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The Wichita daily eagle. (Wichita, Kan.) 1890-1906, November 01, 1890, Image 7

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014635/1890-11-01/ed-1/seq-7/

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$Ie tSKn&iis Uailij gaIe: aturtlaij Criimg, IJfoujenxoxr 1, 1890.
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WASHINGTON'S WHEELS.
THE CAPITAL CITY A GREVT PLACE
FOR BICYCLES.
There Are Plenty of Can-laces There,
Too, and Street Cam Beyond Counting:.
Who Koep Good Horse and Carriages
and Who Do Not.
Special Correspondence.
Washington, Oct. 16. The capital is
distinctively a city on wheels. We who
run the government, or who watch those
who do run it, are a lazy lot We won't
walk if we oan help it The smooth, clean
streets tempt one to purchase a convey
ance, or at least to hire one. In no other
city of this country, or any other country,
probably, is there such a large number of
handsome equipages in proportion to the
total population. In no other city do bo
many persona ride about for the fun of
riding. Riding here is not only pleasant,
without the jiggle-joggle of a cobble
SENATOR STEWART'S HIQII STEPPERS.
paved city like New York, Philadelphia
or Chicago, but itis cheap. Hackmen are
everywhere, with a wonderful variety
of vehicles, and moderate charges al-waj-s.
They will flit you a mile in a
hurry for a twenty-five cent piece, or
they will take n party of four or five of
you a three hour drive about the city
and suburbs at the rate of a dollar an
hour. The driver will act as guide with
out extra charge, and pay more attention
to you, while regaling you with his de
scriptions and pointing with his whip as
he talks, thau to Iub horses. In the wide
streets of Washington there is room
enough for all. and a jehu may be reck
less or indifferent without serious conse
quences. Cabs and all porta of public vehicles
are so cheap and plentiful hero that
even economical congressmen make a
practice of riding to and from the Capi
tol. Some of the vehicles are shabby
old things, and some of the horses poor,
stiff, spavined, knee sprung, rib showing
veterans, but they get there just the
samo. You rarely or never see a break
down in the streets here. That is be
cause the streets are like floors. A vehi
cle that would bo shaken to pieces in a
month in Now York or Philadelphia here
lasts a year or two. Consequently this
is the paradise of dealers in what is known
as factory or cheap carriages, buggies
and carts. Only the rich or extrava
gant buy the most expensive vehicles,
for cheaper ones will look just as well
Mid wear almost as long. It thus comes
about that with a very email capital to
spare one may buy a carriage in Wash
ington, and of coureo it follows that
thousands upon thousands of persons in
moderate circumstances avail themselves
bf the opportunity. Horses are cheap,
too. Virginia is a great breeder of fairly
good roadsters, which are sold in Wash
ington at prices varying from $12o to
$250. Here one ruav buy a horso that
will do very nicely, and a pretty, con
venient 6urrey and harness for $250.
Nor does it cost much to keep a horse.
Stable help is cheap, thanks to the re
dundancy of tho colored population.
Feed is hardly as costly as in larger
cities.
One of the most picturesque figures to
be seen on the streets of Washington
when congress is in session is that of
Senator Stewart, of Nevada. The old
senator is passionately fond of driving,
and driving hard and fast. He is said
to wear out a pair of horses every three
months, but as he is' able to afford the
luxury, that is his business and not ours.
The senator uses a light buggy, just
large enough for himself, so that he is
never bothered with company. Then
he puts on a great coat that comes up
about his ears, an onormons white slouch
bat that is almost a sombrero, huge
gjves and plenty of blankets, and away
he goes in all sorts of weather and over
all sorts of roads, driving like n mad
man. Ho keeps a span of roadsters that
aro able to do their mile in three min
utes or loss, and he pushes them nearly
up to that speed for an hour or two.
His drives are short ones, as a rule, but
vory lively. If the whito bearded old
senator couldn't pass every one on tho
road he would quit driving.
Sonator Hearst, of California, owns a
great stable of race lwrses. In Wash
ington ono expects to sea him dashing
CNCEE SAM'S TREASURE CART.
about behind fleet and showy roadsters.
But you don't see anything of the sort.
