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The Wichita daily eagle. [volume] (Wichita, Kan.) 1890-1906, December 16, 1893, Image 3

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014635/1893-12-16/ed-1/seq-3/

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the OTicIxxta jpailtj gsglc: jfetnrtoij fawning, gecerolwr 16, 1893.
SHfil58f
Old Time
Methods
of treating
Colds and
Coughs were
based on the
idea of sup
pression. We
now know
that "feeding: a
cold" is good doctrine.
?5
of cod-liver oil with hypo
phosphites, a rich fat-food,
cures--the most stubborn
cough when ordinary medi
cines have failed. Pleasant
to take;.easy to digest.
Prepared hv gentt A SyraJT AJMroryrjgi
GEOGRAPHY OF CRIME,
Murder 8 Product of Laol: of Civ
ilization. Yhe "Restraining: Influeuoe of Itcllclcras
Sentiment Countries Where the
fllost Murders Are
Committed.
Murder, geographically considered,
is Che product of lack of civilization,
writes Prof. Oettinger in his "Horal
Statistics." "Whenever a state of gov
ernment is in a state of disorganization
the people become demoralized, educa
tional and religious progross is at a
standstill, and murder is bound to in
crease. It is essential to lay great
stroBs on tlie religious feeling" of a
community, "because comparatively fetv
murders occur in Turkey, a country
deranged and unsettled in it3 af
fairs, wherein a large proportion
of the people are lacking in civiliza
tion and culture. But the Islam faith
is productive of a certain religious
sentiment in these uneducated masses
which prevents murder, the greatest
crimo against human arid divine laws.
Compared with Turkey, Greece, onco
tho fcat of civilization, but now de
moralized and degraded by Turkish in
fluence, without the prohibitive power
of the Mohammedan rcligion.manifcsts
the truth of this assertion by-rolling up,
in a population of less than 2.000,100
people. .'JIG murders, and 473 felonious
assaults, an average of ono killed or
maimed for every 2,800 boub;. This
number ..overshadows demoralized Ire
land, where for a number ol years the
most terrible agrarian crimes, mur
ders, arson, etc.. have been committed,
tho outcome of tlie atrocious feeling
between landowners and the peas
antry. Another -country with a large per
centage is Spain, and an increase in
bloodshed gees hand in hand with its
gradual decline. A glance at the crim
inal statistics of the Tinted States
demonstrates that murder reaches its
highest percentage among the unedu
cated class, who can neither write nor
read. Jn the state of Texas, for ex
ample, one murder occurs to every
right thousand iivo hundred inhabi
tants. In Illinois tint, percentage is
considerably lowered, one murder be
iiiSf quoted for very fifty thousand.
Cormany of late -yvans showb an in
crease of murder cases and asiolts,
born out of socialistic tendeucies. 'xhc
murder percentage of Great Britain is
comparatively small, with the excep
tion of. London and Ireland, and per
sonal safety in Enf laud and Scotland
is commended on all sides. Even fow
thefts are committed in the level por
tions. France, Sweden, Denmark, Bel
gium, Holland and Switzerland record
murder btctistios similar to thoe of Ger
many. !No substantial data can bo
obtained about Russia, but the strik
ing increase in political murders, sig
nalized by the nihilistic and socialistic
era. needs no comment. 2Co state in
the world rolls up more revolutionary
attacks and crimes at the present time
than Russia. During tho year 1SS0-S7,
the last authentic report that could bo
obtained, three thousand persons wera
deported to Siberia for life.
As with suicide and mnrder.it is with
thcft.gcographieally speaking. Lack of
culture and civilization is. synonymous
with increased thoft and dishonesty,
not bO ranch on account of the immoral
aud depraved condition of the people as
bccauMj of lack of protection. Theft in
Swedon and Norway, in Demuark and
tho extreme north is exceedingly rare.
The oriental and southeastern states
show an alarming amount of tLeft,and
next to America Turkej, Russia, the
Balkan states and Hungary contain
tho most crooks.
Fraud'in all its variousdenominations,
ranging from high-grade swindle in
Its manifold phases down to small
shady transactions which hover be
tween dishonest practices .and techni
cal evasions of tho law, ha-i its homo
principally iu tho ktrc cities of tho
world London i a perfect mecca for
windlcrs, while throughout England,
tvith tho exception of London, busi
ness dealings are characterised by
xound principles of honesty. Compar
itively lirtlo fraud is practiced in the
northern and western states, as Swc
cn, Norway. Denmark and Finland.
