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New Britain herald. [volume] (New Britain, Conn.) 1890-1976, May 11, 1914, Image 3

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NEW BRITAIN DAILY HERALD, MONDAY, MAY 11, 1914.
I
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n AATAM AThnr I
gUo I UW 0 1 Unt I
The Very
V
Latest
in Waists
There never was a-time when the
ityle, the coloring and trimmings were
, so attractive as they are this season.
see me siynsn n .utfis
offering-, the prices so moderate. You
wonder how they can be made for
,. the price.
At uhc an unlimited, variety iu se
lect from, in lawn, crepe, crepo voile,
voile, etc.. all white, fancy striped
and figured, plain and fancy colored,
all nicely trimmed; values up to $1.50.
All at our price 98c each.
White Jap Silk Waists, all pure silk,
fancy trimmed collar, all sizes. 08c
each. , . --'.v'- v ' " " ' ' ".
At $1.08, Heavy Jap Silk Waists,
black and white, "ruffle trimmed,
fancy silk striped, crepes, variety of
patterns, striped heavy tub silk, In neat
stripes, etc., white organdy, cream
shadow lace and embroidery trimmed;
.values up to $2.50. $1.98 each.
V jl T 16-Button Silk Gloves, heavy iqual
'! i7f pure silk, black or white, -double
.linger tips, all sizes, 75c and $1.00
Chamoisette Gloves, v2-clasp, colors
- -gray, tan, natural and wJhite, 25c . pair.
h, i.CluMBoisette. 16 -button, colors, white
and natural, - all sizes, 50c.
-.'. Madras Shirtings, smart, "new pat
; terns, in, stripes , and...; fancy, woven
colors warranted perfectly fast, 15c yd.
t i - . ..
'I Percales, best quality domestic per-
Stripes, dots ana ngures, is l-zc yard.
i Agents for McCall Patterns. , ,
', The best pattern at any price, lOo
- , ajia ioc.
SCHOOL CQTJNCJL . ANNVAD.
- 'fl'ln.'' ' connection ' with v' the annuat.
; injecting of the school council, which
Jtwttl talce place on May 27, there will
a banquet served at' the " New
Britain1 club at- which Principal Louis
. Slade, of the High school, will act
f as toastmaster. Among the speakers
. will be Superintendent S., ,H. Holmes,
j and Miss Ella A. Fallon. Principal
Wpeks, of the East, street school, is
'""president of the council and will con-
h-uct'the annual meeting."
'Learn to Know this Emblem" I
10 !
It is your guarantee of
Reliable Laundry Work.
7HONE 904.
4
'Our Wagons 6o Everywhere"
N AUG HTON'S
BAKE SHOP
jf .
Clean and wholesome. Where you
can get the Best in the Baking Busi-
ness. We make and Bake only the
Best Materials.
We carry a complete line of Bread,
-Pies and Cakes of all descriptions.
Cream " ods are unequalled.
; Our Pies are the finest in the city.
; Our Bread, you should-try. a loaf,
ihen aisk your grocer or leave your ad
dress at i
361 Main Street.
', (2 Telephones)
nnuu mnTiPTO nnuT
wnn. DHr iioio uun i
DO ALL ID SHARE
Church Not Keeping Up With In
crease in Popuation.
SMALL TOWNS GROWING SMALLER
Hurl fol d Baptist Asswiatlou Chair
man Shows Figures to Prove State
ment Regarding Way the Church
Falls toiCaro For I)rolgners.
Charts containing some facts con
cerning the state of Connecticut's
population with reference to church
work and workers were seen at the
First Baptist church yesterday. In
these charts, made out by W. E.
Woodbury, chairman of the Hartford
Baptist association, it is said that the
Connecticut Baptist churches, like
other evangelical churches, are in
cheasing in membership, but are not
keeping up with the increase in popu
lation. In 1870 the population of this
state was' 500,000 and in 1910 it was
1,100,000. In 1910 the population of
the state had increased 23 per cent,
and from 1880; when the Baptist
church membership in Connecticut
was 21,755, to 1910 when it had
reached 26,902, the membership gain
in this church was but 7 -. per cent.
Foreigners Outnumber Natives.