If there is hanging about the Capitol
an old weather bexton carryall, with
lop bidid springs and frayed upholster
ing, and drawn by an ancient horse
who bangs his head humbly and trots
as if he lutd corns on his heels, you may
be sure that is th coaveyance which
Seua:or Htwrrt will Jrive down town in.
As like as uot b vr" hae two or thre
senatorial friends with him, and they
will stop at Chambexlin's and spend
more money for terrapin and other re
freshments than the equipage which
f Linds waiting for them is worth. Mrs.
Hearst has a fine pair of carriage horses
and a fashionable Tariety of vehicles,
but the senator never uses them. The
most antiquated and .degenerate public
& FT iC? I
i conveyance is goou -enougn tor mm.
Roswell P. Flower, the New York
millionaire, is another statesman who
appears to have a fancy for ancient and
worm eaten vehicles. All summer he
had a contract with a solemn old Jehu
who drove one of the most ricketty out
fits ever seen on Pennsylvania avenue.
In striking contrast with Mr. Flower's
turn out is the equipage of Vice Presi
dent Morton, which is by long odds the
finest in town. No landau, no brougham,
eo regal a3 his not even the London
made coat-of-arms stamped carriage recently-imported
by Sir Julian Paunce
fote. .No footman so stiff, so stvlishlv
dressed as the vice president's; no coach
man so austere, so correct as Mr. Mor
ton's whip. The name of the latter is
White, and he used to be coachman for
the Marquis of Lome when that royal
gentleman was governor general of Can
ada. Since poor Hawkins was deposed
from the presidential box White is the
king of whips in Washington, and Lord
Pauncefote's coachman is tho only con
temporary with whom he condescends
to associate.
Our aristocratic friends, the foreign
ministers, are howling swells in recep
tion parlors, but they do not show up
well on the avenue. With a few excep
tions they hire carriages by tne month
instead of keeping stables of their own.
Explanation of this is to be found prob
ably in the excessive thrift which char
acterizes the diplomatic corps here, for
these gentry are more eager to save of
their salaries than the poorest congress
man, who havo managed to get ono
team, but are very doubtful about an
other. Neither the present Chinese min
ister nor his predecessor has thought it
worth while to keep a carriage, inas
much as there was a cab stand at the
legation door. The present minister is
a rich man; his predecessor was one of
tho twenty richest men in the world.
Yet ho appeared to share the prejudice
of all his countrymen that America is
not a good country in which to spend
money. He not only would not keep a
stable, but the hackmen at Dupout circle
declare he drove very hard bargains with
them. The attaches of tho Chinese lega
tion aro very fond of riding about the
city in an open carriage.
The Japaneso legation, which is su
perior in personnel and in every way to
the Chinese legation, has some exceed
ingly fine carriages of American make.
One brougham must have cost $2,000.
But the Yankee horse trader has taken
THE OMNIPRESENT BICYCLE.
in some one connected with that lega
tion, for it must be admitted the horses
behind which tho Japanese ride are al
together unworthy the vehicles. That
picturesque Russian drosky which an
attache of tho czar's legation used to
drive about tho streets has disappeared
altogether, and no member of tho diplo
matic corps rides in a vehicle character
istic of the country which ho represents.
Senator Stanford keeps a good stable
here, and Senator Edmunds has one of
the finest pair of carriage horses in the
city. Mr. Blaine's great friend, Repre
sentative Hitt, of Illinois, has the finest
stable of which tho popular branch of
congress can boast, though Mr. Hayes,
of Iowa, has tho fastest horses, and the
greatest number of them. He is a
breeder of trotting stock.
The great variety of vehicles owned
by Uncle Sam must not be forgotten in
an account of the appearance of Wash
ington on wheels. In addition to the
large number of department wagons of
all sizes and shapes, innumerable senate
and house mail wagons, postoffico deliv
er' carts and collection ambulances and
military post carryalls, we see hero every
day a very strange government vehicle
a steel box on wheels, guarded front
and rear by heavy metal bar work, and
also by five or six armed men. This is
the treasury department money wagon,
which often rolls down the street with
five or ten millions of dollars aboard.
