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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-current, November 28, 1917, 3:30 Edition, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-11-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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5TALY
GEM, .'MAUL
NEXT MAILS
C?rrO
From San Francisco
Next mail, Dec. 6.
To San Francisco
Saturday, Dec. 1.
Evening Bulletin, Est. 1SS2, No. 6955.
12 PACr3 HONOLULU, TERRITORY OF HAWAn, 1YEDNESDAY, XOVBMBER 28, 1917. 12 PAGEb
PRICE FIVE CENTS
Hawaiian Star. Vol. XXV, To, .7996.
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MAGKENSEN'SIKIebahh Held,
BLOW FAILS
TO CUT LINE
Italians Hold Firm on Piave
Front and England Be
lieves Venice Safe
(Associsted Press by U. S. Naval WirsUss.)
LONDON, Eng., Nov. 28. Official
announcement was made by the Brit
ish war office today that Italy is sav
ed from conquest by the Germans
and that the most critical period of
the fighting is over. '
The announcement , was made
through General Maurice, the official
historian and, statistician. -"It is now
time," his announcement reads, "to
say definitely that the crisis in Italy
has been passed."
He also announced that British
troops have fought their way to with
in sight of Jerusalem.
WASHINGTON. D. C. Nov. 28.
Despatches today to the Italian em
bassy eay there is great activity along
the entire Italian front on the part of
the opposing Teuton divisions. The
developments today- forecast a still
greater offensive tfian the Austro
Germans have yet undertaken. Elab
trate preparations are being made by
the enemy to break through the Piave
Brenta line, where they have now been
held successfully for four days.
HOME,-Italy, Nov. 28 the Italian
batteries today concentrated their fire
on enemy troops massed and in move
ment on the Asiago plateau and the
middle of the Piave front The Italian
gunners are endeavoring to break up
the "massed troops before the launch
ing of the'main enemy "attack.
TffJf
I. Ml.
(i
W LAUNCH
FRISCO-HONOLULU
DIRECT SERVICE
- "In case all American liners are
taken off the Honolulu and San Fran
cisco run, I am confident that the T.
K. K. '"will operate a direct line be
tween the mainland and the islands,
said. K. KObiyashl, purser of the Si
beria Maru. during his stay in Hono
lulu recently. ,
At the present time, according to
the purser, the T. K. K. does not de
sire to apply for a permit to be ex
empted from the Coastwise Shipping
law. He said that if the T. K. K.
should take freight and passengers
from San Francisco to Honolulu, the
bottoms would not be filled on the
long trip from Honolulu to Hongkong.
Mr, Kobiyashi remarked .that there
ras a .possibility thatahe T. K. K.
might ask to be exempt, but only on
me condition that the company would
be permitted, to carry passengers and
freight from Honolulu to San Fran
cisco, and be allowed to refuse ship
ments going to Honolulu from the
mainland.
Daring Flyer Makes
Escape From Huns
SEATTLE, Wash., No. 28. News
has been received here that a flight
lieutenant who for a year had been
flying with the British forces and who
was captured and in prison camp for
two months has escaped and arrived
in Iondon. He had three particularly
narrow escapes from death during his
flight from Germany. Once he reached
the front, but was nearly killed Dy tne
high voltage wires stretched there. ,
1
Sports Program
For Thanksgiving
FOOTBALL
Y. M. C. A. vs. Town Team, at
3:45 p. m., Moiliili field. .
Punahou vs. Kamahameha, at
2:15 p. m., Alexander field. "
32nd Inf. vs. 11 Inf., at 3 p. m.,
Schofield.
Fort Kamehameha vs. 1st Field
Artillery, at 10 a. m. at Fort Ka-
mehameha.
U.S. Marines vs. 4th Cavalry, :H
at 1:30 p. m., Schofield. .
Melim's Townies vs. H Co., 2nd
Inf.- at 10 a. m., Moiliili field (pos-
sibly).
TENNIS
Miss Maile Vicars and A. L.
Castle vs. Mrs. M. Graham and 4-'
Oswald Mayall. at Hawaii pclo
courts, Wednesday at 3:45 p. m.
GOLF
Turkey Day tournament at Mo-
analua links (Honolulu Golf club)
- Thanksgiving play at Oahu 4
L Country club. ,
1 if tt -f -t ttttt
4
U.S. Witness;
Until Wanted
(Asseelatsd Press by U. S Naval Wireless.)
