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Honolulu star-bulletin. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1912-current, November 30, 1917, 2:30 Edition, Image 2

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TWC
HONOLt 30,1917,
8
Prolsiofiia
apply
relief
are necessary in
in glasses for the
1
of eyestrain and all
errors of vision.
Inferior and poorly fitted glasses are likely to in
jure eyesight.
Entrust your eyes with one who knows this is
important.
WALL & DOUGHERTY
. i .
Optical Department
Second Floor, Young Building
DR. P. W. RUSHFORTH
in charge.
- .
Sammy
in his training camp
j and milady in her
drawing room have
in common a fond
ness for
GhioGO
afte
Buy a box and he thankful.
Pure Rich Good
exquisitely flavored.
FOR SALE BY
Hbllister Drug Store Henry May & Co., Ltd..
J. M. Levy & Co., Ltd. Chambers Drug Store
OF
FLASMLIGIfS
Handiest article you can have around the house
or camp. Note these unusual values:
Reg. Price, Now Selling at
$1.75 $X3S
1.50 1.15
2.00 1.35
1.50 - l.OO
1.00 MSc
SEE DISPLAY IN OUR WINDOW
: - :" ' :'..',;..'
S wers & f finite
Lumber & Building Material. . 169-i77 S. King St.:
NEWSEEADLER
MYSTERYTOLD
Survivors of A. B. Johnson Ar
: rive at Coast; Describe Coral
- Marked Burial Ground -
SAX FRANCISCO. Cal., Nov. '20.
Four unmarked graves on the coral
reefed Island cf Mopeha, In the South
Seas, form the latest mystery in the
career of the German raider Seeadler.
Mopeha Is the scene of the. recent res
cue of the crews of three American
schooners marooned there by the Ger
mans. " The four graves lie 500 paces from
the shore near the deadline prescribed
by the Germans for their American
prisoners during the stay on the isl
and and were used by the German
guards as forcible reminders to the
American seamen of the fate that
awaited should they venture to cross.
A description of the graves was
brought here yesterday by John M.
Tweed, first officer of the schooner
A. B. Johnson, which was sunk by
the Seeadler last June. Tweed ar
rived aboard the schooner Bertie
Minor from Tahiti in company with
three members of the crew of the
schooner R. C. Slade, also a victim
of the raider. These men are Robert
Bruce, sailor; Haknar Olsen, sailor;
Y. Yakeinoto, cook, all of Sau Fran
cisco. The remaining 25 men oik Mopeha
were rescued from the island a
month ago and now are awaiting the
arrival of tne Union liner Moana at
Tahiti to bring them to this port.
Tweed said yesterday:
When we landed on Mopeha, after
the Seeadler .went ashore, we were
shown a deadline by the Germans and
threatened with death should we cross
it. The guard said to us: "If you
cross that line you will be put with
the others up there."
We were curious as to what lie
meant, and one night another and my
self crawled to the spot and found
four graves. Each was bordered by
bits of coral and a crude cross. No
names were inscribed.
The Americans frequently speculat
ed on the mystery during their cap
tivity. Some thought the, graves
might have been those of castaways
who had perished on the island, which
is 300 miles from Tahiti and out of
the steamship lanes. Others thought
some ship might hate put ashore to
bury their dead. Some believed the
Germans had been occupying the isl
and as a base and shot some of their
prisoners. Again .otheifi suggested
that the Germans had buried ammuni
tion on the island and marked the spot
in a way to lead to the belief that
bodies had been buried.
The Germans treated the prisoners
well, Tweed said, paying them in Ger
man paper money for enforced labor.
Part of this labor was the construc
tion of a wharf at Mopeha. As the
"work was done with pick and shovel
the first big tide washed it all away.
JAPANESEHIT
BYALtdDIES
- An unidentified Japanese was In
stantly killed when struck by an auto
on Berettfnia street opposite Duncan's
gymnasium last' night. The machine
was owned and driven by Walter Dui
senburg, who was driving toward Fort
street when the accident occurred.
The Japanese had crossed Beretanta
street and stepped In front of the ap
proaching car, the front left fender of
the car striking him. Mr. Duisehburg
swerved the heavy machine to the
right, but the Japanese had fallen and
the wheels passed over his body. Wit
nesses declare tnat the car was stopped
within ten feet of the man's body.