The second chart shown makes
known the startling fact that at pres
ent the Connecticut foreigners, the
term meaning those whose parents
were born outside of y the United
States, are out-numbering the native
whites. Figures show that in 1890
there were 350,000 in the state born
of native white parents, comprising
ebout fcjrty-eight per cent, of the en
tire . population. ... Of foreign paren
tage there - were 370,000, or fifty-two
per cent, of the entire population. In
1910 the. total number born of native
white parents reached 390,000. In
the meantime, however, the foreign
births had reached 700,000; leaving
but thirty-five arid one-half per cent,
of the population of the old stock,
while the foreign element had in
creased to sixty-four and one-half per
cent, of the entire i population.
Foreigners Multiply Rapidly.
Another startling statement made is
that the foreigners in this state mul
tiply in the cities just five times as
fast as 'native whites. From 1890 to'
1910 the native whites of native par
ents increased but eighteen per cent.
'.while the foreign born, or of foreign
parents, : increased about 100 per cent.
In towns ,of less than 2,500 from .1890
to 1910 the foreigners increased forty
r per. cent, and1 thtf'riaCtlves decreased
twenty-five per cent. i,
:, ,i Where; the Forelgtiera Wye.-; J 5
Where do these foreigners live? Iii
round numbers they are, spread out
over the state as 'follows:.' "Russians,
In New Haven, 12,600; Hartford, 10,
J000; New 'Britain, 9,500; Waterbury,
8,000; Norwich, 2.800 and New Lon
don, 1,400. Of the Italian race New
Haven again lea-ds with 21,600; Wa
terbury comes next with 10,300, Hart
ford has 7,000; New . Britain has 2,
700; Bristol has 2,000; Torrington has
1,800 and New London has 1,300.
These 'figures are from the 1910 cen
sus and figures for 1914 would show
a decided increase.
In Hartford Association. .
In the towns and , cities where the
Baptist churches of the Hartford as
sociation are located there is a total
population of 199,000, of which 62.000
or less than one-thlrd are native
whites and 134,000 -or more than
two-thirds are foreigners. These fig
ures Include 26,000 Irish, 22,000 Rus
sians, 14,000 Italians and 1,600 Hun
garians. New Haven's association is
four-fifths foreign and one-fifth na
tive whites.
, Work for Natives.
The Baptist state work for native
Am erica ns one-third of the popula
tion is carried on by 105 pastors and
140 churches. For the other two
thirds of the population, made up of
foreigners or new Americans as they
are called, there are ten German and
Swedish pastors with fourteen
churches, thirteen missionaries and
three places where a small mission is
located, but without any resident mis
sionary. Population Distribution.
Among other things asserted by
these charts is that the population of
the largest centers is Increasing while
that of the smaller cities is decreas
ing. From 1890 to 1910 the towns
of more than 2,500 people increased
400,000, or eighty-nine and three
quarters per cent. On the other
hand the towns of less than 2,500 de
creased 8,000, or ten and one-quarter
per cent.
154 Churches In State.
Thirty-five of the 154 Baptist
churches in this state are in towns
of decreasing population. In the
New London association seven out of
ten churches are in such towns, while
in the Stonlngton Union , there are
four out of ten churches in such
towns. ' In the Hartford association
Colebrook has two churches, Corn
wall a like number and Wethersfleld
one. In these towns the population
in 1840 was 1,232, 1,703 and 3,824 re
spectively, but in 1910 the population
had dropped off to 557, 1,016 and 3,
148 respectively.
59,000 Russians in Connecticut.
There are 59,000 Russians living in
Connecticut towns and cities where
there are Baptist churches, yet there
is no preacher for them. Even in
New Britain there are only three such
missionary workers, while in the
Hartford association, to which this
GREAT CLEARANCE SALE
(
OF OMENTAL WSJGS UN PMOGKESS
Many lovers of Fine Oriental Rugs throughout Connecticut
are taking advantage of this Special Reduced
Price Clearance Sale
Which Includes futcclmous. of scarcity, beauty and extraordinary fineness as
well as more modern and practical Oriental Rufis. Their designs are prin
c-lpally nil-over patterns skillfully blended In soft variation of color.' Rich
browns and dark blue tones prevail with Ivory, old blue, mahogany and
old rose hues.
9x12 Mahal, Ispahan and Khorassan Carpet sizes as
low as $95, $98, $112, $130 and $160.