4- f- ft - 4-t-4
"
4 SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. Nov. 28
Called as a witness for the 4
prosecution in the Indian con- 4
f.spiracy case today, Shtv Dyal 4-4-
Kapur, a Hindu, refused. to tes- 4
4 tify. The government then dis- 4
4 missed the case against hinV and 4
4 it developed that the Hindu had 4
4 turned state's evidence on condi- 4
4 tion that he go free after the 4
4 trial.
4 SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Nov.; 4
4- 28. Frederick W. Klebahn, head 4
4 of the shipping department of 4
4- H. Hackfeld & Co. of Honolulu, 4
4 arrived here today bringing books 4
4 to be used by the government in 4
4 the India conspiracy trial. 4
4- The government has detained 4
4 him at Angel Island until he is 4
4 wanted as a witness in the Hindu 4
4 case. ,
4 4 4 4 4 - 4 4 4 4 4-4
THAM GOD FORmGHTm
SERVE, SMZTHE
PRESIDED
Congressmen Bid.
Aloha to Hawaii
OLSHl
BpSugarMen
Under Fire For
"Profiteering
(Associated Press by U. S. Naval Wireless.)
LOS ANGELES, CaL, Nov. 28. Pro
secutions may ; bej begim against beet
sugar interests charged with "war
profiteering." V - 1 - I
The, United States district attorney
here is conferring with the food ad
ministration officials and a grand jury
investigation is in prospect over al
legations of undue profits reaped by
beet sugar men.
A Riverside man charges that thou
sands of acres of land have been un
developed owing to the unfairness of
the refiners in grabbing the profits
from the beet-sugar farmers. One re
finer is alleged to have netted $800,
000 on an investment of $600,000,
. - a m
Brazil to Use
German Ship
s
To Aid Allies
(Associated Press by U. 8. Naval Wireless.)
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil, Nov
28. Brazil has reached an agree
ment with France whereby 30 In
terned German steamers now at
Brazilian ports will fly the Brazil
ian flag and transport supplies
for the Allies for a year.
INTERNED GERMANS SAID
TO BE SENDING GIFTS TO
SPECIAL FRIENDS HERE
That interned Germans on the
mainland have sent to special friends
here-' gifts significant of the "Father
land" was the statement which reach
ed the Star-Bulletin today on good au
thority. ""It is declared that a steamer arriv
ing from the coast last Monday
brought packing-cases addressed to
Mrs. Hans Isenberg of Kauai and Carl
du Rol of Honolulu, and that, when
local authorities opened the packing
cases, inside were found identical
lamp-fixtures ;made by the interned
Germans during their confinement at
Fort Douglas, Salt Lake City. The
metal fixtures are- said to have bee?i
surmounted by the German flag, the
whole forming, a mute appeal to keep
the German spirit burning in Hawaii.
After examination,4 the gifts are said
to have been allowed to go to the
beneficiaries.
WASHINGTON, November 7 .President Wilson issued tonight his 1917
Thanksgiving proclamation: :v .Cr
"BY THE PRESIDENT-' OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION. , u ,
"It has long been the. honored custom of our people to turn In the fruitful
autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for His many
blessings and mercies to us as a Nation. That custom we cam follow, now,
even in the midst of the tragedy of a world shaken by war and immeasurable
HisaKtpr. in the midst of sorrow and treat neril. because even amidst the
darkness that has gathered about us. we can see the great blessings God has J
bestowed upon us, blessings that are better than mere peace of mind and
prosperity of enterprise. i
"We have been given the opportunity to serve mankind as we once served
ourselves in the great day of our Declaration of Independence, by taking up
arms against a tyranny that threatened to master and debase men every
where, and joining with other free peoples in demanding for all the nations
of the world what we then demanded and obtained for ourselves. In this
day of the revelation of our duty not only to defend our own rights as a
nation, but to defend also the rights of free men throughout the world, there
has been vouchsafed us In full and inspiring measure the resolution and spirit
of united action. We have been brought to one mind and purpose. A new
vigor of common counsel and common action has been revealed in us. Ve
should especially thank GocF that in such circumstances, in the midst of the
greatest enterprise the spirits of man have ever entered upon, we have, if
we but observe a reasonable and practicable economy, abundance with which
to supply the needs of those associated with us, as well as our own. A new
light shines about us. The great duties of a day awaken a new and greater
national spirit in us. We shall never again be divided or wonder what stuff
we are made of. ' , . ,
"And while we render thanks for these-things, let us pray Almighty God
that in all humbleness of spirit we may look always to Him for guidance;
that we may be kept constant in the spirit and purpose of service; that by His
grace our minds may be directed and our hands strengthened; -and that In
His good time liberty and security and peace and the comradeship of a
common justice may be vouchsafed all the nations of the earth
"Wherefore I Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of
America, do hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-ninth day or November
next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout
the land to cease upon that day from their ordinary occupations and In thir
several homes and places of worship to render thanks to God, the great ruler
f n"lnwSitness whereof. I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal
of the United States to be affixed. - " -
"Done in the District of Columbia this seventh day of November in. the
of nr i.nrd. one thousand, nnie hundred and seventeen'; s find of the
fj f tho TTnitprf States the one hundred and fOrtysecond.