Mr. Dulseuburg, In a statement to
the Star-Bulletin this morning, 6atd
that he was driving not more than
ten miles an hour. "It had been rain
ing, and the streets were slippery,"
said Mr. Duisenburg. "I was driving
slowly for fear of skidding. My lights
threw the rays directly in front of the
car. The first I saw of the Japanese
was when he seemed to stumble out
of the darkness. The front left fender
struck himL and as I swung the car to
the right, he fell and the wheelB passed
over him."
A physician in the crowd examined
the dead man's pulse, it is said, and
declared the Japanese was dead.
Sheriff Charles Rose said this morn
ing that he had examined the body
and believed that the dead man nad
been drinking prior to the accident.
The sheriff declared that he believea
the accident to have been unavoidable.
TENNIS STARS
fPllDAY
Miss Maile Vicars and A. t. Castle
defeated Mrs. M Graham and Oswald
MayaR; in the. first match of the pa
troitic mixed doubles at the ' Hawaii
Polo and Racing Club courts WedneA
day. The winning team took the match
in straight sets, 62, 63. , .
Miss Vicars played great tennis
throughout the match,, and A. L. Castle
also played a steady game, although
not as brilliant in all departments, &
usual. Mrs. Graham and Mayall put
up a hard fight In both sets, the games
often going to deuce.
This afternoon Mrs. Frederick
Schaefer and Capt. William Warren
will meet Mis Vicars and A. L. Castle.
Miss Ruth Anderson and Liout. Ather
ton Richards will play Miss Alice Hop
per and William Eklund. the play will
begin at 3:45.
MANUFACTURE OF CORN
1 MEAL ON 0AHU URGED
23 SEEK CITIZENSHIP
Tomorrow is naturalization day in
federal court and nine Britishers, two
Turks, one Canadian, four Russians,
three Portuguese, one Dane and one
Frenchman will be examined as to
their qualifications to become citizens
of the United States. They are as fol
lows: Robert C. Walker, F. W. Jamieson,
Mary Isobel Wilson, R. H. Fiddes,
Elijah Jones, J. A. Fernie, D. T. Blue,
William Jamieson and G. J. Watson,
Great Britain; Romen A. Bienvenne,
Canada; Andrew Pastushin, R. A.
Kemp, Mitchel Saiviaki and Alex.
Schmidt, Russian; Cohen Elie and
Hovanness Jerahiam, Turkey; Joseph
Fernandez, Manuel Martins and Man
uel Rodrigues, Portugal; Viggor Han
sen, Denmark; Frank Irene Bruez,
France,
rk B. Porter, secretary of the tef
ritorial board of health, left Wednes
day for a business trip to Maui. He
will return on Saturday.
Honolulu Aerie of Eagles, No. 140,
will give a dance tonight at Lusitana
hall. Robert Ross is chairman of the
committee in charge.
An attractive musical program has
been arranged for tonight under the
auspices of the Junior auxiliary to be
given in St. Andrew's parish house.
Those who . will participate are the
Misses Hamlin. Schaeffer and Ray
mond, Miss, Rian, Miss Margaret
Steven, A. A. Grant Schaefer, A. von
Ahn Carse, Miss Helen Center, Mr3.
E. D. Kilbourne, Canon Ault, the
Misses Munro, and Miss Oakes.
(
PERSONALITIES
MR. AND MRS. EBERT J, BOTTS
are receiving the congratulations of
their friends over the birth of a son
yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Mrs.
Botts and the boy, who are at the
Queen's Hospital, are both doing nicely.
W. R. HOBBY, superintendent of
public works, has returned from a
trip to Maui. He states that the La
haina swamp fill will be completed
next month and that the masonry dam
at Olinda is nearing completion.
MISS BERNICE AYERS, youngest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Av
ers, has resigned her position with
Raymond Bros, and will leave Nov
ember 28 for Honolulu, where she has
accepted a position with The Ha
waiian News company, of which J. FV
Soper is president. Mr. Soper Is . well
known here and formerly resided in
San Francisco. - Petaluma, Cal.,
Courier. ; '
COLDS CAUSE HEADACHES
LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE re-
moves the cause. Used the world over
to cure a cold in one day, - The signa
ture of B. W. GROVU is on each box.
Manufactured by the PARIS MEDI
CINE CO SLXfi U, JR.A.
PASTOR SAYS LIQUOR
FOR BRITISH SOLDIERS
ROBS PEOPLE OF SUGAR
Criticism of the rum ration of the.
