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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-current, October 19, 1917, 3:30 Edition, Image 1

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NEXT HAILS
Next null, Oct. 21.
For San Francises
Next mail, Oct. 2X
Ermine IluNeUn." EM. 1SS:, No.
ll.vallan Slr. "ot. XXV. No. 79!
12 PAGES UOSOJXCU, TERRITORY OF HAWAII, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19. 1917. 12 PACiES
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REVEL M
PATHWAY
OF
Should This Important Seaport
Be Taken by Germans, Way
for Advance on Capital City
Would Be Open; Ex-Czar
Placed. on Food Ration
(AsttelsU Ptm y V. S.Kavarwlilut.
O-TROGRAO. Russia, Oct Ifc
-Trl - Germans on Wednesday
succeeded in landing troops on
Dago 'stand, to the northeast of
Oesel. y . . .. . Y Y- . '
:' - In Wednesday's naval battle In
the Gulf of Riga two German
trawlers were sunk and one- Ger
man dreadnought was hit'; Ten
of the newest Kaiser and Koenig
' types of battleships and battle
. cruiser participated. :v '
TyETBOGRAD, Oct. 10With
, I the success of the" Germans
in the Gulf of Riga 'ua the
forcing of the defenses of Moon
bound, the government is tak
ing alarm and it was a n
nounccd today that as a pre
cautionary measure the seat of
government will in the near
future be removed to Moscow.
Preparations for tno evacuation of
' Itevel, a fortified seaport and impor
: tant town ofJEsthonia bordering on
ao Gulf of Finland, are under way.
'i&e schools havo been closed and the
Inhabitants are being sent to the in
r ' terior in anticipation of a. bombard
ment by, the German naval forces."
J(.Kcvel should be captured by the
German- It would piace;the capital
city In danger, as Pctrograd Is less
, than : 100 miles distant, -with a direct!
;Ilne of railway between the twoclt-
ieav vV -t -.':Y- - f -.;' YYw ;:'
The . government reports that two
German torpedo boats. have' been sunk
.Jn the minefields protecting Moon
'' .'aound. . . : " : '." - y .
: " It was announced that the former
Czar and bis family have been placed
on . rations and are now using food
cards at his prison castle in. Tobolsk.
BERLIN Oct 19.-Two Russian In
' fantry regiments, numbering 50QO men
Y havOoen captured, on Moon island
whi? tbo Germans now possess.,- ; .
LOCAL m RANIS
KD I COAST
Plaintiff "Says Honolulah Was
"Too Attentive to Her Husband
"Asks $500 Monthly Balm
(AociUd PrM7 U.S. 2rUWlr !.) v
SAN FRANCISCO, CaU Oct' 19.
.Ylian,Armstrong Erickson Bell has
. filed a suit here for divorce from
Eustace Bell. aHeging extreme cruelty
and the undue attentions of 8 Hon
. lulu woman. The uple have been
married 15 months. Acquisition of
wealth from oil lands left by the bite
Thomas BeH is thought to be respon
tible for the marital differences. Mrs.
Bell asks alimony In the sum of $590
a month. '.: .'' '
The Bells are not thought to' be
residents of Hawaii, as their names do
not appear in the directory. ' They
- may have been visitors bere recently,!
however. y, ; . ;' ;
JAPAN TAKES STEPS TO
INSURE SAFE RETURN OF
NIPPONESE WAR MISSION
-Every precautionary measure is be
ing taken by the Japanese government
to insure the safe return to Japan of
- VIscrK.' Ishii, head of the 1m
pcriaVlapanese war. mission, and his
party. -Y :"':"-Y I : .' ' :
; Viscount Ishii, who has been visiting !
In Washington and other cities on the
mairiland on Important mission, it Is!
said, will soon leave for his homeward
, trip. . .: :.Y:-: :: VrY
- Acting under instructions, from the
foreign office In . Tokio, 'Vice Consul
Moroi said this morning that no In
formation on the return of -the war
mission will be published. .
TAUriT OF. GERMANY'S -
EMPRESS PASSES AWAY
- (AisociaUd Prua by t). S. Vaval Wirelaas.)