Holland, Belgium, France andSwitzer
and rank favorably in this respect. In
Germany a striking decline is noticea
blo in fraudulent transactions. The
panic conditionslack of civilization
and education which prevail with
Dtner crimes pertain to fraud. Spain,
Italy. Greece. Turkey, ard. above all,
Russia ler.d the 1'ne
Ot
N ALWAYS
AHEAD,
!rriQ Pr
v wr
.c? ramioniu
'" " BUHOUIS
POROUS PLASTER
For "Superior qusIHy of Medicinal
Highest awards io
SEABURY&JGHF;
CHEMISTS
MEW YOB K
GET THEffc
J-'oi:
ncuiiiNP
SIPSlk
1 i Rp'1 Vy
..skasshi
vSsjEy
((5v
YPfSsSi
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Mm
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3iAiV,
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ANOTHER LEADVILLE.
Rich Ores and Peaceful Minora in
the Kaslo-Slocan District.
An :e (ties of the Camp Eight BDIm an
Hour ob a Shovel Hoir the Idaho
Man Held Rears by the Ears oth-
Ibjj Too Good for Visitors.
1COPTRIGHT, 1833.1
HE opening of
navigation on
the Kootenai
river from Bon
ner's ferry in
northern Idaho
to the south
ern end of Koo
tenai lake
brings within
easy and co'm
f or table travel
a region which
contains proba
bly the most
important de
posit of high-
grade silver-bearing ores that has been,
opened up in the past twenty years on
the North American continent. This
is what is known as the Kaslo-Slocan
district.situated in thelower end of tho
Selkirk mountains in tha province of
British Columbia, about ono hundred
miles due north of the international
boundary line and about an equal dis
tance south of Roger's Pass.
The now Eldorado is totally inacces
sible from the north, the distance ly
ing for the most part through an un
explored wilderness of lofty moun
tains, deep canyons and dense forests.
From tho south the case is entirely
different. The traveler from the east,
reaching St. Paul by any routo he may
choose, has only to step into a Great
Northern sleeping coach, and in
trine over fifty hours is landed at
Bonner's ferry, where ho is promptly
transferred to a stateroom on a steamer
lying at her dock on the Kootenai
river. The steamer is new and fast,
built expressly for this traffic, with a
speed of twenty miles an hour. If he
cares more for scenery than for sloop
the tourist will limit his nap to two or
three hours and then go on deck at
daylight and enjoy tho picturesque
route followed by the deep, broad
river as it threads its way northward
between two mountain ranges, with an
intervening valley four or five miles in
width. This valley is crossed and re
crossed four times in tho run of sev-enty-fivo
miles to Kootenai lake, tho
river preferring for the most part to
hug the base of the mountains on
either side.
Breakfast time or thereabouts finds
the steamer emerging into Kootenai
lake, a superb body of crystal water,
about ninety miles in length, from one
to five miles in width and of unknown
depth. Its shores on both sides are tho
abrupt slopea of mountains four thou
sand to seven thousand foct high,
while in tho distance are to be seon
tho loftier peaks of the southern Sol-
I kirks. In all tiro two hundred and
fifty miles of shore lino there are not
more than a dozen level spots suitable
for town sites.
On her way northward the steamer
touches at a few small settlements es
tablished with reference to mining and
lumber industries. Among these is
Pilot Bay, where a large smelting plant
is in course of construction, and Ains
worth, the county seat and location of
the only jail in all that vast region.
Uefore noon you aro at your jour
ney's end. tho new and thoroughly
unique town of Kaslo, the metropolis
of the Kaslo-Slocan district, occupyiug
a'pretty and pvctureque sito on tho
shore of a small bay on the western
side of Kootenai lake. At this writing
Kaslo contains about two hundred
biuMings, all of them frame structures
finished in natural pine inside and but.
