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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-2010, November 09, 1917, 3:30 Edition, Image 9

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HONOLULU STAB-BULLETIN, FBIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1917.
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MEIH.W.WAI
ALL VESSELS TO
BRING FREIGHT
Whether or not there is an embargo
on carload shipments of eastern
freight to Honolulu became; the point
of contention at tho meeting of the
retail , board of the Honolulu Cham
vber of,. Commerce held yesterday aft
, emboli. The meeting was called, ori
ginally, to formulate some msthod to
prevent the placing of an embargo on
the shipment of luxuries to Hawaii, as
was reported to Emil Berndt by cable
to be": the intention of Pacific coast
railroads. ,
J. T. Warren of the Honolulu Photo
Supply Co., who was largely responsi
ble for the calling of thel meeting yes
terday to consider what effect the
embargo would have, on certain Hono
lulu merchants said in explanation
that he had had a change of heart. At
first he had thought perhaps it would
be right to protest against the luxury
embargo, but after conversations with
a number of other merchants had de
cided that, a sa matter of patriotism,
fsacrif ice should be made if "sacrifice
was . necessary.'
.. What ho did object to, tnoiigb, was
the possibility that ships might be, al
lowed to come here empty for sugar
cargoes as in the past.; He wanted ac
tion taken that would assure all ships
coming here loaded with merchandise.
Mr. Warren feared that if the lux
ury, embargo was imposed during the
w ar a number of stores might have to
close, or limit their business mate
rially, his included.: It this was done
it would throw a number of persons
out of employment.
"John Effinger favored securing the
suspension of the : coastwise shipping
laws for the Dutch boats and the T. K.
K.; liners, 'as a means of affording
some relief for the shortage of ship
ping situation. He asserted that
the T. K. K. company would not take
the initiative to secure the suspension,
but wanted to be requested by the
government to handle freight or pas
sengers for Honolulu. -
Fred Bush of the Honolulu Iron
Works said he doubted whether there
was an ; embargo on Hawaii ; freieht
CAPTAIN FILMER TAKES- r
COMMAND OF KOREA MARU
saY francisco, Oct. 29? with
the arrival of the Korea Maru yester
day afternoon, Captain WVC. T. S. Kil
mer, formerly -' in command . of the
Shinyo M am, boarded the vessel for
the first time in his new capacity of
port captain in San Francisco for the
T. K. K. ... ' .; :-. ..' : .
Captain Togo, who was in command
of the; Tenyo Maru for two :voyage3
and who was then made-port captain
here, will undertake a similar position
in Kobe and - will leave or Japan on
the Siberia Maru. V . 4
In addition' to the ; Japanese finan
cial commissioners and several other
distinguished Japanese, the Korea
brought a large; number of American
passengers, mostly businessmen. In
all she brought 153 cabin, 40 second
cabin and 342 steerage passengers.
UiilNS
UlvllLlf luLnnlJ
HARBOR NOTES
t:
Plans are being considered by the
harbor, board for the dredging of the
harbor directly in; front of Kuhio
wharf, Hilo. so arf to allow Inter
lsland vessels to utilize the end ad
joining the road that leads toward
town.: :v .':
The harbor - beard at a meeting
yesterday afternoon . approved the
form of a .letter to be sent, by the
chairman v proposing . an agreement
whereby the Inter-Island Steam Nav
igation Company would" sign its will
ingness to use a new wharf at Kuhio
bay, Hilo. If the company agrees to
use th6; wharf , for a period , of five
years the harbor ..' board will com
mence ' work within a short time.
He had been of the impression that
such was the case, although iron works
freight continued . to come through.
He had sent a; cable. to. the New York
office' of his company, where it had
been' ascertained that there was no
embargo, he said. :
? Arthur Coyne, furniture dealer, was
also;pf the opinion that, there was no
embargo, as he continues to receive
shipments of furniture. .
-The retail board finally decided to
appoint a committee -which will re
quest the traffic and : transportation
committee of the' Honolulu Chamber
of Commerce "to secure all possible
space privileges on steamers .calling
v While there are accommodations for
400 passengers, two times Ihe number
Ihe biggest Matson steamer will
carry, there are not bathing facilities
sufficient to accommodate one Hawaii
family.
