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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-2010, August 20, 1917, 2:30 Edition, Image 2

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HONOLULU blAiliiULLiuTlN, MONDAY, ALGIS1 21V 1917.'
.
'a
BnrnsHERS are
READY TO SAIL
FOR VAR FRONT
Given Rousing Farewell By
Countrymen at Banquet at
young Hotel saiuroay
Given a hearty seed -off by the mem
bars of the Biitiih Club, the first
contingent for the Canadian army re
cruited Id Hawaii is ready to aail for
Vaneoaver on the Maknra, either late
this afternoon or early tomorrow. The
farewell party given In honor of the
British recmlta waa a banquet served
t thm Yfluoc hAtrl last Saturday night.
which was attended by 0 Britishers
betides the recruits, wno numoer z.
Fred Harrison, vice-president of the
club, presided as toastmaater at the
banquet, which E. L. S. Gordon, the
Britlab consul, was unable to attend,
due to Indisposition. Among those
who responded to the toasts were the
following: George Bastard, rice-president
f the club; Rer. Cannon Us
borne Ault, Ernest Fair, one of the
recruits, and Peter Tosh.
Music and songs were supplied for
the event by Sunny Cunha, Jack Pat
ten, Nell Slattery, Fred H. Pearson,
Ed Munroe and George Bustard.
The men of tbe Hawaii contingent
and the countries of their birth are
sa follows :
, Ernest rarrar, England; George B.
Marshall, Australia; Alan J. Marshall,
Australia; Edgar C. Slaight, Canada;
Charles Kempster, Hawaii; James 8.
Hilea, Canada; James H. R. Bryant,
Hawaii; Georga Ibettson, Canada;
Hugh MeDoogalL Canada; Charles
Mackld, Scotland; Ed. Jones, England;
William B. Grieg, Scotland; George A.
Murphy, Canada; Donald McGregor.
Scotland; A. A. Webster. Canada; Fred
H. Pearson, New Zealand; E. H.
Brown, United States; H. H. Me
Cleary, United States; J. J. Ryan,
England; Charles Johnston, South At
rica; Thomas Stephson, England. ;
HARVEY HITCHCOCK, a grade
ate of Punabou Academy, will . leave
Honolulu this week tor tbe mainland
wbere te win enter Cornell. His
younger brother, Dixon, will also
leave Honolulu to enter a prepara
tory school.
ITlUtllitTiu Aiura vaii
f TOOArS NEW TODAY v ;
Ladies' Muslin
jq TTRf nT?ftmERY OR LACE TRIMMED
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NEW DUB
AT FORT Kit
TO BE ERECTED
Selected By Chairman Dole to
Succeed Mrs. C. M. Cooke,
Jr., on Woman's Board
Col. R. M. Scbofleld. department
quartermaster, announced today that
plans are under way for new buildings
at Fort Ruger. These will include a
barracks for one of tbe coast artillery
companies, two or three sets of offi
cers' quarters and a new guard house.
Tbe company building will be about
2x120 feet in dimensions and will be
two etories In height. It will be built
to correspond with tbe other barracks
building erected tbe first of this year
at Fort Ruger and will occupy the
place on which the guard house is now
situated. This will necessitate the
building of a new guard bouse.
Mrs. E. A. Mott-Smlth and son will
leave Wednesday for tbe mainland.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Engle ex
pect to leave in the Mauna Kea last
Saturday for Hilo and the Volcano of
KCauea, where they will spend two
weeks.
Raymond C. Brown, chairman of the
civic convention committee, leaves
this afternoon tor Maui on publicity
work for the convention. From Maul
be will later go to Hawaii.
While going down Smith street an
automobile driven by D. 8. Kaalkala
waa run into Friday afternoon
and tbe radiator and an axle dam
aged by automobile 502, owned by
A. E. Davidson. The later was driv
ing along Queen goto towards Ka
uai when be struck the machine
coming" down Smith street
Selling beer to soldiers for 60 cents
a bottle, Ah Kau, sv Chinese, was ar
rested by M. C. Medeiroa, assistant
liquor license Inspector, Saturday
afternoon in a room back of Wo Fat's
restaurant oo Hotel street. Ah Kau
now faces charge of ; violating tbe
law prohibiting the sale of Intoxicating
liquor to soldiers.
