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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-current, November 15, 1917, 3:30 Edition, Image 6

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"m"
RILEY H. ALLEN
EDITOR
THURSDAY. ........ NOVEMBER 15, 1917.
Because Germany made tear on us, sunk our ships
ami killed our citizens.
To assert ami to defend our rights.
To make good our claim that ice arc a free Jiation.
To hare the kind of institutions tec insj.
To live the kind of life tee have determined to live.
David F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture.
Facts, facts, Facts
A Visit of Achievement
Georue AY. Perkins torn a siuo w v "
Club in New York the other day that applies to the
homestead situation in Hawaii. minister
Perkins related how a conscientious, old minister
was called on to preach a sermon over the body of
the meanest, wickedest f sinner m the on. Hie
niiiHtor pot along through his introduce al
rWit; but when he arrived at the point where it aa
reverend gentleman stuck. He coul d ir t rvXe
single item of approbation. He hesitated-stam
HKed-and t heal parrot, roosting around, -cm
where, rasped in with "Facts, facts, facts-gne us
fil And the minister, with a hurried -And so our
brother died,'.' called it a day's work and . quit.
What we need about the homestead situation in
Hawaii is farts, facts, faets.
Tl is Eo, -o say tha, the. homertead s.tuauou
,aiall,-.s the case of the meanest man it 'to be
ause it is not the meanest or wickedest class, ot
irtivit.v. hut a nood deal .told of bomerteadinR i.
not in the realm of fact.
Take the recent Kapaa select .ons. for -"'
There were TSS applicants, and .!,.. . pomt to
l,v some wople as evidence of the chum that there
an arm, 'of waiting, anxio ctamg
1 homesteaders in Hawaii. But after he e nnre
liM of TSS applicants had been iione through, the.e
,. ,lmmed lots. Moreover, the
1he demand for these Kapaa lots was of the specu
Htive sort-not of the bona-fide homestead sort.
The Star Bnlletin don. not vouch for the accuracy
of these stories that come down concerning the
Kauai sections, but does maintain
needed in this case, as in many .no her n lUwau
is possession and analysis 01 u.r
hard facts. Certain.,- one fact is that the Kapaa
experience did not tor out the claims that the.e
ex Wed TSS arsons anxious to take up homesteads
and car,-y out in spirit and letter the requ.remen.s
of homesteading in Hawaii. m.,,,i
It is the political fashion to boost .bmeiMd-in-
holus-bolus, ... call for changes in the land
aws That will make it easier for people to get ,-os-
siou of the public lands, and in larger allotments,
that will turn over to public entry lauds now leased
ln.u m .,.,.;. ,,,- al revenue is
iitd from which a su".-mu - t
derived. It is the political fashion to call the
i.Mnfition interests all the names under the sun.
TtZ "cusses ' on the side for the sugar-barons:
Up to the present time the politicians have been
nl e to get awav with it, and they will probably
inue to get away with it until somebody ea Is
their bluff and demands impartial discussion of the
farts. Also, the plantation interests have either
lxen unable to unite on a policy toward the lea
f ublic lands, or unwilling to appear as a unit for
fear thev would be sniped atjby the political crowd
would be accused of coercion and the like.
The statement bv E. Faxon Hishop which appear
ed in Tuesdav evenings Star-Bulletin, which, he
was careful to say. represents his personal views,
furnishes one of the very few inslauces when a
leader in Hawaii's chief industry has come out def
' lintel v and unequivocally in a statement to the pub
lic on this irerennial subject of homesteading. And
there is not the slightest doubt ,that already the
political nowd istiusy denouncing Mr. nisnop uuu
all his works to some or all of our congressional vis
itors who are looking into the laud laws.
That there is a legitimate demand for the open
ing of .public lands no one of fair mind can deny.
The applications for the Wailua lands furnish con
vincing proof of this ciill for agricultural tracts.
That This legitimate demand should be satisfied is
just as obvious. Readers of this paper know the
iiiiht t;dan up in these columns on behalf of the
Kauai homesteaders a year and a half ago, when
the settlement of the ttarden Island problems was
dragging unreasonably and some sharp, incisive
action was necessary. The facts brought out. by
this paper wei-e admittedly responsible for the visit
of the governor and a large party of officials to
Kauai, and developments went along satisfactorily.