. To be exact, deck charts of the Gov
ernor and President show that on the
three passenger-carrying decks there
is just one bathroom. . And, poor
male! this is marked "woman's , bath
room." The staterooms are small," and
square in shape, with a double deck
of berths extending across one" end.
On the side opposite tho "dressing
sofa" is another berth. The theory
is that the cabins will serve three pas
sengers, and on a pinch four, when the
sofa is forced into 'use. Othr ship's
accommodations are in proportion to
the single bathroom.
As freight carriers the two Pacific
coast vessels are nearly as disap
pointing as they are as passenger ships.
Their deadweight carrying capacity is
estimated to be only 3000 tons.
If the plans of the representative of
the shipping board in San Francisco
ate carried out Honolulu probably will
see the first of these vessels on De-
j cember 5," the date when the Matsonia
was scheduled to make her next, voy
age here. Earlier plans were to have
one of them take the place of tho
Maui on her next voyage, although
this plan has been altered In order to
accommodate the 22 congressmen.
COOK COULDN'T COOK,
CREW COULDN'T SAIL, v
SCHOONER PUTS BACK
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 31 Cap
tain Taylor, who took the-Seafarer
from this port and who left her at
Honolulu, is back in town, and yester
day told some of his experiences. The
Seafarer was formerly L. A. Norris'
schooner yacht and was bought by
Atkins & Kroll and transformed into
a trading schooner for the copra
trade. Captain Taylor took her out
ml ;
HONOLULU CONSTRUCTION & DRAYING CO., LTD
PHONE 4-9-8-1 ; - mmm:m JJBELSERn :
: STORAGE k TO 71 SOUTH QUEE1T ST.
her
with the. intention of delivering
at Zamboanga." He said:
"We left here with one other sail
or on board besides myself. The
others were useless. They could not
go aloft and about all they could do
was to haul on a rope if it were plac
ed In their hands. That was bad
enough but the cook could not cook.
. "I found out that this cook was an
English slacker. He got out of Eng
land to avoid the draft and went to
Australia. Then he left there to
avoid joining the army and got to
some- of the South Sea islands. His
only experience In cooking, he con
fessed to mc, was acting as chef for
a gang of Portuguese railroad labor
ers in Tahiti.
"Then again there was no wind.
The most we made in one day was
140 miles and it took us 25 days to
reach Honolulu. There the whole
crew quit. So I signed on a crew of
Filipinos. This - time I tested, tho
cook and he served up a good meal
in port, but as ebon as we left Hono
lulu be became so deathly seasick
that I thought be would die.
"None of the Filipinos could stand
a trick at the wheel. They were all
too seasick; My mate and I stood it
as long as we could and then I put
about and beat back against the trade
winds to Honolulu.
"Meantime another crew had been
sent down from San Francisco, but
they gof talking with my original
crew and refused to go. A man nam
ed Edmunds took my place. I hope he
has a pleasanter yachting trip than I
did.",-"
PASSENGERS EXPECTED
The following passengers are booked
to sail by the , steamship Wilhelmina
from San Francisco:
Miss Lizzie Scharton, Miss M. Moo
ney Mr. McCormick, T. M. Pond, Mrs.
Vandewart, .G. R. Haddock, Charles
Wells, G. J. Becker, Miss Sophia
Dobney; Miss A. L. Winchester, Miss
Johnson' Mrs. Gordon McPherson, Mr.
and Mrs. M. J. O'Brien, H. C. Churchill,
W S. Gustlin,' T. Mai, Mrs. A. h.
Gude, Mr. arid Mrs. McGinnis, : Mrs.
ICatherine Tapstopp, Mrs. A. M. Eng
land, Mrs. Mura Mead, Will Lewers,
Miss E. Eames, Mr. and. Mrs. W. J.
McDonald and infant, Mrs. EM. Ben
son and child, Mr. and Mrs. CT E. Bar-
" R" t . Patterson. Miss G. Schulze,
Mr! and Mrs.iR. S. West, Mr. and Mr.
II n I. . II II II - . . l II
1 -- 111
Ortic DaGama, t Mrs. E. W. Bratton,
Miss Hazel Ohmart, Mr. and Mrs. V.
J. White, A. Lewis, A. C. Hunt, Miss
Anna Scharton," Robert L. Lukens, G.