Thero may be throe or four with
painted exteriors, but not more. At
the time of my visit Kaslo contained
pcrliaps one thousand people, ninety
five per cent, of them males. A casual
survey of tho other five per cent, re
called the old yarn of the commissary
supplies laid down by Tom Marshall
TEE K3VIT IDE RAH-
and Stephen A. Douglas in preparation
for a steamboat trip from Cincinnati
to Louis ille many years ago. It will
be remembered that there wero five
gallons of whisky and ono loaf of
bread, and that Marshall and Douglas
were decidedly of the opinion that thero
was "a d d sight too much bread." I
was similarly impressed regarding the
five per cent, of Kalso's population
that were not males.
However, Kaslo's general reputation
must not be allowed to suffer unjustly
becaute of this anciently reminiscent
allusion. It is a s-erious and actual
fact that in respect of security of prop
erty and life this raw and unpainted
mining camp i1 almost ideal. Crimes
or offenses involving plvysical violence
are virtually unknown, and there is
no such thing as robbery or larcony.
We were riding in an open slcigh
stago on the snow road from Hughes'
camp to Kaslo. and the sleigh was
vtcll filled -with miners who had
knocked off work and were going to
town to spend their wages. A Ccruish
man, whose tongue had boon loosed by
frequent contact with tho neck of a
pocket flask, claimed the company's at
tention to a rather long-win led recital
of how he and his pard. out on a pros
pecting trip, came upon a griyady bear.
j and how. as tho hungry beast raad a
I rush for them, their lives were saved
br a clever ruse. "Jun and me. so
the story went, "had stopped to rest
on a- fallen tree, and thar, about
tTPn r-nAc of? tvt ir thf fnH?jilv porrsin
fur us"to beat helL Was we scared?
Well. I guess yes. We couldn't do
nothin- bnt -nd Rtill and shake: no
notning outs. ana Rtui ana s,uc, ho
use to run. Just as the bear got about
twenty foot from us I grabs the f ryin'
pau oxt .urns oacK nuu suin iv
poundin' on it with nr pick. Damn me '
j if that grizzly didn't step right in his .
tracts. i Kcpi ui i.;hj utiiiu i (
it jnst listened to it a minute or two,
and then turned tail and sneaked .0
through the underbrush- What T yo
think of that, now?'
No.one expressed an opinion in re
sponse, but after a moment's pause a
little undersized miner, with twink
ling eye only one, for the other was
covered with a patch to hide a cavity
caused by a premature explosion
of a dynamite shot delivered his judg
ment upon the narrative.
"Bears," said he, in deep disgust.
"When a man talks about being soared
of a bear he makes me want to lay off
and take a rest. Scared of a bear, wa-
you? Why, down in Idaho they used
to get me to hold bsara by the ears
while funeral processions passed by."
Probably very few of those who may
read thi3 article know much about a
rawhide traiL I don't moan the sort
of trail that the village schoolmaster
occasionally left on our backs thirty or
forty years ago before corporal punish
ment was displaced by tho synthetic
X-?
V:JJgH.
HE KSO-'-3HOY E HIDE.
system. This rawhide trail in question
is a peculiar institution only to be
found in the mountainous mining re
gions where ten or twelvo foct of snow
prevails from December to June. If
thero is no trcil you can get over tho
country very well with Enow shoes,
but to keep a mino supplied with food
and working materials and to market
tho ore throughout this long winter
period, ia quite a different proposition.
Hero is where the mule and the raw
hide system of transportation come in.
Imagine a gutter in the deep bnow,
with walhj of Bnow three cr four feet
high on either side, and you have the
trail that winds along tho mountain
side and serves ae tho water trans
portation routo. The trail is worn
perfectly smooth by tho rawhide and
its contents drawn by n mule.
For tho reception of freight a
green oxhide la cut at its four cor
ners very much as you would cut a
shoot of wrapping paper if 3-011
wanted a neat, square parcel and
no surplus folds of papor. The
hide is pierced near its odges with
holes large enough to admit of its be
ing laced with a three-quarter inch
rope. Twenty mules cro at the mine
waiting to haul down the ton tons of
ore mined, sorted and ready for
market. Tho ore, having bocn crumb
led into pieces no larger than a hen's
cg, is put into small blaok sacks hold
ing about 100 pounds oaoh, and the
Backs are stowed on the rawhide as it
lies spread out, hair side down, on the
finow. The hido i then laced up, a
, Rtout rope and whifne-treo at tho for-
ward ond receive tho mule's trace
hooks, and tho train of twenty mules
starts down tho mountain, each ani
mal hauling about 1,000 pounds of ore.
