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Washington telegraph. [volume] (Washington, Ark.) 1839-1871, December 13, 1865, Image 2

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~~W A S H I NJ3 T ° N
WILL. H. El' I’ER,::n::EpM.’OR.
WFTASBDAY DECEMBER 13,1865.
TERMS:
Su'script ion, p*-r annum.- S 4 M
Six Month - 50
Adv rtising per squsre, line* or less) for
tirst laser iua, $2 OU; each subsequent insertion
$1 teJ.
V*l subscriptions must be paid in advance.
it* .-vr advertisement of Maj. Tunstall. He
will ace, pt a few day boarders.
CT" To tn Sayers, the noted English pugilist
au-l "t.’haurpion of the prise ring” is dead.
|V The Eagle says the river has risen eight
«»■ ten feet at Camd*u, and is now in good
boating order.
idF It is said that Maj. Gen J. 11. Magruder
1, 6 taken .kc oath of allegiance to the Imperial
Government in Mexico.
— w—
ky Cap;. J. G. Ryan, C. S. A., who was ar
rested at Memphis las; July, carried to Wash
ington, and subsequently confined in the Vicks
b,:g military prison, has been released and is
Uo.v at Jackson.
CP* Lord PaltnTstou, the British Premier,
died a 1 his residence in England, and was bur
i d in Westminster Abbey, on the 27th Octo
ber, with great pomp and ceremony. Eumor
•ays hu will be succeeded by Earl Russell.
_o ’ Spoilt has declared war against Chili,and
tl ports of the latter are now blockaded. It is
iu r posed the war in South America will end in
<.bt subjugation of Paraguay by the Argentine
Republic.
<'•* Hon. Preston King, Collector of the port
■ N-- v fork, committed suicide on the 13th of
ember, by drowning himself in the Hud-
• n River, in a fit of insanity. Efforts were
I, mg made to recover his body.
J. Phi*.Ltrs Jt Co.—This popular house is
constantly receiving additions to its former
stock. Its numerous patrons will be pleased to
know- that it has secured the services of Maj.
Geo. SV. Saudefur. Geo W. Orton is also in
this house.
tdp* Another insurrection has occurred among
the negroes in Jamaica. Not mucWamage was
d.'ue bo- ever, as the plot exploded before it was
matured. Eighteen of the insurgents, together
with their leader. George W Gordon, were sum
marily executed by hanging, and the trouble set
tled.
I?We have just received the proceedings
of the meeting of the citizens of Clark county,
held in Arkadelphia on the 19th of November.
But they came too late to appear in this weeks
issue. Hon. A. A. Coleman and J- L. Wither
spoon, Esq., were ths delegates appointed to
the convention.
CP" Going; going 1 going! at Goldberg &
Goldstein's—the cheapest bargains in the mar
ket. Watch your chance, and make a good
irade. They have everything to sell, and sell
everything cheap. Look at their advertisement,
and see what a lot of nice things they have for
fir Beware of counterfeits, and look out for
that big advertisement of T L. Alden & Co.,
in another column. There's the place to go
and buy your goods; they keep every thing
imaginable and you’ll be certain to get the
worth of your money. Do you know Captain
John Morgan? Os course you do. Well. John’s
running the machine, and is always at his post
ready and willing to accommodate all who may
call upon him. Try him.
Fatal Accident.—We hare just been fur
nished by Mr. S. W. Crosnoe, the particulars
ot the most lamentable catastrophe that it has
yet been our painful duty to record; and one
that has called forth expressions of sorrow and
regret from the heart of every citizen in the
-community.
The particulars as we received them, are sub
stantially as follows: Mr. Joseph Patterson, a
loi g resident and respectable ritizen of the coun
ty, and a young man named Sevedge, started
with a load of cotton on Tuesday last, for Lit
tle Rock. On reaching the little Missouri
about twenty miles distant, the night being cold
and inclement, they sought a comfortable place
<o encamp.
During the war, there was erected at this
place, for the protection of soldiers against the
w eath, r, several sheds, built ot hewn slabs very
thick and heavy, with one end resting on the
grottndaiid the other on a pol--, support, d by
upright peiees or forks, and the whole covered
with earth, about 18 inches thick. After build
ing a fire at the mouth of this tent, they betook
thems* iv< s to repose, to dri-atn of kindred,home
and friends: but alas! they were doomed ne’er
to awake t» a realisation of their visions of earth
ly Ls,-• During the night the rain hav
ing saturated the earth upon the covering it be
r»Hit too hurry for the pules that supported it,
and this rentable dead-fall, fell with a fall of
devh. and buried both men in its ruins. They
were bo-b instauLiy killed, and the fire catching
•he timbe c burned underneath them and their
arm and *gs .<«'e both burned off O! what
afa •; too terribo to contemplate! They re
laine-i n this sltw.ion from Tuesday night
until Friday morning, before they were discov
ered, for notliving thing was left, to tell the
tale of dei.ii, except the pour hungry mules
that .core securely i«-'tcucd to tho neij-hborißg
trees. Tl-y bad been standing there so long
•bat suspicions of roinething wrung was created
in toen.mn of Mr. Gray, the ferryman, and af
•e- ->■, uuii’g »"w neighbors, search was
■ ’o ini .be facts "e htve related ascertained.
