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The mountain Democrat. [volume] (Placerville, El Dorado County, Calif.) 1863-1943, May 23, 1863, Image 2

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THE MOUNTAIN DEMOCRAT.
V. W. OBLWICKt AND VI. A. im'tlT, BMTOM.
•• Our country, alu-oy* right; but , right or wrong
our country. *•
• PL.AOEHVILLB, OAL.
Batarday May $13, 1803
THE OITY AND COUNTY.
• PtcJftC. —The scholars of the public school
will hold their fifth annual picnic, to-morrow,
under the supervision of their amiable teachers,
Hr. Bartlett and Misa Irvine. The ground se
lected tor the occasion ia on the Georgetown
road, about three-fourths of a mile without the
citj, and is one of the loveliest und most suit
able places in the neighborhood.
City Printing. —As will be seen from the
proceedings of the City Council, in another col
umn, that patriotic and highly intellectual
body, under tbe lead or the venerable und dis
interested Alderman from the ward,, bare
eommenced operations to oust us from thetoon
orable and lucrative position of city printers.—
We neither ask nor expect any favors from tbe
Common Council. We are aware that tbe prin
cipal plank in the platform of a majority of its
members ia hatred to the Mooxtain Dcmocbat
and its editors, and that they will willingly use
their position of “ brief authority' 1 for the
purpose of cat rying out their amiable feelings.
Let them do so. They can neither destroy our
business Dor seriously disturb our equanimity
by anything they can do against us either as
individuals or Aldermen. We have passed
through more trying ordeals heretofore without
serious injury, and bare a firm belief that our
good luck has not yet deserted us, and a lively
hope that we ahull survive tbe malice of the
present Board of Aldermen. When our old
friend Cooper's "body lies mouldering in the
grave” anil " his S'-ut poos marching mi" to
“ Celestial” realms, w e hope to he still here to
chronicle “his many virtues" and the iirepara.
ble loss of mankind iu general and the first
ward in particular, in the Moi stain Dksiociiat.
Some old fogy tux-payer may cuttrtuin the an
tiquated notion that the city priming should be
givcD to the lowest bidder, hut, bless his un.
sophisticated heart, aucii an idea is [entirely
out of place when the cboice lies between un
Abolitiuuist and u Democrat. The fate of the
Nation trembles in the balance! Heavens 1
can patriotism haggle for money considera
tions st such s crisis? Would you save a pal
try sum at the price of the Tory existeuce of
tbe Republic? Shade of John Drown, forbid
it! The very pillars of the capital would crum
ble in sheer consternation, should love of lucre
so far crush the patriotism of the Common
Council as to permit them to give the printing
t<> the lowest bidder 1 The idea is treasonable
and could have emanated only from the brain
of a “ disloyal copperhead"!
Scaled I'eoiuisals for completing the gra‘
•ding, bridging and masonry, on the first see.
tiou of the I’lacerville and Sacramento Valley
Railroad (between Folsom and Miller'sCnrrul •,
will be received ut the office of the Chief Engi
neer, in this city, until the Gilt of June. We
noticed iu one of the flatter County papers, a
short time since, a statement that a contract
on the Central i'ucitic Railroad, taken bv one
o t the otlieers ol that Company, liud been re
let by him at about floo.oijo less than the bid
on which it wus awarded to him. Thu Dourd
of Directors should he admonished by this cir
cumstance to reject uny bid that may be be
yond the estimate of their Engineer and that
may afliird a margin for stub immense profit.
We think, too, that bids should not he submit
ted by officers of the Ci in puny, fur the reason
that, no difference how fairly any such might
obtain a coutract, or how honestly fulfil it, sus
picions of unfairness and collusion might arise
and be employed to defeat the proposition fur
the County to become a stockholder ia the
Compuny. We make those suggestions thro’
no doubts of the intelligence or honesty of the
Board of Directors, 4>ut through onr anxietv
that they and the great enterprise whose suc
cess or failure ia in their bauds shall stand well
with the peopleVf the entire county, and that
they may avoid Soy action on which the ei.u
rniea of the fa'ifTWTe! w.oa Lang a su -j it'ioti or
found a complaint.
Solenoid Coach.—Charley Watson isabullv
driver, has a bully team and a splendid new
Concord coach. He is prond both of his team
and coach, and when seated on the box would
scarcely condescend—he d think it a conde
scension—to nod to an Ktnpcror. The coach is
a beauty, elegantly finished, runs lightly and
rides easily. Other coaches, of the “same
sort,” will soon be placed on the route between
this city and Nevada Territory, by the Pioneer
Stage Company. In agents, drivers, teams and
coaches this company has no peer anywhere.
The proprietors, appreciating the wants of the
traveling community, employ none but gentle
manly and atteutirc agents and careful and
temperate Jdrivers. During the whole of last
winter, in all kinds of weather, their stages ur
rived with remarkable regularity. As travc|
Increases they place new stages and teams on
the route, so as not to detain or incommode
those who patronize them. A company thus
accommodating must please. It not only de
serves but commands success, and has the
good wishes of ail who can appreciate eutor"
prise and courtesy.
Strawberries.—We are indebted to our
worthy friend, Mr. E. Mortensen, for a box of
large and luscious strawberries. They were
grown in bis garden at Michigan Flat,and ‘May
over” any others that we have seen this season-
Mr. M. sold forty-eight quarts of this tine fruit
in oar market, du Thursday, at 07’ J cents per
quart.
