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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, February 23, 1877, Image 1

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The Daily Gazette.
foL. L XXXV.-NO 216
WILMINGTON. DEL.. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 23 1877.
PRICE ONE CENT
Harder the Times the Lower the Prices,
ie
At No. 3 W. THIRD Street
and
At 10« MARKF.T Street,
(Tenth A Marke! Sts.)
will be found the store» of the
Grkat Canton and Ja
pan Tka Coupant which
now selling good tea and
coffee cheaper than any
house In this city, v> e mean
just what we say. All we
ask Is a trial of our goods—
We have a good roasted cof
fee at 20 ct per pound, and
Java coffee strictly pure and
tho very ftneNt quality, and
all grades of teas from 40ou
to gl .00 per pound.
JAPAN TEA
JAPAN TEA
JAPAN TEA
IMPERIAL TEA
IMPERIAL TEA
IMPERIAL TEA
OOLONG TEA
OOLONG TEA
OOLONG TEA
YOUNG HY80N TEA
YOUNG HYSON TEA
YOUNG HYSON TEA
MIXED TEA
MIXED TEA
MIXED TEA
mixed tea
i VA COFFEE
'»VA coffee
jiVA COFFEE
ItVA coffee
»»CAIRO COFFEE
fiicAlBO COFFEE
bacaibo coffee
IpiCAIBO COFFRE
OitTRA COFFEE
luiUVRA COFFEE
hGUm COFFEE
pmOOFFEK
I BIO COFFEE
I J o COFFEE
I BIO COFFEE
I BIO COFFEE
are
IBEAT CANTON & JAPAN TEA COMPANY,
TVo. 3 West Third Street and
3NTH AND MARKET STREETS.
AD VKUTlSKMKNlli.
RON WE U. -
WEAR WELL
. AND
[a ww*lc In your own town. Terms
I und # outfit free. H. HALLKTT A
rortlud Maine.
A YEAR, AGENTS
wanted on our Grand
Combination Prospec
so»
ipreirnting
0 IJ,NTINCT BO( >KS
d everywhere. The Biggest Thing
Tried. Kalos made from this when
ijrle Hooks fail. Also, Agenst wanted
•Magnificent Family Bible».—
ior to all others. With lnvuluable II
iatkd Aids and Kui'EKn Binding»
Books beat the World. Full partie
free. Address JOHN F, POTTER
«Publishe
PHILADELPHIA.
t (Rnn a to Agents. $10 Outfit
u\bl ! FREE. I*. Ü. VICKERY.
Ri, Maine.
at home. Airents wanted. Out
tit and terms free. TRUE 4iO.,Au
Maine.
I
ot over 1'iuO
Garflen, Fi 6 li& 1'lowet Seeto,
Boddlng Planta, Rosea, &o.,
Vtilcd Free to all appUcuu.
àànMkmvBi
Lucrative Business.
W £ WANT WO MORE
FIR8T
t v EWING MACHINE AGENTS, ANI)
MKN OF ENERGY ANI) ABILITY TO
[n THE BUSINESS OF SELLING
ro machines. Compensation
k-VL, BUT VARYING ACCORDING
klLlTY, CHARACTER AND QUALI
|KN8 OF THE AGENT. FoR PAR
|AKS, ADDRESS
Sewing Machine Company*
A CHICAGO. j
r Broadway, New York, or New
' Orleans, Louisianii.
)n
iü l i r *,j* ne Mixed Card«, with
iSuVy post pald - L - J0NK »
55510 Pf^ayat home. Samples
frec ' 8t,nsom 4
Jeb20-2tawlm.
using and Notion
»tome,
13 Harket Street,
ÄÄ f a!l r Ä» NO -
f"ÄS d on C LÄ kta « done
ÄepÄ Ull,lg 10 order a*
ic patronage respectfully salicited.
MRH. R. B. day.
in
it
*» d aÄ.a b "^-Ä
er to any other!,.* waa .Pronounced
-ly-i-ir u- Preparation.
1 W WOOLKICH & CO.,Mftl
c and weak
liture !
Furaitura!
■ c °r Fourth 4 Shipley Sts.,
Son hSEd? ÏS pul ? llc "»Ht I !n
'ffiuRE. which -win '£r nmei "
Ursttiu " my
k my special attention to
In Uiatllnnx«..,.