L. Dorre; Mr. Vandewart, Mr. Arnold,
F. R. Godfrey; W. Rathman, Mrs. A.
M. Fvler. Miss Matsue Kato, Miss M.
J. Reid, Gordon McPherson, Judge
Barlow, J, W. Kinne, D. Saitto, FranK
Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Morgan,
Mrs. Fred White, Miss C. Kemp, 5Uss ;
Isabelle Tapstopp, Mrs. K. N. Dun
ham, Robert Lewers, Mrs. J.- B. Cox
and infant, E. T. Redmond, E. M. Ben
son, Mr and Mrs. Weinzheimer, Geo.
La w son, Miss M.4 Schulze, Mrs. E.
Schulze, Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Mr. and
Mrs; Robert Lewers, Mr. and Mrs. H.
L. Terwilliger, Mrs. T. C. Ohmart, Mr.
and Mrs. E. R. Leber, Joseph : Bon
hake, Dr. J. J. Carey. : ;
JAPANESE CREW
iliili
and
was erice
There are many little necessities which make the soldier's life more enjoyable with which
the United States does riot furnish the men; Here are some of them:
I
The
New
Gillette
Razor
and
Gillette
U. S. Service Set
Constructed with an ornamental metal .case. An In
destructible Iirror; fits in lid of ease, 4" long, w ide,
tbick; Svith razor, packet of new blades, and mirror..
No stropping -no honing. -
. FOR THE SET
Khaki
Roll-Up
Toilet Kits
These are the handiest' articles you can possibly . carry.
They fit nicely into your haversack.
$1;75, $2;p0, $2.25 IB
Kotohira Sailors Voyage 2400
Miles in Open Lifeboat
Ere Sighting Land
, After a voyage of 2,400 tniles in an
open lifeboat, i tossed about at the
mercy of wind and sea; Masao Fuji
wara, second mate of the Japanese
steamer Kotohira JIarjir lost July 27
on a reef off Amchitka island of; the
Western Aleutians and ' nine of his
comrades have landed : in Yokohama.
For 42 days the men sailed and rowed
through the northern Pacific Ocean
until they reached Ikeda Bay; Charlot
te Island, September 10. : ..- 'v
They were practically without food
for a week before they reached Ikeda
bay . No word had been received
that the little craft in which they
were sailing had capsized. After the
Kotohira Maru crashed onr a rock in
a heavy fog, July 27, the officers
and crew put out in three lifeboats,
well provisioned, and landed on Am
chitka Island. -ATwo days were spent
in dividing the stores and supplies
saved in the hasty flight from . the
doomed freighter and the three boats
set out on. a' 600-mile voyage - to
Unalaska. Two of the HfeboaU were
forced to put back by a heavy storm,
which arose shortly after they left
the Island, but Captain M. Shibuya's
boat was. unable to return to shelter
and;was last seen battling the heavy
seas.. Fujiwara' who spent tall the
time with Captain Shibuya i gives a
thrilling description of his adven
tures: ;;: 'i ; ;
'Driven before a terrific; wind and
mountainous seas, we grounded on
the southern point of Amchitka is
land on Jul v 27. after a ? hard but
fruitless struggle, with the elements.
We had only grounded a few minutes
when the seas broke the engine room
hatch, flooding the engine room and
boiler room. The bulkhead gave way
and hr quick time the holds were
also flooded. As we ran great danger
of being engulfed by the big 'seas,
the boats were lowered on the lee
side, and we were subsequently
seated. This, was not easy to ac
complish, but air aboard succeeded in
getting! away from the vessel, which
was abandoned to the storms : :c
"We remained ashore for six 'days
and then decided to divide ' the forty
nine men Into three parties, one party
to each lifeboat, and try . and make
Dutch Harbor. On the evening ' of
August .13 we' attempted to make
Dutch Ha.rbor, but the weather pre
vented us, and, running before the
gale, we were driven, far to the south.
On August 17 we brought up abreast
of the Alaskan peninsula and were
enabled to replenish our exhausted
supply of water.. : i
"The bad weather continued, and
we decided to alter our plans land
head: for Canada. We were at sea
for several days before we were abje
. . . ' - i - . - - ' - - iir .