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands. Oct
; 11). Princess , Henriette Elftabeth of
Bchleswlg-Holstein, aunt of the Em
press of Gcruany, died at, Kiel, Ger
; xsasy. late : . 'w-'X' '" ':
LICENSING SYSTEM EXTENDED
TO CONTRt ILHAWAII DEALERS
President's Proclamation Affects Many Lines of Tradesmen,
Both Wholesale and Retail, With. Aim of Curbing Prices
of Foodstuffs
TERRITORIAL wholeKalers of food products, retailers whose gross sales
of food commodities exceed $100.K0 a year, packers and distributors
of fresh, canned or cured beef, pork or mutton whose gross sales exceed
1100,000 a year and operators of poultry or egg-packing plants whose gross
sales exceed $o,000 a year, must ootain licenses to do business from the
United States food administration, law department, license diviFion. Wash
fngtou, D. C before November 1 or be subject to the penalties" of the
' law. , r
On -October 10, according to infor
mation received in the last mail. Presi
dent Wilaon Issued a.proclajnation re
garding the licensing of various lines
of trade. Under the proclamation
cold storage warehouses, grain eleva
tors and firms handling various foods
in Hawaii and other parts of the ter
ritory must secure license. The pen-Altlca"-prescribed
for violating the
trade licensing act pre a fine of $5000
or Imprisonment for not more than
two years".
The president's proclamation will af-
Lfect a large number of dealers In food
stuffs, both retailers and wholesalers,
in Honolulu and other parts of the.
territory, and several local dealers,
when Informed by the Star-Bulletin
today of the act, sent wireless messages
to the national food administration re-,
questing the license forms. The word
received by. the Star-Bulletin is the
first to come to Honolulu, and to all
local retailers and wholesalers it
proved a distinct surprise.
It is pointed out that the larger
firms JUke Henry May & Co., the feed
companies, the meat companies J. M.
Levy & Co.. C. Q. Yee Hopp & Co.,
and L. Ah Leong &-Co, are not the
only concerns to be affected, as many
of the smaller Oriental houses arc
doing business In foodstuffs amount
ing v to more tban $100,000 a year.
Many of these firms are also affected
becausethey, are conducting whole
sale as well as a retail business. -
The territorial food commission to
day announced that it has received no
information of the issuance - of the
president's proclamation, and declared
it , did not ; know who i would enforce
the licensing act here. The office of
tne federal food' commissioner said
this work probably would be done by
the food commission, but J. F. Child,
acting executive officer, says he has
no information other than that given
him by' the Star-Bulletin.,;
Alma to Curb Prices , . . ,f ;
The manaaer "of a laree retail and
Wholesale concern, whose business
in foodstuffs is far in excess of $100,
000 a year, expressed the opinion that
the . passage . of the act . undoubtedly
Is a move on the part of the national
administration to control the prices of
fcod to a certain extent and that price's
on many commodities may be fixed In
the. license, without which the com
pany or firm would be unable to op
erate.; For Instance, he points out, the
foodU administration might rule that
goods bo sold at a profit of 25 per
cent ' above the actual cost. Other
wholesalers and retailers expressed
similar opinions It is also thought
locally that the act, will tend to pre
vent the hoarding- of large quantities
of foodstufrs In warehouses and cold
storage plants.: - " -
The proclamation authorized by the
food control law specifies that the -following
must' applyfpr licenses:
' All persons, firms, corporations and
associations engaged in the business
either of (IV -Operating cold storage
warcvouses a cold storage warehouse
fortihe purposes of this proclamation
being' defined as any place artificially
or mechanically cooled to or below a
temperature of 45 degrees above zero
Fahrenheit in which food products are
placed and held for 30 days or more) :
(2) operating elevators, warehouses
or" other; places for storage of 'corn,
-i- r . . . - . .
-i (Continued on page two)
LWLOflHCOMhl
Allotment
of
Liberty
Bonds
- It is hoped that tlie Seoond Liberty Loan, like the first,
will be heavily oversulseiHbed. But should such iirove
: the vase, ho mat ter how large the oversubscription may be,
the policy of distributing the bonds as widely as possjbjc
among, the people of the country will be followed, and
every subscriber to nri amount not greater than $1000 is
' suro to receive the bond or bonds subscribed for.
Subscribers to larger amounts will receive an allotment
based on the amount ofjhc bond issue and its proportion
to the amount of subscription. What proportion of their
subscription they will obtain will not be known until ail -subscriptions
are in. I
IP YOU ' SUBSCRIBE POR A $50 i LIBERTY BOND
' i 1 YOiJ'LL GET THE ENTIRE BOND
KARL KOESSLEIl
IS AGAIN NABBED
BY AUTHOiilTIES
German Alien Found Loitering
on Waterfront and Turned
Over to Police; Was Arrested
Few Months Ago for Failing
to Secure Federal Permit
Kan Koessier, aged so years, a
German alien, was arrested late last
night by the military authorities as
he was prowling around the water
front. He was taken uiyler military
escort to . police headquarters and
turned over to the municipal officers
for investigation. The arrest was
made by Lieutenant Ballard of the.