British army formed a part of the
Thanksgiving sermon delivered by
Rev... Li. 'Li. Loofbourow, pastor of the
Methodist church, at the union service
in Central Union church yesterday
morning. The minister referred gen
erally to Great Britain's war policy in j
the matter of prohibition, and pointed
out that, while distillers are using 65,- j
000,000 bushels of grain annually, the'
nation is growing only sufficient grain j
for one of each six loaves of bread
needed. The minister said, in part:
"The English brewers use six per
cent of her sugar, and the rest Eng
land gives out on a food ration basis.
When the Y. M. C. A. ordered a ton of
sugar in England once for the tea and
coffee of the men in the trenches they
got fifty. pounds. But the brewer had
what he needed! When the British
Tommy Is wounded and in the hospi
tal he has had to go without sugar for
considerable periods, but the public
Jiouse across the way can provide it ,
to its patrons.
"It is not a square deal- Neither ta
the children nor to the Tommies."
GERMAN PHILOSOPHY IS
SCORED BY BISHOP IN
.THANKSGIVING SERMON
-Thanks to" God that the United
States nas entered the war, ready to
sacrifice blood and treasure, so that
man may be freed from the reign of
force, formed the keynote of a stirring
sermon delivered in St. Andrew's Ca
thedral yesterday morning by Right
Rev. Henry Bond Restarick, Episcopal
bishop of Honolulu.
"If this country were not at war
with the powers of evil, if it had stood
back hoping to enjoy material benefit
from the, warfare of others, if it had
stood willing ta see oppression, cru
elty and lust triumphant, provided that
we were not hurt in hide or wallet,
ten we should have done will to have
set apart this day as one of humili
ation, as being derelict to our duty as
men, and onr ideals as Americans,"
said the bishop.
"And here we are met by the stern
fact' that despite the splendid show
ing of real patriotism in the United
States, there are among us large num
bers of men and women who were
born in alien lands and brought up
under a philosophy and with ideals
which if carried out would in the en,d
be absolutely destructive of the Amer
ican government."
MARKET TO EXTEND
WHOLESALE BUSINESS
Although the retail market at the
territorial marketing division is to
close, the division will continue its
wholesale meat business arid probably
on a larger scale than before.
It was reported today that Dr. J. H.
Raymond, whose ranch at Ulupalakua,
Maul, has been the principal basis of
supply for the division, is contemplat
ing ceasing the Valley Island sales of
his No. 2 beef and shipping it to Hono
lulu for sale through the division. In
the past, and at present, much of the
No. 2 beef is sold on Maui, Doctor Ray
mond sending all the No. 1, or best
grade beef, to this city.
The marketing division is to con
tinue its wholesale sales and the re
tailers at the fish market and other
places in the city will be supplied as
usual.
First Lieut. A. T. Longley, U. S. R.,
who is superintendent of the division,
is to remain in charge until December
6, when, he probably will apply for a
leave in order to attend to his military
duties. Oswald Ligntfoot was In charge
of the division while' Lieut. Longley
was at the training canip at Schofield
Barracks. !
: s .-, I
J. F. Child, federal food commis
sioner, is to take up with the local
feed companies the matter of manu-.
factoring corn meal for household pur
poses, the plan being to cut down as
far as possible all importations from
the mainland, and to encourage the Use
of corn meal instead of white flour.
Mr. Child, who recently returned
from Maui, points out that little or no
corn meal. Is being manufactured for
the trade on the Valley Island, and
declares it "will have to be manufac
tured In Honolulu If It is to1 be placed
on the local market. On Oahu, he
says,, corn is being used as food for
cattle and hogs in place of rolled bar
leys, and the growers are sending very
little to Honoiu"u. While on Maul-he
tried to get four tons of corn for a
local retail grocer, but could not se
cure it
. He thinks that if the manufacture
of corn ' meal is begun in Honolulu,
much of the Parker Ranch corn could
be used for this purpose. The demand
for island corn meal has been heavy,
and Honolulu dealers .have been un
able to secure it
DU R0I DENIES CHARGES
THAT HE IS PRO-GERMAN
Answering a letter by J. A. Balch,
treasurer of the Mutual Telephone Co.,
in which he was called on to answer
rumors of his alleged pro-German ten
dencies, Carl du Roi, manager of B. F.
Ehlers & Co., in a public letter has
made a general denial of the purport
ed accusations.
His answer, he says, Is to reassure
those who,. like Mr. Balch.&are "still
trying to believe me to be loyal." He
denies that he was present at a gather
ing celebrating the sinking of the Lusi
tania, or having ever expressed any
gratification over this act by the Huns.
