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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-current, November 06, 1917, 3:30 Edition, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-11-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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HONOLULU STAB-BULLETIN, TUESDANOVEMBER 6, 1917
TWO
0DY!S QUERY
A. W. Carter Ascribes High
Prices to1 Island Scarcity,
Necessitating Importations
v
4- Fissures secured by the territo-
rial food commission from retail-,
ers tend to show that the poor
man is paying too much for meat,
4- while persons of larger means are
4- not navincnoueh.
4-
4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4 4 K t 4
4- V
Importation of beef from the main
land, necessitated by the, lack of
enough local beef to supply the-cm
lian population and the army, is one
of the principal causes for the recent
increase of one cent In the wholesale
price of the meat,; according to a let
ter received bv the territorial food
commission from A. W. Carter, one
the directors of the Hawaii Meat Co.,
to whom the commission's letter, ask
ing for information, was referred.
The increase in the price of cattle,
he says, is as follows:
Steers, 15 to 16 cents a pound.
Ccws, 14 to 154 cents a pound.
Heifers, 14 and 15 cents to 16 cents
r. pjund.
In part, Mr. Carter's letter follows:
"The reason for the raise is that
there is not sufficient local beef to
supply the civilian population and the
army, and the company is obliged to
import beef. The cost of the cow
beef from California this month is ISM
cents a pound and tills Is sold to the
retailer at the same price.
"The company last month purchased
in Australia for November delivery
260,000 pounds of beef, army cut, for
the army, wh'ch will cost about 17
cents a pound, and 190,000 pounds of
similar beef for January delivery
which will cost about 16 cents a
pound. The company purchased with
out the territory 650,000 pounds of
beef for delivery in November, Decem
ber and January, last mpnth.
"Last month, asking the Western
Meat Co. or San Francisco for a figure
cn 150,000 pounds of army beef for
November, we received the price of
15V? cents in San Francisco.
"I should say that the shortage of
beef was accounted for in two ways:
The unprecedented drought through
out the territory, with the exception of
& few localities, and the very material
increase in the requirements of the
army. We "have to plan for a monthly
requirement of 250,000 pounds. This
is probably about 100,000 pounds more
than last year. I have-not the figures
but they are easily obtained.
"I think it will be found that trans
portation in cold storage has advanced
one cent a pound. This adds to the
cost of getting beef here. 1, should
say that, with usual weather condi
tions, and it looks as if the dry spell
was over, the local -supply could take
care of the army and civilian trade
by March 1. Tire cost of producing
beef varies on evfcry ranch.
"The price th6 company pays the
grazer is the price the retailer pays
lor the carcasses. The profit the com
pany makes out of hides, etc., after
deducting all expenses and 7 per cent
on its capital, is divided between all
of the grazers m-rketing stock that
iear, pro rata, according to the num
ber of pounds each puts in."
ETR0P0L1TAN
IMPORTS LITTLE
"In the ten months of this year
the Metropolitan Meat Market has
sold at least 2400 carcasses of beef,
and of that amount not mere than 72
have been imported," is the state
ment made' today by Antone Louis,
proprietor of the Metropolitan; in dis
cussing a story which appeared in the
irorning paper.
"We would prefer to handle abso
lutely no imported frozen meats, and
do so only in event of temporary
shortage in the island beef supply.
As long as we can get the home
grown meat we avoid the imported
article.
"I understand the Hawaii Meat
company has imported meat from
the coast two or three times this year
to meet a threatened shortage in the
local supply. The Metropolitan
Meat Market took only a part of the
total shipment, however.,
"I know that my establishment has
not -sold more than the 72 carcasses
mentioned in the last 10 months,
which is not more than 3 per cent
o! the total amount of beef I have
sold to the Honolulu consumers in
that period."
HAWAIIAN MUSIC IS
SOUGHT BY SOLDIERS
John A. McKinney, former Honolu
lan and now a; member of the Royal
Hying Corps, writes from Manitoba,
Canada, asking Promotion Secretary
Fred Halton for Hawaiian music. Mc
Kinney leaves shortly for Fort Worth,
Texas, for training, and then for
France. Mr. Halton asks that any one
who has copies of Hawaiian music for
disposal to kindy bring them to the
promotion committee rooms for ship
ment. They should be in the office
by Nov. 15.
Turnkey Moses Keoua at police
headquarters received word yesterday
that his son Is in the Canadian army
In Manitoba. Young Keoua left Ho
nolulu several months ago.
Fred Halton received word from R
H. Young, county 'road engineer ol
Paducah, Ky., asking for information
of the whereabouts of his son, Huff
man Young, who left home over a year
ago. Any Information on the matter
wiH be greatly appreciated by Mr. Hal
ton, who will promptly notify the boy's
parents. . V v ,
FIRST LOAN BONUS
RECEIVED HERE
V"
. While one or. two of the local banks
have received their, certificates for
the first .liberty loan the remainder
of the -banking houses- have cabled
San Francisco to have the first issue
certificates held up on the coast until
they can learn how many of the local
purchasers of the first Issue want to
convert their 3 percents to 4 percents.