They were burled near the spot, as their muti
lated and mangled condition rendered it impos
sible to remove them
.’-e ’*attereoi‘. ’s* a good man. Poor, but
' --nest and industrious. It was a sad and terri
ble blow to his grief-.tncken widow and help
kss orphans; and the community has lost a
guO'i, —r' ted end respected citizen.
CV* Hon. Charles Gayarre and Ran
del! Uu“t, are mentioned as prominent
candidates for the United States Senate
in Louisiana.
Gen, Baiid is the new Commis-
o r the Freedmen for the State of
Lou ; iana. Ho has decided to withdraw
-the provo»t marshals from county par
ishes.
It is said that Gen. Grant is en
r ute for Mexico, tc cons’dt Sheridau on
Mexican affain.
Gov. Holden, of Noria Carolina,
has appointed Dr. Wm. Sloan,State Tie-s
--ursr. Dr. is said to be an unconditional
Union man.
The Federal Test Oath.—We notice the
fact, ai d hail it as an indication of a better era,
that some of the Republican journals of the
North are advocating thb repeal of the test oath
in Congress. They say truly that it was a war
measure, aud if proper at a time when civil war
was lagiug, and the greatest necessity existed
of keeping out of the councils of the nation all
hostile eiem nts, that such necessity has now
passed away, and a new oue become paramount,
to wit, the necessity of that union of hi arts aim
purposes < ssential to the strength of a nation.
No statesman, with his reason unbiased by evil
passions, can be so blind as not to see that there
can be no strength or glory in a nation, a large
mass of whose people are kept under a ban, tor
political offences which no repentance nor sub
mission can ever be allowed to loosen. It must
of necessity establish two castes amongst the
same race, more fatal to harmony and good
government than any of the old established
ranks of European monarchies. It is wholly
inconsistent with all ideas of republicanism that
anv of rhe free citizens, especially whole classes
of them, should be marked and branded for dis
grace, a ithout due trial and conviction of some
crime involving moral turpitude. Those men
in Arkansas, who now, “clothed in a little brief
authority,” “play such fantastic tricks before
high hiaven as mak- the angels weep," and
who would fix and rivet upon their fellow
citizens by aid of military power, the most gall
ing chains of disgraceful disfranchisement, and
most especially those who having led them into
Mcetsion afterwards deserted them, and having
secured their own pardon and favor would now
aid and assist in trampling them in the dust,
would do well to remember that Nemesis
though uot always swift is sure—that good
sense and common political sagacity, to say
nothing of justice and mercy, will finally tri
umph, and that in the rebound they will re
ceive the scorn of all those whom they would
oppress, and the contempt of history.
There will never be another war of secession.
The people, once’having suffered so severely,
and having been mortified so humiliatingly by
those who. having first “fired the Southern
heart.” afterwards raised the veil, and showing
tlteir hideous treachery, exclaimed: “There, je
wise saints, behold your light—your star! Ye
would be dupes and victims, and ye are !" will
never afford material for a repetition of the ex
periment. They are content in their day and
generation with the government of the United
States; and living so content, and aiding in its
administration, their children will grow up to
love afiid admire it —yes, and to hate the mem
ory of those who first having deceived their
fathers, would afterwards have attainted their
blood, and marked them for disgrace!
We believe the Secessionists were honest, and
have uot abated from them anew hit of our love
and respect. They have our sympathy, although
until the war began, we were not of them nor
with them —wo received, even, their scorn and
reprobation. We could not bat sustain them
in their hour of trial, and win n the “dark waters
of war” closed over them, we stood with them
a willing sacrifice upon the deck, asking no
other favor might be accorded to all in
like condition, feeling only the bitterness of
seeing, at last, the complacent smiles of se
curity of many who having abandoned them tor
safety, were then singing peansover their doom
and urging their disgrace.
We believe them, now, to be honest in their
submission. The people of the South have
never been false to themselves or others. How
ever wrong, they have never been subtile, nor
untrue to their professions. They were “terri
ble in earnest”’ when they threatened war.
