplex'd by stones that truckled
Held out awhile, till in a doze
Devout. y down it knuckled.
When luckily of patridges
Loud whizzing rose a covey,
" 3e not alarmed your honour 1 ' cried
Old sly-boots—lor—la love ye,
This horse is worth Viia weight in gold,
Sir 'tis a noble setter,
And no trained dog, in all the world,
Can do its business better.
-
You saw it drop before the birds,
Rose in the air above ye ?
And had we then our nets at hand,
We had secured the covey.
Astonishing!" the squire replied,
" 'Twould suit me to a tittle,"
Replied tiie clown, " for fifty pounds
" 'Lis yours, tuo' much too little !
The bargain s struck, the cash paid down,
And Clowter sacks the treasure ;
"While of his Rosinante proud
The squire exults past measure.
But !o ! upon a future day
They met, as fate would have it,
When thus the squire addressed the clown,
Who ready stood to brave it.
' Ho, Farmer, what a cursed jade
Was that you lately sold me.
But, ft,' the safety of my neck
We sjit'.y should have told me.
Why, .dr, I said, the clown replied,
i he horse was good at falling,
fiat as to trot, or walk, or stand,
1 i,ai's quite another eel
.ay.
nsantMOM w.
^ttfceilanjL
LON
■VI - TV.
T*
re died jo Ab. 1805,at Gloves,
nry, in Ireland, of a short
.3 Dennis Coorobe, of Ballenda
gin, aged 117 years. The life of this
remarkable riot only for its
-lutation, but for its exemption from
most of the evils of humanity,
retained his mental and corpoi eal fac
ulties in full vigor to the last.—Three
weeks before his death, he walked
out and home 26 miles in one day,
and read the smallest print without
glasses, as distinctly and easily as a
boy of sixteen. Two days previous
to his death, he never remembered
to have had any complaint or sickness
whatever, tooth.ache only excepted.
The first fifty-six years of his life
passed entirely free from even the
tooth-ache ; having enjoyed, till
then, sound teeth. After that period
his teeth began to decay ; buL in the
course of 15 years, a new set an
peared, of which he continued in
possess ion till his death.
Of his mortal character, it is only
1 i recorded that he was stedfastlv an ho
nest man ; sober, regular, and per
fcctly upright in his deportment. His
mind was naturally strong and acute
not disciplined by literary education'
but enriched by observation and ex
-perience. He spent his life in lhe
'cultivation of the same farm, the
property which he had acquired ear
ly in life, and bent his attention chief
ly to agriculture, in which he was
generally allowed to be eminently
proficient. He was one of the earlr
At who introduced and propagated
* potatoe, which he cultivated fci
ist seven'v v r, ?ar$. I
At
nut
m t r i v .is
He
it
We naturally feel some curiosity
as to such a man's commerce with the
other sex, and as to the posterity he
leaves behind.—We are told that he
was seven times married,
first married at the age of 21.
his last wife, who survived him, he
lived longer than with any of the pre
vious ones, that Is, 24 years, having
married her when 93 years old. In
general, they were short lived, and
were young women of his immediate
neighbourhood. The years of his
widowhood, taken together amounted
to 11. All the children born to him
were 48, which is, on the average,
one for every two years, since the first
year of his marriage. He had three
sets of twins ; and his third wife bore
him 11 children in 12 years
His grand-children were in number
236, which is a little more than 5 to
each child. His great grand chil
dren amounted to 944,which is more,
proportionally, than 6 to each child.
He had 25 great-great-grand children,
the oldest of whom is now 4 years
old- Of'1253 decendants of his body,
487 survived him.
By his last wife, he had 6 sons,
the youngest of whom is a fine lad of
18.