The First National Bank has re
ceived its quota of the first Issue. The
bonds are printed in black on the face
and brown on the back with the cou
pons in black and brown.
r: Banks which have held Tip the cer
tificates of the first issue in San Fran
cisco are 'requesting their clients to
notify them Immediately whether they
want their 3 per cent first issues con
verted to 4 per cents. Purchasers of
Libert Loan bonds are asked to bear
in mind that though only two Liberty
Bond campaigns have been held there
are three kinds issued. There is the
First Liberty Loan bond, the Second
Liberty Loan bond and, the Conversion
Fours. These last named bonds are
the ones which will be supplied to
purchasers of the first issue who want
to convert their buy to the, 4 per cent
issue.
The Fir6t Liberty Loan bonds bear
3 per cent interest payable on June
and December 15 each year, mature
on June 15, 1947, and are tax-exempt.
The Second Liberty Loan bonds
bear 4 per cent interest payable May
and November 15 of each year, mature
on .November 15, 1942, and are subject
to the surtax and the excess profits
tax.
The Conversion Fours bear 4 per
cent Interest payable June and De
cember 15 each year, mature June 15,
1947, and are subjec to the surtax and
the excess profits tax.
ROTH ACKNOWLEDGES
RESOLUTIONS ON DEATH
OF CAPTAIN MATS0N
Fred Halton, secretary of the pro
motion committee, has received a let
ter from William Roth, secretary of
the Matson Navigation company, ac
knowledging the resolutions of sym
pathy and sorrow sent by the promo
tion committee on ,the death of Cap
tain Matson.- The letter follows:
My dear Mr. Halton:
I am in receipt of your very kind
letter of the eleventh instant, for
warding copy of resolution passed by
the Hawaii Promotion Committee,
and also expressing your own sorrow
and sympathy at the great loss which
this company has suffered in the
passing of Captain Matson.
Captain Matson toolc the very keen
est interest in every movement which
Had for its object the advancement
of the interests of the islands, and
we are deeply appreciative of these
expressions of sympathy, at this time
when our loss is most severely felt.
The kindly sentiments as exnressed
by yourself and the resolution of the
committee have been conveyed to the
family which join me in assurances
of our appreciation.
Yours very truly,
MATSON NAVIGATION COMPANY,
(Signed) W. P. ROTH,
Secretary.
MOANA HOTEL
DINNER DANSANT
Tuesday evening, Noyember 6.
Dude Miller will furnish the music.
Informal. Adv.
The Social Side
of Hygiene
Society as a rule !s ccnerally careful about
the state of their health, and they are apt to
make pood use of remedies known as disease
preventives. Germicides and antiseptics are In
cluded in this class, but the createst care
should be exercised in using any wh'ch con
tains poisons, unless prescribed by a physician.
By reason of its absolute safety and its
beneficial results, physicians hare strongly rec
ommended Tyree's Antiseptic Powder. This
preparation appears to occupy & unique posi
tion as a toilet aud hygienic antiseptic and is
being most farorably commented upou by so
ciety, both in the States and abroad. The late
Prof. W. M. Gray, pathologist to Providence
Hospital aud microscoplst to the Army Medi
cal Museum, In discussing the merits of the
preparation said: "From the above and other
experiments with Tyree's Antiseptic Powder, 1
conclude that it is a most valuable and use
ful compound, and that its efficiency, must be
due to its peculiar mode of manufacture and
its well-balanced chemical adjustment as well
as the exceptional purity of its Ingredients."
It Is sold in packages at twenty-five cents and
one dollar by the manufacturer, J. S. Tyre,
Chemist, Inc., Washington, O. C
Honolulu Again
Detects German
Agent In Disguise
Pole Deported From U. S. at In
stance of Local Naval Offi
cials Who Tagged Him Here
Investigations carried on by the lo
cal naval intelligence office which
were begun last July when Boguntt
Balzerkevitch, who claimed to be a
Pole, passed through Honolulu aboard
the Persia Maru, bound for the states,
oA his denortation from America.
The Star-Bulletin yesterday publish
ed the story to the effect that Bal
zerkevitch, bound for the Orient,
arrived here yesterday aboard a Jap
anese liner, locked in his cabin, and
under guard, because the captain of
the ship refused to take any chances
of his prisoner escaping while the
boat touched here.