Tho hairy surface prevents tho hido
from slipping too fast on tho steep
gra C3, and in an hour and a half tho
muic train has delivered its ten tons
1 of oro to tho transportation camp,
whence- it is hauled on four horse
sleighs to Kaslo, twenty-five miles
away. Such is tho rawhide system of
oro freighting in winter.
Tho downward descent from the
Washington mine was a novel experi
ence well worth the heavy toil of the
upward climb. My guide and I bor
rowed oaoh a miner's shovel one of
tho long-handled, pointed sort and
started down the rawhido trail. To
bogganing and coasting are mild de
lights compared with riding on a
shovol down a stocp grado along that
smooth gutter. You put tho handle "of
the shovel between your legs and,
holding it at an angle of forty-tiro de
grees, plant yourself on the shovel
blade and there you aro! Not for any
appreciable snaco of time, however.
Yon shoot dow n that trail at a gait of
twenty miles an hour, taking care to
lift your feet so that the heels shall
lightly touch the snow. If you aro
raw at tho sport you w ill come to grief
as you whirl about the abrupt curves,
but the worst that can happen is to
6pill yourself against the :oft snow
wall as you bump against Hi tangent,
and after picking your-lf up and
shaking off the snow you rquniv your
self on the shovel blade nnd ro sailing
along until another curve derails you;
and so on down tho four thousand feet
descent, until, what with these harm
less accidents, and with light grades
where you must got off and walk, you
have made the return trip of four miles
in half an hour.
Hospitality, the mo3t liberal and un
limited, is the invariable rule at all
these mining camps. If you are a
miner in search of work and there is no
work for you, supper, breakfast and a
bunk plentifully supplied with warm
woolen blankets, arc freely yours, but
it is against camp etiquette to stay
longer than for breakfaat or dinner on
tho following day. At the next camp
you can do the same thing over again,
and so on. If, however, you are a
j visitor, with proper credentials and a
legitimate errand, .then' is no limit to
your welcome and hospitable treat
ment. "Stay as long as you can the
longer the better," is the hearty invita
tion of the mino- superintendent, and
while you stay there is nothing too
good for 3-ou, and nothing to pay.
T. Z. Cottixs.
Conidnt Bf lllnStetl.
J&EtE, SS
"Xo. sir' said Tromlcy, 've move so
often thero isn't a Gre that could over-
take us."
"Then," remarlted the agent briskly.
Hvc vill insure you against tha
friction." Detroit Free Press.
CURES RI51N
r
m
fisr
j "MOTHF RS FRirFP SSU"??
i cHored chiUi-bearta? vcao. I Lave been
i id-wife ia " Jf jw .and in each -
-wtero "Mother's Prisnd" caubausrdi-Is
t secompibed -v wifers and re v rod lasc'
:. &. ? Lgt JM&fJ
alcce.
Mas. JI. M. Becftx .
HocifcCi-ery, AJs.
&mt bv express, clurpcs prepaid, ca rcccjpi
ol prico,?lJ0 per boule-
BRADFIELD REGULATOR CO..
gold by all druggists. zlst, Ua.
s
KMiHGOQ
ae:
XiOst
in Gene
JWwRflRFHlisTM Xofi.: idtosTSifliVX 3EIC.. .ate P.
Tor Sale in Wichita by OZANNE & DYER ana by CHAS. LAWRENCE, Dru
gist. ,
INDUSTRY fi ANIMALS.
Cartons Analogy Between the Instincts of
Insects and of Savages.
A recent and interesting contribu
tion to the sum of popular knowledge
of animal instinct is M. Frederic Hous
say's work on "The Industries of Ani
mals," published in the "Contemporary
Scienco" series by Walter Scott. It is
an ingenious attempt to bring man and
animals into line on the common ground
of their provision by industry of the
necessities of life. Tho arts of collect
ing provisions, storing and preserving
food, domesticating and managing
flocks and capturing slaves are quite as
well understood by animals and in
sects as by man in the earlier stages of
civilization and show a curious analogy
in their development in the case of the
more backward among human com
munities. Ants of the same species both have
and have not learned to keep "cattle."