Martin Auiokf, uf Coloma, is entitled toeur
thauks fur a package C.f Cataw ba wine of his
last year's vinlage. It is a most delicious Lev
erage, far superior to most of the Champaigne
imported to this country, and retjeets much
honor on him as a wine-maker, lie sells it at
eight dollars per dozen, and, fur our own use,
we would not give one dozen ol it for two of
the Champaigne sold at Hau Francisco lor |20
per dozen.
Harry Rorr, the amiable and good.looking
young gentleman that superintends the letter
department of Wells, Forgo ,V Co’s Express*
and whose promptness is equalled only by his
politeness, daily delivers to us the Sacramento
Han Francisco and Virginia City papers just
ahead uf the mail, fur which wc owe him leu
thousand thanks.
Arottare Ottv, of the Lafayette Restaurunt.is
entitled to our thanks fur a box of mammoth
strawberries, grown in Holloway's garden ou
Hanglown Hill. Mr. Ort is prepared to serve
tbo public with strawberries and cream, iced
cream and other summer luxuries. Our read
ers should give him a call.
Divorces Granted. —At the receut term of
the District Court divorces were grunted to
Mrs. C. A. How laud, Agnes R. Shove aud Car
oline Skaggs.
In Our Next—The Constitution and by
law Hal the “Excelsior No. 2 and Eureka Cop
per Mining Compautes” will be published id
our next.
The California.
If not universally admitted it is not the
less true that the only obstacle to the
permanent success ‘of the Democratic
party in this State, is the present unfor
tunato ami mischievous division existing
in.its ranks —a division keptupbyde
stgning politicians for selfish purposes.
Certain it is that but for this the Demo
cratic party would have been victorious
where it lias been defeated, nnd Califor
nia, instead of going over to the enemies
of Democracy, would have given a glo
rious triumph for Democratic principles.
But the party was divided where it
miglitand should have been united; dis
sensions, violent and uncalled for and
suicidal, took the place of the pre-exist
ing harmony ; Democrats warred against
each other instead of a common enemy;
and almost from the time it ceased to be
a unit, the Demoeciyi" party has met
with defeat. By its senseless dissensions
it threw away success.
Without calling into question the
causes which led to a result so disastrous
and deplorable, and while it is but loo
true that the Democratic party is not yet
a unit, it is exceedingly gratifying to per
ceive a growing sentiment with Demo
crats generally throughout the State, not
to be “ led like lambs to the slaughter,”
but forgetting past dissensions resolve
henceforth to labor for the succccss of
the united Democracy, as the only way
to achieve permanent success. It cannot
be denied that a largo majority of both
sections of the Democratic party depre
cate the existing division, and that there
is a strong and increasing desire to see
the party one inspirit, principle and ac
tion. That it will be reunited, and on a
basis which will secure for it permanent
ascendancy in the State, is an indisputa
ble fact. The masses of each wing have
so willed, and from their decision there is
no appeal.
Apart from the disastrous results to
our State growing out of the division of
the Democracy, the Democrats of Califor
nia are an element in the Democracy of
the Union; and as such, —essential to its
success and the prosperity of a common
country,—they have no light to war
against each other ; no light to be divi
ded ; no light to give the State, nnd not it
merely, but the Union, into the hands of
Abolition traitors; no light to trille with
the interests of the people, and betray
the confidence reposed in them ; no right
to continue in power a party that over
rides constitutions, violates law s and jus
titles and encourages mobs.
While we do not consider California, or
any other one State, the battle ground in
the approaching Presidential election,
yet, in view of the past, and when we
remember the consequences of a divided
party in the last Presidential contest,
have not the Democracy of the Union a
right to demand that the interests of
the country and the great Democratic
party of the Union be not further jeop
ardised by petty warfare between the De
mocracy of a sing'c State ? Most as
suredly. In every other State the De
mocracy are united and stand on a com
mon platform, and there ia no excuse for
their being divided here. Those who de
sire to keep up the division are playing
Into the hands of tho opponents of the
Democratic party and desire the success
of Abolition traitors.
‘ 'Every citizen, be lie the poor laborer
or the princely merchant or the eminent
professional men, is interested in the per
manent success of the Democratic party.
It upholds equally the interests of all
classes, conferring special favors on none
It is not less impartial than honest, alike
in its professions, its principles and its
actions. Our State has gone over to the
enemies of the Democracy against the
avowed popular will; and now that Cali
fornia is placed in a false position before
the sister States of the Union, it behooves
us to profit l»y past experience, though
hitter be the lesson, and hereafter be one
in thought and in action.
We have said the Democratic party jn
this State would be rc-united. Wc re
peat tbe assertion. The Democracy w ill
meet in State Convention on the 8th of
July, nominate u ticket,adopt a platform,
and work earnestly and harmoniously lo r
a common cause ; and by doing so they
will be enabled successfully to withstand
the assaults of their enemies and main
tain a permanent ascendency.
Gii.ukfu.i.y Backi.su Down. —The Ab
olition traitors, seeing tbe hand writing
on the wall, are gracefully backing down.