Few American cities have more street
cars than Washington. Here the sur
face cars run in every conceivable direc
tion, and a belt lino wabbles about, hit
ting all points of interest, till it has de
scribed a circle around the city, and you
are carried around for a single fare. On
the other lines transfer tickets aro given,
so that one may ride three or four miles
east or west and then as many more
north or south, for a single fare. There
are herdic lines, too, which do the same
thing; and now that the wave of activ
ity has at last struck sleepy old Wash
ington there are admirable electric rail
ways to some of the suburbs, and with
in a 3'ear or two all those beautiful hills
with which the capital is surrounded
will be traversed by other roads.
This city on wheels keeps more bicy
cles than any other city in ratio to pop
ulation. In almost every family among
tho well to do or middle classes there is
either a horse and carriage or a bicycle.
In the capital all sorts of people ride
wheels women, old and young, gray
haired men. children, even babies, col
ored persons of both sexes, men with
high hats, and even men in dress coats
and patent leathers on their way to
dinners or receptions.
Waiter Wellma.
It is rumored in Philadelphia that an
other race track vrU soon be laid out in
that vicinity that may compare favorably
with the larger and more popular tracks at
the north. The site i that of Lincoln park,
on the Jersey shore, six orseven miles south
of the Quaker city. The track will be a
mile, and figures like $730,000 are reported
to bo its probable cost, buildings ai.a alL
TURF NOTES.
Sir Dixon will bo seen no more la public.
It is said. He has cone to the west, where
he will remain ou one of the largest stock
farms there.
H. C. Jewett, of Buffalo, N. Y., contem
plates buildinc a hed a quarter of a mile
Ionjr over the norch sid of bis track fcr
winter driving.
It is said that the need of a notional club
for the proper government of the trotting
associations in the United States wasDOTer
more Datcnt than at the oresent time.
x! lA
r I r -.V:i rtr -.'w a
il MFARffi.
The Modern Duel a Ridiculous
Affair.
A DROP OF BLOOD SUFFICES.
The Views of a Parisian Master at Arms
oil Recent Meetings In Prance Fencing
Brought Into Disrepute What an
Anglo-Saxon Duel Meant.
Dueling can no longer be considered seri
ously. It has dropped from the heights of
tragedy to the depths of burlesque, and not
very entertaining burlesque at that. Of
the recent encounters between noted per-
TAKETO A PRIVATE LESSOR,
sons in Franco it may be said that they
did not rise above the level of ludicrous
and childish .petulance. For example,
when a brace of "Are eating" Gauls sought
tho suburbs of Paris the other day to set
tle a dispute according to the code they
had with them snrgcons, who carefully
painted the blades of the rapiers with au
antiseptic mixture.
The combatants went at each other very
gingerly. After an ineffectual jabbing nad
been kept up for a few moments one of
them ran nway and was chased for a space
of 300 yards. In dodging, the point of his
sword accidentally scratched the ferocious
pursuer's hand. Tho seconds at once in
terfered. They examined the injured man,
and by hard squeezing got a drop of blood
from his wound. This was sufficient.
Gore had been spilled, honor was satisfied
and the duel was at an end. The princi
pals embraced, kissed each other and went
home to spread among admiring friends
tho story of their bravery.
Speaking of "affairs of honor" M. Pro
vost, maitro d'armes of the Cercle Artis
tique at Paris, said recently: "Good fencers
don't fight duels. There seem to be a
kind of feeling among good fencers that
dueling throws ridicule on the noble sci
ence of tho sword, and I cannot remember
for many years past any duel taking place
between really good fencers. As a matter
of fact, when good fencers do go out the
reason for the encounter is u serious one,
and usually of a private nature, and no re
port ever appears in tho papers. Neither
Scholl, nor Ilochefort, nor De Cassagnao
are fencers of any ability, and not one of
them would stand any chance in a real
WHEN SWOKD MEETS SWOP.D.
duel with a habitue of the salles d'armes.
These journalistic duels are merely 'for the
gallery.' Real fencers condemn them as
bringing a noble exercise into ridicule.
People keep ou reading about duels that
end in so harmless a manner, and hare
really got the idea, that fencing is a mere
amusement. Tho duel ought to be a seri
ous matter. These journalistic duels never
are."