25th Infantry, hose detachment was
doing patrol duty along the wharves.
Koessier, being an alien enemy, Is
prohibited from entering certain dis
tricts, among .them being the local
waterfront areas He was caught
twice before on the wharves and pirs,
andtakex in band 'by 'the federal au
thorities, but was released. Just what
disposition will be made of bis case;
this tim6 is not kfibwn. . . - ; -
Koessier first came to the notice of
the Honolulu authorities when tye was
taken off the Sierra about a year ago.
charged with being a stowaway. He
was arrested by Waterfront Officer
Carter and lodged in jail. He was lat
er released and was not 'seen for a
long time. After the United States
enterea tne war, uermans were pro
hibited from entering the waterfront
districts, and the sailors were taken
from the German refugee ships.
It was only a few days after the of
ficers and, crew were removed that
United States Marshal J. J." Smiddy
and his deputies searched the ; Pom
mem and found Koessier in the-coal
bunkers, dangerously ; near the sea
cocks. He was taken before the mili
tary authorities, 'and admitted that he
had been in an Australian internment
camp, and had .later been liberated or
had escaped. He also admitted that
he had been employed aa messenger
to Franz Bopp, German consular at
tache at San Francisco. Bopp was one
of the German diplomatic agents who
was Indicted for conspiracy along
with Von Papen and Boy-Ed.
h- Koessier, however, was released by
the military authorities. Not '.long
ago he was again arrested by Marshal
Smiddy for failing to secure a permit
allowing him to reside In the local re
stricted districts. He is now lodged
at police headquarters, awaiting lnvds
ligation. ,
PALMER MADE CUSTODIAN
ALIEN-ENEMY PROfERTY
(Asxori td FrM by tl S- NftTtf Wireless.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Oct 19. Ex
Congressman Alexander Mitchell Pal
mer of - Pennsylvania has . been ap
pointed custodian of alien enemy
property in the United States and its
territories.
ubekty
'PLEDGES
$3,362,000
Hawaii's Quota to Second Loan!
Is Now Oversubscribed, but;
Drive Leaders Want to Reach
$5,000,00Q Mark
"
Ix)cal subscriutions to the sec-
ond Liberty loan reached $2,5o0.-
300 at noon today. This amount
wa3 collected from 12b9 sub-
scribers. The army figures turn- I
ed in bv deuartment headnuar- !
tors reached $S12,tU0 from five
posts. The grand total, army and
civilian, at noon today, reached
$3,362,900, oversubscribing the
minimum estimate by nearly a
half million dollars.
THE totals announced by the exe
cutive committee for the second
Liberty loan reached $2,550,300 at
noon today, an . increase of $339,950
over yesterday's figures. This amount
as turned in by 1269 subscribers, but
the committee is now working for 3.
0J0 subscribers before the campaign
closes on October 27. Hawaii's quoto
to the national loan is now oversub
scribed by nearly $300,000, but the
local'workers are driving for the $3.
000,000 mark. This means the cam
paign hustlers must secure $250,000
every day until the campaign is ended,
a week from tomorrow.
Officials said this morning that if
Hawaii makes the $5,000,000 mark
she will attract the attention of the
world,1 and in all probability no more
loan r requirements will be exacted or
her for some time to come.
SchofleM 'reported a Totar bfloSS,-
950 at-mldnight last night, and no. new
figures : have been received at depart
ment headquarters so far this after
noon: The army totals reached $812,
600 at. the same hour. The boy scout
totalt today amount to $22,700.
Scouts Still at Work
The Boy Scouts will be out in full
force tomorrow morning to continue
(Contlnuea on case two)
FIRST AMERICAN
SHELL IS FIRED
ON WESrFRONT
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. Oct. 15.
American field. artillery has fired its
first hostile shell in FYance.
To Maj. Maxwell Murray of the
artillery fell the honor, according to
a despatch received here
. Early yesterday morning a battery
of American artillery swung into po
sition somewhere on ' the western
front The pieces were trained and
loaded,
"Fire!" commanded an American
colonel and Maj. Murray jerked the
lanyard that sent the first American
shell screaming over the German
trenches.
