OCR Interpretation


Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-2010, April 23, 1915, 3:30 Edition, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1915-04-23/ed-2/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1 s pnwnsrr-w
MAILS
From San Franclser
Mathotiia. April 27.
For San Francisco-
Mancliuria April 27.
From Vancouver:
Makura. May 19.
For Vancouver:
Makura. Acrll 30.
-
KvniiiK Bulletin. Ktst. US2, No. 14fi
Hawaiian Star. Vol. XXII. No. 717
12 PAGES- ilOXOLULL", TKRRITOliY.OF HAWAII, FRIDAY, APRIL l:5, 1913. -12 PAGES.
PRICE FIVE CENJO
if TrrrrviTTTTr tiir titr ssi
raw ; Editioe
St
l-t
DIDN'T TEDDY
EVER HEAR OF
OUR PLANTERS?
Colonel Roosevelt, In Barnes
Libel Case, Testifies Didn't
Know of the Hawaiian As
sociation; Regarded Barnes
i r I II I I l
as a sort or jeKyn-nyae
Aiwiated Prm by Federal Wireless
SYRACUSE, N. Y., April 23. Col.
Roosevelt, defendant in the libel euit
brought by William Barnes, Jr., Albany
publisher and politician, was asked by
the counsel for Barnes today questions
regarding contributions to the presi
dential campaign funds:
"If you found that the Hawaiian su
gar planters had contributed $10,000,
would you doubt it?"
"No, but I never heard of any such
association," replied Roosevelt.
Discussing Barnes, he said he re
garded him as. a "sort ? Or. Jekyll
and Mr. Hyde, like other politicians.
He has his. good and his bad sides."
He also testified that he didn't try
to "sever the ligaments cf the Siam
ese twin of politic, referring to the
Jekyll-Hyde combination. On the con
trary, he said, he endeavored to have
the Jekyll in them absorb the Hyde.
A recess was taken in the trial un
til Monday,
SAILINGS AFTER
' ; ; ; r ,."'v" f .- v.
;i
A new transpacific schedule for the
Pacific Mail and Toyo KIsen Kalsha
-lines brought to , Honolulu- today in
the steamer Korea cancels all sailings
of Pacific Mail liners .from San Fran
cisco after, November lvv
""We hear that the Vessels will be
'laid up indefinitely t San Francisco
when they, return from their Oriental
PACIFIC HAIL'S
I
runs,- minmaVSctrUt ! the oreftM v morntng's operations can be ac
;.'Ther was no one in an official, ca
lclty fcn beard the .vessel who was
h willing to predict the outcome of the
reported decision upon the part of the
Taclfic Mail directorate regarding the
retirement of ; the fleet
They may . go. back Into service
under a Japanese or Chinese flag for
' an that we know, was said. -
The . Korea met mil pond weather
the V last few day ' of 'its trip to the
Hawaiian ? islands. J SDeiplte . strong
f galea and! heavy seas1 - after, leaving
San Francisc? the, Hacr; made port
. in five 1 days . tad 13 hours.V r
' It landed 42 cabin and four second-
class passengers.- Three hundred and
fifty-three sacks of it ail was received
ty local postal officials. - . ;
The Korea will discharge more than
100 tons of freight, and- steam to Ja
pan, China and the Philippines at 5
o'clock this evening. . '.
The Korea, , like the Siberia, was j
subjected to. rigorous search by cua-1
toms officials at San Francisco and
"Honolulu for suspected opium. The
hollow leg of a saloon dining-room
table was the novel receptacle alleged
to have concealed the drug In the Si
beria. A report brought by the Korea
states that the federal omciais se
cured a ; quantity of opium in follow,
lng their duest In the Siberia". ,
From San Francisco to the Far
East .the Korea is carrying 101 cabin,
13 second-class and 134 steerage pas-
sengers. ; , - '
Dr. A. C. Pratt is medical officer in
the' Korea, taking the place vacated
by the resignation of Dr. EI H. take.
t Dr. Pratt is well known to many Ho-
polulana. ' , ' ... ,".