M. Prevost is undoubtedly qualified to
speak about the matter, for it is to him the
man who expects to have a "meeting"
goes for instruction and advice. "All we
can do," remarked the fencing master, "is
to indicate to him the proper position to
assume and what not to do a matter that
is usually much more necessary than tell
ing him what to do. When he knows his
position we let him attack us., and show
him how his adversary will parry his
thrusts. But as the tnno is so very short
there is really little or nothing to bo done.
One thing I always tell thete becinnera a
thing that comforts them usually is that
the best fencer may often be wounded by a.
mere beginner. It is a fact that the Yery
best duehst is not at all assured no matter
how indifferent p. fencer his adversary may
be of not being wounded."
That dueling as now practiced in the
Latin countries involves but a very small
element of danger is shown- by statistics
compiled not long ago of encounters in
Italy during the decade from 1579 to 1SS9.
Details are given of 2,739 combats. Of this
number 93 per cent, were withswords, 6 per
cent, with pistols and 1 per cent. with, re
vclvers. The aggregate of wounds inflicted
was 3,901; 1,008 were serious aad 50 fatal
Less than 2 percent, of the fighters were
killed. Tho report says that in analyzing
Yftxt
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'3
&n
r
s1 tM
jl n
RO THEOCGH THE BODT.
the causes of all these encounters it was
found that 20 per cent, arose from political
divergences of opinion, and newspaper
articles concerning the same; 3 per cent,
only of the duels were fought in conse
quence of some serious insult, but 10 per
cent anee ont of diserr , tons on relijious
topics, and 19 perteot. from quarrels over
cards and other gam.
It is also a curious fact that the number
of duels was five times greater in summer
than in winter a self evident proof that
heat affects the tempsr while in the Lent
en season there, were hardly any duels at
all, which is peraaps am argument in faTor
of fasting. Out of a hundred duelists it
was ascertained that SO were military men,
29 were journalists, 12 were barristers, 4
students, 3 professors, 3 engineers, and 3
members of the Italian parliament. It
will be seen, therefore, that journalists
and members of parliament supplied, ia
oroDortion to their numbers, by far the
Have You ? Many Millions Have
try
VTv
M K
Y O u .
t w-7!?"li ont kelp yu xt washes clothes or
v vVXi tJff cleans house. It saves labor and it
ferf
v y
suits you, for it will suit you when you try it
1 "J Peddlers and some unscrupulous grocers will tell you, "this is
IF"WC1 ITC as" or "the same pcarUne-" ITS FALSE
JL Vy V V L JL V- Pearline is never peddled, and if your crocer sends von some
thing in place of Pearline, do the honest thing tmdit lack, its JAMES PYLE, Uew York.
largest contingent or aueltsts.
Small wonder it is, after contemplating
the above facts and figures, that the Anglo
Saxon has banished the single combat.
The old time Englishman when he sought
the field of honor went there for a pur
poseto kill or be killed. He ran his an
tagonist through the body if he could. If
fate was against him he accepted its ver
dict like a Spartan. So also with the
American, who, if anything, was a little
more in deadly earnest than his British
cousin. The code in the United States ac
cepted even such fierce conditions as the
tying together of the left hands of the an
tagonists, who then slashed at each other
with bowie knives till one or both expired.
When public opinion declared against
these bloody combats they stopped, or be
came so infrequent as to create a sensation
by their occurence. There was no opera
bouffe half way house between stern trag
edy and enlightened common sense. The
general verdict was that if people couldn't
go out and slay each other like gentlemen
the next best thing was for them to stay at
home. A meeting in the damp grass at
sunrise for the petty purpose of giving or
receiving a pin prick had small attraction
for those who "meant business" in all
the concerns of life.
The result is that the Latin has a mo
nopoly of dueling, lie also has a large
respect for the Anglo-Saxon who eats
"bifstek," says "dam" and strikes from
the shoulder. P. X. WiUTE.
THROW UP YOUR HANDS."
Two Alabatuians Despoil a Gang of Green
Goods Men.
James II. Hafley and Robert D. George
are the names given by two young men
who recently appeared at police headquar
ters in New York city under peculiar cir
cumstances. They were at the Grand Central depot
waiting for a train one evening when their
arrest was requested by a man who called
himself Eaton, and who charged that they
II AFLET CF.ORG E.
had robbed a friend of his by means of
what is known as the "green goods" game.