These facts are extracted from a
register kept by the old man, of the
names, births, marriages deaths, and
general situation of his wives and de
scendants. The keeping of this reg
ister was his principal amusement ;
and his descendants being scattered
far and wideovei the earth, he took
great pains to make the catalogue ex
act and complete. It is to be hoped,
thaï some curious person may rescue
this document from oblivion, by
committing it to the press. It must
certainly lead to some very valuable
inferences, as to the constitution
of human bodies, and of human soci
ety.
He was
With
HISTORICAL CURIOSITY.
During the troubles in the reign of
Charles I. a country girl- came to
London, in search of a place, as a ser
vant maid, but not succeeding she
applied herself to carrying out beer
from a brew house, and was one of
those called tub women. The bi ew
er observing a well-looking girl in
tiiis low occupation, took her into his
family as a servant, and after a while
married her ; but he died while she
was yet a young woman, and left her
a large fortune. The business of
the brewery was dropped, and she
was recommended to Mr Hyde, as a
gentleman of skill in law, to settle her
husband's affairs. Hyde (who
a fier wards the Earl of Clarendon)
finding the widow's fortune ve<y
sidetable, married her. Of this mar
riage there was no other issue than
a daughter, who was the wife of
James II. and mother of Mary and
Anne, Queens of England.
r ■ > r , , _
Anecdotes from thelateTravels of
n-., ... r , _
* 1C - P°' lte !? cs ® °l ^ Persians is ol
a s P tc >*s Pf^oJy oriental. A noble
S?" 0 h, £ h f ank v T e,lt onc da > to the
Frct ] ch Ambassador's
pardon because the weather
ba ,p, ln P " s, . a- ' .
, r , c ' , P lo , ra f 1 1< r conferences
lCran are le , c ,n t . le sa ™ e nian -
°, Ur dramatlc exhibitions,
Wlth * c oors °P an > and in the pres-
?n, CC ° f 3 T UlU,de of liters,
1 he °. rienla,s cann ot
necc * su - v of ® ccrcs y in the
on , sketvveen States,
, , . W0 T ™ en . are as muc51
S aved "* P * rs,a as in the rest of the
, t- ■ A l rt »Çhman belonging „
1 he SUlle 0 c le Ambassador, one day
1 exc ! tcd . a ^ reat ll P roar at Teheran,
having ventured to cast some in,
tl uis . ltivc \ ooks at .the garden of a se.
I ra S' 10 * the sight ot a man, the
: women uttered screams of affright.
was
con.
PERSIA.
" to beg his.
was so
at
conceive the
conventi
en
to
some of them even snatched up arms,
and prepared to repel ogles with mus
ket balls.
Mr. Gardanne one day asked a no
bleman how many children he had-"I
dont know,' replied he-—" enquire of
my secretary." The Secretary re
turned his list and answered his mas
ter had seventeen children.
1 reasury juepanmetu,
March 27,1809.
W HERFAS, in conformity with the pro
vifions made by law, For the reimlnirfe
ment of the Exc/ianptd Six /,cr Cent Stuck,
created by the second section of the act inti
tled " An act fuppletnentary to the Act inti
tied an Act making prnvifion for the redemp
tion of the whole of the public debt of tlie
United States," pafsed on the nth day by
February, 1807 , it has been determined of
lot that the Certificates of laid (lock, d signa
led by the permament numbers conta ned in
the annexed Sfiedule, Ihould be reimburfed on
the firll day of October next.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IS therefore given to the proprietors of the
Certificates of Exchanged Six ter Cent
Stock, created by the act aforesaid, and bear
ing the permanent numbers contained in the an
nexed Schedule, that'he principal of the same,
will, on surrender of the cert ficates, be paid
on th e first dan of October, 1809 , to the respec
tive stockholders 01 their legal reprefenta
tives, or attornies duly constituted, either at
the Treafury or at the Loan Office where the
ftock thus tobe reimburfed may then (land
dited to the proprietors thereof.
It is further made known for the informati
on of the parties concerned, that no transfers
of the certificates of exchanged ftock hearing
the permanent numbers contained in the an
nexed Schedule, from the books of the T
fury, or of any Commiffiuner of Loans, will be
allowed after the firft day of September next.