10x14 and larger sizes for $110, $175, $275, $290 and
$350.
Unusually large assortment of medium sizes averag
ing 6-6x4-6 as low as $23, $28, $32, $45 and $50. A Most
Desirable Gift for the Bride-to-Be.
When you consider such unusual values ns given above this CLEAR
ANCK SALE presents an opportunity that should not be neglected. You
can now furnish at SMAIL COST that LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM or
HALL that you have been contemplating doing for some time, thereby add
ing greatly to the beauty and comfort of home.
THIS CLEARANCE SALE ALSO EXTENDS TO OUR.
DOMESTIC RUG DEPARTMENT
where every Wilton rug except those restricted In price Is reduced from 10 per cent, to 25 per cent. Fin
est grado Wilton Rugs, size 9x12, value $50, $55 ami $00, are now $35, $37.50, $38, $40, $15 and $10.50.
Sizes larger and smaller sizes reduced accordingly. All are choice designs and colors.
THE SAMUEL DONCHIAN RUG COMPANY
205 PEARL STREET
City belongs, there are 22,400 Rus
sians. " '
Sunday Services.
Usual Sunday services were held
yesterday at the Baptist church and
at the. Christian Endeavor service.
Oliver H. Nichols, president of the
Methodist church Epworth league,
was leader. The Bible school of
fering went into the Milk Station
fund. ... .
Tomorrow the Junior C. E. meets
at 4 o'clock and on Thursday at 7:45
p. m. the usual weekly prayer meet
ing will be held.
Will Exchange Pulpits.
At the request of the Connecticut
Baptist convention pr. W. C. Fen
nell, of Hartford, will exchange pul
pits with Dr. Brown next Sunday.
The ' annual offering for the Baptist
Ministers Heme will be received next
Snndairtornlngv, . .tvw...c .
? ' Choir Going Good.
p Th&i church r quartet' and cholrV 'un
der the i direction of Organist and
Musioal Directors. Burdette Hawley,
is going good and the new members
are receiving favorable comment; The
Choir is composed of Daisy B. Dailey,
first soprano; Helen Dickinson, second
soprano; Augusta B. Couch, iirst alto,
Madalene Clough, second alto: Ray
mond M. Grant, first tenor; Newton
G." Curtis, second tenor; Burton Corn
wall, , Ifrst bass: Frederick W. Ilen
$$$$ Second Imss. ; : ,
M. E. CHURCH MEMBER
SIXTY-THREE YEARS
Mrs. Jane A- Roberts Holds Remark
able Record Notices for the
Coming Week.
One of the members of the Metho
dist church who attended the services
last Sunday united with the New
Britain Trinity Methodist Episcopal
church sixty-three years ago that day.
She is Mrs. Jane A. Roberts and it Is
probable that her record is one that
but very few have ever attained.
The monthly meeting of the Meth
odist Brotherhood will be held jointly
with the Ladies Aid society on Wed
nesday evening, at 7:45 o'clock in the
Sunday school room There will be
a social session, with entertainment
by the Wesleyan Glee club quartet
and reader, and local talent. Light
refreshments will be served at the
close of the entertainment and a gen
eral good time enjoyed.
' The W. H. M. S. met with Mrs.
Mills, 27 Wlnthrop street this after
noon and the Standard Bearers will
meet with Mrs- Goodrich, Tuesday
afternoon, at 4 o'clock.
The annual meeting of the Ladies'
Aid society will be held at Mrs. Good
rich's home. 98 Grove Hill, Friday
evening, at 8 o'clock.
The annual offering for the Metho
dist Episcopal hospital in Brooklyn
will be received at the July commun
ion, instead of the first Sunday in
June, as heretofore announced.
AT EAST STREET SCHOOL.
Annual Meeting of Parents' and
Teachers' Association. Tonight.
At the East street school this even
ing will occur the annual meeting of.
the Parents' and Teachers' associa
tion of that Institution. Reports will
be read and new officers will ( be
elected. . ,
Jn connection with the business
meeting there will be an entertain
ment. A prominent member of the
school board will give an address,
John Jackson will givo a solo and
there will also be songs by Miss
Katherine O'Connor's class. Charlos
Stone is to give some recitations and
there will be a piano and vocal solo
by Miss Bridget La r aria. The Gram
mar school orchestra will play.