He further denies that he. publicly
cheered and shouted "Good boys, you
did your duty," to German sailors who
were, being marched up the street un
der military escort after America and
Germany had ... severed diplomatic re
lationsl .
He also denies that a toast to the
German Emperor was. drunk in his
house after war had been declared.
He concludes, "Now that I have been
forced to speak, my purpose is to deny
all these and any other rumors or
charges of disloyalty to the United
States of which I am a citizen."
. m m A
. Otto Wagering received a 15-year
prison term at hard labor in a Fed
eral penitentiary, the Hrst conviction
of general court-martial at Camp
Dodge, Iowa. .
MASSAGE.
Massage parlors for ladies. Mrs. S.
Hirao, phone 5203. 64 Kukui lane,
Nuuanu street. 6956 lm
FOR SALE.
RIAL ESTATE.
Manoa, $8000, 3-bedroom bungalow
witi garage, lot 17,000 sq. ft, 2121
Atherton road, College Hills.
. 6956 7t
WANTED.
Set golf clubs. Address Box 968, Star
Bulletin. 6956 6t
Nothing has ever
equaled or compared
with the medicinal fats
in Scott's Emulsion to
arrest the decline, invigorate
the blood, strengthen the
nervous system, aid the appe
tite and restore the courage
of better health.
Scott's Emulsion is
pure health - build
Ing food, without
alcohol or opiate.
WE STORE EVERYTHING
JAMES H. LOVE
J;LZ1
CITY TRANSFER COMPANY
Ui- -: PHONE 1231. "
It Chases Hunger .
Graham
: Bread
Wrapped as soon as baked.
Phono
1
4
3
1
THANKFULNESS
should be constantly felt where good health is enjoyed. - Only those who
have lost It can appreciate its true blessing. -
If you have lost your health, you too may be thankful If you will con
sult a Chiropractor. - . ,
Try Chiropractic and get well! ' ' , ' ,
F. C. MIGHTOX. D. O,
' ' 204-5 Boston Bid. (Over May'n).
. , ,: .. , v.....,,.,,r,.v.;,.. I
Saturday, Dec; 1st, the day of the
Championship Swim from Castle
Pier to Outrigger Diving stand. :
- OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB : - 5
CKowder an
- ,December 1st, 1917. ; V..
'chowder at 6:30 p. m." ' Dance at 8:3Q p. nv J
r ' ; ! ' : TICKETS, $1.00 . :; v', A; V
Chowder Tickets, $1.00 per plate. This ticket includes
; the dance. S:';;k'1'U
Dance Tickets for those who cannot attend chowder, j$l,
: . Including ladies. ' . 1 : ; : .
Original ity in weave and style is
the leading note in; this display of
Fall
Sweaters
Angara sweaters, leading shades withlute trimming,
at $8.50. .:;v- ::;';?;;c;;;;l;yX-:;i
: Hand Knit Swiss Sweaters, of real Shetland wool, $15.00
each.--.. ;v'r-J-X:J;V'-sV
Shetland Sweaters in a variety of stripe effects, $10.00.
Fiber Silk Sweaters, all colors, at $10.00. ; 'c
; ; -pSecond Floor.
Silk Service Flags, Badge of Honor, 10c each, at the
Eibbon Dept. , ; ; . - . J,;
T TC5
Hotel St., hear Fort
.
Dreams are seedlings of
realities; but ads in the Star
Bulletin will sprout-them so
rapidly that you needn't
wait lonp: for the fruit.
GRAND MOOSE RALLY and BALL
the
NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY, SATURDAY EVENING, DEC. 1
given under the ailnices 2'- Schofield Lodge, No. 1060,
and Honolulu Lodge N6. 800, Loyal Order of Moose, for
the I ;nefit of the Red Cross Fund.
Tickets Gentlemen, 75c. - . . Ladies Free
Cold Turkey, chicken or duck -if there's any -left '
from that Thanksgiving "dinner, will make a most. "
appetizing dinner tomorrow or Sunday if you com- :
bine with it
Delicious
ALAP
- r .
such as these for sale in our up-to-date Delicates
sen Department;
If there's no Thanksgiving meat left in your larder,
try for a change, a ' . . -
Juicy Roast of Beef,
Mutton or Pork
Assured highest quality meats.
Metropolitan
Meat Market
Clean White New Sanitary
' PHONE 3445
V t
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