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The Maui news. (Wailuku, Maui, H.I.) 1900-current, April 12, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014689/1918-04-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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TWO
THE MAUI NEWS, FRIDAY, ArRIL, 12, 1918.
Death Of An Old
Maui Resident
On Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock,
Max Eckart, for many years a resident
of Walluku, quietly passed from our
midst. He had been In poor health
for several weeks, and, aa his disease
was of such a nature as to make it
difficult for him to receive nourish
ment from his food, he gradually
weakened until he peacefully passed
away. In the presence of several
members of his family.
Max Eckart was born In Bavaria, on
the 7th. of February, 1842. As a young
man he served in the Bavarian army
in the war of 1866. A few years later
he came to the Hawaiian Islands, and,
for some years, was engaged in busi
ness as a watchmaker and Jeweler,
in Honolulu. More than forty years
ago, he met and married Miss Maria
Campbell. They were married at
Walmea, Hawaii. A large family was
born to them, of which there are ten
living, seven daughters, and three
sons, most of whom were born in
Wailuku, where Mr. Eckart has lived
for about 27 years. His wife died
some years ago.
The following children survive him
Mrs.. S. E. Lucas, Honolulu; Mrs. A
H. Landgraf, Ewa; Mrs. C. Frank Sil
va, Wailuku; Max O. Eckart, Honolu
lu; Fritz Eckart, Wailuku; Willie
Eckart, Honolulu; Yette Eckart, Ho
nolulu; Mrs. May Minor, Honolulu
Mctta Eckart and Rhea Eckart, Wai
luku.
Mr. Eckart had, in the course of
years, accumulated considerable pro
perty in Wailuku, and in recent years,
has lived in retirement from business,
He was a respected citizen of quiet,
and reticent disposition. He was a
member of the local lodge of Free
Masons, and as such was esteemed
by his fellow Masons, who attended
his funeral at the Eckart home, on
Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock
and shared in the sacred rites con
ducted by his rector, Rev. J. Charles
Vllliers, of the Church of the Good
Shepherd, and Chaplain of the Mne
onnic Lodge.
While an inventory of the deceas
ed's property has not been made, it
is believed that it will ' amount to
about f20,000. It consists of real
estate and various Btocks. The will
which was left divides the eBtate
among the children when the young
est child becomes of age, which will
not be for some six years. C. D. Luf
kin is named in the will as adminis-
trator. '' i'J2t.
except pineapples
33. Fluorspar.
34. All fruits,
and bananas.
35. "All nuts, except coconuts and
products thereof.
36. Gelatine and manufactures
thereof, including nil from Europe.
37. Gold and silver manufactures,
including jewelry.
38. Sulphur oil or olive foots.
39. Grease,
(i. Hay.
41. Honey.
42. Hops.
43. Infusorial and diatomaceous
earth and tripoli.
44. Mantles for gas burners.
45. Matches, friction and lucifer.
46. Fresh moats.
47. Meerschaum, crude or manu
factured.
48. Musical instruments and parts
thereof.
49. Nickel.
00. Oil cake.
61. Oilcloth and linoleum for
floors.
52. All expressed vegetable oils
from Europe only.
53. Lemon oil.
54. Nonniineral paints and varn
Ishes.
55. Pencils and pencil leads.
56. Penholders and pens.
57. Perfumery, cosmetics, and
toilet preparations.
58. Phonographs, gramaphones,
grapliophoncs, and parts thereof.
59. Photographic goods.
GO. Pipes and smoker's articles.
61. Plants, trees, shrubs, and vines
62. Plates, electrotype, stereotype,
and lithographic; engraved.
63. Plumbago or graphite (until
July 1, 1918; thereafter not exceed
ing 5,0(TD long tons for remainder of
1018.)
64. Pyrites (except not exceeding
125,000 long tons to Oct. 1, 1918.)
65. Rennets.
(( Artificial uilk and manuiac
tures thereof.
6 1 Soap.
f.. Malt liquors, inclubru all
from Europe.
t.'1. Wines.
70. Oilier beverage-', including all
fri in Europe.
71. Candy and confectionery in-
luii ng all from Europe.
72. Tar and pilch of wood.
73. Toys.
74. Umbrellas, parasols, sunshades
and slicks for.
75. Beans, and lentils, from Eu
rope only.
76. Dried peas, from Europe only.
77. All vegetables, except beans
and lentils, and peas, either in their
natural state, or prepared or preserv
ed, including all from Europe.
78. Vinegar.
School Notes
Mr. Joseph Sousa is the new prin
cipal at Puukolil school. He taught
formerly at the' Kamehameha III
school, Lahaina.