! FAVORS IMMIGRATION
OPEN TO EVERYONE
Young People at First Church Listen
to Interesting Debate on Timely
Subject at Evening Service.
That the time has not arrived In
the history of the United States to
limit Immigration was the consensus
of opinion last night at the meeting of
the First church young people ' when
the debate upon this timely subject
was held. Walter Robinson argued
that the-country would be better off
if the great Influx of Immigrants were
to be checked and Fred Andres" took
i the opposite view, being of the . be
lief that all foreigners haveanfqaal
right to enter ths "country. " "The de
bate was an interesting .one and
many good arguments, pro ! and con.
were brought forth oy the affirmative
and negative. - x . v 'V;.'
The negative side presented V the
best arguments and presented them
In the best manner, giving them a
clear title to the decision, but popu
lar sentiment and prejudice being in
favor of the affirmative's point of
view made it the harder to come to
a just decision. However, the nega
tives got the credit for winning..
There will be a cottage . - prayer
meeting Friday evening, at 7:45 ,'at
the home of Lewis W. Bobbins, Cor
bln avenue.
Persons who have remnants ..of
dress goods that could be used in
the sewing department of the Dally
Vacation Bible school this summer
are asked to call Miss Bertha Ram
age, 1298-3. ,
On Friday evening, May 22, at ; 8
o'clock, the. Junior Endeavor society
will give an entertainment entitled,
"Mother Goose and Missions," to
raise money for their mission work'
The spring meeting of the Central
association of Congregational
churches is to be held Tuesday after
noon and evening at Rocky Hill. This
church is entitled to eight delegates
in addition to the pastors. The hour
of the afternoon service is 3:00 p. m.
Weekly announcements follow.
Monday 3:45 p. m. Armenian
children- 4:00 p. m. Junior En
deavor meeting, with rehearsal' for
If
All I want you to do Is to put mc to the test and let mo prove
to your satisfaction tliat I can and do all dental work absolutely
without pain and that my charges arc the most reasonable In this
city. A FREE EX AMI NATION AND ESTIMATE WILL PROVE
THIS BEYOND A SHADOW OF DOUI1T.
My $7 sets aro the most lifelike and finest fitting plates that
dental science vtixx promote. Wo have the reputation of making
the inos-t natural looking 'and best wearing teeth. No set over leaves
our oflico until the patron Is perfectly satisfied as to
FIT AND APPEARANCE.
AH our work Is guaranteed. . t . .
SPECIAL OFFER
Full sets of Harvard Natural Gum Teeth $7. Gold Crowns
$1. Porcelain Crowns, $1. Gold Fillings, $1 and up.
Restoration Bridge Work, $ I. All other Fillings, 50o and up.
Cleaning Free with other work.
Painless extraction free with other work.
OiTlco Hours, 0 A. M. to 9 P. M. Sundays from 10 A. M. to
1 P. M.
Harvard Dental Parlors
TEL. 766.
HARTFORD, CONN
the entertainment to be held May 22.
Wednesday 7:00 p. m. Boys' de
partment, stunt night. A mock trial,
"The Case Against Casey," by fellows
from Messrs. Burns', Felt's, Wood's
classes.
Thursday 2:30 p. m. Armenian
women's Bible class. 7:45 p. m.
Week' night service, led by H. W.
Maier. Subject, "The Claims of
Worship on the Christian " 1
Friday 3:00 p. m. Meeting of the
Foreign Mission department of the
Woman's society, at the home of Mrs.
Marcus White, Forest street. Miss
Laura Smith of Berlin will speak on
her work In Africa.
Saturday 7.00 p. m. Important
meeting of all who are to have part
in . the ' Dally Vacation Bible school,'
this summer. 7:30 p.' m. Choir re
hearsal. SPECIAL CHURCH MEETING
At Swedish Bethany Church Next
Thursday Evening. '
Announcement of the special busi
ness meeting to be held at the Swed
ish - Bethany church on Thursday
evening of this week, immediately
after the mid-week service, was made
at the services yesterday. Plans for
the raising of $5,000 to help pay off
the mortgage on the North property,
purchased recently, will be consid
ered at this time.
In the absence of the pastor, who
preached at the Swedish Congrega
tional church In New Haven, Rev. A.
