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The Maui news. (Wailuku, Maui, H.I.) 1900-current, December 07, 1912, Image 3

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THE MAUI NEWS, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912.
3
J f Untercst
J Zo llfflomcn
On no one point of etiquette is
is there more debate mul uncertain
ty lliiin in tlio use of calling-cards.
The reason for this may he found
in the fact that, after all, their ser
vice is not one point of etiquette,
hut several. Many are the details
connected with leaving and sending
cards, and almost numlierless are
the occasions on which they are
sent. In reasons for congratulation,
fur condolence, for inauir.v. in the
place of calls, ns acknowledgment
of courtesies, as invitation, as an
nouncement, in practically every
exigency of life the card is calied
into Bervice. The etiquette of cards
should he known hy everyone who
makes any claim to social life.
STYLE OF CARD
The card itself is the first item to
be considered. It should always he
plain white cardhoard. Its simpli
city marks its good taste. The let
tering should he marked hy the
same severity. The inscription must
lie engraved, as a matter of course.
Printing is absolutely out of place;
better than that is a plain card in
scribed simply with your name in
your own handwriting. The letter
ing may be block, script, or Old
English in plain black.
A married woman should have
her cards inscribed with her married
name: Mrs. John P. Jones, or
Mrs. John Parker Jones, not Mrs.
J. Parker Jones, and never Mrs.
Mary Allen Jones. Even when she
is a widow, it is permissible and
preferable that she should preserve
her husband's name on her calling
cards. The cards of an unmarried woman
should be written. Miss Jones, if she
is the eldest daughter. The young
er daughter writes her name Miss
' Mary Elizabeth Jones. Never is a
nickname, or a contraction to be
used.
When a young girl is in her first
season, and is supposed to be mak
ing all her calls with her mother
her name is often engraved under
that of her mother on a larger card
than she would use by herself. Oc
casionally we see the husband's and
wife's name encraveu on ' the same
card.
Usuallv th married man's card
is the same size as that of the bach
elor. and in both cases the style of
inscription is the same: Mr. Ar
thur Bowles Wilson, or Mr.. Arthur
B. Wilson, or, if he prefers, Mr. A.
B. Wilson. The title is never omit
ted with the man any more than
with the woman.
SHORT CALLS BEST.
Cards naturally BUggest calls, and
these vary in character from the
formal call of fashion to the easy
call of friendship. For the first or
formal call the usual time permitted
is not more than fifteen minutes,
and often even this is cut short; not
only at first calls, but also at after
noons at home. Friendly calls, be
tween persons who know and enjoy
one another, need have no limit be
yond the convenience of the caller
and the hostess.
In these 'days, when we have
brought specialization even into our
social functions, the old-fashioned
way of dropping in for a chance call
has rather fallen into disuse- Peo
ple are too busy to stay at home
every afternoon to receive their
friends, or to make calls on the
chance of finding that those they
seek are not at home. From this
state of affairs has come the custom
of remaining in one afternoon a
week, or two a month, and thus
feeling free to say "Not at home,"
or "Not receiving" on other days.
No caller has a right to feel ag
grieved if she is met by this message
when she calls on a day that is not
the regular "At Home" day of her
friend. When she calls on the "At
Home" day, it is well to recollect
that an overlong call is likely to
prove embarrassing.
Certain Btated calls must be mad
by anyone who moves in society at
II. J he call at least once a year
upon those on your calling list; the
call after having been entertained
at dinner, or luncheon, or at an
evening entertainment; the call of
congratulation after a marriage, or
a birth; the call of condolence upon
those in sorrow ; the call of inquiry
at the house of illness; the call upon
a stranger who has leen introduced
to. you by a friend; the return call,
when a first call has been made up-
on you; the can 01 a new arrival
upon an old resident, who was away
when the newcomer settled in the
town, but who returned later on
none of these can be evaded. A
first call should be returned within
a week, or at longest a fortnight;
dinner call, or, in fact, any others
of those named, should be paid
promptly.
If two women called together, it
is the elder of the two who makes
the signal for departure by rising or
giving a significant glance to her
companion.
FORMAL CALL8
the ether for the master of the
muse. It there arc daughters re
ceiving, a card is lelt lor each one
rom lH)th husband and wife; if
there are other men in the family,
the husband's cards are left, one for
each man. A woman caner never
leaves a card for a man, as a matter
f course. All this calls for a great
expenditure of cardlxiard, but it is
the decree of Fashion.
The unmarried woman calling
upon a friend lefcves but one card,
unless there are other women in the
household, in which case she leaves
one apiece. A married woman call-
ng upon a single woman leaves her
own card and that of her husband
or son. It is permitted to leave
cards for a son or brother if circum
stances render it absolutely out of
the question for these men to dis
charge their own social obligations,
but as a rule it is taken for granted
that unmarried men should pay
their own calls, no matter what
measure of indulgence in this res
pect is extended to married men.
FROM NEW
YORK FILES
THE RACE HORSE.
August Belmont and The
been discussing
Mr.