''i About' 1 09 Asiatic, steerage passen
. pers will4 join the, Korea for points in
Japan and. CIna. ' V '
HUSOSDAUOHTER
DIES; IIEII STORY
II
t Associated Tress by Federal Wireless
v PAfcIS,. France", April 22. Adele
Hugo, daughter Ct Victor Hugo, the
grtat novelist, dltd here today at the
age of 85. years...'.
Aa a'girl she was kidnapped by a
British ftletr and her tragic story
aroused the pity and Indignation of
the world, " She was found demented
in New York.. Her last and only
statement was that she was the
daughter of. Victor Hugo. She waa
returned to the home of her parent
and had been a recluse ever since.
Monuments
H. E. HENDRICK, LTD.
Merchant and Alakea Sta.
SHOCKED
mnin
(UilLU
TEXAS CITIES FLOOD-SWEPT;
MANY DROWNED; LOSS IS HUGE
Awiatel Frpws by Federal Wireless
DALLAS, Texas, April 23. Texas cities have been
swept by one of the most disastrous floods since the great
Galveston inundation.
At Dallas it is reported that 20 are dead and the dam
age is already estimated at $1,000,000. The flood was ex
perienced most heavily at Austin.
Houston was swept by the rising waters and seven were
drowned.
'PENDULUM' PLAN
TO BE TRIED OUT
IN F-4 SALVAGE
Naval Officers Watch Results
of New Experiment With Resolution Calling For Corn
Great Interest mission to Investigate
ABRUPT SLOPE OF BOTTOM SUGGESTS REQUIREMENTS
PROVES GREAT HANDICAP,
Difficulty of Hauling 300 Tons
Up Steep Incline Is
Tremendous
The
raised
towed
sunken submarine F-f was
eight feet this morning, and
auDroximately 60 feet shore-1
ward.
s.ivnp-n onprattona were halt-1
ed by the parting of one of the lines
which held the stem of the submar
ine to the lifting bcowb. and this will
hare to be repaired before work can
be resumed. According to what luck
la rih w. c-ttinir n apw line fasL
A.r.Hnn. K. TMimiBii
The use-of the Maryland as a tow-
lng vessel proved a success and while
i ro vtrm.iv rnnwrvn.
vJ V" Lr.C TVrni1
of operations Is the right one.
Arras -zz-Suizz
towing and lifting work was at a
standstill, tolawait th fastening of . a
new line to the. F-4.
The amount of lift obtained through
ctirately. determined by the amount tf
cable on the drums, there velng abso
lutely no stretch, left in the lines tht
connect the F-4 'with the lining scows.
Eight feet more cable is reeled in and
therefore a lift of eight feet has been
secured. The pull Inshore can onlj
be estimated and the figures range
from 60 to 75 feet.
With the Maryland on the. job as a
towing vessel, it is hoped that sub
stantial .shoreward progress will be
made with the sunken submarine F-4
within the next few hodrs. Much de
pends on the developments 01 tnis
afternoon, and if the plan now In op
eration falls, those in 'charge of the
salvage work will be hard pressed for
'a new on a .'There Is no disposition
toward pessimism by the navy offi
cers who have the task in hand, but
It is generally conceded that the un
dertaking is stupendous, and that .a
large elemental luck will be essential
to a successful conclusion.
This' mowateff". shortly before ' 8
o'clock the Maryland worked her way
out from the navy dock and maneu
vered into position shoreward from
the lifting scows from which the sub
marine Is suspended fore and aft by
four wire cables.' ' It took all morning
to get the cruiser into position and
pass the towing gear from the Mary
land to the scows, the work being ac
complished, however, without hitch
or accident Weather conditions
greatly favor operations, the sea be
ing as smooth as the proverbial mill
pond, and there being no wind to in
terfere with operations.