They are equally in earnest now when they
submit, -.r.d renew their allegiance. President
Johnson knows this well, and thinks they may
be trusted. He will trust them if he is allowed.
They never prevaricate. They scorn false pre
tences. The danger we fear and deprecate is,
that the terrible wound between the sections,
which bid fair to be heal d by the first inten
tion, may be rudely torn asunder by the selfish
ambition or evil passions of imprudent men, and
be forced to undergo the long and sickening
process of a festering granulation. Healed it
will be in time by some means, for it is not
mortal to the Union, but how-sad the prospect
of the latter! Hew dangerous, meanwhile, to |
our position amongst the nations of the earth!
Hence we hail these indications at the North.
God grant that jhe sentiment may grow in
I strength. We think it the whisperings of the
“still small voice” after the storm. We thiak
them the first rays of the sun, which in time
will cause the South to throw off the dark cloak
of sectional animosity which it Lad wrapped so
closely and so fiercely around it, forbidding the
true pulsations of its heart to be seen or felt.
L<t us th-u be pati nt, submissive, law
abiding. conciliatory, and peaceful Speaking,
mcantim*, like nun, and nor humiliating our
selves with lip-st rvicc to that which we know
and f«il to be unjust. Biding our time, and
working honestly and honorably for the result.
We cannot yet rejoice in the issue of the con
test. He is a craven who pretends it. But
having accepted it honestly, we may look for
ward w ith pleasing hopes, for our latter days
and fur posterity, to the time when the Gov
ernment may be restored in accordance with its
true genius al! over the land, when peace, har
mony, and good will may pervade throughout
its length and breadth, and our common nation,
raised to the greatest heights of power by the
free exercise of ail its industrial arts, without
hindrance from internal dissensions, may be
pre-eminent amongst th-- powers of earth, bo
mote it be, and speedily !
We understand that Col. Dwight
May. t’.ie present Commandant of this
Military District, has been breveted Brig
Gen. Col. May is said to be an •efficient
officer, and a clever gentleman.
[Con. Eagle.]
IGovernor of Vermont Las
appointed Chtel Justice Poland, of the
Supreme Court of Stat*-, to fill the
vacancy in the United St«.t t 8 Senate oc
casioned by the death of Jacob
Collamcr.
UF Tho wife of Clement Clay and
the daughter of the rebel Secretary of
the Nary, Mallory, were at Washington
last week to secure the release of Messrs.
Clay and Mallory, now confined in pris
on.
(y Among the Southern gentlemen
who have been pardoned by the Presi
dent is Major Henry St. Paul editor of
the Mobile Times. «

GT The widows of Daniel Webster
and J. J. Crittenden, are now both reai
dentatfN. Y. city.
Col. H. M. Day, «f the 91st Illi
noij infantry, has been bevetted a Brig
adier Goieral by the President.
Gen. Sickles succeeds Gen. Gil
more in cemcQ&nd or the Department of
South Carolina.
pF" Brig Gen. Spragtnf; Superintendent of
the Freedmen's Bureau fut Arkansas and Mis
souri. was in town a few days since. We un
derstand that he released several pieces of prop
erty heretofore seized. and made some whole
some alterations in the policy of t.is subordi
nate offices. There is room still for improve
ment in the management of that Bureau,though
we have evidences of several gratifying changes
and a disposition to administer the affairs of the
offices more favorably to justice and right.
[Coe. £«gf«.]
We have recently seen a circular issued by
E. W. Gantt, in which he states that he has as
sumed the control of the Freedmen’s Bureau
for the South-western District of Arkansas, st
the urgent solicitation of Gen. Sprague.
We fully concur with the Eagle in the ex
pressed opinion that “there is room still for im
provement in the management of that Bureau,
and heartily endorse the action of Gen. Sprague
in restoring “property seized hertofore; ' but
we express our entire disapprobation of the
change he has made in the Superintendents of
the Freedmen's Bureau in South Arkansas.—
Men who have heretofore held this position in
our midst—although strangers to us, and in
war our open enemies—have in numerous in
stances given general satisfaction to the people,
and arc now superseded by a man, in whom the
people have no confidence, and who has proven
himself recreant to every trust reposed iu him.
This certainly cannot be one of the “gratifying
changes” to which the Eagle allude:, tor to us
and the people generally it is one of the most
unfortunate alterations that has yet occurred in
the direction of “that Bureau.” W hat benefits
can we expect to derive from the operations ol
the freedmen’s Bureau, directed and controlled
by him, who wears the honors of his office a
midst the execration of the people, and wields
his sceptre over subjects that r-gard him with
infinite contempt?