uiueycuucnv u-nnnpnw wit snM
s Prior , to . their departure for
the mainland the members of
the f'i congressional - delegation
adopted the following resolution
of appreciation to Hawaii for
By the President:
ROBERT LANSING,
Secretary of State:
HIIHRRY FILIPINOS flEBE
iffllil
WHEN FOODLESS HT IS PROSPECT
.
Editor and Member of Guard Asserts Outbreak Was Due Pri
marily to Fact That Sense of Discipline Was Not Instilled
Into Guardsmen at Kawailoa Camp Says, Filipinos Are
in Guard Because They Were Urged to Enlist
Failure by he commissary department to provide food for the Fili
pinos and lack of discipline after several days of laxity in camp at Kawai
loa are given, as the two main causes of insubordination yesterday after
noon by Filipinos of the national guard embarking for Kauai.
Pedro M Esqueras, assistant editor of the Filipino newspaper Ang
Abvan and himself a member of the national guard, told the Star-Bulle-
tin today that it is grossly uniair io uiame iue rmymus im "
vn.rorHav at the steamer Kilauea when several hundred left the steamer
and, disregarding orders from their officers, went uptown in
Esaueras. who is a company clerk I
e weeics .visit tome lsianas. x nere i - - . . mi: . -.-i. x-t,
search of
of Company B, 1st Kegiment, uauu.
ftiakes the following statement:
"The Kauai guardsmen left camp at
Kawailoa yesterday morning and
came to Honolulu to take the steamer
on their return to Kauai. They had
only a little baconand bread, I under
stand, before leaving. At any rate, I
know they were hungry when they
got here. They had been told there
would be food for them in Honolulu
but they found none. Instead, as they
were sent on board the steamer, they
saw they would have to go to Kauai
hungry and they rebelled. '
"They were about three hours at
the wharf. Finally, growing restive,
they tooK mauere w adjutant general of the territory
oe on xn-pnt in search of food. A,DU"'- A . . . . ,
GUARD HEAD TO
PROBE FAILURE
TO SUPPLY FOOD
Johnson Refuses to Talk on Re
port He Will Ask for Num
ber of Resignations
John-
Bricadier General Samuel I.
I it e nnninl rennrt f mm rvffi.
Will Uitll lUr a Bl,'C-iai
their pleasant stay in ; the isl-
ands: ;;-
-f ,," Whereas, the members of
the Congress of the United
States now visiting the Ha--f
vl waiian Islands are on the
-f eve of their departure for the
mainland and,
:Whereas, the congressional
4- delegation has been received
with such marked thought-
fulness and hospitality as to
create a sense of deep obli-
gation, .
V Therefore, be it resolved
-f that we express to those in
-f authority, and to" the people
f, of ' the islands our sincere
appreciation of the courtesy
-- and kindly consideration
shown us and which have
contributed toward making
-f our : visit one of unusual
pleasure and profit.
Aloha!
HoiblLlGl
ROUS G
ADIEU
TO CONGRESSMEN
Hawaii and her people turned out en
masse this morning to Pier 15 ot bid
aloha to the members of the congres
sional, party on the occasion of their
departure to 'the mainland after . a
three weeksVvisit to the islands. There
with the parting which made the sev
erance ofi tfie knot of friendship the
harder to bear. Tears and laughter
and good-luck wishes intermingled
and thousands remained on the pier
waving farewell to the little specks of
fluttering handkerchiefs on board the
Maui long after the ship had passed
from the wharf.
The pier, was dense with people
shortly after 9 o clock, on hand for the
occasion, and it was with difficulty
that the 22 members of the congres
sional party were able to make their
way through the crowd to the gang
planks The lei sellers did a land office
business and some off the legislators
almost staggered under the burden of
flowers and wreaths placed about their
necks by Honolulu friends. The con
gressmen and senators were kept busy
during the half-hour prior to sailing
time shaking hands with the. numer
ous friends they had made during
their brief visit.