They know that posterity will hold them
responsible for the war. They know that
a compromise, satisfactory and honorable
to both sections, would hava been effected
long ago, bad it not been for their insane
opposition. Knowing this and dreading
the consequences of their folly, they are
changing their tone. Even Horace Gree
ley is becoming conservative. Some of
his old admirers were displeased with his
recent suggestion that the Southern
States, on the restoration, of tbe Uniuu
could hold slaves, the same as before.
To one of these he thus replies;
“ What 1 understand to bo the truth
of the matter is this: 1. The States
which formed the original Union and
adopted tho Federal Constitution were
previously in full possession and exercise
of the power to fix and regulate the legal
status of their own people respectively ;
2. They surrendered many powers to
the Federal Government, but they did
not surrender this one; 3. They have
never since surrendered it; 4. Conse
quently, they still possess it.”
A Swiniileb Convicted. —A verdict of
bl.154 81 has been recovered in New
Orleans against the redoubtable Gen.
Neal Dow, one of Lincoln's appointees,
for stealing and sending home silver
spoons, etc. Excessive loyalty was plead
in excuse of his rash act.
Damaging Statement*
It will be recollected that the organs of
the Administration party, in order to di
vert attention from the imbecility and
recklessness of their purchasers, fiercely
assailed Gen. McClellan for what they
called “ his insubordination.” Placed in
command of a magnificent army, from
which much was expected, and knowing
that the people would hold him responsi
ble for its success or failure, he carefully
matured plans for its onward march
plans which promised success, and would
have been successful, had they not. been
interfered with and thwarted by the ig
norant and jealous authorities at Wash'
ington. The President and Secretary of
War, distant from the field of operation 1 *
and ignorant of military movements,
without consulting the commanding Gen
eral, fdBiwiiiy and recklessly withheld
troops from him, for “ the protection of
Washington," and submitted suggestions,
amounting almost to commands, for his
future actions. Gen. McClellan, knowing
that if he followed t'teir suggestions, his
army would be defeated if not captured,
modestly remonstrated and asked for re
inforcements, and for doing so he was
branded as a “ rebel sympathizer” by ev
ery Abolition traitor in the. country. —
These scoundrels have nothing to say
about the “ insubordination" of other
Generals. They received instructions
from their masters to villify McClellan,
and they obeyed. Around Mctlellan
clustered the hopes and the affections of
tiie American people, and the President
and his Cabinet saw in the successful
General a formidable rival for the Presi
dency, and in order to destroy his popu
larity it was necessary to command their
hirelings to abuse him, and to accuse hint
of inefficiency .insubordination and treach
ery. Faithfully have the mercenary
wretches obeyed the command. They
have not a word of complaint against the
inefficiency or treachery of other Gene
rals. Not one of them dare notice the
following, so disgraceful to all concerned:
“ Gen. John Cochrane, in a recent let
ter, states tiie Order No 8, of Gen. Hum
side, alluded to in the report of the Com
mittee on the Conduct of the War, ‘ dis
missed hum the service and relieved ol
their commands twenty general officers of
the armv of the Potomac, who had dis
turbed General Burnside. At the head
of this list stood the significant name of
Gen. Joe. Hooker’.’ ”
CoSTEMET FOI! THE CONSTITUTION. —TIlC
late Congress was noted for its imbecility,
corruption and total disregard of consti
tutional obligations. The abolition trai
tors who swore to support the Constitu
tion, laughed derisively as the oatli was
administered. They professed to owe al
legiance to a “ higher law” than the
Constitution—that higher law which con
demns perjury. They passed a Con
scription law which gives the President
absolute power over too States, as though
there were no State Governments at all.
It gives him tiie power of appointing all
the officers, clothes him with more than
regal power, and if he were an able and
ambitious man, he could and would de
stroy the liberties ol the people. The
Constitution of the United States de
clares that—
Congress shall have power “to provide
for calling forth the militia to execute the
law of the Union, suppress insurrections,
and repel invasions; to provide for or
ganising, arming and disciplining, the
militia, and for governing such part of
them as may be employed in the service
of the United States, reserving to the
States respectively the appointment of
the officers, and the authority of training
the militia according to the discipline
prescribed by Congress.”
We are informed the President intends
to enforce the Conscription act, and yet
lie has taken a solemn oath to support
the Constitution of the United States 1
Is the senseless plea of “ State necess
ity” an excuse for violating tho Consti-'
tion ? If so, what crime may not be
committed under the plea of necessity ?
Easteks Negroes. —Much has lately
been said about the gallantry of negroes.
A few weeks ago the Sacramento Union
published an article in which it was con
tended that negro soldiers were superior
to white soldiers as sentinels. Extraor
dinary effiorts have been made by Gov.
Andrew, of Massachusetts, to organize a
negro regiment. His agents were found
in New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland
and Virginia. The Rochester (N. Y.)
Union gives the results of Fred. Doug
lass’ labors in the cause. Fred, raised
seventeen men in Geneva, but before the
time of leaving, nine of them deserted
Of the eight who reached Rochester, only
four could he got into the cars, and two
of them left before the train started. Of
the two who went on, one subsequently
returned. The party was thus reduced
to one, and it is said he expects a com
misssion.