Jockey Club have
how to make racing the sport it
used to be. They advocate stricter
regulation of betting and other
changes. That a lot of people rule
racing out entirely because of the
gambling in it doesn't seem to in
still in some of us the liking for a
good horse race. We even admit
that we like it infinitely better
when we have a little money on it.
We do not take kindly to the no
tion that to race. a horse is wicked.
How about it? Moderation is the
answer, so it Beeins to me. uur
old friend moderation I Moderation
for everylxxly except the horse 1
He can go as far as he likes.
THE LBTTER8 OF CHE8TERFIELD.
Happening to pick up a volume
of the Chesterfield letters lately, I
came upon this typical observation :
Air, address, manner and graces
are of such infinite advantage to
whoever, has them that I tremble
for fear I shall not find you pos
sessed of them."
"Drivel 1'' said I, throwing the
book aside, and then thought better
of it and said: "Drivel nothing!"
Instead of drivel it's the truth!
"The Letters of Chesterfield" are
irritating only localise they are so
frankly snobbish. And even ad
mitting and detesting their snob
bery, it would do a lot of people
good to read them.' Somewhat to
my surprise, I learn that a lot of
people are! This book of etiquette
is a very steady seller-. One of the
best outside of fiction even at this
late day. Everybody getting all
mannered up!
MEN .
Mr. Bok's publication would
have us believe that men like "the
of feminine dressing. Which is al
very well for very young ladies, but
which looks like the devil if I may
say so on grown women. Doubt
less "the white muslin and blue
riblwn style" is supposed to mean
simplicity. And possibly men, as
a sex, may be said to prefer the
simple to the elaborate. But do
men often know juat why they like
a woman's dress, or do not like it?
I doubt it! Men are the salt of the
earth. I would even go so far as to
say that without them the world
could not continue! But there are
some things they do not know.
They know precious little about the
way a woman dresses.
A 8TRADIVARI VIOLIN.
I've heard of people who prized
their violins, but I never saw any
one in the actual act of prizing un
til one evening lately. A young
violinist came a-calling on some
friends of mine and brought his
Stradivari with him. He never
leaves it alone. It was done up in
several little nightgowns, white hags
with ribbons at the top. "And did
it really cost 89,000?" "It did,''
said he. "All the perfect Stradi
vari violins are registered. Mine is
one of them. Do you wonder that
I alwavs take it with me?'' I
never saw a woman more tender!
with a baby than was this violinist
with his violin.
C. II.
COOKE,
President.
Corrkct Attest:
I). H. CASE 1
R. A. WADSWORTH Directors.
J. GARCIA )
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
7th day of December, 1912.
J. D. MARQUES,
Notary Public.
No. 8207.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF
the Baldwin National Bank of Ka
hului, tut Kohulut In the Ter. of
Hawaii, at the close of business,
November 36, 1912.
Resources Dollars
Loans and Discounts 159,844 72
Overdrafts, secured and unse-
cured 13,89636
U. S. Bonds to secure circula
tion 25,000 00
Premiums on U. S. Bonds 593 55
Bonds, securities, etc 45,845 36
Banking house, furniture, and
fixtures 3,453 6
Due from National Banks (not
reserve agents) 1,972 58
Due from approved Reserve
Agents 2,641 02
Checks and other cash Items.. 2,140 00
Notes of other National Banks 140 00
Fractional paper currency,
nickels, and cents 122 84
Specie 5'.9J3 5
Redemption fund with U. S.
Treasurer (5 of circulation) 1,25000
in the Court Room of this Court at
Wailuku, Maui, at which time and
place all persons concerned may
appear and show cause, if any they
have, why said Petition should not
be granted, and that notice of this
order shall be published once a
week for three successive weeks
in the "Maui News," a weekly
newspaper printed and published
in Wailuku, Maui, the last publica
tion to be not less than ten days
previous to the time therein ap
pointed for hearing.
Dated November 12, 1912.
Sd. S. B. KINGSBURY
Judge of the Circuit Court of
Second Circuit.
Attest; (Sd.) EDMUND H.
HART
Clerk Circuit Court of the Second
Circuit.
Nov. 16, 23, 30, Dec. 7.
1 he first and most common use
of cards is made in calling. It is
hardly worth while to say that
woman does not carry her card in
and present it to the hostess, or
hand it to the hostess, should the
latter happen to open the front
door for her. In that case the call
er should lay her card on the table
inside of the door; or, if there is
none there, she may leave it on
table in the drawing-room.
When a servant opens the door
she usually has in readiness a tray
on which the caller may lay her
card. If, however, the function is
one at which the servant announces
the visitor's name, the cards may
l dropped into the salver, or dish
which will be on the hall table to
receive them. If the caller is
married woman calling upon anotl
er married woman, she leaves one
of her own cards and two of he
husband's one for the hostess, andwhiVe muslin and blue ribbon style'
No. 5D94.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF
the First National Bank of Wai
luku, at Wailuku, in the Ter. of
Hawaii, at the close of business,
November 26, 1912.