Ü fndi nU ll , mp " lruoelve P roni Pt
[j««àn?Ut l «£o «paired in Uie
^«lrona ? ?™l^:-"arge«
u - PETERSON,
Ag't.
i L.
h '-AT.LAW,
Kuililing.
* Almond's
rly
_
PLUMBEBB.
Robert Hutton,
Plumber and Gas Fitter,
IVo. 107 King St
Does all kinds of work In his line in the
beat manner and at the lowest ligures,
Orders thankfully received and promptly
aa tended to.
Oils and Lamps of different kinds kept
Ut» 11 a t 1 fur sale very cheap.
no v25d»m
w a. 8 . WA
No. 1009 Market Street«
l'CUMBEH,
STEAM «V OAM FITTER,
All materials; la my lias of basin.«« con
•tantly on hand.
tf
Wilmington. Aug. 2d, 1876
NDRKW MCHI (ill
A
PRACTICAL PLUMBER,
Steam and Gas Fitter,
KoMl Walnut Street,
Wilmington, ue\
AVPlambtng, Gas and Steam Fitting ot all
descriptions executed in he be«t manner, at
tbe ahoriMt notice, and on moderate terms,
an 19 tmareh2&
BOOTS AND SHOES.
GREAT ATTKaCTIONI
AT THE EAST END
Boot & Shoe Store,
S. E. Cor. 9th and Spruce Sts.
Call and examine my stock of Gents, La
dies, MIbhoh an<l Childrens boots, «hoe« and
Kaltem, all of which are selling at prices to
«ult the times.
Custom work a specialty, and done in the
best style and moderate rates.
Repairing neatly and cheaply done.
augf-ly
WM. HOUCK.
«JAMES MONA GKAM »
FEW
Boot and Shoe Store,
N.W. cor. Second & Jefferson Sts
Having laid In a full assort
ment of Gentlemen's, Ladies',
Misses'and Children's Boots,
_ Shoes, Gaiters and Rubbers
alTof which are made of good material and
in workmanlike manner. I am prepared to
supply the citizens of Wilmington and vi
cinity with all goods In my line at priées
it the present financial crisis.
Custom work a specialty, and satisfaction
guaranteed.
The publlo are cordially invitedtogiveme
a call and learn my prices.
declö-3md JAMES MONAGHAN.
to
THE PLACE TO BUY
IS AT THE
NEW SHOE STORE,
;i08 Wc«t 1 Second Street
Whore you can got well made and durable
BOOTS AND SHOES
^ ATEXTREMELYLOWPRICE8.
rll We have a large stock of Gents',
Ladles', Misses and Children's wear
oonetuntly on hand
feb26-ly
J.'c. ALEXANDER,
103 West Second St.
New Store ! New Goods !
Low Prices !
AFTER ALL. AFTEKIALL, AFTER ALL.
Tho best argument we can offer the people ift
Ioowbst Prick» for Quality of Good».
This we üo offer m every
Boot, Shoe or Gaiter
we »ell for Ladle«, Gent», Mlue«, and
Children. W« have» fall and oomplete
•tock for the coming eeaeoa, which we invite
the publlo to call and examine.
LADIES WJirf KO fui'P BRS
SPECIALTY.
Particular attention paid to
J
CUSTOM W OBK,
JOHN K. BABCOCK,
f W. Cor. Second and Marke
pr24 -3m
NO HUMBUG
«I
The undersigned lHjscllinglhls
entire stock of
boots A SHOES
At and Below Cost !
U> Close Business by February nextV
Store Fixtures foi sale.'
T. F. PENNINGTON,
110 East ftecond StreetJ
nov22-dim
First Annual Joint Sale
Ob*
PERSONAL PROPERTY
A MiijvimL rnurc.ni l
£ r A VINO a surplus of stock, Ac., on
1 hand we will soil at Public Kale, on
e premise« of Wm. M Euatburn, near
Corner Ketch, Mill Creek hundred, l»el.,
TUESDAY, MARCH 6T1I. 1577.