The plan which is being tried to
work the submarine into shallow
water is said to be entirely new, and
naval officers are watching results
with keen interest The F-4, a wateA
togged shell, and suspended from the
lifting scows on. nearly 300 feet of
wire cable formjs great pendulum
which will swing backwards towards
deeper water If sufficient Impetus is
given to the scows in a shoreward
direction. It Is believed that a pow
erful strain on the scows will cause
the F-4 to swing out far enough to
enable a considerable lateral move
ment to be secured before she
grounds on the slope of the sea floor.
The scows could then slack off to a
position directly above the submarine,
take up the slack on their hoisting
(Continued! on page two)
a as m
BASEBALL RESULTS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
At Cleveland Detroit 8, Cleveland 4.
At Chicago Chicago 4, St. Louia 3.
At Boston No game; rain.
At New York No game; rain.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
At Pittsburg Cincinnati 2, Pitts
burg 1. .
At Philadelphia Philadelphia 2,
Boston 1.
At Brooklyn No game; rain.
. SUGAR "
SAN FRANCISCO, CaU April 23.
Sugar: 96 degrees test, 4.64 cents. Pre
vious quotation, 4.885 cents.
! i ORE STUDENTS
FOR COLLEGE OF
III
I
Representative Lyman Offers
FOR ENTRANCE.BE LESS
i j
Boarding-school at Small Tee
Is Also Proposed In
His Plan
1 On the ground that tne numier o
; students who attend the college 01
Hawaii is smaller than it should be,
Rcuresentative Lyman introduced a
concurrent resolution in me nouse laie
today looking toward a lowering of the
entrance" reauirenients. Dormitories
may be provided tor oui-or-town siu-
aems, u me puns emuuuie in me
' resolution are carried out, where those
t attending can obtain lodging and
board for a sum not to exceed 60 a
year. The resolution which calls for
a commission to investigate, is as fol-
I lcwr :
- "Whereas, the College of Hawaii
is receiving annually from the Federal
"?v jsssjrs
grants and appropriations for the ad
vancement of scientific and advanc
ed education in the Territory of Ha
wall: and ".
- vnvbereas: JT wtlrieTnoreradyantag-
duiHtf in pedpTe And 'students of. the
Territory "of - Hawaii- that a greater
number of students take advantage of
the' opportunity of such advanced ed
tocatlon for the uplifting of its citi
zens, as at the present time can be
obtained at said College of Hawaii;
and
"Whereas, the number of students
attending said College of Hawaii" is a
very small percentage of the number
that should attend in proportion
with the amount of appropriation be
ing allowed by the governments afore
said, and that the teachers have only
a few In each class, which is not. com
mensurate with the salaries being paid
them; .and
"Whereas, it would be more advan
tageous to the students and the said
college that some of the students
should ' remain - and spend most of
their time at the school, in order, that
they might receive more attention In
the practical part of the education" and
of the work on the scientific farming
lines; and
"Whereas, the students from the
(Continued on 'page three)
Investigation of Fair Commis
sion Held Today No.Con
scious Violation Alleged
That the Hawaii Fair Commission
rather stretched the territorial laws,
though unwittingly, in its method of
making expenditures from the 1913
fair appropriation was the conclusion
arrived at by the accounts and public
expenditures committee of the house
of representatives today, according to
what one of the members of the com
mittee said this afternoon.
In conformity with a resolution in- J
iroaucea in
the house to probe the :
HAWAII
URGED
affairs of the commission, an invest!-, meetings in Tokio to voice opposition
gation was made and this morning to the government's policy In the ne
Chairman Emil Berndt and Assistant gotiations with China. The newspa
Secretary Taylor of the Hawaii Pro- j pers. supported by the anti-govern-motion
Committee, and John Wise, ment parties, are attempting to incite
member of the Hawaii Fair Commis-. the people against Okuma's enforce-
sion, were asked to appear before the ,
investigating committee. The meet- j
ing was an executive session, but it j
was understood that the promotion
members were called in because of
the close connection between that ,
committee and the fair commission, I
some of the accounts of one being
co-extensive with the accounts of the
other.