Tho detectivo who was appealed to took
Hafley and George into custody, and con
ducted them and the complainant before
Inspector Byrnes.
The prisoners' luggage on examination
revealed $1,700 in good bills and several
"green goods" bundles that is, packages
done up to represent paper money. From
their persons were taken four huge re
volvers so carefully oiled and prepared for
use that it was dangerous to handle them.
The men, who refused to talk, were locked
up, and "Mr. Eaton," on promisxnir to ap
pear in court the next morning with the
victim of the swindle, was allowed to de
part. But since then "Jlr. Eaton" hasn't been
seen, and the true story of events prior to
the arrest has developed as follows; Hafley
and George, who live in Alabama, visited
New York some months ag and bougnt,
as they supposed, a lot of counterfeit
money, for which they paid good cash. Oa
opening the valise thought to contain the
bogus bilN tney found nothing but a brick
wrapped m some paper.
The men went home very much disgust
ed, and when, they received a "green
goods" circular recently they resolved on
revenge. They mada a -second visit to the
east, met the swindlers in Jersey City,
went to a room and there completed a deaL
Up to this point all the proceedings were
"according to Hoyle,' mz just at the mo
ment when tho fraud was to be worked
the "southern suckejs" pulled their revol
vers and cried:
"Throw up your bands!"
Then they despoiled the bunco men of
all their wealth andstarted for heme. Tha
"Mr. Eaton" who secured the visitors' ar
rest is supposed to be one of the disappoint
ed gang. At any rate no one hen appeared
to prosecnte, and the only question now is
whether the authorities snail give George
and Hafley the 31.700 or torn, is over to the
oolice pension find.
The irecrct f Health.
It is a common remark that farmers,
as a class,, are more healthy than other
people I mean farmers who till their
own soil with their own hands. They
exercrsa in the open air. Tha word exercise-
contains the secret of their supe
rior health. By setting free the waste
particles which have become useless the
system is relxoTed from a certain source
af disease. Dr. Walker iaJnsess-Miller
aw
dV. When
"M; lie
? wa
3L. v"Bf n
fire.tf is useless to Hre yourself
about haJf of your toil can be
avu.aea oy
It doesn't aake ns tired to te3 abcut the merits of SAPOLIO. Thcusaaa.
of women, in. tie. United Stoics thasi vs every hocr of tbesr Irrcs for saving
told them of SAPOLIO.
Its use saves many weary Boors of tod ia house-cJeasing.
BEWAE35 OF OIZTATZOErS.
Grocers oflea substitute cheaper goods forSAPOUO to mate a better profit.
Scad back shcIi articlesy and insist upon 'vmg-jst what yoa ordered.
ENOCH MORGAN'S SONS CO.. NEW vqdkl
accepted James Pyle's invitation to
his wonderful discovery, Pylds
Pearhne; for cosy washing and cleaTi
ing. You couldn't count them in a
lifetime. Some of the twelve million
housekeepers in this land must have
accepted very often. That's the way
with Pearline. The wise woman who
investigates, tries it; the woman who
tries it continues to use it A daily
increasing sale proves it. The truth
is, there s nothing so acceptable as
Pearline. Once accept its help, and
3'ou'll decline the imitations they
saves wear, iz nurcs notning, duc its
suited to everything:. Try it when it
Memorable Sayinjs of Great Men.
Vigorous and terse phrases that com
prise "the whole story in a few words"
take a strong hold of the public fancy, and
aro. long remembered and quoted. Jack-
son'3 "I take the responsibility;" David
Crockett's "Be sure you are right then
go ahead;" Clay's "No north, no south
nothing but my countryl" and "I would
rather be right than be president;" Web
ster's "Where shall I go?" and "Union
and liberty, now and forever, one and in
separable;" Patrick Henry's "Give mo
liberty or give me death;" John Adams'
"Sink or swim, survive or perish," and
many other forcible or odd sayings of our
remarkable men, uttered years ago, are as
fresh in the memories of the people as if
thoy bad but just been spoken. Gen.
Grant's "I propose to move immediately
on your works," and "I propose to fight it
ont on this line if it takes all summer,"
possess similar elements of immortality,
not to mention his famous "corked in a
bottlo" simile as applied to the Army of
the James. New York Ledger
Here is a good cure for cockroaches:
Take three pounds of oatmeal, or meal of
Indian corn, and mix it with a pound of
White lead; moisten with treacle so as to
form a good paste, and put a portion down
at night in the infested building. Repeat
for a few nights alternately, and in the
morning remove the paste and tho corpses
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.