He says in his circular, if we are not mistak
en that there are no perquisites or salary attach
ed to the office, it there was he could not hold
it. How innocent; hew conscientious; how
honest. It is through the lore and friendship
that he has for us that he has accepted the po
sition. O! what a model of excellence, a true
paragon of nobility.
“Now, by two-headed Jai.us.
Nature hath framed strange fellows in her lime.”
The friendship that he entertains for the pea
pie of Arkansas, is oue of the most prominent
virtues that adorn his heavenly nature, and has
been so often manifested that it would be un
grateful in us not io acknowledge and appreci
ate it. He showed it when he deserted us and
went to the enemy; he exhibited it iu all bis
abolition speeches and lectures throughout the
North, when he demanded that the rebellion be
immediately crushed and its supporters wiped
out of existence; aud he evinced it, when he
went to Washington and made his statements
to the President Muphy’s Gov
ernment, and in numerous other instances he
has been an unfaltering advocate of our reli
gious rights and principles. How consistent
he has been. He says he has always been our
friend; we say,“Angels and Miuisters’of'graco”
deliver us from such friends.
“A friend should bear a friends infirmities,
But Gantt makes ours greater than they are.”
We are sorry there is no salary or any thing
to remunerate him for the onerous dati*-s he
have to J erform. We don’t like to see a fellow
work for nothing. Couldn’t we raise a sub
scription to pay him something. But the Gov
ernment ought to furnish biro two or three plan
tations, and the negroes to work it, ic’iicA we
have no doubt it will do.
But we will take this occasion to express our
regret at the removal of Capt. Montgomery.
He has given almost entire satisfaction to the
community,and at the same ti.ne has discharged
his dutii-s faithfully towards the freedmen of the
country. He had made bis arrangements to be
come a citizen of our town, aud Lis iuterests
were identified with ours, and although he was
an enemy in the late war, yet in peace he be
comes our fri'-nd, aud all th" animosities of the
past are buried, we hope, forever. He is no
Yankee, but a Missourian, and we prefer an
honest enemy to a deceitful, tn a< herous traitor
We hop- bis removal will uot deter him from
becoming a citizen of the South.
A Sensible Skmvior —H-m. J R. Doolit
tle, Senator from Wisco:*sin. was invited by a
number of citiz -ns of Food du Lae, on th*- 2<i:h
ult., to speak in that place on the political ques
tions of the day. He repli-d in a letter, prom
ising to accept their invitation to *|>eak, in the
course oi a week or ten days. In bis letter he
says:
As to negro suffrage iu the Southern States
being made a condition precedent to the admis
sion of their representatives in Congress, I shall
maintain:
Ist. That the policy of Mr. Lincoln and Mr.
Johnson, of leaving that to be drterni»"d by
thosetS’at. s for thvmseries, is the on I, just and
wise policy.
2d. That it is in accordance with the letter
and spirit of the Constitution.
3d. 1 bat i is almost inconceivable that any
Federal administration should attempt to eu
fores universal negro suffrage in States where
fur two hundred years the uegroes have been
degrat.'-d by slavery. when, at the sam<- time,
two-thirds of the tree States deny suffrage to
person; of th*- same race, who have been edu
cat* d as freemec, among fnenten. with the
thoughts, habits, and respousibilities of free
men .
4th. That such a policy would inevitably
throw the Union party ont of power in N'W
York. Pennsylvania. Ohio. Indiana. Illi- uis.atid
Wisconsin, as well as in all tne border States;
give tie; n.-xi Congress and President to th"ir
opponent; d- f- at, iu ail probability, the amend
ment to the Constitution of the United States,
which they Lavr everywhere oppo«.-4, and by
which alone, liberty to the black man and pro
tection to him in its enjoyment, is mad*- sure;
which would leave th*- States with full power to
re-establish slavery, peonage, or any other sys
tem ol involuntary servitud , and thus sa<n
fier the most important of alt the fruits of
this terrible struggle, at the tiiu*- it would,
iu all human ptobal iiity, produce a wjp ot
There is but one more instance, so often re
peated i.i history, in which the most sacred
C.usr is placed iu greater p»Til by the misguid
ed zeal and fanaticism of its professed friends
than by the open hostilities of its avowed <-ue
mirs.
Soin*- of the foremost in denouncing Mr.
Johnson's policy intend to mak-- uncompromis
iug war upon bis administration, iu order to
i.-uild up a new party for the next Presidential
contest.
It is evident that the radical extremists are
not to receive any aid or coinfort from Senator
Doolittle He under stands his duty to the coun
try, and has not yet thrown off the restraints
imposed by an old instrument, called the F"der
*l Constitution. We bop-- many other North
ern Sc-aaiors will be squally true.