"We found that there was a viola
tion," said one of the committeemen.
following the hearing, "but it is also
evident to our minds that the viola-
: i - . ..,
tion was made in ignorance of the
law and without any criminal in
tent." The report of the committee will
be filed about Tuesday, he said.
1 1 mi
ra it 11 m
K
UUUUUi
FASTI CREASE,
Moving-Picture Operator Re
cently at Front Declares
Conditions Horrible
TRENCH FIGHTING DULLS
SENSES TO BRUTALITY
Conditions For Caring For the
Wounded Poor, For Dead
No Better
Svdnev I Cohan, special represen
tatlve of the Gaumont company, who
has been recording wr's traeedies
and high lights on the movie film, is
in Honolulu again, a passenger in the
Korea, bound for the Far East. No
veniber 20 last Cohan was here, head
ed in the same direction. At that
time he had circled the globe three
times during the year and now he his
added another lap of the globe to his
record.
Cohan was a victim of the Emden's
raids in Oriental waters and after leav
inc here he again became connected
with the German hiwk, this time, how
ever, as a photographer of her finish
on the rocks of. Cocoa island.
After leaving .Honolulu last Novem
ber Cohan proceeded to China and
took pictures round Tsingtau. He then
went through the Suez canal and ac
companied New' Zealand and Austra
Han troops to the front in France,
seeing, he said today, the first ad
vance of the Allies' fleet in the bom
bardment of the Dardanelles.
"I left the battle-grounds of France
only a few weeks ago," Baid Cohan
this morning, "and I found conditions
far worse on this visit than when I
left there last' October. The horrors
of this war can never be described
Motion pictures come nearest to tell
ing the truth and we are making ev
ery effort and sparing no expense to
hare operators yhjffever, great events
ate' happening. r' f-sM'foirTyingrarto
the Far E?st again,! because it is ex
pected that big things will be doing
there shortly.
"This trench warfare tends to dull
the senses, so that the men who are
doing the actual fighting get more or
less used to sights that the average
man couldn't stand. In France on this
hist trip, I saw one soldier eating his
ration, nd using the body of a dead
comrade for a table. It is sometimes
two '.or .three days before bodies can
oe coiteciea tor Dunai ana me pres
ence of death has ceased to mean any
thing .at all to most of the soldiers.
The stench is frightful.
"Conditions for caring fof" ths
wounded are poor, as a rule," con
tinued Cohan. "Even if men are pick
ed up soon after they fall they are
likely to spend a whole night in an
ambulance before they can get to the
field hospitals."
When here last Cohan gave pei
sonal testimony as to German abuses
In Belgium. When questioned on this
subject today he said:
"Yoa hear nothing more about Ger
man atrocities now. That seems to
be all over with. There are no more
complaints on that -score."
Cohan has taken manv thoua'nd?
ofTeet of film since his last visit
here. Some of the films will never
be shown, being entirely too gruesome
tar. public exhibition. These have a
certain historic and military value
and are made for that reason.
Anti-Government Parties Ar
ranging Demonstrations,
Say Tokio Despatch
(Special to Nippu .Tiji.l
TOKIO, Japan, April 22. Anti-gov-
ernment parties are arranging mass
ment of the demands.
,
The Nippu Jiji is of the opinion that
the Seiyukai party, still smarting with
the defeat at the recent election, is
responsible for the movement. Fbr
the first time in the history of .Japan
public opinion has split on its foreign
policy.
When war was declared on China in
1894 the entire nation backed the
Japanese government in all the poli
cies of the period. Likewise during
j the war with Russia the Japanese na
I., 1 A j I 1 . c 1 is
tion was united in its foreign policy.