Lespes found a tribe of black ants
which had a flock of "cows" which they
milked daily. But he also discovered a
nest of the same species which had no
flocks. These he presented with some
of the aphides used by their cow-keeping
relations. The ants instantly at
tacked, k.lled and ate them, behaving
iu exactly the same improvident man
ner as a tribe of Australian "black
fellows" when presented with a flook
of sheep. A little-knovrn and striking
instance of foresight and industry
exhibited by a bird is that of the Cali
forman woodpecker. Like others of
its kind, this bird is an mscct-eate.
Yet in view of the approach of winter,
it prepares a store of food of. a wholly
different character, and arranges this
with as much care 6 an epicure might
devote to the storage of his wine in a
cellar. In the summer the woodpecker
lives on ants. For the winter he stores
un accrns. To hold each acorn it hol
lows a small hole in a tree, into which
! the acorn is exactly fitted, and is ready
I to be split by the strong beak of the
1 climbing woodpecker, though too
I tightly held to be stolen by squirrels
j or other birds. A relation of this
woodpecker inhabits the dryest parts
Mexico, where, during the droughts, it
must dio of starvation unless it made a
! store. To prevent this it selects the
hollow stem of a species of aloe, the
bore of which is just largo enough to
hold a nut. The woodpecker drills
holes at intervals in the stem and fills
it from bottom to top with the nuts,
the separate holes being apparently
made .for convenience of access to the
column of nuts within. The intelli
gence which not only constructs a
special store house, but teaches the
vood pecker to lay by only the nuts
which will keep, and not the insects
which would decay, is perhaps the
highest form of bird-reasoning which
has yet been observed.
The common ants of Italy if not so
strangely ingenious as the gardener
ants -of the tropics, which prepare a
particular soil on which to grow with
in their nests the fungus on which
alone they feed, exhibit what is prob
ably the most complex form of in
stinctive industry shown by any Euro
pean animal. Tiiey store up oats and
A'arious kinds of grain, making hun
dreds of little rooms as granaries, of
about the size of a watch. But grains
lying in the ground naturally germi
nates. How the ants prevent this is
not known. Probably by ventilation,
as bees ventilate their hives by arti
ficial draught. All that is certain is
that if the ants are removed the grain
sprouts. When the ants wish to use
the store, they allow the grains to
germinate, until the chemical change
takes place in tho material which
makes its fermenting juice food suit
able for their digestion. They then
arrest the process of change by de
stroying tho sprout, and use the stock
of giutirious sugar and starch so left as
their main food in winter. M. Houssay
might have drawn his parallel between
human and animal industries still
closer, if he had referred to the curious
partnership which modern observation
has made possible between men and
bees. By giving tho bees a foundation
of wax stampod with the shape of the
sells, the bee-keeper Bives the hive tho
time and trouble spent in this non-pro-luctive
lalor, and the purpose of arti
ficial aid so given is at once couiDre
hended and turned to use by the other
wise stereotyped intelligence of the
bee. Spectator.
irorcer was a general storc-Trecpf r,
-.nd his memory Ls embalmed in the
Mercers, Careers and Marcjs.
bniracJry of Tlld Fowl.
"Wild peese and wild ducks sliovs '
knoviicdge as to the resistance of the
atmosphere andsagaciti'in overcoming
it. VThvn floelrof them have to po long
distances they form a triangle to cleave
tho air more easily, and the most cour
ageous bird takes position at the for
ward angle. As this is a very fatigu
ing1 po-t another bird ere long takes the
place of the exhausted leader. Thus
they place their available strength at
the service of the society.
, ESJSaiSr2L55.
. lV a2ss2 a
tl
L'.nEwUSLS) IN PRICE;
U The Hw Mecon Magazine
U rnlve,n- comtnentlecl by
, tUe prcSs as one ofthe tocst
' ir ti.rip:in iirazines
j V 'li "contrihntorsi are ainonsr
I vj the most popular American
? It- niustrations
' v arc fine and nn.
j incrons It is a
j W htoichonsc of
j ?' choice IStcratnre
' ?ff and art. Its low
! K price is s. won.
' ff tier; a IarRC clr-
tb1 culatloa only
kj udintts of it.
&1 isc-nd Si for a
, 9v -tear's safc8crip-
if ticn. or 50 cents fc- O months.