P. Palmquist of MIddletown had
charge of the evening service at the
church last evening.
The regular weekly prayer service
will be held tomorrow evening.
At 2:30 p. m. Thursday the Beth
any Sisters' society will convene In
the church parlors for its monthly
business meeting.
The Bible class meets Friday even
ing.
WANT THREE INSPECTORS.
A move is on foot to have three
medical inspectors for the schools ap
pointed in place of one, each to re
ceive a salary of $75. The salary 1
at present established at $500. The
committee on health and sanitation of
the school board Is in favor of the
change.
I Hurt You
Don't Pay
Me
Ill MAIN STREET.
IR. A. E. , LOCKHART, MANAGER
BMBAL GIFTS
Chosen From Our "Gift Shop" Arc Sure To Please.
Sheffield Plate
LARGELY REPRODUCTION OF TIHIASITRED PIECES 1TOOM
MUSEUMS OR PRIVATE COLLECTIONS.
Nothing Finer Tor Wedding Presents AVide Range of Choice.
We are showing, at our "Gift Shop," a magnificent collection of
Sheffield Plate, which is reeommanded to those who wish to makt
presents of fine character and distinction.
A remarkable revival of the use of Sheffield Plate has been
brouRht about during the past ten or twelve years. Simplicity and
plainness of design make It attractive to people of refinement. Sen
timent is also responsible for the ever-growing demand for this
beautiful and artistic ware.
The Sheffield Plate we show is reproduced from the best de
signs of the Georgian period by the leading firm devoted to this
' business and their trade mark is stamped upon every piece they
manufacture. So remarkable Is the finish they put upon their ware
that on comparing it with a real antique museum piece, the eye of
the connoisseur has difficulty in detecting the difference.
Hartford
Tine EMectt off Yomf Home
IS MADE OR MARRED BY THE RUGS YOU USE IN IT.
Why not beautify your rooms by the use of such splendid
ORIENTAL 1 RUGS as we are selling AT VERY LOW PRICES? y
" Or by such excellent Oriental style as is seen in Whittali RugTt
It may be truly said of either the real Orientals or the Anwli
canlzed Oriental art seen in Whlttall Rugs that once v they enter
home they become a treasured luxury. For beauty, , durability and
honest rug values they are not to be excelled anywhere.
'
SPECIALS-7-TUIS WEEK. i
IN OLEUMS
Inlaid Handsome Patterns, 75c a Yard.
- rugs.
WILTONS 0x12 $ 15 values now $27.50
AXMINSTERS 9x12 $27 values now ...................... $19.3tt
NEW MATTINGS 25c to 50c a yard a superior stock.
You can rely upon any merchandise bought here. ,
WALL PAPERS),
J' 1 yU 1
1 S , '
Wednesday, May 13th, 1914
' .
A choice lot of horses, fresh from the farms of Ohio. Among
them will be several matched pairs. 2.600 to 3,100 lbs.; grocery
chunks, brick yard and general purpose horses, ranging In weight
from 1,050 to 1,500 pounds; well broken, clever and ready for work.
Will also have several second-hand acclimated horses worth the
money.
This will be the banner carload of the season. Do not fail to see
this lot of horses if in need of anything in horse flesh.
Remember every horse will be as represented. Quick Sales and
Small Profits.
Our Motto "Well Bought is Half Sold."
P. H. CONDON & CO., INC.
22 Laurel Street.
Phone
HOFFMANN'S
lei
Conn.
894-902 MAINST;
HARTFORD v ,
DRAPERIES, PAINTS.
Horses -Horses
Horses
20 OHIO HORSES 20
WILL ARRIVE
68-3.
Bristol, Conn.
PURE BAKING
A FEW
SUGGESTIONS
lOll YOUR SATURDAY AND
SUNDAY DESSERTS.
Chocolate Fluffs, new and delicious.
lady Baltimore Cakes, better than,
ever.
Old Fashioned Raised Loaf Cakes,
Fruit Cake, Pound Cake, French
rastry, Whipped Cream Goods. Choco
3nte Eclairs, Pies, flaky and crisp; and
last but not least, Hoffmann's Puritan
Raisin Bread.
C3WCOT KAIMf-V
EniTL5TlC0I3Ii

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