The danger of holus-bolus homesteading. and the
disaster that will overtake entrants unprepared for
a long tight, and the perhaps inevitable lagging of
road and market facilities, make it a matter of
plain common-sense that lands should not be turned
oyer to entry unless they will be used, used effiefent
ly, and used honestly. If they are used merely for
speculation, merely to. hold up some plantation, or
the homesteader gets tired of blistered hands, sun
burn and balky crops then homesteading in Ha
waii will continue in disrepute.
fn tVin oiliOK linml ;l mnllvl to ami tlno rnfn r f
nnpniny lands will satisfv bona-fide reouirements
j, - o - ... - j
iind will give the youth of the territory some pros-
in the future.
r . Col. Jioosevelt is writing for the Kansas City
Star and Judge TafHias'lieen signed up as contri
buting editor for the Vhiladelphia Public Ledger.
Kvidently the ox-presidents are solving for them
selves the Droblem of what shall be done with .them.
Viscount Kikujiro Ishii and his fellow-commissioners
are returniug to Tokio after one of the most
memorable visits ever paid by foreign envoys to the
United States.
The agreement reached between Japan and the
United States as the result of 'this visit is as far
reaching in its effects as any treaty. It will be ob
served with all the scrupulous care with which
Japan aud the United States have observed the
"gentlemen's agreement" restricting unniigration to
our shores.
Viscount Ishii and his colleagues have impressed
on all with whom they came in contact on American
soil a sincere desire to 'wipe out the frictions of the
past remove the causes for possible friction in the
future. Xo matter whether or not one be disposed
to question Japan's intentions in regard to China,
it is unquestionable that the Ishii -Lansing ex
changes have brought about a better feeling between
the two countries than has existed for the past live
years.
Hawaii Jias felt with peculiar sharpness ' every
issue of point of controversy between the conti
nental, republic and the island kingdom. Our geo
graphical position and our population alike make
it certain that any American-Japanese issue reacts
immediately and acutely here. In uo part of the
United States will there be more satisfaction than
here, if the two nations have found a simple, busi
nesslike and effective plan of agreement upon the
questions occasionally threatening to develop into
disputes.
Hawaii had the honor of welcoming the Ishii mis
sion to American soil. To this territory falls also
the honor of final escort as they return to their
government. When they went to the United States,
it was .confidently expected something momentous
would result from their visit, and this expectation
has. been amply fulfilled.
HOUR HAS COME FOR DE10GMV; WAR
A PROOF, DECLARES FnED B. SMITH
Businessman-Evangelist in ;
Stirring Address Against
"Soft" Preaching-
' I... i "
Fred B. Smith speaks tonight at
student assembly, Y. M. C. A. night
school. .
FRED B. SMITH
PROGRAM
Till DKIVE OF THE 1)U FONTS.
This is not a free ad for the I hi Font powder
people, who are making so much money auwyay
that they don't need free ads. but an illustration of
the spirit of coojeration to win the war that is per
meating many a giant concern on the mainland.
The following is the text of a leaflet printed in
red, white and blue and pasted or piun 1 t nailed
up in thousands of different places throughout 1 lie
great shops of the Du Font plants scattered over
the country put up by the men :
I am a DuPont man.
I know that "the man behind the gun" is depending
on me.
I know that "the boy3 over there" must have my
help in order that victory shall come to America and
the "world made safe for democracy."
To the bluejackets and to the khaki-clad, I say
"You may fire when ready we'll keep the powder
coming!"
I know that battles have been tost and armies de
feated; because, at a critical time, the ammunition
gave out.
History says that the Du Pont powder worker stood
back of Perry at Lake Erie in 1812, was with Scott in
Mexico in 1846, made possible Appomattox in '65, and
helned tell the story of Santiago and Manila Bay in
1898.
With this glorious heritage of service to American
arms in the past, as a Du Pont man I can do no less
than my very best!
I know that when I am away from - ork it means
more than if a soldier slept, for I maintain many sol
diers; I know that my carefulness here counts "over there."
I know that carelessness, concealed cr open, may
cost an innocent man's life.