Resources Dollars
Loans and Discounts 200,700 90
Overdrafts, secured and unse
cured 10,992 81
U. S. Bonds to secure circula
tion 25,00000
Bonds, securities, etc 84,21886
Banking house, furniture, and
Fixtures 5,o
Other Real Estate owned 1,046 77
Due from National Banks not
reserve agents 599 53
Due from State and Private
Banks, and Bankers, Trust
Companies, and Savings
Banks 5,665 03
Due from approved Reserve
Agents 9,58700
Checks and other cash items... 97674
Fractional paper currency,
nickels, and cents 27 37
Specie 60,229 95
Redemption fund with U. S.
Treasurer (5 of circulation) 1,250 00
Total 408.823 19
Liabilities Dollars
Capital stock paid in '. .. 50,000 00
Surplus fund 14,926 42
Undivided profits, less ex
penses and taxes paid 5,34 8
National Bank notes outstand
ing..: - 2C.OOO 00
------ ... -
1 Due from State Bank and
; Bankers 4,909 35
Individual deposits subject to
check 294,723 12
Demand certificates of deposit 1,00000
Time certificates of deposit 12,81482
Certified checks 7 25
Cashier's checks outstanding.. 102 15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THB
SECOND Judicial CIRCUIT TERRI
TORY OK HAWAII.
In the Matter of the Estate of
ANTONE SYLVA, late of Wai
kapti, Maui, deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Notice is hereby given 40 all per
sons having claims against the
Estate of Antone Sylva, late of
Waikapti, District of Wailuku,
Island of Maui, Territory of Ha
waii, to present the same to the
undersigned, Charles Wilcox, ad
ministrator of said Ivstate, at his
otlice, Wailuku, County of Maui,
Territory of Hawaii, within six
months from the date of publica
tion of this notice, or payment
thereof will be forever barred.
Dated at Wailuku, Maui, this
30th day of November, 1912".
CHAS. WILCOX,
Administrator, Estate of An torn
Sylva.
Nov. 30, Dec. 7, 14, 21.
Total 408,823 19
Ter. of Hawaii, County of Maui, ss:
I, D. C. Lindsay, Cashier of the above
named bank, do solemnly swear that the
above statement is true to the best of my
knowledge and belief.
D. C. LINDSAY,
f Cashier.
Correct Attest:
H. A. BALDWIN ")
F. F. BALDWIN I Directors.
J. N. S. WILLIAMS )
Subscribed and sworn to before n
this 5th day of December, 1912. .
E. R. BEVINS,
Notary Pubilc.
Total .' . 405,294 96
Liabilities Dollars
Capital stock paid in 35, 000 00
Surplus fund 35,000 00
Undivided profits, less ex
penses and taxes paid 8,949 09
National Bank Notes outstand
ing 24,997 50
Due to other National banks... 1,68339
Individual deposits subject to
check 268,35487
Demand certificates of deposit 6,754 61
Time certificates of deposit 22,605 50
Certified checks 1,95000
Total 405,294 96
Ter. of Hawaii, County of Maui, ss:
I, C. H. Cooke, Cashier of the above'
named bank, do solemnly swear that the
above statement is true to the best of my
nowledge and belief.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, TER
RITORY OF HAWAII.
At Chambers In Probate.
In the Matter of the Estate of
PETER JOSEPH, late of Kula,
Maui, Deceased.
Order of Notice of Hearing Pe
tition for Administration.
On Reading and Filing the
Petition of Francisca Emilia Joseph,
widow of deceased, of Kula, Maui,
alleging that Peter Joseph, of Kula,
Maui, died entestate at Kula, Maui,
on the 4th day of February, A. D
1912, leaving property in the Ter
ritory of Hawaii necessary to be
administratered upon, and praying
that Letters of Administration issue
to said Petitioner:
It is ordered, that Monday, the
20th day of January A.D. 1913, at
10 o clock A. M. be and hereby is
appointed for hearing said Petition
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
The undersigned having been
duly appointed administrator of the
estate of Jose Fernandez, deceased,
hereby gives notice to all creditors
of said estate to present their
claims, duly authenticated and
with the proper vouchers, if any
exist, even if the claim is secured
by mortgage upon real estate, at
the office of Antone F, Tavares in
Makawao, Maui, within six months
from this date, or they will be for
ever barred.
ANTONE FERNANDEZ,
ANTONE F. TAVARES
Administrator of the Estate of Jose
Fernandez, Deceased.
Nov. 30. Dec. 7, 14. 21, 28.
ADMINISTRATOR' NOTICB TO
CREDITORS,
The undersigned, having been
duly appointed Administrator of
the Estate of Manuel C, Pimental,
deceased, notice is hereby given to
all persons having claims against
the said estate to present the same
with proper vouchers, if any exist
dully authenticated, whether sec
ured by mortgage or otherwise, to
the said Administrator at his office,
in Makawao, Maui, within six
months from the date of this notice
or they will be forever barred.
Dated, Makawao, Maui, Nov. 27,
1912.
ANTONE F. TAVARES,
Administrator of the Estate of
Manuel C. Pimental Deceased.
Nov. 30. Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28.
Cr
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