AND EASY LABOR
."OSAGE PILLS
HttsiGiended by fading Physb'ar.s
Purely Vegetable and prfct!r
bannlew. Sold by all Drofnrit.or
sent, post-paid, in plain wrapptrou
receipt otSS. Write for circular.
TBS ONACCniiDICUECU.,
Wichita. Umnu.
Sold by
Charle3 Lawrence, 102 East
Douglas Ave.
Van Werden & Co., 328 North
Main Street.
Gus Saur, 524 East Douglas
Ave.
DAVIDSON & CASE
8uccsors to
John Davidson, Pioneer Lumberman
of Sedgwick County.
ESTABLISHED :-: IN :-: 1870.
A Complete Htock or Pine Lumber.
Shingles, Lath, Doors. Saab,
etc., always ou baud.
Oflic- and yards on Mosely nvenuo btvren
Dojglas at-nuend Hrrt street, liruncb yard at
UiOQ Cit)OV.:ahou.u Lity and El Keuu, Ind. 'ler.
11. . LM v. Pros. A. W. OU VtK. V.P
11. l.hltASlER. A Si't Cashier.
Wichita National Bant
PAID UP CAPITAL.
SURPLUS. - - -
$250,000
50.000
DIRECTORS:
8. H. Kohn. A. W. Ollrer. JI. W. Lery. L. A. WJ.
ion, S. T. TntUe, Jf. F. Nlederlaader, W. R. Tucker.
Joha DaTldsoo, J. C Kutait.
JJoa General Banking, Collecting
and Brokerage Business,
Eastern and FoJeljrn Exchange
bought and sold. United States bonds
of all denominations bought and Bold.
County. Township and 31unicipal
bonds bonchu
REAL ESTATE AGENTS.
W carry a complete Una of all kinds of Books
cd DUaJcs, och as ars Used fay Real EabUa AcmU
co&slit&ijr of Dreda. Mortnea. Abstracts. Itwrpt
Kookn. Sato Eook, Ran KegiMen, Notary PsbUc
Record aoX ELasks. Contract Books. Pocket itta
Jtatc Book? for Farm and CltT Property, etc. Or
ders br mail promptly attended to. Address
THE WICHITA EAGLE,
WICHITA. KANSAS
J. P. ALLEN,
Druggist.
EreirtMng Kepi in a Mass Drug Sfere
103 EAST DOUGLAS ATE.
ICTTTTA. - - - KAN.
vSdXk!&JJ?i
tvWJL
cTtn " ' a
hz winH hlnwQ uhwf
me use oj-&pQita
THE WICHITA EAGLE
J!f. 2f. MuniecJe 4b Br., Frepristers.
PRINTERS, BINDERS AND BUNK BOOK Mm
All stlnas of county, township aad school district
records and blanks. Leral blanks of every des
cription. Complete stock of Justice's dockets aad.
blanks. Job printing of all kinds. We bin la-wand
medical journals aadsaagrazlae periodicals f all
kinds at prices as lo- as Chicago aad 2?ew Tcrk aa A
guarantee -work just as food. Orders treat ty mail
-will be carefully attended to. Address all butlaess ie
R. P. MURDOCH,
J. a DAVIDSON. PrssWemV W. T. BIBCOCK. TV Ft mil ml.
11105. O. FTTCB. Secretary aad Treaaorar.
DAVIDSON INVESTMENT COMPANY.
PAID-UP CAPITAL $800,000.
DIRECTORS-John Quincy Adas, John C. Derst, Ckas. O !VsW O. A.
Walker, Thos. G. Fitch, John 22. Sanford, W. T. Bahcock.
"NT. . Stanley and J. O. DaTldsea.
$5,000,000 LOANED IN" SOUTHERN KANSAS.
-oney always on Hand for Improved Fana aad City lieaas.
Office with Citizens Bank. cor. Main and Douglas, VicMU, lai
SCALE BOOKS!
THREE FORMS.
STAOTJABD,
HOWE AJSTD
FAIRBANKS!