1 LPT" - 111 . 1 r !' "-f y t
j-- J,k Ul)ilUlW -fc. -
3 amn!f ntlV- 1 CI15L. "
1 Tie Hew Peterson Magame
r-MS.THiaOST.,FKn.S.
The tro 3Ia;r-ine
jiaziaes
kE2-2l
I A "S'K-k-
"NERVE SEEDS."
TiUwomifrfol sa-dr pzar
ntn4t.es-I trdi-
Cintrne4ln vetet. l perba torS.
RESTORED!
SS&n&sssssnSs; ;
PENOBSCOT THEOLOGY".
InUImas Bellev That God Had an Adrtsr
at the Creation.
In the beginning God mado Adam
out of the earth, but he did not make
Glus-kabe (the Indian God), says Abbo
L. Alger in the Regular Science
Monthly- Glus-kabe made himself out
of the dirt that was kicked up in the
creation of Adam. He rose and "walked
about, but he could not speak until the
Lord opened his lips.
Gcd made the earth and the sea, and
then He took counsel with Glus-kabe
J concerning them. He asked hira if it
woma 00 ueuer to &e uje hd ui
un en one side of the earth and down
on the other, but Glus-kabe said: "No,
they must all run down one way."
Then the Lord asked him about the
ocean, whether it would not do to have
it always lie still. Glus-kabo told Him:
"No! It must rire and fall, or else it
would grow thick and stagnant."
'How about fire?" asked th3 Lord;
"can it burn all the time and nobody
put it out?"
Glus-kabe said: "That would .not
do, for if anybody got burned and fire
could not be put out, they 'would die;
but if it could be put out, then the
burn would get well."
So he answered all the Lord's ques
tions. If you have 2alaria, Tiles, Sick Dead
A ache, Costive Bowels, Dumb Ague or
" if -our food does not assimilate,
9
Price, 25c Office. 3lH"ark Place, '.V.
IftrouoledwithGonorrh-aT
QIeet.hite8.8pei latorrbcsal
or hit iiunstunu dlscbsrss ask1
r out druxzist for e. bonis of
Bis: 9. It cures In n few days
rltbout tcaidorpublieltr of s,
3 if ,An.neAitti (inn
traamaiecd not to ctrictura.
Tr.g Utiivcrsxi Amanear. luti.
snnfaeturod br
Brass Cicmieal I
CINCINNATI. O.
&'
O&0
Oar ?Efi72CTX0X STRIKGl fte lth rfroJ.
U CUCAN. P"CS not BTAIS. PKKVEJnS BTR1CTURS.
Ceres OOKOaCKdv iu4 OI.CET o 0 to Fobs l;t
A QUfK CURK for IXUCORKHEAor TTHITES. .
61407 U PROQGISTN. SroHssny AAiKftbrW Vi.
7U &iCfi.CTU?! CQ !. OttlQ,
Alclrich & Swentzell Dint; Co.,
ofthe Proprietors at Wichita.
Agon
D-R. T. FELTX OOUBAUP'S OlttEJJ
TAI, C13EAM. OXt MAGICAL
IltmoTt s ta jiai
plo,frccUe moth
ptcne. rsh rl
tkinAlittse iijiO
every blemish a
iKnutv.fcud dc3cs
rte'cHon. it ht
Atced me to-t t
0 y -ra, and is i
li.rir.!e wo r
It 10 br guro It Is
propei ty m d e.
JLtcepi so tx'jf
terttt at similar
las. rr. L. A-.
ber rM to
l-Jrortbs ln'it
tan ' ptCtentd
"s yon Js.Ui e
VU! fl' the, J
rt-COMSDU ooi
"Wichita's Wholesale &
Manufacturing Ilouses
The "Western "Wheeled Scraper
Co., of Aurora, Ills..
With tbe-iew of metling tin deraanebs forlr
rigaf ins tools have utabMb' 1 an asuncy with
UicWicbita. Implement Co. I'M Wwt DiTJK"!.'ia
Ae., wnerea llncot the'r c-lebratcd jrood-t
canbe fctca. P-irti(S Jnteretetl jilejiis call
and examine. Correspondence sriiclud.
JUST received,
f - r CASES RUBBER GOODS
3 r I I m Great Vane y, w Inch we
f l J J offer to dealers at Lowest
.Market rate3.