Underwear
- - '?' -w..
Also Hind Embroidered
Night Gowns 41.00 to $6.50 ea.
sidrti SU5 to $150 ea.
Envelope Chemise-LOO to $4.00 ea.
'V. -i.;: ' ' '" -
Corset Covers 35e to $1.50 ea.
Chexalses $1.00 to $2.00.
Drawers 65e to $2.00 pr.
....
X WISH TO
fJr Jf
AN EXHIBITION OF SKILL, NERVE AND DARING
RIDING A HIGH POWERED INDIAN ZIOTOROYOLE ON
AN ABSOLUTE PERPENDICULAR WALL.
NEXT TO LIBERTY THEATER
EACH EVENING 7 to lO P. M. EXHIBITION EVERY 20
OF WJ1
flllE IOOEB
Miss Mattie Paine of Long
Beach, Cal., to Be PrincipaJ
of Kawaiahao; H. Milnor
Blowers to Temporarily Head
Mills School
Dr. Robert Day Williams, president
of Mid-Pacifc Institute, today an
nounced the list of new teachers for
Kawaiahao seminary and Mills school
for the coming year.
Both of these departments of Mid
Pacific Institute will be under new
heads. Miss Mattie Paine of Long
Beach, California, will be the new
principal of Kawaiahao, taking the
place of Miss Katherlne N. Adams,
who returned to the states. At Mills
school, H. Milnor Blowers is to serte
as acting principal in place of John
F. Nelson, who is spending his sab
batical year at his former home in
Loveland. Colorado.
Miss l Paine has been an instructor
in tbe Long Beach high school for a
number of years, and has been active,
as well in church and Y. W. C. A.
work. Other changes at Kawaiahao
seminary are as follows:
Miss Ruth Mylroie, a teacher at tbe
Korean girls' school of this city dur
ins the laat year, will fill tbe place
left by Miss Mary F. Kinney, who has
been granted a year's leave of absence
for rest and study in the states.
Miss Mary F. Varley of Oxnard,
California, comes to take the place of
Miss Edith V. Currier, who baa been
granted a half-year's leave of absence,
After Miss Currier's return it is the
intention of Miss Varley to introduce
some new courses in band work. Miss
Feme Haynes has resigned to return
to her home in the states and her
place will be filled by Miss Hacel M.
Abell of Berkeley, California. Miss
Abell's specialty is lower grade and
industrial work.
Miss Rbselle F. Feast, who has been
absent for two years Is California, will
return this tall to resume her work.
Even more changes than at Kawaia
hao are to be made this year in the
staff of Mills school, the boys' depart
ment of Mid-Pacific Institute.
Besides the change in principalship
already announced, there will be one
Is the farm managership. H. H. Tost,
farm manager for two years, has re
turned to California to accept an im
portant position under the state uni-
Terslty agricultural department His
place la already taken by Harry Stone,
a Berkeley man, and a brother of
Robert Stone of the school faculty.
Miss Edith Cold has been appointed
for a year to take tbe place of Miss
Elisabeth Jones of the primary de
partment, who is spending her sabba
ileal year on the mainland.
Miss Cold was a missionary and
educator in Turkey until the outbreak
of the war, having spent six years in
that country. She is a sister of Mrs
Clyde Manley of Honolulu.
Miss Rue H. Beatty of Lead, South
Dakota, a teacher, of seres years' ex
perience, will take .the third and
fourth grade work: in place of Miss
Austa McKltrick, who has returned to
her home Is Ohio.
Leslie Abell. former instructor in
the Oakland Technical High School,
will be In charge of the manual train
tnr denartment In nlaca of Jerome L.
ilears, returned to the mainland. -
nesota, succeeds Roy I. Ganfield Is tbe
commercial department, and Norman
T. Booth takes the place of George
Bettin in the seventh and eighth
grades. Mr. Bettin Is one of the suc
cessful candidates for the training
camp at Schofleld Barracks.
WUllard C. Ross, coach and physical
instructor during the past year, is
also to enter the camp. His successor
Is not yet announced.