"When ordering state WHAT form la
wanted.
L. C. JACKSON
Wholesale and Betail Dealer ia all klads of
Anthracite and Bituminous Coal
AND : ALE : KINDS : OF : BUILDING : MATERIAL.
Ifaln Office 112 Sou th Fourth Avennfe, Branch, Office 183 Itorth Kaia Street
Yards connected with .all railroads ia the city
DENVER
WICHITA
577 Miles - 1105 Minutes
via SANTA FE ROUTE.
Vestibule PcxtM an Sleepeus,
Vestibule Dinixg Cars,
Pkee Reclining Chaik Caks.
Inquire of V. D. aiurdock, local agent
for further apecsnieus of railroad mathe
matics. IC PovtLr, PrwMent. K. T. He. V. Prw
F. V. Waller, Jr.. CaaMer.
Fourth National Bank.
WICHITA, KANSAS.
PAID UP CAPITAL
SUltPLUS, - -
$200,000
10.000
DIRECTORS:
P. T. Bin. E. B. Pow!l, O. D. Barn. L. K. Coin
Anx I- HfHik. V. V,'. Walur. 3. W. Larrlmerfot
lion. B. O. Orarea.
B. Lombard.
Present.
j.r.au.Bx,
Vice President.
L.D. GKISXsa
Chlr.
AV.H. LiTixawro.f.
AmMam Ctlr.
State National Bank.
OF WICHITA, KAN.
CAPITAL,
SURPLUS.
$100,000
82.000
DIRECTORS:
John B. Carry Orore W. Walter. W. T. Orra. !
J.P. Allen, Kos Hanlo, J. M. Al!-n. P. V. Healy. II.
Lombard. Jr., Peter Oetto. L. 0. fckinnar, Jum
Imbard.
IT YOU
VTaatmonT
Want a ooolc
VTaat a partner
Want a Utustloa.
wat aarrraatclrL
Want to sell a fans.
Want to aall a bonaao.
Wans to any or aaj stock.
Want a geot bsrtf gr bsttaa.
Want to!aU plaaU or arala.
Want to Mil crieerlr ox drosa
Wast ta sail hosaol4 fanttUira
Want n naka aar taaaa Joana.
Want to aall at Oae for aaytblnc;
Want to Had coatoason far aaythlnc
RKAD AJ.D ADTZ&TISC IX OOR
TWO -:- CENT
COLUtfJf
s4rvrUa!sc aMslna Bw roatin jira,
AdrrtWiic kcpa J ctuoiBsra.
AdTarUti&x llbraUy alvari pays.
Advrtlalac Bkakaa aaetawa sr.
AdrtlMnc craalva coS4ana.
jlA nrfltfxf la jrtmt of awrn
X4vrewm saMkCta lock.
xanu(r bmsjis "Mx.
AianrUas tarsi nf!far.
Atfn.ru caasauiuy.
A n ' unasa rwvutr,
XilnrOM
APVfSTlf
AT JC
XO Wl
OLIVER BROS.,
-5tALXK8I3-
LUMBER.
WICHITA, KA'BAS.
. !
Txrdseiricaltv,MaTaH.'WeWlar I
tmu Harper. Attica, Oardrn P4i. !
Aaiamr.ArKASsAa city, AudaJe ausi i
i HATca.
- Business Manager.
SPECIAL.
Our Scale Beoks are Printed ea Creed
Payer.
TJtlCB ZIST:
Single Bosk $ 75
Three Sooks see
8ix Books a 75
Single Book fey mail, prepaid 85
Address,
THE WICHITA EAGLE,
Wichita, XmtuMM.
11. r. MUBDOCK, Bnsiness Manager.
(7 OrJara by mall prompUy atuntlt to.
UNAeeuAmrto wm th ctocArnr or tw uomim
01TA1N MUCH WrOAMATXX FROM A TUOT Of TMi V Of TH'
Qicago, M W & Pacific Bj.