Mr. J. Halemano is acting principal
at Keanae school.
The reports of enrollment, as of
March 29, for the five districts of
Maui County are as follows:
Makawao, 1771 pupils; Wailuku,
1619 pupils; Lahaina, 855 pupils; lia
na, 486 pupils; Molokai, 237 pupils.
This report does not include the
high school and private schools.
Tin foil collected and given to the
Red Cross this week is as follows:
Waihee school, 1 pound; Makawao
school, 3.10 pounds; Keokea school
14.5 pounds, ( lead foil); Lanai school
0.25 pound; Olowalu school 0.5 pound;
Kamehameha III school, 4.25 pounds.
tt
Uncles Sam is in a race against
Germany for ships and food Are you
with him?
Save food or go on short rations.
79. Whalebone, unmanufactured.
80. Manufactures of wool.
81. Manufactures of hair of camel
goats, and alpac.
82. Zinc.
Wanted Men To Lead
(From London Headquarters Gazette)
There isn't ft lad but wants to grow
Manly and true at heart,
And every lad would like to know
The secret we Impart.
He doesn't desire to slack or shirk,
Oil linvtint T-nn tinnril him nlnnrt?
I ClnAi Itnl. elin
He'll follow ft man at play or work" '. 1
If only the man will lead.
Where are tlje men to lead today,
Sparing an hour or two,
Teaching the lads the game to play Corn, lg. yel. ton
Just as a man should do? Corn cracked ton
Village
Dratted Meat
Beef, dressed, lb A .11 to .16
Veal lb 1 to .16
Mutton, lb 18 to .19
Pork, lb ia
Goat, lb 14 to .14
Hide, Wet Salted
Steer, No. 1. lb
Steer, No. 2. lb 'O9
07
Kips, lb
Goat, white 20 to ..w
Feed
Corn, sm. yel. ton None
95.00
......... 86.00
57.50
87.50
95.00
and slums are calling, Bran ton
"Come," Barley ton
Hero are the bovs. indeed. Scratch ' food, ton
Who can tell what they miKht become Oats, ton 85.00 to 87.50
Buy
Liberty
.Bonds
Local Japanese To Feel
Import Restrictions
(Continued from Page One.)
wines or other beverages, all candy
and confectionary, and all manufac
tures of cotton, wool, hair, or grass
fiber. A glance over the list of 82
articles henceforth prohibited will in
dicate to those who know the Japan
ese trade, where and how serious the
matter will prove:
' List of Restricted Imports
The following is the list of restrict- f
Now
j
l
t 1
If only the men will lead?
Motor and golf, and winter sport,
Fill up the time a lot,
Out wouldn't you like to feel you'd
taught
Even a boy a knot?
Country and home depend on you,
Character most we need;
How can a lad know what to do
If there isn't ft man to lead?
Where are the men to lend a hand,
Guiding at boyhood's side?
Men who will rise in every land,
Bridging the "Great Divide."
Nation and flag and tongue unite
Joining each class and creed.
Hero are the boys who would do
right.
But where arc the men to lead?
n
Doaolnlo Wholesale Produce!
Market Quotations
ISSUED BY THE TERRITORIAL
MARKETING DIVISON.
Wholesale only.
Week ending, April 6, 1918.
Small consumers cannot buy at theie
prlcet.
Middling ton 7i!-6U
Hay, wheat 48.00 to 54.00
Hay, alfalaf 47.00 to 48.00
ed imports, No. 1:
1. Agricultural implements.
2. Animals, live, except for breed
ing purposes.
3. Art works.
4. Asbestos.
5. Beads and ornaments.
6. Blacking, and all piepara'ons
for cleaning and polishing shoes.
7. Manufactures of bone and horn.
8. All breadstuffs, except wheal
and wheat flour, including lienor's
from Europe.
9. Broom corn.
10. Candle pitch palm, and other i
vegetable- stearin.
11. Cars, carriages, and other ve
hicles.
12. All acids.
13. Muriate of ammonia.
14. All coal-tar distillates except
synthetic indigo.
15. Fusel oil or amylic alcohol
16. Citrate of lime.
17. All salts of soda exxcept
rate of soda and cyanide of soda.
18. Sumac, ground or unground
19. Clocks and watches and parts
thereof.
21. Cocoa and chocolate, prepared
or manufactured.
22. Manufactures of cotton
23. Cryolite, except not to exceed
2,000 long tons for the year 1918.
24. Dials.
25. Dice, draughts, chessman, bill
iard balls, poker chips.