The local naval intelligence office
stated today that when the Pole pass
ed through Honolulu on July 25 of
this year, he was placed on the sus
pected list, and investigated. He
was allowed to proceed to San Fran
cisco, however, but subsequent inves
tigations caused his detention at An
gel island on instructions from Hono
lulu. Balzf rkevitch claimed he was a
Pole, Ibut Investigations proved, that
he was a German. He was allowed
to proceed to San Francisco, but
while he was en route from this port
the local authorities were investigat
ing his record. They learned that he
had been educated in Berlin, and at
the outbreak of the war he was a
clerk in a powder manufactory in
Russia. He was later interned, but
liberated by the czar's proclamation
freeing the Poles. He posed as a
Pole and thus gained his liberty, ; ,
Further investigation disclosed the
fact that he traveled through Russia
posing as a member of the Russian
Polish refugee committee. In 1916
he came east over the trans-Siberian
railway to Shanghai. He worked up
and down the Amur river, in North
Manchuria. He left China aboard the
Persia Maru and attempted to get In-,
to North America without passports.
When he arrived in Honolulu he was
questioned by the local officers,
whose later instructions detained
him at Angel island. Because of sus
picion, and the fact that he. was not
a Pole, the authorities ordered his
deportation from America.
MC101AD
.... .... . .: .-, - - '
UUItVLIfULUU
HSU I'll! I BE TO
START FRIDAY
With a vit'W to securing information
sufficient to warrant it taking steps to
wipe out the alleged monopoly cn
fishing and bait grounds, the territorial
fool commission, at a meeting at 2
o'clock next Friday afternoon in the
Chamber of Commerce rooms, will be
gin an investigation of the high price
and scarcity of fish.
After weeks of work the commission
has about completed the gathering of
data and information pertinent to the
fish question, and Friday's meeting
will be in the nature of a public hear
ing at which all sides will be heard.
J. F. Child, federal food administra
tor for the territory, said today th-t
one of the outcomes of the meeting
may be-the opening up to the public of
all private fishing and bait grounds,
placing these under the control of the
territory, or under the control of the
United States government. The pub
lic, fishermen and representatives of
local fishing companies will be invited
to attend the meeting.
CUSTOMS CHIEF COMING
TO ISLANDS IN MARCH
Frank Halstead, chief of the division
of customs of the treasury, depart
ment in Washington, is to visit the Ha
waiian islands next .March, according
to a letter received from Collector
Malcolm Franklin, who is now in the
East.
In this letter to Acting Collector
Itaymer Sharp, Collector Franklin
writes that he has been spending
much of his time at Battle Creek,
.Mich., with a sick nephew, John
Franklin.
Of his last visit to Washington ha
writes: "It is impossible to see any
one in Washington unless your busi
ness is war."
Collector Franklin states that he ex
pects to arrive home by November 15.
. '"1
CVhen Your Eyes Need Care
Try Murine yc Remedy .
Most
Wonderful Valu
'ia Honolulu .
"ffie. Wonder
1CEIT airacrra 1
Mill
zieirKiTTfr
Survey work on the first section of
the new Volcano road ha3 been started,
according to A. C. Wheeler, engineer
of . Hawaii county, who arrived this
morning on the Mauna Kea for a short
stay in the city.
This first section will include the
road line between Four MJles and Olaa
a length of about five miles. Mr.
Wheeler estimates that this piece of
road will use up some less than the
$200,000 appropriated by the legisla
ture, of which ?100,000 is aow; avail
able. ;-'V:':;:. v' '
The road is to follow an entirely
new line, will be 18 feet wide, and of
concrete. It will have o be cut through
old lava and forest country. Work
has also, started on the eight-mile
Kona-Kau road, for which $50,000 was
appropriated.
The recent stormy weither has been
a help to the contractor on the Waio
lama reclamation project, says Mr.
Wheeler, for it has driven in sand that
was much needed infilling. This sand
is taken from the .ocean and had grown
scarce in the vicinity owing to quiet
weather of the last several months.
I TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY
- 1
. HELP WANTED.
l 4 . .
w
WE STORE EVERYTHING
JAMES H. LOVE
CITY TRANSFER COMPANY
: - PHONE 1231.
Competent foreman ; for - reinforced
concrete building work; long job; j
good wages. Address P. O. Box 404, J
lino, Hawaii, r : - . 6936 6t
FOR SALE.
''vv' .V AUTOMOEJL ES. V-
Spassenser touring car, self-starter,
: ' and full equipment, ; $ 400.00. Phone
JL5jji .L -; ; - ' i -:. 6936 tf
BUSINESS GUIDE.
DRESSMAKERS. ' ...
Mrs. Rodanet, dressmaking. El. Ve
'ranb. 1057 Beretania St. 6936 lm
RED CROSS WORKERS
TO TAKE HOLIDAY
Red Cross workers at the Capitol
will take a half week's holiday, begin
ning tomorrow, no work being done
after today until next Monday. . An
nouncement to this effect was made
today by Mrs. Henry- Damon, chairman.