Murray is a son of Maj.-Gen. Arthur
Murray, in command of the western
department. He is a graduate of
West Point with the class of 1907 and
Is 32 years old. He was one of the
first officers sent to France under
Pershing and is now a major m a
field artillery regiment at the front
I NEW YORK STOCK
I MARKET TODAY 1
1
Yester.
Today dav
Alaska. Gold
'2
1C5T'8
115
64
931 i-
55' 4
57'4
at
American Smelter
. 86&
. 105'4
. 114"
f63'4
. 93?8
- 56
- 57ft
a....
American Sugar Rfo.
American Tel. &-Tef.
Anaconda Copper ...
Atchison
Baldwin Loco
Baltimore & Ohio ...
Eethlehem Steel
b 84?i b
80'4
Calif. 'Petroleum
Canadian Pacific ...
C M. & St P. (St Paul)
Colo. Fuel & Iron
Crucible Steel
Cuban Cane ...........
Erie Common
General Electric ...
14 13'4
149 149
48' 4 49
383 38
.. 67 66
.. 282 27' z
.. 19S 19
.. 139'4 137' 4
95', i 94
.. 100 100
X
General Motors, New ..
t Great Northern Pfd
Ir ter. Harv N. J.
I Kennecott Ccpper . .
t Lehigh R. R.
j New York' Central ..
Pennsylvania .',
' Ray Consol. ........
.. 33'
.. 59
74ft
.. 51
22
. . 752
.. 81
39
.. 144
.. 1234
33! 4
58
73
Reading Common ...
Southern Pacific . . . .
Studebaker ,
T.xas Oil ...
Union Paicfic ,
U. S. Steel . v
uuh
Western Union ; . .
Westinghouse v . . , . . .
88l4
40
144
123 i
4 f flM 9
.. 80 80'8
.. - 81ft 83
... 42 . 42
; au4. r Eeividaaa. xUooMotad. .
FRENCH PIERCE
GERHLINES
ONTHE AISNE
Simultaneous Attack by Teu-
tons on the Meuse Is Rc-
pulsed; Dunkirk Bombed by
Huns
Ari9ciated Frass by L. S. Naxl WUiless.)
!
A RIS, France, Oct. 19. After days
of Inactivity the French guns thun
dered out an Intense barrage fire
this morning and under its cover the
rrencn infuiitrymen sped to the at
tack, penetrating the German line
along the Aisnc. One hundred were
takei. piisoners.
Simultaneously the Germans launclu
ed an attack on their right flank
along the Meuse, but were repulsed.
Twenty bombs were - dropped on
Ptiuk;rk by German airmen but ni
casualties were reported. Armored
motor cars bearin? antiaircraft guns
replied to the attack and succeeded
in damaging several planes, eventually
tin"ing th raiders off.
'LONDON',. Eng. -Oct 19. Hun air
raiders attempted an attack on Vcr
mellcs today, but quick work by Al
lied aviators drove the airmen orf be
fore their purpose could be accom
plished. - ;
LATE NEWS AT A GLANCE
CHEWS OF THREE U. S. SHIPS, SUNK, REACH HOME
AN ATLANTIC PORT, Oct 19. A French liner today brought the
crews of three American ships sunk. by submarines.. They were the bark
Toalina and the schooners Crockett and Henry Lippitt. .
SLAYER OF LOUISIANA SHERIFF HANGED
BATON ROUGE, La., Oct; 19. Helalfe" Carrlere today was hanged for
the murder last July of Sheriff Swords. r,
CHORUS GIRL SERIOUSLY HURT IN FALL
Whilerehearsiag for the new show to be put on at the Bijou theater,
Maude Armstrong, one of the chorus girls, "fell and t sustained possible
serious injuries of the back. She was rushed to the Emergency hospital,
but owing to the seriousness of her condition, was transferred to
Queen's hospital. '
ARMITAGE GETS COMMISSION IN RESERVE CORPS
George V. Armitage, chief clerk at the office of the, constructing
quartermaster, today received his commission as a captain in the quarter
master's reserve corps.
HOURS SET FOR PEDESTRIANS TO PASS OVER PALI
Because of the confusion resulting from the closing of the Pall road to
traffic while the national guard is protecting the Nuuanu water supply.