It was not until the two sharp blasts
of the whistle warned them to get
aboard that they hurried forward to
the gangplank. Here Governor Lucius
E. Pinkham, representatives of the
territorial, civic and county govern
ments and officers of the army and
navy were on hand for a final hand
shake and well wishes. And when the
last member had hesitatingly clam
bered up the steep gangplank and the
band broke into the fond farewell song
ViiiLt
miwm
DP!
Arrini a mil nr-ss fi 1 11 f TPitTftii ntir niinntmi-itrmrsfmrt
TI0NS HAVE BEGUN WILL CAUSE WASHINGTON TO ACT !
GREAT MASSMEETING IN BUDAPEST CALLS FOR CES-!
SATI0N OF WAR ,
(Associated Press, extraordinary service) V j
PETROGRAD, Russia, Nov. ZS. Despatches from the front today ay
that representatives of Ensign Krylenko, the Russian commander acting for!
the Bolshevikl, have been received in the German lines and told by the Gsr i .
man commander there that the German government has officially consent-;
ed to Immediate negotiations for an armistice on all fronts in the belliger
ent countries.' The peace conference Is set for; December 2.
PETROGRAD, Russia, Nov. 28,Peace negottions be-;
tween the Russians and Germans have formally begun. . .
issued an announcement today that representatives of Ensign
Kfelenko, the commander-in-chief of the Bolsheviki forces, .
have crossed to the German side and are entering negotiations
with the German military authorities. : - . 1 ; ,
WASHINGTON, D. C, v; 28. No action with special
rnrro ir f h a ronrtrf nf T?ncan.frorm nn nnnpn n-rpTinnrfpc Tins riPPH 1
.Cjv w w..vt'yr.r- - -
taken. by the United States government. : V
;j It is given out that the determination by the government
whether the Bolsheviki regime is to be treated as an enemy j
or an active ally of Germany rests on official advices; as to l
the reported conferences with German officers. ;
: vVMSTERDAjr, Netherlands, Nov. 28. Denial was 'an-
ihr-rlvar ?n TcrliTi tndsr fTifli dprti TiiiflpTiflnrfT. : rifrht-hand man !
tliutluvu vvx ' " v 7 -o t
for GenVHindenburg, is on the i Eussian front to carry on peace ;
(Continued from page 2)
I NEW YORK STOCK
MARKET TODAY
Japanese vendor naa ume di u , . determine why food
5 wharr. dut. not ou8n yesterday for the
and tbw who could na t guaPrdsmen who spent the day
nt up town. I met a num- t j? UJ That :
trance to the wharf, but not enou
fnr KM) mon .1
' ' . t msf a .,m Kauai guarasmen wuo syeui. me u A,asJa ra&
h cayuaA iron f I1TI tOWTl. I met ft BUnl- I ... A i rr-w t. : MISSKa OIO
I'L .V " hor. nd thPv told me town on ineir .?lu "ur,e- t u" American Smelter
tiT.fr trnnhlP ! they were wUll0Ul t0C. 7 American Sugar Rfg.
their troubles. Jbeen responsible for the scene yester American Tel. & Tel.
"Of course the Filipinos did not d aternoon on the waterfront when Copper
cbey orders at the wharf, but they ;thy left the steamship Kilauea in S P
were not entirely to blame. There , s jtJe of orders f rom their officers and j Baldwin Loco' " '
was little discipline in camp among jwent town to buy food. ! Baltimore & Ohio'.,
these companies, ine ieu Until he has had some omcial report! e.tu,.u.m
Calif. Petroleum
PATRQL SHIPS FAIL TO
FIND THOR'S CREW
Official reports, received by the
Star-Bulletin late this afternoon from
the naval authorities and other offic
ial sources indicate that patrol ships
have not yet picked up any survivors
of the foundered steamer Thor, which
wirelessed for help last Friday night.
Earlier reports this afternoon were
to the effect that a patrol 11 ship had
found the second boatload of survivors
?nd had fanded them on Kauai. This
eport is apparently unfounded and
'incorrect, according to : later advices.