Three Things. —There are three things,
says tiie Providence Post, the Democracy
wunt and will have, viz ; Free speech, a
free pross and free ballot. They are guar
anteed to them by the Constitution, and
will be maintained at ail hazards. They
will submit to any law, to every enact
ment, now matter how hard or oppress
ive, so long as their right to think, speak
and vote is respected.
Hard ok Lingoes.—A late number of
the Bostou Post has the following: Mr
Lincoln says he is the Government. He
is only the agent of the Government. The
Constitution, the laws, the Supreme Court
and Congress are all above him. They
constitute the Government. An organ
grinder might as well say he was the or
gan as Mr. Lincoln say he is the Govern
ment.
-« -•♦•-*'
D you w&ut your washing well done bur a
Dasha wav.
Common Connell Proceeding*.
Placurville, May 20th, 1803.
Hoard met pursuant to adjournment.
Mayor Tracy presiding.
Present—Full Hoard.
Minutes of last meeting were read and, on
motion, approved.
The Finance Committee reported the follow
ing hills, which, on motion, were allowed:
on tub gkxkrai* roxn:
J. B. Hume ♦130 00
V. E. Chubbuck 85 UU
Jas. Bailey 1*5 00
i *r*s oo
Robert fleudersou 1.. 20 00 j
Total 1415 00
Aid. Stewart moved that the construction of
the sewer across Main street, at the junction ot
Sacramento street, he referred to a committee
of one Alderman, with instruction to ascertain
what sum could be raised by private subscrip
tion. Carried.
The Mayor appointed Aid. Stewart said com
mittee.
Aid. Stewart moved that one gas light be
constructed at the corner of Reservoir Street
and Quartz alley, and one on Sacramento street
at or near the bridge, the necessary posts aud
lamps to be furnished by ik*> f'itv. Carried.
Aid. Stewartntlered the following resolution,
which was adapted-.
Resolved, That the Mayor, Treasurer and
Clerk be and hereby are authorized to issue
bends to Confidence Engine Co., So. 1, Xep
tunc Engine Co , No. 2, aud Young America
Engine Co., Xo. 3, in accordance with the Act
of the Legislature approved April 3d, 1»>W.
A communication from Yaruell A Co. was
laid on the table.
Aid. Stewart moved that the Council proceed
hr the election of Trustees and City Superin
tendent of Schools.
For Trustees, Messrs. X. A. Hamilton, IV.
II. Rogers and (Jeo.C. Rannev were nominated.
Aid. Cooper moved, that the names of the
three nominees fur trustees be placed upon one
ballot.
The Mayor declared the motion to be out of
order.
Aid. Cooper appealed to the Council and the
decision was overruled.
The motion was adopted.
Upon the first ballot, Messrs. Hamilton, Rog.
ers and Rauney were elected.
For Superintendent, Uev’d Messrs. C. C.
Peirce and J. II. McM magle were nominated.
Mr. Peirce was elected.
Aid. Cooper moved that the Clerk be author
ized to have the necessary job printing, prior
to the next meeting of the Council, done at the
Dailv News ollice.
Aid. I) inaliue moved to amend by instruct
ing the Clerk to have it done at '.lie office which
w ould do it the cheapest.
Am ndmetit lust.
Original motion adopted.
On motion, the Council adjourned.
C. E. CHUBBUCK,
City Clerk.
, - 1 »
White Labor. —The Republican press,
for years past, has hail much to say con
cerning the dignity of white labor, the
freeing of the negro, etc., but particular
pains is taken to be very quiet in regard
to the effects of negro labor coming in
conflict with white labor at the North.
The New York correspondent of the Sian
Francisco Call writes as folluws :
About every day, now, we have a dis
turbance among the laborers working on
tlie piers or wharves, or in the ware
houses, owing to tlie dislike exhibited,
especially by Irishmen, to the iutrudoc
tion of negro workmen. This dislike
usually culminates in a row, when the
parties in antagonism happen to get into
me vicinity of each other, and stone
throwing, pistol shooting, the turnout of
the police, etc., are tiie consequences.
The political disposition to elevate the
negro, as an industrial, to the status of
the w liile man, has produced a fueling
among the white laborers generally, of
the most implacable hatred for the Colored
race, and I fear will work much mischief
yet —ns it nducts the wages ol labor, and
at a time whon the price of everything to
eat, dtink, wear, etc., lias so much ad
vattced, the exasperation is not likely to
diminish. When it w ill end, time only
can determine.
Mask tiie UstitrEUs. —Oath making
has always been a favorite trick with
bigoted, corrupt, intolerant revolution
ists. The French Revolution presents
scenes of oath making an oath taking,
which oath men violated as surely as ta
ken, until all respect for such obligations
were lost upon the people.
The civil wars of Great Britain were
no less fiuitful of such evils. As parties
changed, the oath changed. The domi
nant party for the time being, overriding
all sense of justice and decency, forced
the minority to swallow any extra judi
cial oath they might hatch up. Those
who called on God to witness their de
votion and truth to Charles I,'beheaded
him and placed Cromwell in the protec
torate. Among the statesmen and war
riors who bore a chief par*, in restoring
to the throne of England Charles the 11,
were the very many who had repeatedly
abjured him, —nay, some of them boast
fully utlirmed if they had not uhjoured
him, they never could have restored him.