Mayor Fern today made arrangements whereby pedestrian traffic may pass
twite daily. Pedestrians going over the Pali from Honolulu will be passed
by the gnard at 9 a. m. and 2 p. m., and coming over the Pall to Honolulu
at 11 a. m. and 4 p. m. These are the shifts when the watch changes.
THREE CASES INVESTIGATED BY GRAND JURORS
City Attorney Arthur M. Brown this afternoon was to present the fol
lowing cases to the territorial grand Jury for investigation: . John Kaihe,
charged with the malicious conversion of a gray horse belonging to Wil
liam JBucnce; cnaries Fapoko, charges wlthan assault on Bertha Ahln a
girl under 13 years; an alleged forgery case involving $50.
WILSON RECEIVES JAPANESE PARLIAMENTARY MISSION
WASHINGTON, D. C, Oct 19. President Wilson today received the
Japanese parliamentary commission recently arrived from Japan.
ILLICIT BOOZE SELLERS GIVEN PRISOr-L SENTENCES
Juan Onkinko, rcently arrested at Waialua on a charge of selling liquor
to soldiers, was sentenced in federal court today to serve three months in
Oahn prison. H. Beherens, convicted on a similar charge, was sent to prison
for six months. t -
- WOULD TAKE I.I.- CASE TO U. S. COURT
The Inter-Island Steam Navigation Co., through Attorney W. L. Whit
ney, filed in circuit court thi3 afternoon a motion to transfer to the local
United States court the injunction suit . brought against it by the public
utilities commission to enjoin it from refusing to obey the commission's
decision ordering It to adopt .the- passenger and freight rates in effect In
1916. The company claims it is within the jurisdiction of the federal ship
ping board and that there are federal questions Involved.
FRENCH DEPUTIES VOTE CONFIDENCE IN GOVERNMENT
PARIS, France, Oct. 19 By vote of .369 to 93 the chamber of dep
uties today decided to support the government in its general war policy.
Minister Cambon declared participation by the United States in the Allies'
war conference was necessary because of the essential importance to Its
participation in the war.
ANTI-GERMAN OUTBURST IN ALSACE-tORRAINE
WASHINGTON. D. C, Oct. 19. Switzerland advices reaching here to
day say that the people of Strasburg, Metz and other Alsace-Lorraine towns
have participated in a general outburst against German domination and par
ticularly have expressed resentment against the new German war loan.
U. S. SCORES POINT IN TRIAL OF PtOTTERS
CHICAGO, III-, Oct 19 The prosecution in the case of Gustar Jacob
sen, on trial for complicity in the German plot to foment a revolution in
India against Great Britain, rested its case today. Motion of the defense
for dismissal overruled by Judge Landis. The defense presented no wit
nesses. The case is expected to go to the jury Monday.
LIBERTY BOND TOTALS
CLOSE TO TWO BILLION
NEW YORK. NY T, Oct. 19. A
block of one million Liberty Bonds
was sold here to-day at $y9.72 per
$IW certificate.
WASHINGTON, th C. Oct. Es
50:timatcs made late today give the
22 4 1 amount subscribed to the Liberty
75 i Loan at $1,750,000,000.
WASHINGTON, D. O, Oct. 19.
Twenty million dollars . were today
loaned to France by the United
States.
Joaquin, Sanchez, charged with vag
rancy, : was sent to Jail for three
Jtaontha in police court todays U
Sugar inN:;Yi-.
Jumps to 15
Cents a Pound
NEW YORK, Oct. 19. New
f Vork is in the grip of the worst
sugar famine in its history. Due
to transportation congestion ow-
ing to the government demands
for the shipment of coal and
grain the beet sugar crop of the
West cannot be moved. As the
result the stocks on hand are 4
fast dwindling and today the
price jumped to 13 cents a pound
in this city. Many retailers
have already exhausted their
I stocks
t
The restaurants in an attemnt
tOjavo today abolished the sugar
bowl and during the stringency
each customer will be limited to 4
one lump.
BOSTON, Mass., Oct 19.
The "dry" influence around the
national army zones in the New
4 England states is being blamed
for the shortage of sugar. Guards- .
men and civilians who acquire u
thirst and are prohibited from 4
slacking it by the "wet" route,
are said to be consuming enor-
mous amount of the toothsome 4
4 candy, and the lack of trans por. 4
4 tation for renewing the sugar 4
4 supply is causing a serious cur- 4
4 tailment in the output of the 4
4 factories. 4
4 tr4-4 44 4 4444444
THIEVES LOOT GROCERY
ST0RESIN ILLINOIS
AURORA. I1L, Oct. 19. Grocery
stores In Kendall county were the
victims last night of hungry burglars,
who drove up to the shops in an auto
truck and loaded up on the neces
saries of life, but left the cash box
intact
No arrests have been made, the
bandits making a clean getaway.