Ib« Island of Manhat'an, on
which the city of N ew York is built, was
once purchased by cue Peter Miunit for
«24.
Gen. Spinner, U. S Treasurer, is
mentioned for Collector of the port of
New York
ty” Ex-Gov. Lubbock, of Texas, was releas
ed from Fort Deleware last Friday morning,
leaving that rebel reformatory institution as
thorough a Union man as he was formerly a
rebel.
ty Gen. Butler has prepared a legal argu*
ment, showing’ how Davis and Lee can be yi d
by a military tribunal.
It is thought that etforts will ba made
during th* present session lor an indictment of
Jeff. Dat is fur treason
MhnV bf the oncers of the Veteran Ro"
serve Coreu. being without commands in con
senunaee of the master ont of the tnen belong
ing to the Corps, ora resigniug then edtamis
sions and retiring to private life.
aaiborities have ordered the
Spanish residents on the coast to the interior ana
are confiscating their
ty The oath question is to be tested by Mr.
Stuart, who makes application for • seat with
out taking the test oath.
Humphrey Marshall, is seeking
pardon at Washington.
HT Gen's Grant and Auger have re
turned to Washington.
(3P •‘Mttdwair* Jackson, of Virginia,
is said to have received a pardon.
DIED,
In the vicinity of Richmond, Sevier county.
Arks., from injuries received from the falling of
his horse on Friday, Nov. 10th, James PeMNY,
Esq., age 57 years.
W e have seldom been calhsl on to record the
death of one so eminently uselul and so highly
esteemed generally as Maj. Fenny. He was a
native of Ireland, but emigrated with his pa
rents to America in early life. He took op his
abode in this State when it was a territory, and
engaged with spirit aud determination m the
bailie of life along with the pioneers of civih
zation In this severe school he learned the
value of self reliance and perseverance—les
so .s which he turned to good account in after
life Kntering the legal profession,bo soon dis
tinguished himself by bis industry and close ap
plication to the duties of his profession, aud
soon commanded a good practice. He settled
permanently iu Sevier county, 25 years since,
and it was his home up to the liineot his death.
H-re he was called from time to time by his
fellow-citizens to important offices, which he al
ways filled with ability,and he never was iu any
instance unfaithful to tha trust reposed iu acter
In life he exhibited all these traits of charhim.
that arc r< al ornaments to man. As a husband
and father, devoted and affectionate; as a neigh
bor'hud friend, kind and obliging; as a citizen,
he was always a leader iu all enterprises tor the
public good. And his death lias left a vacancy
hard to fill. He was buried on a beautiful spot
of ground on bis own premises, to which be
was followed by a large crowd of sorrowing
friends aud neighbors—from far aud uear.whose
tlc'iiug tears well attested their deep sorrow of
heart tor so great a loss. He icr.ves an inter
esting family who share largely the grief and
sympathies of all who knew him.
A useful citizen has gone from among us.
The legal profession has lost oue of its or
naments. and the widow and orphan aud the
distressed, oue who was truly a friend in
deed.
Thn« our friends depart from the shores of
time, but they await our arrival beyond tberiv
er 1 bat seperates us from the Spirit-laud. Au
unwaveriM faith iu Christ, oar Redeemer,
buoyed b' .in exalted h<q>e. w,il lead us to ro
join" them in a fairer and more genial clime where
sorrows are uuknuw u. N. O.
Paraclifta, Dec. Ist, I •'65.
Goldberg k Goldstein,
ARE now opening one of the best assorted
stocks of
FALL AND WINTER GOODS
ever brought to this market, aud tor quality and
'price challeng** competition.
They particularly invite the attention of the
Ijidi- a to their
DeLaaet,
Prlats,
, Bella,
Cleves,
Shoes,
Hora,
Hou da,
Cloaks,
Skirts,
Balmorals,
bltawis,
Ribbons,
kc.
TQ THE GEHTLEMEM
They would >»sk Lefore purchasing elsewhere,
to examine tL< ir
CJLOTJEIINGr
AND
FURNISHING GOODS,
which an- of superior quality aud the very latest
styles.
NOTIONS OF EVERY KIND.
THE BEST CHEWING AND SMOKING
HATS. CAPS, BOOTS, SHOES,
TIMWARE,
POWDEB,
SHOT,
CAPS,
kc.