The solemn league and covenant, a test
of the days of Cromwell, was n few years
after its vitality burned by the common
hangman amidst the huzzas of thousands
wiio themselves subscribed it. Those
who plighted their allegiance in the most
solemn manner to James the II, plotted
his duwnfall, and placed William and
Mary at the head of the “ legitimate"
government. The chronicler of those
events, in speaking to posterity of them,
says “ Do not flatter yourselves that the
ingenuity of law givers will ever devise
an oath which the ingenuity of causists
will not evade, What indeed is the value
of any oath in such a matter? Among
the many lessons w .ich the troubles ol
the last generation have left us, none is
more plain than this, however precise, no
imprecation, however awful, ever saved
or ever will save a government from de
struction.”—[Placer Herald.
Shocking Resects of Wak. —Outrages
are frequently perpetrated by soldiers al
most tuo shocking to believe. The New
York Christian Inquirer, a strong Union
paper, makes, on what it calls “ reliable
authority," tliede statements, but they do
not tell the half of the whole sad truth:
“ In several libraries of New England
clergymen we have seen choice volumes
of great cost, bearing the names of South
ern ministers, to w hom they still belong,
ulthough they have been sent North as
gifts from Yankee soldiers who had ap
propriated them, Some Massachusetts
parlors arc said to he carpeted with
spoils of another kind. Now. if any one
asks what has become of the Union party
once so strong at the South, wo answer
that, in. part, they have been alenjated
from the government by the unjustifiable
outrages committed by wicked or
thoughtless federal soldiers. 4t Reau
fort, S. C., tombs were violated. At Hol
ly Springs, Miss, a communion table was
used in behalf of ‘ euchre’ and • old
sledge.’ Such tales of wrong has infuri
ated many who were disposed to he
friends of the Union, and their righteous
iudignation has had something to do with
reverses that have overtaken our arms,”
•«*»■—
Btr a Dasbawar Washing Macbiue if you
want to please the ladies.
Great Decrease. —The 128th Illinois
regiment, having lost about seven hun
dred men in five months by sicknesa and
desertion, its principal officers have been
dismissed, and the regiment ordered to
be consolidated. The dismissed officers
were also ordered to leawe the depart
ment In the same department, a cor
respondent of the Augusta (Maine) Age,
says, hundreds of soldiers are daily de
serting, on account of sickness and intro
ducing negro soldiers among them.
White men will not submit to be degiad
ed to a level with the negro.
Board or Education. —Ou Wednesday even
ing, the Common Council re-elected Rev. C. C*
Peirce as Superintendent, and elected Messrs.
X. A. Hamilton, W. II- Rogers and George C
Ilanney as Trustees of the City Schools.
DEATHS.
In this eity,*«vtt l*th i«*C, Mary, second
daughter of Dr. ls«ac S. and Stba Titus, aged 4
years, I month and 11 days.
In £1 Dorado, Sunday morning. May 17th, Mrs.
Clarissa D , wife of Thus. J. Or gun, Esq.' in the
40th year of her age.
Thus has passed from earth a noble woman, en
dowed. with the most estimable and endearing
qualities. She possessed a cultivated mind and a
sweetness of temper which neither sickness uor
suffering nor anxiety could sour, t’nobtrusive,
charitable and amiable, she was an ornament of
society and the cherished idol of the Louie circle.
Her best eulogy is, those who knew tier Lest de
plore her death the most. In the town in which
she lived she was universally esteemed and loved,
and the tongue of malic* never uttered a harsh
word against her. Mrs. O. was a daughter of the
late Judge Conger, of New Jersey. J»he came to
this State, from Indiana, ala>ut eleven years ago,
and e«a>n after settled at £1 Dorado. At an early
age, she became a member of the Congregational
Church, an«l was to the time of her death a devout
follower of the meek and low ly Jesus A husband
and little daughter and numerous friends mourn
her loss.
[New Jersey and India 1 a papers please copy.]
II HIT IIS.
In this citv, on the l*th in«t., 4 to Mr. Stephen II.
Alvtrson and wife, a daughter
flrto Stobrrttscmnus 2To Day
MASONIC 50T1CE.-A Special
Communication *-f K! Dorado Lodge. No. *J0,
H'. and A M.. will h-» heni s.r tluir Lottge
Room iu the City of Phtcerville, on ihe even;::;:
Wednesday next. M .y ‘27th. at > o’e!- *k. f. r the
transaction of important business. Mvtnbcrs are
requested to be punctual.
By order of the Worshipful Ma**er.
L. W. KF.rHniMKR,
Secretary pro tetn
Plaeerville, May 22d, 1863.
Siler's Special Noll re.—Do your duty
to yourselves, protect \our health, u»e liOl.l.O
WAY’S PILLS AND OINTMENT, lor «ures.
wounds, bowel complaints and fevers, th< ) arc a
perfect safeguard. lull direction* Low to u e
than, with every box, Only 25 cents. 21 *
BLUE LEDGE GOLD AKD SILVER
QUARTZ MINING COMPANY.
islureby giveu to the Stock! *ldrrs in
the abovenatmd Company, that an «««(-..men!
of nine cents per -hare wj» this day l.ved. payable
immediately to the Secretary, a; the the
C npanyin Color.:a. K! Dorado County, C.iPfori.’a.
II)' order of the Board of Trustees
A. ST C. m.NYFR, Secretary.
Colorna, May 18th, Is&i.— 4w
NOTICE.