'P.0anSSflainnisWBp oD
DAYS TO SAN FEANCISCO '
Hegular Sailings to San Francisco and .Sydney, IT. S. W.
r For further particulars apply to '
C BREWER & CO., LTD. General Agents
Watson pigiol Gorapai;
; Direct Service Between Sah Francisco and Honolulu
: For further particalars apply, to ' ' :v -
CASTLE COOKER Ltd., Agent, Honolulu
TOY
Eegular Sailings to San Francisco and to the Orient
For further particulars apply to--CASTLE
& COOKE, Ltd., Agnt, Honolulu
CANADIAN-AUSTRALASIAN ROYAL MAIL LINE '
Regular Sailings to BRITISH COLUMBIA, FIJI, NEW
ZEALAND and AUSTRALIA
.v : For further particulars apply to x
THEO; H. DAV1ES & CO., LTD., General Agents
! PHONE 2295 REACHES ; ; ; . ; ,
! Hus4ac
ALL KINDS OF ROCK AND SAND FOR CONCRETE WORK.
. . FIREWOOD AND COAL
83 QUEEN STREET : - ; v r 1 p, p. Box 22
NEDERLAND ROYAL MAIL &
1 ROTTERDAM LLOYD I
: JOINT SERVICE : :
To Batavii ; Java via Yoko
hama, Nagasaki, Hongkong
and Singapore. Sailing dates,
freight and passenger rates on
appUcatic';
C. Brewer & Co., Ltd., Agents
0AHU RAILWAY TIME TABLE
yA OUTWARD x ' '"
For Waianae, Waialaa, Kahuku and
Way StaUona 9 : 15 a. rcu, 3 : 20 p.m.
? For Pearl City, Ewa Mill and Wa7
Stations 17: 30 a. 9:15 - a. nx.
11: 30 '; a.nw! 2:1S p.m 3:20 P.dl.
5:15 p.m t9:30 PJO Ul:15 P-m.
For Wahiawa and LcUchua 1L02
a.m.; 2:40- p.m t5:00 p.nu; 11:30
p.m. -
For Lcilehua 16:00 a.m. :
FR
El G
end
w K F T
H,T
T i
' W FV w fc
' Point cn the
Walaianct
GO & CO, 72 S..
K'3 StTcl.'151I
nsMost -Complete Line' of Chlnest
' :-S " -- ' : . Good 4 at -r ' ..
FONG INN CO.
honolulu'a Leadinj Chinese Curb
; Store-1 152 Nuuanu SL, nr. Pauah?
.; . INWARD " - '
Arrive Honolulu from Kahuku,
r-ii anrt Waianae S : 36 a.m.,
5:30 p.m. ,
Arrive Honolulu from Ewa Mill and
Pearl City-17:45, a. m..-'8:30 a.m..
ll'02 a!m. l:38 p.m. 4:24 pjxLf
5:30 p.m 7:28 p.m- ;
. Arrive Honolulu from WaMawaand
Leileaua 9.l& a.m v-t
p.m, 7:13 pan.
Shipping and
COMMISSION
' : Merchant -
-FRED L. WALDRON, LTo
Fort & Queen Stt, Honofulu
KHAKI SEWING CASES....". 35c
A 1
Aiway
s ropuiar-tne
Ever Ready
and Gem $1.00 Safety Razors.
f . -
Metal Trench Mirrors are indestnictible . V . .25c to ' $3.00
Amber and Smoked Sun Glasses. ...... ... .25c to $2.00 1 -;
If you do not have time to purchase your; requirements, have a friend in town do it for you
The Auto--Strpp Razor
In its new Military Kit is a real Soldier's razor. It is
the only razoi that sharpens its own blades and-keeps
them. free from rust. "Weighs only 5 ounces with trench
mirror. ,
PRICE, ' $5.00 FOR KIT
' - - -
" SERVICE EVERY SECOND
Gop
Li,
FORT AND HOTEL STREETS
OPEN UNTIL 11:15 P. M.
rrvi waieiwa Limited. ' a two-hour
to take a bearing, but with the ad-lraln (oniy first-class tickets honored;.
1 paves Honolulu every ouiiuaj w
!!-SHaleiwa Hotel; returning
arrives in Honolulu at 10:10 p m.
The Limited stops omjr ai. v,j.