Services In ' memory of the late
Mrs. Ella Peabody . Osborne will be
held this afternoon at Central Union
church at 4 o'clock. Rev. J. H. Wil
liams officiating
The men bad not
been tausht discipline in camp, uiey. th the fneral refuses" to
had seen and had taken part in break-. cominent on it, arrd also declined to-; Canadtan pacific
mg ruies, ana uiy ,day to discuss tne aissatisiacuon ; c M & SU P. (St. Paul)
ters into their own hands at th6;among a number 0f his officers with j Cofo.FueJ & Iron ......
wharf. ithA situation at the guard encamp- tlJikt "ftti -
wiuviw
Cuban Cane
Erie Common
Tn TviT- men rnmnnnv. there was i. i u oViortnln nn-
good discipline for we have good of-; followed as outlined. f
ficers. The Filipinos of my company j Tt ia nndprstood that a meetiner oiif!...rPiM.
. .i v... I . . usiismi
understand discipline iur luej- : officers will be held in a short time
been taught it
It is unfair to blame the Filipinos
for the trouble in the national guard.
They will make good guardsmen if
Lproperly taught and well handled.
Is It our tauil mat we are in ine
guard? We were appealed to for en
listment and the Filipinos responded
readily. We like the worlf. We like
to be serving the flag. It appeals to
the sentiment of the Filipino people
to be doing something for Uncle Sam
about whom we have heard so much.
"You will find that the Filipino
companies which are vvell handled
are good companies. I must say, too,
that all the cases of lack of discipline
at Kawailoa were not among the Fili
pinos, not at all. There was lack . of
discipline among the Hawaiians, but
again I say, all this could have been
avoided with proper handling of the
camp. x ' ' . ' ' ,; ;;;
"I am not speaking as a guardsman
but as a Filipino who wishes to de
fend his neonle against unjust critl-
General Motors, New
in line with the policy each year after
encampment, and it fs not unlikely
that the matter will be threshed out
at that time. General Johnson was
asked todav regarding a report that ww York Central
he would ask for resignations from a j Pennsylvania .......
number of his officers, but he refused . Ray Consol. r. ......
to confirm or deny it. ' Reading Common
One element among tne orucers was
Great Northern Pfd.
Inter. Harv N. J. . ;
Kennecott Copper .
Lehigh R. R.
'.I s f.
Today.
02
t75'4
92
106'2
57
83
55
492
BO
12&
13438
368
35
554
29'4
14
. 127
88
89&
338
53i2
14
inclined today to regard the dissatis
faction expressed toward the guard
head as a personal fight, though the
feeling seems to be quite . common
that the failure to follow the schedul
was a mistake. It is admitted that
the departure from plans necessitated
by the ceremonies In honor to the late
queen was unavoidable and entirely
proper. But on the second week tod
little attention was paid to the ar
ranged program,' most of the- officers
feel. v .V r- V ?-'vW -
The army policy seems to be to "sit
tight" on the matter for the present
at least Whether ' ; the camp report
(Continued from, page 2
' " "v '
Southern Pacific
Studebaker
Texas Oil ....
Union Pacific
U. S.: Steel ...
Utah .........
Western Union
Vestinghouse
69'
46:
22'2
69'2
82
44,
142'2
f144
97
78 .
838
384
Yester-day.
78
98
106
58
84
55
50
81J4
13
1342
37J8
36
55'2
29'2
14Vs
1274
y 9075
90
: 33
545.2
69Ta
22
70'4
B2VS
1427s
-144 ...
114
97
78
I 832
38
Bld. fEx-dlvidend. Unquoted.
Walter Love and "Haole"- Sumner
left for the mainland today on the
Mauf to , enlist In some arm of the
service. Love hopes to get Into the
engineers as he has had, railroad ex
perience In the Northwest Sumner
will apply for . admission to whatever
branch he Is deemed suitable for,
west front.
, Agreat Socialist demonstration was made in Budapest,
Hungan', last Sunday in favor of an immediate armistice with
TJnccIoUn 1m fnllnTrort hv pnrlv Rof flnmPTif. nf Tionrf-f rms.' A
number of speakers spoke to vast throngs, urging this tourse, ;
and a great procession was held, the crowds carrying banners :
calling for peace at once. v V : ; 7 "J : - ' 1
LAT
NEWS
AT
GLA
; CHINA HAS MEN AT BIG WAR CONFERENCE. .