And the intereft on all the cert ficates contain
ed in the laid Schedule will ceafe and deter
mine on the day preceding the day hereby fix
ed for the reimburfement thereof.
Albert Gallatin,
Secretary of the Treasury
cre
rea
SCHEDULE.
16.256 39,020
16.257 39,021
16,261 39.022
16,26? 39,031
16.268 39,032
16286 39,033
16.287 39,040
16.288 39,043
16,294 3-9,047
39.056
39.039
39,061
40.006
40,008
40,01 7
40,020
40,029
40,034
40.039
40,046
40,0+8
40.053
40.054
40,063
40.07 1
40,072
40.077
40,032
40.099
40.100
40,109
40.121
40.122
40,127
40.129
40.130
40,138
40,140
40,151
40.154
40,158
40.161
40.162
40,168
40,186
40,195
40,200
40.204
40.205
40,208
40,230
40,237
40,242
40,246
40,259
40,264
40.270
40,278
40,283
40.291
40.292
40.293
40,2.97
40,299
40,301
40.319
40.320
40,323
40,326
40,307
8
40,308
40.3 I 5
40,318
40,329
40,332
40,333
40.335
40.341
40.342
40.349
40,351
40-352
40.386
40,35,9
40.360
40.373
40.336
40,391
40.406
40.4 40
40,416
40,419
40-121
40,4.22
40.423
40.424
40,427
40.430
40.431
40,436
40-438
40.442
40,453
40.456
40.457
40.467
40.493
40.494
40.495
40.504
40,506
.50,004
53.007
53,010
53.014
53.017
53,023
53.044
53.045
53.050
53,052
53,854
54,003
54.007
54.015
55.015
55.017
55,021
55.039
55,035
55, 38
55.039
55.040
55,042
55.045
55.050
55,054
55,057
55,062
•55,068
10
5.002
5.003
5.004
5.008
5.009
5.025
5.028
5.029
5.026
5,033
5,044
10,006
10 019
10 020
10,024
10,039
15.007
15,013
15.015
1.5.020
15.021
15.023
15.024
15,031
15.0. 32
16.007
16.016
16.017
16.018
16.021
16.024
16,034
1 6,050
16.051
16.0. 59
1 6,065
16,069
I 6,070
16,074
16 . 0/8
16,087
16,090
16,094
16,104
16,109
16,113
16,115
16,121
16,122
16.123
16.124
16,126
16,129
16,145
16,046
16,15.3
16,160
16,164
16,167
16,191
16,197
16,207
16,212
16,224
16,226
16,230
16.236
16.237
16,24?
26,002
26,007
26,009
26.011
26,012
27.002
27.004
29.002
29.005
29.006
29,011
29,016
29,026
29,053
2.9,057
29.061
29.062
29.063
26,066
29 , 0*0
29,071
29,074
29,0*6
29,079
29.081
29.082
29,085
29,094
29,097
2.9,101
2.9,102
29,119
29,123
29,126
29,130
29.13 1
29,133
29,142
29.1 50
29,161
29,162
2.9,164
29,172
29,188
29,193
29,19.9
2.9,201
29,202
39,207
29,21 1
29,218
29,222
29,233
2.9,236
29,238
2.9,241
29,245
39.001
39.002
39.013
39,015
39,019
A VALUABLE
Tract of Land for sale,
At Private Sale.