S. A. McGlung Boot &. Shoe Co.
133 and VjI N. Market St
J. P. ALLEX.
DRUGGIST,
Eyefjihiog Kept in a Fiishfass Dreg &rt
10B EAST DOUGLAS AVE
IVICHXTA. - - - KAfi.
GHSAPNESS
UKSURPSSSEQ IK HERIT
h
Mnr's Hew Home Magazine
I A Monthly rterotetl to Home J
1 nntt te Kjlilonj, containtn j
nearly 100 patcc of choice
Iiteratnre. Slorle. Iocnjs,
Sketches of Tr. a- el. History,
etc Xotenou the newest styles
in dress, etc.
Many valuable
hotie old hinti
pretty deslsms in
needlework, etc
A. niece of choice
5Inlc n every
nara bcr. I
KftSTM nc
$3.5
W r rrr t a c a
PATTERNS.
All for only 9 x
per year. Randsome pre
minuis for sculuj us ctuutt.
Sample copy, 5 cents.
Msr'sHewfiosellagazlne
c
, J1
G84S.THISQST..PKfIX
Ons Year for i-7-
in x c. i. -a-.- 'mm
Tutt'sTiny Pills:
tri 11 mw these troubles. Dose small. V
VraMi s!
WYOURSELF !
msik
mm
fiKS5Ef
&ifca
$
'ff T3
'j$U-i
-V-Wr'l
rSsspV9 -7ars ft-"111 Co.iWB
s-W"&
JF.9iS ikfVfl
jjiucan.juanui )
;ana .reani th ut hsranl or :l iht Mtm
jirejiti Htlins. For &sle by til dR(rliU nd Uncjr
rarxis lnlsri Jn tho V. S Cnnft'lr and inroju.
I'LRD T. UOPKl.Sa, Pf e'r 21 Grsat Jonss bUlil
Wichita's Wholesale &
Manufacturing Houses.
C H. RECKMYBR,
Wholetalc Manufacturer of
SADDLES and HARNESS.
And Jobbers in Saddlery Hardware. 121 East Douglas Are.
it. m nixwrLL,
Maxwell & Mc Chare.
237 AND 239 SOUTH MAIN STREET. WICHITA, EAlNSAS.
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF NOTIONS, FURNISHING GOODS.
WICHITA AVIIOT.ESAXE GROCERY CO.,
Wholesale Grocers
OFFICE AXD WAltEIlOU3:213 TO 223 SOUTH IjRIEr STREET.
KeM eveij tuij; in the yitx-cry lliie, i-iiow cnbcB, tunics u,t jrieef r tlx. lures,
also sole pioprietursot the "1 toy ally" and "La luxiocecla" brauds orCIMH
I, C. JA.CKSOIST,
DISTRICT
SANTA FB COALS,
ANl) JOBBER OF BUILDING MATERIALS
1 1 2 S. 4th Ave. Wichita, Kan.
COAJL.
AND
SATsTD
C1IAS. AYLESBURY. GEO. M. NOItRlS
AlLESBHRr-NOERIS MERCANTILE CO
Nos. 138-140 N. Fourth Ave.
Wholesale - Grocers.
Jobbers op Teas, Cigars and Spices
Sole A gents for Alvarado, Figaretta and La Perleta Cigars,
THE C. E. POTTS DRUG CO.
(Formerly Cbnrles K. Pot In X Co., Cincinnati O.)
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS.
Goods Sold at St. JUmla niid Kantian City J'rlcen.
c3 ind S:jf bout li 11 yin Slieet, - - - - "VVicVita, Knnsa
THE JOHNSTON & LARIMER DRY GOODS CO-
HOLiAUi
Dry : Goods, : Notions :and : Furnishing: Goods.
I'oinplHt- Mock tn all (he Departments.
119, 121 & 128 N Topeka Ave. Wichita, Kansas.
- :- EAGLE :-: CORNICE x WORKS. x-
500 EAST DOUGLAS AVENUE.
Manufacturers of Galvanized Iron, and Copper Cornice; Tin,
Copper, Iron, and 'Slate Hoofing AVork done in any part of tlia
country. Estimate Xurnished on application.
Caswell & Buckley;
J. I,. AULERS.
A LVA E.