I know that these who go make the supreme sacri
ficebut that we who stay assume great responsibili
ties. I know that with less men to .do, all must, do more.
Even with America's army overseas, America's man
power must not decrease. I must do all in my power
to help.
I must not waste.
I, whether manager, superintendent, department
head, supervisor, foreman or operator, am "doing mv
bit" to put the "do" in Du Pont, and help America
win the war.
This sort of spirit is undatable. It will rise over
Russian defections and Italian reverses. It will
win.
WHY?
A lady of the citv who drives the familv car
and is a careful, conscientious driver asks:
"Why isu't there some attention paid by the po
lice traffic squad and the city supervisors to condi
tions of lieretania street? This street, somewhat
narrow at best, is getting almost impassable for
autos because of the long strings of trucks dawdl
ing over the pavement, because of the procession of
swill wagons, and because of army officers who per
sistently violate our civil ordinances and laws, defy
iug our, rules of the road."
There, are doubtless some food producers who are
perfectly right in saying that they can't lower
prices and make a living. What hurts their case is
that all food producers claim substantially the
same thing, and investigation has proved some of
the claims to be, merely camouflage to cover the
most heartless kind of profiteering. That is why
the public likes to see an investigation of everybody
provided it is a real investigation. Amateur dilly
dallying doesn't get us anywhere.
Villa is starting another revolution in Mexico,
which reminds us that we haven't heard much of
Mexico of late. It is. said to be the policy of the
administration in Washington to say 'that there is
no real trouble in Mexico any more. Hut recent
correspondents in the interior describe conditions
there as worse than ever, and Villa new outbreak
shows that Carranza isn't ruler of the whole
countrv. '-
A stirring plea for greater inter
church unity was voiced by Fred B.
Smith, the businessman-evangelist, in
an address at a union mass meeting
in the Christian church last night. The
church was filled to capacity. Mr.
binith's topic was "The New Empha
sis in Religion."
"I was once one of these deluded
men who believed that war was
past," said Mr. Smith. "I thought
that there was enough Christian mo
mentum in the world to prevent it
yielding itself to murder, But during
the last three years I have been
taught some serious lessons."
briefly, the speaker told how he had
suddenly become a Christian and how
he came to lead finally the grefct Men
and Religion Movement that swept
throughout the world",' and in which
Honolulu played a part: '
"I then resign J the most fascinat
ing position in the world," Mr. Smith
continued, "l had had a cinch. 1 had
a job that 1 never had to lie awake
nights but once to think about. I had
just been drifting along in delightful
experience. But tuen 1 became deter
mined to get on a platform on get soma
place where 1 might preach the doc
trines of inter-church Christianity."
The speaker declared that so many
new things are coming into :ne relig
ious world today that "if we wait to
get the money for salaries we will
never develop them."
The Hour of Democracy
"If any one will tell me that I have
done enough for God, then I'll go homo
and stay and I'll pay $1000 for the in
i'ormation," he said. "In this new em
phasis in religion, this great awaken
ing, the whole world is being turned
upside down. What is it going to be
ten years from today? This is the
hour of the rise of the common man,
the crowning of democracy.' That is
exactly what is going on today.
"I'll venture there isn't a man in this
audience who knows the name of the
person whose assassination started
this great war. But that shot was
fired at a system, not a man. The
Hohenzollern demon reached out to
grab Serbia by the throat and she
would rather fight than yield."
Mr. Smith said that the presidential
campaign of 1896 was- based on econ
omy, and that of 1916 on humanity.
"And you'll never see another cam
paign won by dollars alone," he
added. "That is what this world has
come to.
The Kaiser knows," Mr. Smith con
tinued,' -tnat if he loses this war m
part he will spend the rest ot his days
on St. Helena and God speed him
there. '
Hawaii Bonus System Pointed Out
l he Hawaiian bonus system, said
Mr. tmitn, is but an illustration of tha
laet tnat the common man has got to
be reckoned with. -'And," he declared,
"is any man such a foul as tu believe
that religion can remain the same?
i am longing for the day lo come when
we will hot have to ' use the word
I'roiestant or adjectives of that kind
to describe types of ieligious bodies.
1 want to see the day come when ' we
can speak of a Christian as a Chris
tian. Things may change, but the
iii We never will."