The Jiji predicts grave results In
ternally if the mass meetings are as
effective as the leaders hope to make
them.
I'MR'SHOIUS
SAYS IV E AN
SPLIT IK JAPAN
OVER DEMAND ON
CHINA HAS COME
WISE MONARCH WAITS ;
WAR'S DEVELOPMENTS
BEFORE HE GOES IN
Ferdinand, Czar of Bulgaria
I and shrewdest of the Coburgs.
j Though Bulgaria is on the verge
j of war, diplomats of the belliger-
ent countries apparently do not
j know whether Ferdinand will
j cast his lot with the Teutons or
i with the Allies, it is generally
! believed that he is waiting to see
j which way the tide . is running
j and will get on the. winning side.
SPEER, FORMER
Famous Princetonian Spends
Day In Honolulu Greeted
By Football Opponent :
Robert E. Speer,
secretary of the
Presbyterian Board
of Missions, col
lege idol and lead
er or American
youth, is Honolu
lu's; guest today.
Mr, Speer is en
.. J f . ;, I s-v-:V-.'.'.'
J -mB
r7-.V--Hi?2L
mmmm
am . -
1 5 -
route to Siam.
where he will
spend two months
inspecting the mis
sions. He will also
go to the Philip
pines for a month
Robert E. Speer. and eventually vis
it Korea, North China and Japan. If
the war permits he will cross Siberia
and return to America by the way of
Kurope. o
Mr. Speer spoke to an interested
group of men at the University Club
this noon and. also addressed a mass
meeting at Central Union church at
3:30 o'clock. In the uartv with the
missionary are Dr. David Bovalrd,
professor of Columbia Medical
School, who will act as medical in
spector of the Presbyterian missions,
and Guthrie Speer. a Princeton grad
uate doing Mr. Speer's secretarial
work.
In his talk at the University Club
today Mr. Speer drew attention to the
fact that a number of years aeo
there was an awakening of the nation
to the necessity of conservation of its
material resources coal, timber, water-power,
etc.. and that now there is
steadily developing the realization
that the moral forces must be conserv
ed and built .up. He Illustrated graph
ically tne development of the moral
rorce by effort and action with the
example of the runner who gets his
"second wind" by effort.
'1 don't know just how my plans
will work out," said Mr. Speer. "It
may be some time before I get back
to America. We will make a thor
ough study of the missions and
schools in the places we visit."
Greeting-Mr. Speer at the wharf
when the Korea came to rest this
morning was former Governor George
R. Carter.
Speer and I were classmates at
Andover prep in ," said Mr. Carter.
He has since become famous and
I have become happy."
Carter went to Yale while Speer
went to Princeton for college work.
The two old pals found themselves
opposing, each other on the gridiron
in the days when football was the
real strenuous sport After gradua
tion they were separated for 22 years
and although they have met since
the meeting this morning was none
the less warm and flavored with rem
iniscences delightful to both.
Bishop Restarick will officiate at the
11 o'clock service at Epiphany Mis
sion. Kaimuki. on Sunday morning
Rev. Mr,
Savior will he on Kauai on
that date
: f:, f "
FURIOUS FIGHTING AROUND
VPflES; ELSEWHERE ALLIES
CLAIM MATERIAL SUCCESSES
WESTERN FRONT ACTIVE IN MANY PLACES WARSHIPS
OF ALLIES RESUME BOMBARDMENT OF DARDANELLES
FORTS AND RUSSIAN FLEET DOES DAMAGE TO TURK
LAND CAMP ON BLACK SEAANOTHER BRITISH
: TRAWLER SUNK BY SUBMARINE
Associated Press Service by Federal WIrelesso
PARIS, France, April 23,Spirited fighting has been tak
ing place in the corner of Belgium still held by the allied arm
ies. It is admitted that the Germans have compelled the Allies
to retire near Ypres. -
LONDON, England, April 2$.-4-Ypres is again the target
for German shells in a lively bombardment. It is belieyed that'
many civilians have been killed.