Washington, Dec. 13, 1863. 3S-tf
bale of Town Property
BY virtue of aud in pursuance of a decree
ot the Hon. Circuit Court for Hem|w>tcad
cuiinty. Arkansas, in chancery sitting, rendered
in the case of John R. Eakin vs. Daniel Griffin,
administrator et. ais , I will proceed to expose
lor sal", :tu*l sc!' to the highest bidder, for cash,
at public auction, at the court-house doer, in
the town of Washington, ou Saturday, the 6th
day ot January, ltC6. the valuable Iu; with a
two story building of offices, situated un the
court hot:**- square, tn said town, now occupied
by said Eakin, and described as follows: “Be
ginning twenty five loot from the south-west
corner on the public square, and rtfuning north
with Hamilton street twenty-five feet, and ex
tending back iuto the court-house square nev
••nty-th *• f«et.” Said sale is made for partition
and will be bona fide to the highest bid dor.
The property is very jlesirable for renting, and
i.i constant demand. Sale to be opened at 12
o'clock. M. The attention of the public is in
vited to this investment. The proceeding in
court is amicable, and tin- title indisputable
WYATT C. THOMAS.
Commiooioner.
Dec. 13, 1865. 38.
NO A ICE.
THE subscriber having rented the Fall
house tor the ensuing year, will take a
tew Day BOARDERS, if early application is
made.
N. R. TUNSTALL.
A ashington, Dec. 13, 1865. 38-1*
For Sale or Eease.
A Y ELL improved place in Sevier county,
known as the “Bizzell Plantation,” on the
north bauk of Red River, containing about
IUI3 Ac reg of cboico jjßnd. Md •dresig
cultivation. Half etuh, balance on leng time.
Apply to A. R. TVilliaies, at V ashingtou, onto
the undersigned st Little Fuck.
< • . » . - a,iC C.
• Little Rock, B-tv. “O, JMt
Fry Hate or Ment.
AF4RM, harirj Uigtav
cleared ./sod, .w->-miles frocrWaehiutt<n
Good Dwelling md out bmklbigs. Apply ire
mediately L>
w x- . 'n . . WILLIAMS-
WaahiDglon, Dee. 13, 5t"3
t. L ALDEN & CO.'S COLUMN.
msOßmwl
T. L ALDEN & CO.,
sortment of
Consisting in part of
English and American
prints,
Brswn and Bleached
domestics,
CHOCTAW STRIPES,
mabbokough STBIPES,
GEOH6IA STRIPES,
Hickory Shirtings,
6_a_9 a Ibi Sheetings,
Cotton Checks,
Linen. Checks,
Irish Linen,
Linen and Cotton Damask,
Linen and Cotton Diaper,
Plain Brown Linen,
Brown Linen Twill,
Bleached Linen,
Duck and Twill,
Cambrics;
Solid anti Check
Ginghams.
Cnatnbray
Ginghams.
Naiasook Muslins,
Swiss Muslins,
Mull Muslins.
v Plaid Muslins,
Victoria Lawns,
Linen Ijawus,
Printed Linen,
Plain and Figured
Black Silk Dress Paterns,
Fancy Silk Dress Paterns,
Plain and Fancy Delaines,
Solid and Figured
All Wool Delaines,
French and
English Merinos.
Empress Cloths,
Striped Alpaecas,
Plain Black Alpaccas,
Colored Alpaccas.
Poplins, Deßaze,
bolid and Figured
Mozambique*,
Brown. Bine aud
Green Bareges,
Ladies' Chesterfield
Cloaks,
Ladies' and Misses'
Balmoral and
Hoop Skirts.
Ladies' and Gents’ Hats,
Fancy and Plain Shawls,
Misses’ SI awls,
Ladies’ and Misses'
Breakfast Shawls,
Sontags. Vandykes,
Ladies', Misses'and Infants’
Hoods, Nubias,
Gents' and Childrens'
Scarfs, Ladies' and Gents’
White aud Colored
Cotton Hosiery,
Ladies' aud Gents'
White and Colored
Lamb's. Wool
and Merino
Hosiery.
Children’s Fancy anal
White Cotton, Merino
and Lamb's Wool Hosiery.
White and Fancy Cotton
aud Wool Yarns.
Ladieo’ and Gents'
Black aud White
Kid Gloves,
Ladies’ and Gents’
Berlin Lined Gloves.
Ladies’ and Gents'
Buck. Kid and
Calf Gauntlets, I
Lamb's Woo! liu"!
Ladies' and Ge>«
Lisle Thread
Gloves,
Children's Threaded
Worsted Glov*.
Ladies' and Gents'
Plain auJ Famy
White Linen Handkerchiefs,
H 8 Handkerchiefs,
Embroidered Handkerchirfs,
White and Colored •
Silk and Cottou
Handkerchiefs,
Needles, Pins,
Buttons, Worsted
and Cotton
Fevrettings,
Worsted and
Cotton Braids,
Bik. Ferrettings
and Braids, bilk and
Cotton Cords.