Mil. C. E. CIll'11 HI CK is duly author
ized to receive and receipt for ah i..»ney? due
nie, nd those indebted '<• me .sic rriju*. st- ! u*uk<
immediate payment to him, and save co.-n.
M C. MLTZLER.
I’Uccrville, May Dili, 18&L-—tu-v-liu
PLACER VILI.E AND SACRAMENTO
VALLEY RAILROAD.
NOTICE TO "CONTRACTORS.
FRAM'D P»rnpOFAI.F w” be n «v v.
ed until JUNE Oth. !■***•:>. ..t the
>tce of the i'lnef Knduevr id the
iCon.pai.y. at Pi a erv He. f-r th* irra
dii.g, m.i-H.nry and t-nlgi j? of th- n ir.M • it ? por
tion of the firet division of Pl.-e t-rv.lle and
ramento Valley Railroad- !r< in 1'* l>-.r:» 'I r’>
C-Tal, in in Pi rado County, a d.stance of ab ut
fifti en miles.
Plans, profiles and fixations of t! ab ve
w rk trill be r- adv for tl
on and after fhe 3*'th of M.«v. at -*i• i . It; a.
3 " . SANPUJ.'U.S.
President P and S \ K R. Co.
FRANCIS A I
Chief Enjsii. -r i* and 3. V. K It. Co.
PiacervillwMay Isth, td
KNICKERBOCKER SEGAR STAND
FIXE CIC IRS A.M> TOR it C O
FBESH FRUITS,
mts a\i> ( i\i»n;s,
THK undersigned hnvlntr purchased the KNICK
KRbOCKl.lt STAND, tn-xt to the Caty lluuse.
respectfully inform* the pm ; that tl.-y W..J *\>
fioil there the best of cijr.i. - and t. bacco. ai d a
I eueral assortment of Fre-.n liuits, Nuts «;.i Can
do tf. at the very lowest prici*.
rnaySS JAMES L. WEYMOITII.
, PALMER, HANSCOM & CO.,
Golden State Iron Works,
MAXCFACTJL'r.K
sfy IRON CASTINGS
ax D
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS,
Kno’xs Amalgamators,
Special Department for
MANTEL OBATES, STOVE WOI1K,
CALDRONS, ETC.,
No's 19 AND 21, FIRST STREET,
HAX FRANCISCO.
Heath & Hrotlle Crushers
may28] Always on hand. [8m
ESTAULISIIED 1760.
PETER LORILLARD,
Snuff and Tobacco Manufacturer
10 and 18 Chambers Street,
(Formerly 42 Chatham Street,) New York,
"llTOCLD call the attention of Dealers to the ar
m tides of his manufacture, viz.:
BROWN SNUFF:
Macaboy,
Fine Rappee,
Coarse Rappee,
American Gentleman,
Demigros,
Pure Virginia,
Kachitoches,
Copenhagen
YELLOW SNUFF:
Scotch, Honey Dew Scotch,
High Toast Scotch, Fresh Honey Dew Scotch,
Irish High Toast, Fresh Scotch,
or Lundy Foot,
E Attention Is called to the large reduction in
o! Fine-Cut Chewing and Smoking Tobaccos
which will be found of a superior quality,
TOBAOOO:
bJIOKIXO. FISE-CCT CHEWISQ. SHOE I SO.
Long, P. A. I.., or plain, 8. Jago,
No. 1, Cavendish, or Sweet, Spanish,
No. 2; Sweet Scented Oronoco, Canister,
No’s 1 k 2 mixed, Tin Foil Cavendish, Turkish
Granulated.
N. R —A circular of prices will be sent on appli
cation.
New York, May 23d, 1S6G.
tma2G.Jy)
tftisrrllanrous aubcrtising.
people s opposition
STEAMSHIP USE!
coxNtcnxo
CALIPOBN1A AND NEW YORK!
VIA NICARAGUA.
• * '
750 Mile* Shorter than Panama Route i
Low antes o! Passage!
Tins fast >411* 1 favorite DOUBLE
„ S'* I *.ENtiJNK S*TKAMS1II1\
—i'ilil'lJlI trrtnno m > VT HTJ
MOSES TAYLOR,
J. II. IILETIIEX ..COMMANDER
Will be despatched fur
SAN JUAN DEL SUR,
WED .VESPA Y. JUNE 10th, 1383,
From Mission Street Wharf. Fat. Fraaciaco, at *
o'clock, a. w . precisely,
Connecting at Greytuwti wiiii tit . splendid Steamship
AMERICA. 2,500 Tons.
Reduced Rnto* of Pissige and Quick
Tr P- arc secure.I b.v tie re opening e.f the
NICARAGUA ROUTE.
These «t.-.vrc -< ire i:n*ttrpa»«’d fnr spe- I, elean-
Pfe mi arid i'i f > y . I eve ry ■ Hurt sriil la- made to
insure the comfort of p * ss r n gm >.
A man of * xp. r rice a II he sell' on each
Fleaiuer In take el ai *■• f the baggage and of ladies
who may he Have "galone.
For fdither lid rim: 1. or passage apply to
I. K ROBERTS.
N . 1 ’7 Ptrwl,
CPP' S * c thi* Po t Olficc,
mayir.'.j San Francisco.