EXPRESS MY APPRECIATION
r APPROVAL OF
IfPONEDKi
ARRANGE PLANS
FORTAGE lET
Under the guidance of tbe editors
of the Japanese daily newspapers, the
Hawaii 8hinpo. Nippu Jiji. Hawaii
Hochi and Hawaii Cboho. tbe mass
meeting for higher wages for Japanese
plantation laborers will be held to
night in the Japanese school on Nun
anu street commencing at 7 o'clock.
une Hundred leaders and delegates
from the Japanese circle, It is report
ed, will be in attendance. Besides
this number, merchants, bankers, phy
sicians, hsckdrivers and automobile
drivers and others have been in
vited. R. Murakami, of the Hawaii Chobo.
reported this morning that a resolu
tion of special Importance will be
presented to the meeting for discus
sion. He did not state, however, what
it is.
According to reports current in Jap
anese circles, the merchants, physi
cians, bankers, hackdrivers and auto
mobile drivers, saloon keepers and
others are expected to turn out at to
night's meeting.
Should they refuse to responJT.
the call of the four dailies, their busi
ness, it is said, will be boycotted. On
this, account it is certain that the
meeting tonight will be one of the
biggest that has been witnessed In
Honolulu.
Although Francis B. Smith has been
known as an amateur fisherman, the
real anglers will have to take off
their hat to him, as yesterday he
landed the record kaku for Hawaii.
Fishing oft Kaena Point, he landed a
kaku which weighed 53 pounds.
Accompanied by Commodore Mac
farlane, Honolulu's well knows
yachtsman, and Ed Paris, another
well known yachtsman and angler.
Smith started out. Paris and Smith
started on Saturday at 1 o'clock on
the Crete, owned by Commodore
Macfarlane. They trolled along Kaena
Point until dark and then Joined
Smiah, who had come oyer in the
Mollilou. The party spent the night
on the Mollilou, and the next morning
about 6:20 started trolling. There
the party met a number of anglers
in the Sea Scout.
Smith, with the assistance of Paris
and Macfarlane, landed the kaku after
a hard fight The fish was carried
about three miles before landing.
Many times it lamped out of the
water in an effort to shake the hook
Off.''' -. -
Paris is an old hand at landing a
fish, and the. party are now reced
ing the congratulations of their
friends. Commodore Macfarlane gave
an example of his ability to handle
a yacht on the Teturn trip. Accprd
ins to Information received tbe kaku
measured five feet and four inches
from tin to tip. This is considered to
be a record for Hawaii. After the
record catch, it Is doubtful If Smith
will still be cailedas amateur.
TO COMMENCE WORK ON
BELT ROAD THISWtbK
Thia week will ete tbe first step
takes towards the permanent Improve
ment of the belt road through the
Koolannoko district for which the
legislature eet aside $500,000. In a
day or two the surveying party neaoea
by Engineer Rea will begin the sur
vey, which' will take about three
months. When this is finished the
report of the engineer will be tiled
with the board and if approved, bids
win be called for.
TO OVER FIVE THOUSAND
MY EXHIBITION DURINO
f. b. sr.ni LANDS
52 POUND W
Bovsno
DIED liESGH
FLAG HONORED
Old Glory Draped Over Grave
of "Jimmy" Dias, Fatally
Hurt in Taking Stars and
Stripe From Burning House
Is honor af "Jimmr" Dias. a. small
S Banish hav of Waialusu whoa daath
followed as accident which occurred
after he had attempted to rescue an
Americas flag from the roof of a burs
in houia on Jnhr 4. the bev acouta
of this island attended special ser
vices at the grave of tbe dead boy yes-
teroay at tne waiaiua cemetery.
Dressed in their full equipment
which they wear at their encampment
at Waiaiua. several hundred bova
filed into the cemetery and took their
places near the grave of the boy.
"Jimmy" Dias bad been a boy scout
himself and a leading member of tbe
Waiaiua troop.
Scout Commissioner Roger N. Burn
bam opened the service with as ap
propriate explanation of tbe thought
to which the service had been dedi
cated. Chaplain Ignatius Fealy, U.