26. Eggs of poultry.
27. Electric lamps.
28. Explosives, except fulminates
and gunpowder.
29. Feathers, natural and artificial
31. Manufactures of vegetable M
fibers and textile grasses, except jute.
39 IPIwh tinnkn rnft anti rools
Will you help our flag to g5
victory?
Buy Liberty Bonds Now!
j Your dollars and every one else's dollars are needed to
assure the men at the front all that they need to eat,
to wear and to fight with. They will GIVE their
lives. Will you LOAN your money?
File that application NOW with any bank on Maui.
I Installments are due in Honolulu as follows, and should I
nit. I be in the hands of your local bank at least two days
earlier:
5 percent with application; 20 percent not later than
May 1 5th.; 35 percent, not later than July 9th.; 40
percent, not later than Aug. 3rd.
Comittee Members: C. D. Lufkin, Chairman; W.
O. Aiken, F. N. Lufkin, D. C. Lindsay, W. H. Engle.
Island Butter, lb 55 to .60
Eggs, select, doz 55
Eggs, No. 1, doz 52
Eggs, Duck doz 47
Young roosters, lb 60
Turkeys, lb 50 to .60
Ducks, Muse, lb 35
Ducks, Pekin, lb 35
Ducks, Haw. doz 10.00
Vegetables And Produce
Beans, string, green 05 to .06V4
Beans, string, wax 06 to .07
Beans, Lima in pod 04 to .04
Beans, Maul Red 8.25
Beans, Calico 10.00
Beans, small white 12.00
roas, dry island 9.00 to 10.00
Beets, dozen bches 30
Carrots, dozen bchs 40
Cabbage, cwt 02
Corn, sweet 100 ears 2.50 to 3.00
Rice, Haw. seed, cwt 8.00
Peanuts, lg. lb 05
Green peppers, bell 08 to .09
Green peppers Chili 06. to .07
Potatoes, Is. 1 3.00 to 3.25
Potatoes, Sweet red 1.75
Taro, cwt 2.25
Taro, bunch 15
Tomatoes 08 to .10
Cucumbers, doz 40 to .50
Pumpkins, lb 02 to .02V6
Fruit
Bananas, Chinese, lb. green 01
Bananas, Chinest, lb. ripe 01V6
Bananas, cooking, bch 1.25
Figs, 100 1.00
Grapes, Isabella, lb 08
Limes, 100 80 to .90
Pineapples, cwt 1.50
Papaias, lb 02 to .02
Strawberries 25 to .30
Livestock
Cattlo and sheep are not bought at
live weight. They are slaughtered
and paid for on a dressed weight
bule.
Hogs, up to 150 lb 19 to .20
Born
iniiiiiiuiuimiiuimHiiunnmiiuuuiiuiia
Woolens
Voolens worthy
of the Born Label
are worthy of your
confidence for we
can't afford to risk
our refutation on
any fabric of un
certain tailoring and
wearing qualities.
You may choose your
pattern now from a lino
unlimited in variety of
weave and color.
And you'll find our
brlce very reasonable.
(fciuttnf Bam Qtatar)
Maui Drygoods & Grocery
Company, Wailuku.
K. MArHinADrug Store
ICE CREAM
The Best In Town ,
And a Up-To-DaU Soda Fountain
Give Us a Trial
MARKET STREET, t WAILUKU.
ATTRACTIONS FOR THIS WEEK AT THE
Saturday, April 13th.
PARAMOUNA PROGRAM
Miss BILLIE BURKE In .
"ARMS AND THE GIRL"
"BRAINSTORM", Foxnim Comedy.
And, "WHO IS NUMBER ONE?"
Wednesday, April 17th.
ARTCRAFT PROGRAM
WILLIAM S. HART in
"THE NARROW TRAIL"
Last Episode of "The Fighting Trail"
And, "PATHE NEWS"
Subscription list closes in Honolul April 26th.
Sunday, April 14th.
EVART OVERTON in
"A SOLDIER OF CHANCE"
And the Australian Bushranger
"STINGAREE"
Monday, April 15th.
VALESKA SURRAT in
"WIFE NUMBER TWO"
Thursday, April 18th.
VAUDEVILLE
TIM and GERTIE MOORE
in New Absurdities.
"PATHE NEWS
Friday, April 19th.
CHARLEY CHAPLIN in
"BEHIND THE SCREEN"
And BESSIE LOVE in
"CHEERFUL GIVERS"
Coming Monday, April 22nd
Tuesday, April 16th.
"THE PRICE OF MALICE"
THEDA BARA
in "HEART AND
artificial bait. . x
SOUL.-lC!
an Manure salts. 'fa

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