WASHINGTON. D. C- Nov. 28.- The Chinese legation here announces
that Hu Wei Teh. Chinese minister to France, and Tamt Thai Lleh, vice-
secretary of the general staff, are the .Chinese representatives at the hi?
war conference of the Allies. '-,'; ;
NAVY, DEPARTMENT COMMANDEERS TIN SUPPLY. ; 1
WASHINGTON, D. C, Nov. 28. Protests by birge canners made to'tha
government today reveal the fact that the navy department has comman
deered all the tin supply stored, in New York warehouses. 1
TERRIFIC ARTILLERY FIGHTING ON WEST
BERLIN, Germany, Nov. 28. Artillery battling of the greatest violence
is in progress in Flanders and along the Passchaendale sector, . Two hun
dred prisoners were taken today in fighting on the Cambrai front as well
as a number of machine-guns, r ; .,: . - v ' ; ; u
SPAIN ACKNOWLEDGES AUTHORITY OFBOLSHEVIKI j
acknowledging the peace" offer of the Bolsheviki faction, promises that
Spain will do all in her power to contribute to that peace for which human
ity thirsts. .' i;-'w--' )xy'-.
GARCIA TO HANG FOR CRIME ON FRIDAY. . '
Antonio Garcia, murderer of a Japanese at Honakaa, Hawaii, who has
been i reprieved three times because he declared he had murdered Harriet
Kunane, at Kohala, for which crime a man is now serving a life imprison
ment term, will be hanged In the courtyard of the territorial prison at 9
o'clock Friday, morning. : Preparations: for the hanging have been completed,
and all is in readiness for carrying put of the court's sentence..
LOCAL BOYS TO SEE AIR SERVICE ABROAD.
Ralph Gray,, son of Mrs. L. M. Gray of Kalia road, and a well known
Honolulu boy, is at San Diego awaiting orders that will send him to
foreign country with a flying squadron. Gray- took , examinations several
months ago, and passed with flying colors. He was sent to the San Diego
aviation camp, where he has been In training for some time. Gray's mother
left Testerday for the coast to visit him: John ODowda, also a Honolulu
boy,: vvho enlisted in the aviation7 corps has already, received orders to em- i
bark for" abroad . it was understood today. O'Dowd was attached to the f
San' Dieeo camo. ' 'i : "-"''' ' : ,'.;'-'., .: .;' '; .;' : . " ' .' :
' THIRTEEN TO TRAIN AT FORTRESS MONROE ;
Orders directing the sending of 13 non-commissioned officers from ' the
- Hawaiian department to Fortress Monroe, Va, for training as officers were l
received late this afternoon at army headquarters. They are as follows:,:
-Master Gunner Ballard E. Webb,; C a. C; Electrlcianergeant 2d class j
'William T. Lawson, C. A. C; Corporal Lewis D.;3Iayers; 8th Co.. Oahu; ;
Corporal William S. Smith, 8th Company, Oahii; Corporal Harry C. Smith, j
' 1st : Company, Oahu; First Sergeant John J. Duffy, ,2 d ' Company, Oahu ; ,
Private Frederick M. Hudson, 12th Company, :Oahu; Corporal Arthur C !.
Walker, 3rd Compahy, Oahu; Sergeant George E. Starbird, 5th Company, j
Oahu ; First Sergeant James B. Parker, 8 th . Company, Oahu ; Sergeant j
Clifford G. Showen, 9th Company, Oahu; Sergeant Charles Gorham, 9th Com-1
pany, Oahu; Corporal Thomas F. Hamilton, 9th Company, Oahu. " ;
TONIGHT'S BAND CONCERT.
- The Hawaiian band will, play this
evening at Thomas. Square beginning
atl7:30 o'clock.
A..'-'. : Old Hundred
Overture Raymond . . . . . . .Godfrey
March Broken Doll . . . . ... . Grant
(a) Barcarolle ......... Offenbach
(b) Pua Mohala ....... . . : Nape
Selection Attilla .... ..... . . ; : Verdi
Songs xiawalian Band Glee Club. .
Selection "Sky High". ..... Taylor
Foxtrot There's a Little Bit of Bad i
In Every Good Little Glrr, Clarke
Hawaii Ponol . ,
-The Star-Spansled Baaner . 5 . ,
OFFICER PROMOTED.
Orders announcing a temporary
commission as ' captain for Lieut. Ba- j
rott of Schofield Barracks were re :
ceived today at army headquarters. I
Thec officer is with the 4th Cavalry. :
r r. v 4 -f
k:--:-y : ,
NO ISSUE ON.THANKSGIVING
' '
-f The Star-Bulletin will r.ct ts
-f Issued tomorrow, ThaalslTlc z
-f Day. '

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