8. A., delivered an address. 8gt. San
derson, U. 8. As and scoutmaster of
Troop XV, of which Jimmy waa a
member, told about his experience
with the boy.
"Jimmy" Dias had been a member
of Troop XV is Waiaiua for some
time. By hie acts of bravery and
diligence he advanced rapidly is rank
in the scout troop. Not long ago he
waa gives special awards for saving
some children from drowning, sear
Waiaiua. His last act of bravery
came on July 4. when the mill en
gineer's house caucht fire. "Jlmm-"
was there. He saw the Americas flag
Y AUTHORITY.
Sealed tenders will be received up
to 12 o'clock soon, end opened on the
tt& nay of September. 1317. at tba of.
flee of the Clerk of the City and
uousiy of Honolulu, Room 8, Mcto
tyre Bufldlsr. for fiiraiahin is.noa
feet No. f Single Conductor Solid Cop
per, Light Armored Steel Tape
Cable. Rubber Insulation 63 J" with
lead covering 212", 8teel Tape .03 of
an men ror &ooo volts working pres
sure.
The Board of Suservlsora rticrrM
th right to reject any or all tenders
ana to waive au defects.
D. KALtATJOKALANT.
Clerk. City and Countv of Honoinin
W69 Aug. 20, 21, 22, 23. 24. 25, 27. 23,
29, 30. -
I
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY
i
HELP WANTED,
Thoroughly experienced , work room
nana. Apply jetre Fashion Co.
LOST.
Between Third and Fourteenth ave,
KalmnkL ladles' white crepe Bechene
waist. Phone 7(7S for reward.
63tt2t
Passbook No. 1I8S3. Please return to
Bank of Hawaii. 6168 3t
BRITONS!
YOUR COUNTRY CALLS YOUI
WILL YOU RESPOND?
Apply for Information te
British Recnilttef Mission, si
British Club Rooms, Fort Street
Honolulu.
Hours, 11 to 1 and 7:80 to 9.
P.O. Box 1181.
or British Consulate, 11 to 3,
PEOPLE WHO GAVE THEIR HEARTY
THE PAST WEEK
Wt STORE EVERYTHING
JAM Ed H LOVE
Whon You Ordor Your Groceries '
"Lovq'g Graham BreacH"
"Wrapped as soon as baked" (
on the root catching fire and rushed
up, little thinking of his danger. While
coming oft the roof a rusty nail
Pierced his foot. Ha waa taken to a
doctor, but complications set in and
ba died three days later and war
buried in the Waiaiua cemetery.
Following a word from Addison Kin
ney, patrol leader, and friend of the
dead boy. a large American flag was
laid on the grave. The scouts then
assembled and stood at attention,
while "taps' were sounded over the
One of the
greatest aids
to Social Functions
during hot weather
jj J.
Electric Fan
First of all, in dressing, it trscrss.wlat
might otherwise be a tiajfw teeKJsar,w er
deal into a comfort and pleascre aCsrwtei est
to appear In cool, perfect trim.
And then, it is the very essenos cf T7TL-
WITTC 1im - mm m mvmm ' m'mImm V .Li, i'ii t--t
fin
made invitingly cool 1yfectrw ,cmssa-? v't? s it
Hot weather gets
when the Electric Fan stcrtsl
For the practical dde cf Uvfcc--rc-&, 'ctsir
household labors, professions ths Elsctrft Faa
is a natural Incentive for increased e2crt. A r
Then are scores of Electrical hot wtathtr
helps bat ths best of them go hand-in-hind with
ths Fan.
You can't dodge ths hot weather.
I Take it coolly!
Oar Fans start at $8.00.
Hawaiian Electric Co., Ltd
Phone 3431
MINUTES.
CITY TRANSFER COMPANY
PHONE 153V"
grave. Then they repeated the scout
oath in unison and ended tbe cere
mony by repeating the Lord's prayer.
CuEHJeNCE NEXT WEEK
INSTALL KALIHI SEWERS
. The contract and bond by the Spald
ing Construction Company for the in
stallation of the Kalihi sewer system
will be ready to file with the board
of supervisors at its meeting Tuesday
evening. Tbe work is expected to
commence next week.
is the M
an awful setbaci
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