Mrs. Damon has received word that
Hawaii Red Cross garments and surgi
cals which have arrived In Paris are
attracting comment for the high stand
ard of work, done upon them.. A Hono
lulu woman has received a letter from
her daughter in Paris, who had seen
a big shipment of the Hawaii goods
unpacked. ' She was told that they
were in first class condition.
" Nine small cases or surgicals . from
the workers at Kohala have just ar
rived at headquarters, and two large
cases of hospital garments from West
Kauai. Mrs. de la Nux from Kau, Ha
waii, has also sent in a supply of
goods. All of these shipments were in
good condition and will be forwarded
soon to the mainland. :
FOR SALE.
AUTOMOBILES.
One Ford delivery truck.1 Pacific Auta
Machine Shop. Tel. 4055. ' 6936 tf
Hob veirize your bread b on
by placing a definite order for
. Graham
r
Wrapped as 3
soon as
baked.
Bread .
THE "OCEAN ACCIDENT" '
is another insurance company which accepts Chiropractors report i oa caset
adjusted Chiropractically until they "got well. : v r y
There are over 30 insurance companies aovng tne same..
With Chiropractic they . get well quicker! ! ; ;
F. C. MIGHTON. D. C.
204-5 Boston Bid. (Over May's) :
.- s
1 1
Mis
Any Kind of External Ache
Relieved By Sloan's
Liniment
For prompt relief from Rheumatism,
Neuralgia, or Lumbago, you can depend
cn Sloan's Liniment. The warming,
soothing, counter-iBritant effect is the
quickest ay to overcome the inflam
mation, swelling or stiffness. A tew
drops go right to 'the sore part, draw
the blood from the congestion and
remove the cause of the ache.
The great penetrating power oi
Sloan's Liniment makes rubbing need
less. It i3 easier and cleaner to use
than plasters or poultices. It does not
stain the skin or clog the pores. A
bottle of Sloan's Liniment is all ycu
need for quick rest and relief from
the pains of sprains, bruises, back
ache, stiffneck, and most,- forms of
rheumatic twinges. Generous size bot
tles at druggists everywhere. 25c, 50c,
?1.00. Adv.
A
Ft
An anti-smoke campaign in Pitts
burg is Reported to have reduced its
famous smoke by at least 75 per cent,
thereby saving on property alone $7,
500,000 annually. :
Tine Newspaper
he Fads
We desire to correct the following misstatement which ap
peared in the news columns of The Advertiser, this morning
November 6:
"Most of the beef sold at the Metropolitan (meat
market) is imported from the mainland. It took a :
part of the shipment made on the Maui two weeks
ago when she came down here with her icehouse filled
with bottled beer and meat, half and half."
" i In the ten months of this year, to Nov. 1 last, the Metro
politan Meat Market has sold to its trade a total of not more than
7 2 beeves, imported from the Coast. In that same period we have
sold over our counters not less than 2400 beeves. In other words,
our sales of imported beef have been, at the most, not more than
3 per cent of our total sales.4 ;
H t -
Since Nov. 1 we4 have sold not one pound of imported beef.;
The sniall amount which ; we have handled in the past has been
due to brief scarcity of that commodity in the island wholesale
market. v '"
We prefer the Island Beefv A
sell that kind alone, just as long as it is to be had;
m
eat
po
Dealers in High Quality Island Meats
Phone 3-4-4-5 r
THE
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JAPANESE BAZAAR THE JAPANESE BAZAAR THE JAPANESE BAZAAR THE JAPANESE BAZAAli
JAPANESE BAZAAR THE JAPANESE BAZAAR THE; JAPANESE BAZAAR TEE JAPANESE BAZAAR
i
Now on for Two Weeks
We expect to reduce one-third of our present stock by means of an: extraordinary cut id prices on our
entire stock. -1
We have a big stock of ODDS and ENDS and all of them will be sold at 30 i to 50 per cent discount
This is a golden opportunity for Holiday Shoppers.
Hand Crochet Medallions ....... . . 5c Ea.
Tfnnrl Crochet Bows, 30c-40c value. Now 15c Ea.
Hand Crochet Bow?, 60c-80c value. Now 35c Ea.
Hand Crochet Collars and Yokes. Down to half
; price.
CREPE WAIST PATTERNS
Regular $2.25. Now - .$1.00
-Regular $3.00. Now $1-25
SCREENS
$7.50 cut to ' ..$5.00
$12.00 cut to ' $8.00
$75.00 cut to $50.00
$90.00 cut to $65.00
SMOKED BAMBOO VASES
Regular $1.75. Now . ... . ...... . .90c
Regular $1.25. Now ......75c
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Come early and get first choice.
PTTTl
ilihie
Jai
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JAPAHESB BAZAAE THE JAPAHESE BAZAAR ' TEE JAPANESE BAZAAR TEE JAP A1TT3H 3
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