BARGAINS! BARGAINS!
GOLD AND SILVER
WATCHES!
GOLD WATCH CHAINS!
DIAMOND RINGS, ETC.,
1 jr ?ak l * fur by
FL-AJ^FR,
Pi**: Lr—k-r,
>! iitj 95 rt* *. 1*1 -A tf» lie.
.V j L* M.WR.Vl L:;, Aif -M.
J. J. t l IXLV
M’a(tliiiiak(*r and
■ \T titr . v '<
ON THE PLAZA. PLACLUVILLP
* rv i
m r: i ■
. t i | * r v r rep. ate
t ♦ f .• !. i, j
\\ a i j.c* aiaii
MANUFACTUP.E JEWELKY!
of ewry .1.< ri|•: i. Ht r? r. •* a’.d ti c
best »t.V t .
Diamond W. E:. Chasing.
r\i r. \ \ IN*. >! \! ‘ ' Tl 1 \ < i ll .-IN'KIN*. !
4.ii.iii\u «..«j4L\;.iwi.\u 4a...a s« ;u
t. .t' 1-' ....
W • rk |*r rnjil-,/ ami UrhvtrrrJ at thr
Mr Cn.I.KN s *■;< r.t f-r tl v « . • of the
BAY STATE SLAVING MACHINE!
i.// A IS*» til in *•
f .*> Th a
l it \ X a HUt tv K HIT, • ,
All jobs done n'ly
ai.-t at r a*ut.A i • > *• n.i»>2
TO THE LADIES.
FASHIONS!
BEAUTIFUL FRENCH FLONVEUSi
MBS. McLELJ
B a J ■ tur . 'r ... . i i
■L.Jy ;h< U>'y U2*MAI.L
MBS. McLELLAN, .v . .-t
. • y.; to
SuRTMl NT uf tbe
Choicest Artificial Flowers !
.■*t!tt - f '.T fp»f!! lui|»t»rf;ri tlireet from Pari*. re
’ • o! > t' *• ! i'* r. The Laving are invited
to t all :»:.■! exai:.:::*; them.
MILLINERY. DRESS AND CLOAJ
MAKING,
Of ever;- tb-rr | * ;i. June m die Intent styles, at.
r.. lif'.s u jru.ir-iiiti* J.
MBS. McLELLAN,
A‘ •’ • r • • * Mr J«*!.i- Fountain.
Pl.icerr.lle, May 1 i — 1 m
SILVER tTAH COPPER - MINING
COMPANY.
Nf’Tl' h 1*1. f i s' ■. n t.* the shareholders of
d»v»Ve 1 ; . v t( t t or two
dollar* on » irt> ‘•lure of tw. • ut.lrmi fret I a. i„ , n
thi y lwivd, maJt Juv .iici jisyuLle to l» 11 AM.V
Tr. wimr. «.r, ."r b*' i r» , -t..th J ay „f M.v
aicl t.i it all *li ir»« i iiir -irf mi tint date Vtll f.e
I* ;.t o:, tl.e .'IXHI L»A V 'il JIM, ;«t 1 oclfM-k. 1*
' I a, 1 .' 1 ' !} . » till Micti.Cab Flat,
l.y order of t! e li* iirJ • r l> : r-. ♦< r«.
... .. *■-. MORTKNbKN. F**cretary.
3Iiclti|;au Eat, May nib, l-tlj.—-uialGwtl
N
ar<-
C.i
i<d
Mh
.ill'
u.U
tl
fi>
OTIC'E.-T'.e :Wkholdrr« of the “TOI.D
M'lIlNt.S KK\>ToNh MINING COMPANY"
hereby n I that an (4th) of Ten
u per share ,».( one ft»*»t, has been this day lev*
h.\ the Hoard of 1>. rectors, made du*; and paya
. "ii. ih.'e *" 'I'• • • - J “* g n. tf.cretary, and that
... Kirnr. ,. r the 2Ph d ,y of May
ut H »» pr..%**"»-*i by hr Comparv's taw . on
'../lh day o J May. at 1" .»Y!w« L A. M . at the of.
o. the Ci mpuny. n t» . vlliacr of FI Dorado.
, _ Tilt* .1, OKGON, bec’v.
I Dorado, May 2nd. 1MI?.—mJ)vri
VALUABLE PROPERTY FOR SALE
f T 1|IE undersigned will sell at public auction, on
A Monday, June 1st, 1803,
At Iti oVUn k, A M. #>•» the premise*. in Diamond
JT n ”iT*- «»»•* HREPRflOF IIHICK BUILDING and
Loi. now o.-enptef hy Well**, Far o A Co nn an < ffi.-e
—the property of the Karate of E K. Ludwig. der’d.
and the under-;? ed. The building yields a g»od
!l *tructure.
TKKMB—One-half cash, and balance on nine
mouths credit, secured by mortgage on the property
c.ko. ii carter,
r . , „ , Burvlring Partner.
Diamond spring?, April 23d, let^3.—t<l
NOTICE TO STOCKHOLDERS.
Office P. aki> 8. V. Railroad Co., )
Placerville, May 1st, 1*68. J
Notice is hereby giveu that an as*
_ «r«w»ei't of ter, dollars per share on
‘ e * tot * ” f t],p Wttoervjlle and Sacra*
nn-nto \ alley Railroad Company is due
ml payable, at the ‘dlice of the undersigned in the
City of Placerville, Kl Dorado County, California,
within thirty days from dat*.