HE subscriber ofFers for sale the tracf
of Land on which he at present re
sides, situate in Mill-Creek hundred in the
county of New-Castle and state of Dela
ware, containing two hundred and fifty
acres more or less, with a comfortable
dwelling house and kitchen, a cellar, barn,
and a good stone spring-house thereon
erected, a young apple orchard, and a vari
ety of other fruit trees of the best quality j
it is well watered by a number of excellent
springs ; on said tract there is near twenty
acres 0 / good timothy meadow land, about
forty acres now in clover, a large propor
tion of woodland—and the residue good
arable land capable of improvement to at
high state of cultivation, being within one
mile of limestone where it can be had on
reasonable terms eight miles irom Wil
mington and six from New-Port on lhe
main road leading from thence to Lancas
ter. As it is presumed any person inclining
to purchase will view the premises, it is
thought unnecessary to give a further de
scription—it will bear a division into three
parts, and will be sold either the whole to
gether or in parts as may best suit the pur
chaser. If it is not sold at private sale on
or before the 28th day of September next
it will be sold at public sale on the premises
on said day, and a liberal credit given for
a considerable part of the purchase money,
at which time attendance will be given ;uid
the terms made known, by
JAMES OCFIELTREE.
Wilmington, June 24, 1809.
T
Wilmington College Lottes#
Fifth day's Drawing.
—100 dollars, stationary prizti
Prizes of 2.0 dollars.
Nos. 440 543'2
Prizes of 10 dollars.
N'os. 2122 2146 2151 2352 3025 3684 4031.
4283 4331 4723
No. 374
Prizes of 5 dollars.
2576 3346
2703 3395
2754 3485
2*..5 3530
2768 3568
2783 3317
■2313 3 « 89
2343 3s07
2839 3j
2921 3;-35
987 2030
1023 2043
1031 2073
1049 2194
1121 2204
1 2.94
1322 22.(9
1451 2305
1478 2309
14.92 23 ! 8
1513 2366
4539 533*
4562 539 O
4684 5430
4733 5484
4921 5,519
4363 55597
4896 5648
4239 5Û04
5014 5674
5026 5()34.
5074 5760
50/6 5762
5122 5786
5223 5,'87
5239 536.Î
5252 5883
40
48
4;-)
109
336*
2239
350
407
420
1 130
5 39
605
3.987
4039
4101
41 50
4219
42.30
4296
One Tom tli of (lie above lottery is now com
pleted in the drawing. The gain of the wheel
for the laut three days has exceeded the exper.
rations of the warmest friends of the institu -
tion . As the trustees are desirous to expedite
the completion as soon as possible, they offer
the few remaining tickets at 5 dulls. 25 cf. till
the next day's drawing. The same justice duc
to those gentlemen mentioned in a formel ad
ertisenient, who have honourably anti exten«
sive! y embarked in promoting the laudable ob
ject, induces the tiusiees, to postpone the ov'.t
day's drawing till the 6ih day of üçptambe;,
llext - _ June if, 18 , 49 .
1 ',52
2.046
2971
3036
3174
3301
3301
776
1.573
1 779
1816 2481
1977 2533
2012 2556
2
bl
8 55
87/
926
963
Farmer's Bank
Of the State of Delà
ware,
T up IV » 4s 1809.
HE Directors have this day declared a.
dividend for the last six nrumihs, at ihe
rate of six per centum per annum on the
capital stock of this Bank, which will be
paid to the stockholde
presentatives, at the
the Branches,
instant.
rs or their legal
principal Bank and
any time after the 15th
re
at
PETER- CAVF.RLY, Cash'r.
Wilmington, Jaaly 8. i 8 09 .
Wilimngtoa & Philaclel^hï
Co ache es y
L E wT E thc subscr , iber ' 8 > Swan Taverp
Wdmtngton, and the widow Davis's
tavern, Bank street, Philadelphia, at eight -
ÄS T' Ll:
Fare one Dollar.
a.
t
The
carriages are constructed on the
most approved plan for ease and conveni.
fnl C ,G are Tu tllent order . a ^ have care,
ful drivers. I he greatest care wilfbe takers
of baggage, and the strictest attention paid
" r/T 8 ' Wh °' f ° r ,heir convenience,
the city lakCn " P ° r SCt d ° wn in an > P ar ' J '
»
Isaac Anderson.
April 22, 1809.

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