I1
. Acting upon the. request of the army
authorities for some step to be taken
toward prostrating ships that attempt
to enter or leave the harbor outside of
the hours.providedin the regulations,
the harbor board has, asked Attorney
General I.'M. Stainback to commence
proceedings to bring the violators is
WAR PRICE
OF'SUGAR
SETAT$5;95
Differential Between Raw and
r Refined Fixed at $1.30 Per
Hundred; Cuban Product to
Bring Only $4.90
m
FROM information gained from tha
Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade
Journal. A. MNowell, secretary
of the Sugar Factors, has analyzed
the margin of $1.30 between raw and
refined sugar which is to be allowed
sugar refiners by the food adminifitra
tion. With the differential established at
$1.30, the price which will be secured
by the Hawaiian Island planters for -their
raw sugar will be $5.9 per 100
pounds, or about what was first esti
mated here after the announcement
as made that refined sugar was to be
sold at $7.25 a hundred.
Unless some special concession is .
mide to the Cuban producers, Cuba -raw,
f. o. b., will bring only abouti
$4.90, after the duty of approximately
one cent a pound is deducted., V
The refiners margin, as agreed to by
the U. S. food administration and the Y
refiners, was based Jirst on the aver
age margin for five pre-war years, and
then on the increased cost of refining
since the war started. The following
was the margin in cents for the years
specified: . -. ' '
191G.784. 1912.879.-
1911 .892. ' 1913 .772. V-
- 1914 -841.
Taking .811 cents, as the average .
differential for the five pre-war years,
allowance was made for increase cost
of. refining of 100 pounds . of sugar
output as follows:
Increase loss la manufacture; due
to higher ; MUtMw,4i cetw
Bags, jute and cotton, 15 cents:
coal, 5 cents; " labor, 4 8. cents, bona
black, z cents. Actual calculation
totals 181 cents.. ;, '
For cartage, interest, lighterage. In
surance and all other increases' the
refiners were allowed .019, making the
total differential of $1.20. " :
Extracts from a public information
announcement issued by the food ; ad
ministration gives the following infor
mation regarding the filing of the
price of sugar: -
fit Is intended -that consumers' in
terests shall be protected, in an effort
to combat the old laws based only
on supply and demand. ,YY v
"As a step in this process, refinera
have agreed to refine sugar on a net
margin between the cost of their rar
material, and the selling prtccof thefr
refined product of approximately 1 20'
cents per pound, after trade dlscounU
have beea dedflctedY The. bash for
this margin had its origin Jn the five
year pre-war period. The flgufewas
arrived at by taking thc averag mar
gin for five years previohs to and. in
cluding 1914, and adding the Increased
cost of operation which refinera must
how' face. For example. In , refining
sugar there is a ioas - in weight of
about seven pounds on every hundred, :
and as raw. sugar is expected jlo coat
in round f figures aboqj 2-cents , per
pound more than In the five year pre-
war period, this alone amounts to an .
increased cost of 14 cents per one
hundred pounds. Bags, jute and cot
ton have increased la t price equiva
lent to about 15 cents per hundred,
coal 5 cents, labor 8 cents, bone biack
2 cents. - These increases added to '
the old pre-war basis, bring the figures
up to 1.281 cents, so that in selling
(Continued on page two)
-
TO ALLIES WAS 1
TO TALK PEACE
(Associated Pth by U. 8. VstsI WlxIu.
ZURICH, Switzerland, Oct 19.
The political writer of the Neuste
Nachrichten of .Munich sees In the re
cent journey of Kaiser Wilhelm and
Von Kuehlman to Constantinople and
Sofia the preliminary steps to a new
peace overture from the Central
Powers.
(Associated Press by XJ. B. Viral Wlralsss.)
COPENHAGEN, Denmark, Oct 19.
According to a despatch received
here from Lemburg Germany Is agaLV
interfering with the liberty of the'
Poles and has notified the council that
their sole candidate for premier, Tar-'
nowski. Is persona non grata to Ger
many and win not be allowed to t.:i
IL4ISER S TRIP
GERMANY AGAIN .
CRUSHES POLES
0

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