Under repeated attacks by the Germans the British con
tinue to hold Hill 60.
Russian Black Sea
Camjv
Turk
Wreaking
PETROGRAD, feussia, April 23. The Russian Black Sea
fleet has dealt havoc to the Turks by a bombardment of tks
Turkish coast near Russian soil. A big Turkish encampment
was shelled, the Turks being cleOTaKxeoX their barracbi and
provision stores destroyed. A number of Turkisha vesseb Vith
supplies and ammunition were 'sunk; ' ": jtaifr!
Allies Talr a Half Mile nf Tnm
Trenches in
PARIS, France,! April 23.
St. Mihiel have been captured
charges that drove the enemy
over the torn terrain.
More Victims Found bv German?
Submarines Patrolling North Saa
GRIMSBY, England, April 23. A; British ; trawler has
been torpedoed in the North Sea by a German submarine. Two
of the crew were killed. The survivors jiave reached here;
Dardanelles Forts
LONDON, England, April 23. Four British warships have
carried on a heavy bombardment of the. Dardanelles forts at
the entrance to the straits. The results have not been an
nounced. I
The bombardment to thejnorth of Smyrna has been ; rc
sumed by the warships of the Allies. " ;
Russian Aviators Report Damage
PETROGRAD. Russia. April 23. It is renorted here that
Russian aviators have successfully attacked the German posi
tions at Plock and Mlawa, as well as German boats on the Vis
tula with soldiers and war supplies. uf :
ATLANTIC FLEET
TO PASS CANAL
Associated Iress by IVdcral WirelessJ
WASHINGTON, D. C April 23.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels an
nounced today that the Atlantic fleet
will go through the canal in July to
the Pacific He says tlie plan is to
reach the Atlantic end or tne canal on
July 4. He expects thl fleet to go
through in good shape.
GERMANY WONT HAVE
TO DEPEND ON CABLE
TO REACH OUTER WORLD
Associated Press by Federal Wireless
SAYVILLE, Long Island. April 23.
The power of the Sayville wireless
station has been nearly trebled, as
suring direct communication between
America and Germany. . 'j;
SEAMEN'S STRIKE ENDS ?
GLASGOW, Scotland, April 23.
The strike of seamen which has tied
up several transatlantic liners haa
ended. .
The petition of Toml Tano. a, Japa
nese woman, for a writ of habeaa cor-
ipus waa denied by Judge demons In
the federal court today. ? . "'
EARLY IN JULY
RD.AIVPR
Fleet Bombards
St. Mihiel
Half a mile of trenches near
by the Allies in a series of fierce
out 'oHh'e
Again Targets
II. Gooding Field, statistical expert.
In behalf of stockholder of the Ho
nolulu Brewing and Malting Company,
this afternoon will begin an Investiga
tion of the books of the company, in
accordance with an order. Issued 4by
Circuit Judge StnarC which baa been
acceded by the directors' of the com
pany. t"-'f'r
The in vestlgatlon by V Mr. f Field
forma another chapter In the suit In
equity filed against President and Man
ager Bartlett and the directors of the
company by Mr. Field and F. TL Green-
well, minority stockholders, In which
it alleged that Bartfett, prealdeat and
manager, misappropriated brewery
funds in tne sum of more than 22J)00.
Other than the announcement of Mr.
Field's investigation, .: there were no
new developments In the case today.
The attorneys for. both , aides,: a well
as the members: of the board of . di-
f rectors of the company, remain reti
cent - Thga far it is not known la
what form the directors will make an
swer to the suft: : i ':
MORE ABOUT THAW ?
NEW 'YORK Yprir 23-Th ;
triaf of Harry Kendall ;Thaw tot::'.
hiaCsanityr set for, Julyhas been ad
vanced to May 17.-
Muck
Havoc
FIELD TO LOOK
LOCAL DffiEY

xml | txt