Mr. Smith told how the old school
evangelists used to preach against
card playing, theater going and dan
cing. These are not the cardinal sins,"
declared the speaker. 'These are not
sins which turn men, hr1 hearted,
from the doors of the church."
Teo Much "Soft preaching" I
But he declared that the trouble to-'
day seemed to oe that the ministers
are losmg their grip. "One-half of the
preaching I hear is so sort and gentle
that it wouldn't, make anyone mad
in len years," he said. i
A new school of religions is being
formed, said Mr. Smith a new school
of prophets men and women who
have dared to say a new word about
tomorrow for religion. These men
and women have 3een the breaking up
of the religious system il.z world has
followed for 400 years. They , have
seen that the hour has come for a
n'jited Christian church, he added. :
Olive Branch 7 Rebckah Lodge, I. i
O. O. F., meets this evening for nomi
nation of officers followed by social
and refreshments on the roof garden. !
TODAY
7.55 a. m. McKinley High School
assembly. s
8.20 a, m. Punahou assembly.
9.00 Mills School.
t.30 p, m. 25th Infantry.
7-15 p. m. Student'Assembly Y. M.
C. A. Night School.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16r-
I. 30 p. m. Fort Shafter.
6.00 p. m. Intermediate dinner , Y.
M. C. A. ...
7.30 p. m. Student ra'lly Y. M. C. A.
Games hall,
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17
3.C0 p. m. At Castner.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER; 18
7 p. m, Bijou theater. Music by
Y. M. C. A. orchestra.
7.30 p. m. Men's mass meeting at
the Bijou theater.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19
College of Hawaii, student assem
bly. ,
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20
7:30 p. m. Women's meeting, Mis
sion Memorial Auditorium.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24
8 a. m. Japanese men's mass meet
ing, Nuuanu Street Japanese church.
Music Royal Hawaiian Glee club, 7:30
to 8. :;';;?'::.' :;,,
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25
II. a. m Methodist church.
3 p. m. Dedication Army and Navy
Y. M. C. A. V;-
7:30 p. m. Men's mass meeting Bi
jou theater.
i
STuDENTSHEAR
HI R. Mill II
In appreciation of the hospitality of
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lucas the 1st Field
Artillery band will render a serenade
next Thursday afternoonat the quar
ters of Chaplain Fealy in the artillery
cantonment. Enlisted men who have
attended the parties given by Mr. and
Mrs. Lucas at their Diamond Head
home are irfvited to be present to re
new acquaintances.
That a clean, unblemished character
is the greatest asset of the young man
or woman who would make a success
ot life, is what Fred B. Smith, bust
nessman-evangelist, told the students
of Punahou, Mills school and McKin
ley high school this morning. The stu
dents of the three institutions receiv
ed the noted evangelist enthusiastical
ly and his addresses, while brief, were
interesting and to the point
"Stay every hour and day in school
and college," said Mr. Smith. "Don':
blunder now. Standards in les-.ershiy
arc being" Increased throughout the
world, and the leaders of the future
must be trained as our fathers and
mothers were never trained.
"Tlie day on which you are to count
will open up opportunities for leader
ship like tjie world has never known
This war1 is going to open up an en
tirely new world. There are seven
million dead over in Europe, and now
we are going. to send over three mil
lion or so of our choicest men, and
the majority of them are sure to go on
the scrap heap killed, wounded or
disabled. It's a horrible mesa! Per
sonally, I see no hope for an end this
side of 1919. o get ready to be train
ed; get ready to capitalize your lives
in leadership.
"I envy you young men. But don't
lose your chance. Let no lure take
you away from your studies until you
havd been trained to your finger tips.
Some one may come along and offer
you a job, tell you how you can make
some easy money. But you " stay
where you are. .
"Some of you, of course, will fail.
Some of you will have to be endowed
so that yon ; can keep going. And
these failures are going to be the ones
who permit their characters to breali
down. In every walk of life the doors
are closed to these kind of men. Su
perb character wins every time."