WICHITA CREAMERY CO.
Wholesale ?a! Butter and Eggs
212-214 South Topeka Avenue.
Feter toy pf rm !Ion to KarjMn National lUttk
LEHiIA2sN-UIGGrNSON GROCER CO..
Wholesale Grocers
203 AND 203 X. WATElt F-THKKT.
Sole Apit? for the tiliHiid Jkh-j Coihe tl e Iwl jaihur cofT1 in thmnrKM
JACOB DOLD PACKING CO.
rOBK AXD BEEF rACKEKS.
PETE MEATS, LAKUS AND SAL'SAGES.
A I aril for Ev:y1 ody: W liiti- Iot r Itrnml nnr F rlly; Ihi Cneat
Lnrrt in tli roimti-v. . hoice l-aniilr Ijml, tlie31ot 1'opnlnr bruiitt m Uiu
Diaik't. The Uent'Groi-i'i can mi iiiliJUier.
11 j on vani tlie nrsl cnJJ f r bite ( U.-r. and Jiitiston celling It.
In original I.?tlioxripliPl 'untynn r im- of urltUtx It.
Put up Tor Family use In it, 5. 3o una 20 puuml l.-.xquiinl Tin i'sU.trltb
-JthoKrapb label. ''
HOLIDAY GOODS, BOOKS, ALBUMS BIBLES.
Gold and Fountain Pens. A full lino of Blank Books.
WlIl.lH
114 North Main St.
r. r. ma jit ry,
Wfc,lj jcJ Ill
ArliFl" ilatenals, 1'iciurcH. Frnm&s
i cc direr TUtntrtt' ri.TM.iei.
1rl coal tr rrrta Oj n tnr srie.
F5trrUi!D?!tiilof AtU.U Ur:l. S
LctUt.ii rfc . TL fc57 nowlit Art
jzl soJtTjr mats srnt-iw.
. CHAS. LAWRSNCG3,
! n, . i- s , , !
'IjAinffPfl $R MImF! IP,V ;
I IlVl,'i;l UUwu VJUiMilllJ. I
I K JZ Dmt'jltt A rru nc.
WJchlf. Kan. TJexbonr Counfctlon
wiuiriA noi'ima wonts
C1TW 7IMMWSMl.5f:'.3frr
Botilera of Olnror Jtte. Jiamo
Cld-r,K&cla frr,ft'tn.tarir'jrr
1'ood. itizo Oeurt 1 tsui a
A Etiir tur It . J.tsin j four JaIs.
lor. rirsl zrA ttat'OSts- - Wichila.
j HE "WJLLOTMTCr CO
J"'jcct w-ora Jo
i nn-T xit & a n alk v.
Mur'scmrctis of and JobhvrM ts
I irc and jrtJMn rn-si T V arsu
25i;wr!J Haiti treU
21. It.ifi JulZ.--r.
, X. McCLUilK
AGENT FOR
All kinds of Coal at Lowest Market
Prices. Best Arkansas Rivor Sand
Wholesale and Retail.
SCHWARTZ BROS.
OFFICE 541 TT. DOUGLAS AVE. P1IOKK 193.
SWEET.
FJtA'KU. WALKER
Smith.,
Wichita, Kan
W. G. "WILLIAMS,
V,'ho-9n" ami RUiI (ten Dt&Ut.
Snd 2. tor f. A; W. 32 us 89 C F,
Jtrolrr.
Wcs'crn as"'1 tut Lfupont Vorrdtr.
119 E. Doudaa Ave, Wiohii
BULBS
Uya lHr, TmHp. u-tr. V4c
jioh' r-t . ;' tun of l'ala nml
lUitomiux i' mi
j piicv Ut.
ci f-s. p. Mriir,KiJ.
yiirri, lrhtt. K.n. I hutif 2
FA1HJCS MACIHXK W0KK&
ullda and Bcj1m
ERB1ES, BOILERS and MAOiUHtBY
J. A. BISHOP.
j Tier a t t t p a P"HTR
ZX-LJi-J O- Xi-J- i-JJ-s.
Viint, OtU st 1t.
- Muthci &., it Uhlut, Knn
ISO
a
l
. 1 fc'Tf- ia?A iS iil'
fefj. vij-Z'Pcti.

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