Including ZJbm Xaat aad Wait of th XlMettrt
River. Tha ELract Rout to and from CHICASO,
HOCK IHIAITD. DAVE1TPORT. SV8 KOnOM,
COTTNCI1. BX.U72TS, WATEttTOWW, BIOUX
FALLS, SmreEAPOUa, ST. PAUL. ST. JO
KPH. ATCHISON, LEAVXITWOXTH. XAXBAS
err jr. tofxka, irzrrvxx. coroxxno irxM
and PUEHIXX Tna Kacllnln Cbolr Cart m aw
from CHICAGO. CALDWKLI. HUTCKXJteOIT
and DOtxaH Cmr, aad Palao SlMctM Can ta
twaen CIUDAOQ.-WncmTA and HUTOKOrSOir.
DaUrTrcina to aad xroxn KXCTOTTJHaUa, tm Mm
Indian Tarritory.
SOLID VEST'IULE EXPKSS TWUtt
of Through CoaelMa, BUmt. and Slnla CM
daUjrbatwaanCHICAOO, DES XODTXf, COUJf
CTL, HLirrra and OSAKA, and Xraa XacliBfem
Chair Cars bttwtm CHICAOO and DZXVI,
COLORADO RPBIHOH and FUKBLO, tU . Jos
eph, or Kanaaa Citr ad Topaka. Excursions
-latlr, with Choic of Koutaa to and trow Bait
XOca. Portland, Loa AncalM and Ran TraaetaM.
Tha Direct Una to and from PIka'a Pa. Xaa
tou. Oardan of tha Ooda. tha aanltarima. m4
8cnl Orandaura of Colorado.
Via The Albert Le Haute.
Solid Xxprvaa Traiaa dally batwaan Chleaeo asf
acinnaapoliii and Bt. Paul, -with TXBOUOX
eltntnjr Cnslr Cars tTKXX) to sod from ttas
rolnts and Kanaaa City. Throuah CasJr Car a
Blpr batwaan Paorta. Spirit Zsks and Ultra
Tails -rta Sock Island. Tka 7avrita ZJsa ta
Watartown. Slotuc rails, taa eumasar XsaorM ad
HunUnjt and Tiahlns; Orouads of tha jrertbwMl.
Ta Short Llrva rla Banana aa4Tlnasasa aar
faciUUas to traval to and from IadUaayoU. Clas
cinnatl and othar Soutnsro points.
Vor Tlcksts, X(4. roldcra. or daaira4 lnfcraa
tlos, apply st any CoapsaTlckst OSes. M adsVcsa
E. ST. JOHN. JOHN SEBASTIAN
Ota.1 auas-r 0nl Tkt. 01 Pass. Art.
CHICAOO, ILL.
TO WEAK MEN
BaSrrltit rroai tha 1fteU of yoottfal orrasc, aajf
eear. waatlsc wkn. loat aaaabood. te I lu
end a TaloabU treaUaa (asalad atalnaas; Ml
TsrUenlara for bona esra. F7tECf eharss, A
rpWu&l-i stdlcal work s aboBjdU ra4by avarjr
jls -who U serroas aad dabU11itLAlraiy
ITW M i a miw),ii nil
B&& and ATrti la Ovr Wast Gllfaaav
MISSOURI :-: PACIFIC
RAXL1VAT.
The Htrt pmltf rtrst ta
CltT, fit. lMt M4 CliaWaWaj
PoLSaft MmJtt 94 JUttfc, f
Hpriaxrfi. ArVu, m O
a.&4 ail pelbU fsUa SaVsl
E0LID DAJL7 TX4UT1
St, Louis, Kansas City, Purife
ajd Denver,
WTTK-
Pallman Bnfet Sletf isg Cin
-ru. TK-
COLORADO SHORT LINE
Tne Shortest JLoate U ft. Lesls.
5-DA1LY TRAINS-5
a AKEA8 OITT TO BT- L0U13.
PttllaAn Buret SWpfaur Cr.
rajaj iUHcllaUc ChU CaMk
v c rnwHP"".
m 0 11 r. r sHRfn3awfBK24lFjlBl
kTrru'i a PitaaaBnaaPnaaaTaai
S ttJMjaML39WVBeBDBHBaafiBBa
I wMp Cv iw -ftaapMfaWWaW
v-yi janawaHaKaS
ly&gvT . javBeCTSBMaFClaaWI
Y JurVFO ' 1H1 Tffnawlp!aTrW J
x vrTCTnM4HPPttaMaagav i
"fvsh " ',arainMrfPgil
A ra.

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