This afternoon Mr. Smith is speak
ing to the members of the 25th Infan
try at Schofield Barracks. Tonight he
will address a student assembly at tne
Y. M. C. A.
Though handicapped with a severe
cold in the throat which he contracted
on the steamer voyage, Mr; Smith's
addresses are characterized with all
the fire and straightforward, vigorous
quality that were noticeable here on
hir visit some years ago on the Men
and Religion Forward movement.
HERMAN SIELCKEN,
"COFFEE KING," DEAD
D. P. R. Isenberg has received news
of the death of Herman Sielcken, his,
brother-in-law, in Baden-Baden, Ger
many, on October 8. Sielcken, who
was 72 years old, was known as th;
"Coffee King," as he fathered the
Brazil coffee valorization enterprise
He has visited Hawaii several times.
As anoHier Thanksgiving draws near, it looks
again like early, curtains for Turkey .
KapahmU
met
. , . . .'. .
Nine lots on Harden Street, cleared and ready for
building. Two-story Lome on one lot. Chicken runs.
W ater on property.
Entire nine lot and home for $4700.00.
t Real Estate Department. .Tel. 3688. Stangenwald Bldg
SUMMER COMPLAINT
(With apologies to K. C. B. of the
' Hearst papers.)
ON NEARLY i
.; ; ... 1 ;:y ,
EVERY CORNER
. a
BETWEEN
"
PA WAA JUNCTION
-
ANO
;,"T'-v'V?--'V..'.;.;;:-?;
FORT SHAFTER
-
THERE ARE
FRUIT STORES or '
. .': , v'- '
DRUG STORES or
OTHER SHOPS
WHERE A man
WOMAN OR child
CAN BUY
LEMONADE OR
SODA WATER or
f
SOMETHING TO drink
' '
WHEN THEY are
THIRSTY
AND SO it should be
IN A
.v..-;.,;
CLIMATE LIKE ours
.
AND I am still a
.
MALIHINI
I MAY be-wrong
BUT I have a
, -
HUNCH THAT
SOMETIMES
--; ."' ......
HORSES AND
: .
MULES 'AND
DOGS
."
GET THIRSTY
AND I CANT
UNDERSTAND
WHY THERE are ,
NO WATER troughs
HERE AND there
FOR THE, ,
DUMB BRUTES
WHO WERE and
STILL ARE our
FRIENDS AND I
.-..
AM SURE
THAT THERE are enougr
WEALTHY PEOPLE
IN HONOLULU ;
WHO NEVER thought
'
OF THIS .
AND IF somebody ' -WOULD
START
THE FAD
AND BUILD the -
"I
FIRST ONE say at
'
AuAKEA & K'NG St.
OTHERS WOULD follow irr
THE GOOD work.
1 THANK You
;-' - .
FISH
MUSIC CLUB PLANNING
AID FOR RED CROSS
In order to. aid the Red Cross, the
Morning Music club, will . charge 5 J
cents admission to all meetings at
which programs are given. This new
plan will probably remain in effect un
til ,the first of the year. The clnb has
already purchased a )50O Liberty bond
and recently turned an or tne money
In its treasury over to the Red Cross.
All members of Honolulu Lodge No.
1, Modern Order of Phoenix, are re
quested to attend " tonight's meeting.
Matters 7 of special Importance wil
come up for discussion. ' ;
,v. i m i i mvi
-. -a .4, .... ,. .. . .
The Safest
Way
-1.
LJ
nHTTP. safest, wav. ftftfir all is tn "nlace
A your property as a TRUST in our care,;
while you are alive, keeping us informed
definitely at all times just how you wish
your income and your properties divided
and bequeathed in case of your demise. ;
A long experience in estate administra
tion shows this method to be the best in as
suring that there be no contest over the
will. - r v.. : -rh
In this way you may actually watch your
Will in its workings, and may correct any
arrangement that works out unsatisf actor
ily before it is too late.
i
RICHARD H. TRENT, PRES.,
C H AS. G. HEISE R, J R, TR E AS.
IRWIN Hi BEADLE, SECY.
fJI Settled in your cozy home in the nr
You've no need again for studying the -For Rent"
page. -
Let us show you these attractive lots
. PHONE 5701
'If "WT ; n - T ifwiiu
FCXT s. MEICHANT SltiSSTS MONCUJUU
1
CT ' rr :z . '

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