Ewa MUi and Waianae. .; :
Daily, t Except Sunday. JSundaj
CHCP SUI
93 North King Street
Call and see our brand new
CHOP SUI HOUSE
Everything Neat and Clean
Tablea may be reserved by phone
No. 1713
vent of sunshine on September X we
made an- observation and discovered
we were 660 miles from the Strait
of Juan de Fuca. By this time pur
provisions were exhausted, " and we
were hungry. Our replenished stofek
of water was also used up by this
time, but we kept up a bold front,
makinc no comDlalnt. With stout
hearts we continued the voyage, and
on September 8 saw land ahead of us.
It was Cape St. James, as we proved
by the beams from the lighthouse as
darkness fell." After reaching land
the Japanese sailors were cared for
and sent on to America.
Laden with a valuable shipment ; of
Oriental mechandlse worth approxi
mately J2.000.000 the Kotohira Maru,
chartered by the Mitsui Bussan Kal
sha, was bound for San Francisco
from Kobe, following the great circle
route when she crashed on the rocks.
Chief Officer K. Masuda and. 31 sur
vivors reached Yokohama early list
month with an account of a similar
adventure.'-; r:-J'H- '::-X:t::x$t
Asthma Catarrh v
- SFASSODIC CROUr
COUGHS COLDS f
WnOOPING COUGH
620NCHITIS
STABUMtO J7. ' -A
rimple. ttte eed xmtmevt for bronchial
mubt. without dorinc the itomadi wiUi inf.
with taaxu for thirty yr. v.-.'t Jj '
The air ctrryin the eptie rtpor. Inrplred wtth
ererr breath, mtkei breathinj Miy. eoothet the fore
throtf. tod r$ the coorh. arliir rul nlrhii.
CkkOcw: it lnrxlaible w mother with younx child,
rea tni t ho9 to tofferew from Afthaa. J
.Setxt a potul for ieecriptsre hoouet.
ALL fcRUGX2STS.
r Try CmelentAntt'y
fpUe Throat Tiy
tot the irritated throat.
They mtt simple, etfett
ire aae aatiaepde. Of i
ywir dntrriat r from
oa, 10c ia ao7S v '
Telephone 3375 1115 Fort SL
the Standard Optical Co.
OPTHALMIC OPTICIANS
Pantheon Block - 7 ; ,
Walter l.: Seymour Pres. & Mgr.
L. AYAU SHOE CO.
Sole Agents for W. L. Douglas
'; - ' Shoes. " - -T .;
Phone 2663 f. 1005 Nuuanu, nr. King
THE J. S. WINVICK CO.
Paper Hanging art Decorating t
Rear Stangenwald BIdj. Phone 3134
Estimates Cheerfully Furnished.
Buy your gasoline
at'
n SERVICE
STATION
Rear of Boston Bldg
Christmas
Ribbons
Stickers
J '-Tags -Seals
,
Fancy Boxes
Ribbonzene
i Holly..
.: Etc.
- -. . . - . - . - - .
: . .-
Hawaiian Nevs
Co., Ltd. ;
Young Hotel Bldg. ; :f -
;.';-;,:'v::.-:':; Bishop Street
TIDES, SUN AND MOON.
Date
Hlh -:'v X;- Hfeh Low
Tide ?TL of Tide v- Tide
Large ; Tide ;! Smali Large
'Low,
; Tide
Small
Son ;''
Sua
Seta
M003
Rises
'and
Sets
A.M. : FT. P.M. P.M. A.M.
Not- 5 . 8;33 '1 1.8
't - C '.' 9 23 -1.7
;-? i : T .- .10 .23 -1.6
v ":.:: -tv- X- "-'-'"v- -; '
' ' '" ''. i " ' i ' '. . ' .'
V.i.. i 8 -".. .llll1! ' '
1
10 .........
0:44
1:20
1:53
1.4
L6
10:03
11:1
" . .
0:05
;P.M.
12:00
13:41
1:20
4:35
5:13
5:43
0:23
1:43
3:40
6:07
6:03
6:03
5:20
5:20.,
5:20:
Rises
11:21
0:12
6:10 5:13 6:10 -," 5:13 0:33
6:33
6:56
6j33
7:34
8:23
6:13
6:10
6:11
5:13
5:13
5:13
1:43
m . V
11
1.8
7:20
C2 CerUaaA St, 1. T.
1 1
Last quarter of the mqja, Nov. 6.
3C
YapeCmoIeM Ce

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