Cotton and Velvet
Dress Trimmings,
Dreas Buttons,
Thread. Cotton and
Hilk lao,.
Cotton and Silk Velvet,
Black French
Br<>ad<.]oth,
Black and Fancy
Caaoimerea,
Satinetto,
Tweed*.
Genuine Kentucky
and Missouri Jeans,
Ketarys, Liuaeys,
White, Plala.
aud Fancy Coloted
FUawete,
Opera Flannels,
Printed Flannels.
Brown and
Bk ached Canton
Flannels,
Italian Cloth
Blankets.
Ac., dec.
JkLSO —
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
BOl'fP A!hD<AEMTS’ CLOTHING,
COTTON AND LAMB'S WOOL
UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAWERS,
’sratu’rs xxrrasr rautsTr.
Brown Linen Msirta,
HICKORY SHIRTS.
• Lidiw’ Cotton, La.-nb’« Wool and
MERINO VESTS.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
BOOTS AND SHOES,
HARDWARE,
OUEENSWARE,
FANCY AND STAPLE
G-ROCEKIES,
AND ROPE,
Ac., Ac., Ac.
Every ')o<ly is in. Pad to give ns a call before
perchar pg elsewhere, for we indulge the full
-iMtrance of giving aatisfaction to.any patron
Country Merchants, particularly, are invited to
-all and aamniua anx stock and prioea.
T. L. ALBEN A <M>
WabbmgtOD, iMc. -J J, 1865. 3rj.tf oi
GREAT IMPORTANCE
ti TO K'KS
BETTER BARCOS
THAN WAS EVER OFFERED
IS WASHIXGTOV
Meyer, Weisel & Co.
(FORMERLY W. B. STUART'S OLD STAND.)
RESPECTFULLY inform their friends And
customer!, that they h»ve just received the
largest, best and cheapest stock ot
FALL AND WINTER GOODS
Such as all kinds of
a AJB-23S’ &IM9SS
SHAWLS, CLOAKS,
GINGHAM CHECKS.
IRISH LINEN.
DELANES, BALMORALS,
HOOP SKIRTS,
FINEST IRENCH
COBSETS.
A Urge and well select'd stock of
CLOTHING
_axd-
Gents’ Furrishing Goods.
BOOTS vAD SHOES,
BOYS CLOTHING,
£££.?> lEX/I/TES,
UMBRELLAS.
TO'S, BOOKS,
SLA EB, DOMESTIC
UNBARE. CANDIES,
ALL KINDS OF
GROCERIES.
J U TLE RY, &c.
We tvite Country Merchant* to examine our
*tuc' Hll 'l prices before purchasing els,here.
Vashingten. Nov. 8, 1863. 36-ts
"family groceries.
JAM just receiving from New Orleans a larg>-
and complete stock of Family Groceries,
insisting ot
COFFEE. TEAS. FRUITS.
SUGAR, KICI. TOBACCO
MOLASSES. FLOUR. SNUFF.
SALT, FISH, SEGA RS.
and almost every article kept by a firs’-elaas
establishment of the kind; all of which is of
fered at the lowest market price.
Iu addition thereto. 1 bare a full supply of
My stock of
FANCY GROCERIES
being large and complete. 1 would respectfully
call the attention of the Indies thereto, and in
vite them to call anil examine, asstniug them
mv business will be so conducted that they
ne.-d not fear disturbance.
Pi •’C • -,*.*■* Vi'* X 1 ?; TVS* f
aJiu w Adr M fit » i aX. m tM
will do well to examine stock and prices, as I
will supply them at greatly reduced iat<-s.
Store in the building formerly occupied by
W. 11. Etter, be tween Jett’s Drug Store and
T. L Alden Jt Co.
GEO. TAYLOR.
Washington. Dec. 6. 1865. 37-ts
E. M’.NAIR. IL GARDES
McNAIR & GARDES,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
NO. T< COMMON STREET,
Sew Orleanw.
ty Particular attention (mid to purchasing'
Plantation and Family Supplies,
Dec 6. 1865. 37-ts
a l'Gt:«Tr« block, late a. a n nlock. a brittiw
BI.OCK & BRITTIN,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. »■» Common St., Opposite City Hotel,
NEW ORLEANS.
Particular attention given to consignments
of Cotton.
Dec. 6, 1865. 37-tt
The New Orleans nd Ouachita Steamer
STEPHENS,
M. LANGHORN,
fPHE above named Steamer ', fP**** - ■h
'A has been fitted up in the
best possible st j le, and will take ■■HMSSNKi
her place in the Ouachita trade as soou as the
river will admit of it. For freight or passage
apply on board.