All-shareholders are requested to make payment
on or before that time, or such assessment will be
promptly collected In the manner prescribed by law
0 , „ . OGDEN squires,
mjl2,ul Sec’y P. and 8. V. K. R. Co.
D -A_ e "W _a_ Y
WASHING MACHINE !
The only practical Washing Machine ever offerer
to the public. They will wash anything, li on
,ln “‘ ,me " l>> 'he coarsest woolen fabrics with
outugury All who have them in use uronoutci
them the labor saving machine of the age.
, ,Manufacture, I hy X J Parsons, Marlnne Shop
Ilaccryillc. Also, ChOTUEa W1US0EKS of va
nous sizes fur sale. mavfi.
Ctjas. 1$. Pettit's Column.
Dry Goods and Clothing
AT GREATLY
REDUCED PRICE81
F«n THE NEXT THIRTY DAYS.
(be uriricrsigiuii will sell off all the old stock •
CLOTHING, DRY GOODS,
BOOTS, SHOES, HATS AND OAPB,
Furnishing and Trimming Goods,
Lately purchased of the creditors of H. A. Canto
A Co., at
San Francisco Cost!
He will also tell,
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
All his present stock of
Fall and Winter Goods t
To make room for a new stock of
Spring and Summer Goods l
rr Purchaser* wilt consult their Interest by call
li*p and exanmvnir his goods, as they were bought so
low *s to enable him to sell them at prices wbfefc
other dealers pay for their foods.
aj>r4 i C1IAA B. PKTT1T.
\nv GOODS ! NEW GOODS:
CHAS. B. PETTIT,
(At lie uM alar.d „f II. A. Cagwin A Co t
DEALER I*
STAPLE AND FANCY
DRY GOODS,
C A It PETS, OIl.CEOTIIg,
Clothing, Hats and Caps,
BOOTS AND SHOES!
I > FSpfCTfl’Ll.Y inrite* *he attention of parrha-
II •••■.» !. * large and Well selected assortment
of ue>*ras!t fwud*, ah of which be Is selling
AT THE LOWEST PRICE8!
Jl.VT ItIX LIVED,
VJHM.FNPID of Frrnch, Enffltfe
m.d Ai:it,r..Bn DltEoS GOODS, cam,
|«ri»n g e
Beaut 1 Nil Prints j
Bich Silks;
Pine Merinos;
Handsome Delaines;
Splendid Bepa;
AlJ a great variety of
ltxdii« 1'u rgi Uliing Goods t
W‘ l, I. .he lid ti air respectfully invited to can aad
exa u-.r.e.
CIIA3. B. PETTIT.
1.4DIES' HOOTS 4\D SHOES!
Vfl'l >\H!> A-.«..nTV»NT •- By far the larges!
»..J U.-1 it the l— j. (or ulc.
AT THE LOWEST PH ICES!
by CII.O. B. PETTIT
t. i:\rs clotiiixg:
I omif K'tt rsif , I !»m .luck of
l l ! "1 MIS' ... .1 1. t [«■ C . .1 w, h I«i4a CU
U ,..r. ..*>«4.1
ANY DEALER IN CALIFORNIA*
chas. u. crrriT.
(U.ltOltMi III.4SKET8!
l!K-’ i T I\ l e t convtaut supply on L -‘4
1. I'.I tvf ul 1 .’,
AT THE LOWEST RATES!
CHAS B. P ATT IT.
>li:.\!A* t\U HOIS* BOOTS
iM) MIOE* }
VI. ‘.n f STOCK OK A 1.1. KIMIM. ilnfi M
4 r r.i!c .[ | nets that iilho( fall lb
puri-Las- r .
CALI. AND SEE FOR YOURSELVES
chas. b. prrm
ai.i:\ amm;»s hidsi
4 I!SI G-minMl ». T . ALEXANDER'S
* 1 FIRST C I.AbS KID GLOVES. alse.
a cuoU a»n-rtiuent of
CHEAP KID GLOVES!
For sale by
chaa b. pittit.
LESS THAN NEW YORK
PRICES!
A large stock or
Drown and Bleached Sheetings and
Shirtings;
Ded Tickings, Denims, eta*
For wile by
chas. b. prrriT.
CARPETINGS J
OIL CLOTH8. MATTINGS. ETC,
A goo<l stock iu store and for Mk »(
VERY LOW PRICES!
CRAB. B. PETTIT,
SHAKER FEAN1VEL,
IVentucky JEANS i
Curtain Damasks;
Table Linen;
Towels; Napkins;
Bed Quilts, etc., etc.,
For sale low, by
CHAS. B. PI 11 IT,
GLOVES AND HOSIERY !
THE I a rent and best assorted stock in Use Clip,
always In store and
FOR SAXE VERY LOW.
CHAS. B. PETTIT.
- ORDERS
FROM THE COUNTRY wit! recciro p.-ospt •*-
notion, at the same low prices ss if bo/crS
were present. r
HEMEMBEfl
The Old Stand of H. A. Cagwln A Co,
IRON FRONT BUHJDINQ,
MAIN STREET, FLACERVTLLE,
C|t AB. 11. PETTIT

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