Dec. 6, 1865. 3745 m
The Plantation
ON Red River, 22 miles from Washington,
to the estate of B C. Phillips,
is to rent for the year of 1866, conaiating of
about 006 ocrea of open laud, embracing »U the
buildings, with the privilege:of cotton seed.
Refer to Hon. O. D. Royston ar Messrs. Block,
Washington.
B. F. RENFRO.
Adm’r of B. C. Phillips.
Nov. 11, 1805. 374»
NOTICE.
have on band and for rale on rease ja
ble terms, a large lot of exealleut SIX
■MULE WAGONS and HARNESS. Also, a
lot of extra Harness in comple.te sets.
_ T. L. ALDEN A CO.
Washington, Dec. 18,18*6 38-ts
NEW GOODsTT
— ’
FRESH ARR IV
J. PHILLIPS & Co
TTAVE just received and . r
f J «‘ h « r old ’/« •<!. (formerly
A Smith s) one of the ' il ' M
MerchandiNP ev.- r br.., le^ d
conststmgin partof the fulh JW i* ‘ iV
Groceries of all ki n4s
Calicoes,
Merinos,
Alpaccas, W **’ 4
Checks, n
Wiinea,
Hoop Skin.. I
or , u klna »(
Gent’s fine calf Boots and Shoe 1
Brogans, B
Ladies' Shoes of all kinds I
Boys’ Boots and Shoes |
clothing!
* H
Caps, Blaukju. I
Ga. Kerseys, Sat tin, ;g ■
Ky Jeans, B
Horse Collars, ■
Saddle Wallets, w . K
S 3 3 SWAtas I
tixware, I
SOAPS, ■
BOOKS, SLATM
BLEACHED AND BHOWK I
BOMESTICS, I
LOWELLS, I
BAGGIAG AMA R APfl
Advances made on ( ott
We < spec; .lly call attention of H
COUNTRY MEECEW3I
to our stock of Goods, and inrit- ta-m
'ns a call before purchasin'' rlj-.t; f
1 know we i an suit tie-in in qinfri uid
J. PHILLIP* K (■
Washington, Oct. 25. 1863.
WHOLESALE A Al. DITtS
4’ S’ F 5
, WASHINGTON ’V.n>W
DSS. SMITH at &CAEBjBuTZ®
(srcccr.ssiißs to muokk e -xt'? ■■
HAVE opened and now offer
building formerly ucci.p r I i’>
MOORE A SMITH, a luge ai:l
kct< d stock vs I'iesii and tJ- ntiiu- ■
Consisting in part of H
Drugs, Medicines.
I'aints, Oils. Dw
Per'nnicry. Surgical I>
Brush* s. Flavoring Eni’' ’■*■
bpic'-s, Tobacco. Suuf.
— ALSO — H
SUPERIOR LIQUOBSI
, An»l ii short, everything that i'
’ in such nn establishment
I Particular attention paid te
tions and orders.
-W• -■ «-./ ■« ■ ( r«5 « --- CSS «-wr- ■
World co wrii t<- call and *-x»b
--cud pi ic* S.
SMITH A SCARB*i«
Washington, Not. 1. I>os.
’ i
PHOTOGRAPH GALII
A. L. WARNER ■ -
ITAS re-opened as .•’•e • ’
‘ II pared t<> take Photograph.
Opal type. A large snpplv of
Pictures of Confederate Geti*r»>
Frames, oval aid Mjusre. <, n«tje~
hand. Particular ■■
ing of fading l»aA H
in the Plrntograpj ■
given in the ArtJ H
f Washington, g
B. W. Maktix. I
MARTIN* 1
I «
ANU I
i Commiss I
’• 4 h
December. 6th ■ r-p,
, ~ ~ H i®mi
o. h. ntnwKs. M v a ||
BARM J ■
13 AJ I 7 00
COLLEC
LITTLE HOC] ■ 1J A
Government g H * r yio
change, and L'llcuf V
Collections promt] Bi O.
Messrs Fisk 4c / II
Third National 1 / IB
Franklin Insura. ,1 , fl
De<-. ti. i , 7R A
Tanya fP: j,
,
v v stock on han “
r House aud Lot coni
situated iimnediatelj j -Iro<>
Bowie county, Text _ I Ntxo]
wood, Sevier county f ) Hi
Boston, Texas.
NO
Nov. 29.1865. I J§.
FOR ' -- —
WE have just cm \
hapd, one fine
single, and one tin'- u I At
winch we utier for Bi x' It r . ®
Apply to
WM R. J

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