at 12 o'clock, M.,
the following described properly, vis :
Twenty head of horse, and cobs,
among whleli sre several gisst
driver», Uie rest are good farm or
rood horses; one more in foul,
H head of cows, some of which .— r~
will be in profit by day of sule,Mg(AÏ»
« head of cattle, steers and heif
era, 35 head of well selected we»- - R 11
tern ewe« with lambs by pure Bouthdown
bucks, 25 fat wethera, three shoots of Berk
shire stock, would make excellent brood
sows, 6 shoots of Chester White stock 25 or
30 pair of chickens, 1 good rockaway car
age In perfect order, (Tbompeon A Pas
lalPs make.) 1 dug-out wagon, 1 sulkey,
100 bushels ol extra seed oats, ripens ten
days earlier than common oats 10 bushels
prime clover seed warranted clear of pink
or carrot, a lull set of carpenter tools In
f ood order, formerly the property of James
tote, deceased, a lot of chestnut posts and
rails, and many other articles not herein
mentioned.
Condition».—O n all sums of *25 and
upwards, » months credit will be given by
the purchaser giving a bankable note with
approved endorser. If not paid when due,
Interest will be added from date. On all
sums under 925 cash will be required.
WM. M. EASTBURN.
L. W. STinHAK A Ron, Auct's, fl5-w2t
►n
ri
PUBL1C SALE.
OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
The subscriber«, Intending to quit the
dairy business and remove to a small farm
will sell at public sal«' at his residence, on
the rood leading fromCentrevllletoChadds
Ford, three quarters of a mile from Pyle's
Mill, In Penn8bury township, Chester
county, Pa., on
TUESDAY, the 27th of FEBRUARY, 1877,
The following described Personal Prop,
erty, to wit :
3 Head of Horses—No. 1, a good brood
mare, 8 years old,sound and aen
tle in all kinds of harness. No.
2, a bay mare coming three years
old,purlly broken, Tom Brown
a bay horse, coming four
12 Head of Superior
Milch Cows, all of which will boVlJff*
In profit by the day of sale. FIvoImii
S uperior Shout Pigs, 1 Brood
J833 äSow with Pig of good stock, 1
Ll_ JTÎ-àâ good Hour Pig of extra stock.
Farmlmr implements, consisting of ox
cart, lm> lied, two-horse wagon, plows,
Germantown wagon, harrows, union mow
er, grain cradles and scythes, sleigh, hay
cutter horse rake, forks rakes, shovels,
Ac. Dairy Fixtures, such as churn, but
ter worker, butter tub, cream cans, milk
pans, straining kettle, butter scales and
weights, buckets, Ac. 1 wardrobe.
Hale to commence at 1 o'clock, p. in., on
said day. Conditions—all sums of 925 and
rds a credit of six months will be
the purchaser giving a bankable
note with approved endorser. All sums
under 925, cash.
fee
stock. No. 3,
years old.
fi
PJ
K
JESSE GRAVES,
IjEWIM J. GRAVES.
febS-wts
Webb A. Nichols, Auc't.
Fashion able_F urniture !
J. & J. N- HAKMA : L
No ilO King street,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
«pectfully Inform the oitl
Wllmlngton, and the sur
J rounding country that we continue
dtiBrAP to manufacture and keep ou hand
at our large and long established ware
rooms, Furniture of every variety and
style, consisting of Mahogany, Rosewood
and Walnut Furniture suitable for parlor,
dlnning-room and chamber uses.
Our assortment of Furniture is larger and
more varied than can be found in Delaware,
and all articles sold at our establishment
warranted as represented.
Venillan Blinds of the most fashionable
designs made to order and kept constantly
on hand. We also manufacture and con
stantly keep a large assortment oi Bpring
Hair, Moss und Husk Mattresses.
* J. A J. N. HARMAN,
410 King street, Wilmington.
■» We
sens of
ari
A HEALTH INFLUENCE!
Restoring the Nervous and Debilitated.
Imparting Life, Strength, and Health to
the waning organism.
SuccessfuUy treating Disease without Medicine.
Dr BRYAN'S ELECTROVOLTAIO AND
MAGNETIC APPLIANCES.
Recently Introduced after years of study
and research. They are of quadruple pow
er. Imbuing the system with a constant
current of Vitalizing Kleclric and Magnetic
force ,
ELECTRICITY IS NATURE'S POWER.
A Sovereign Specific In Dyspepsia—Ner
vous Debility—Diseases of the Lungs—
Rheumatism Paralysis—Epilepsy—Sciatl
- Spinal derangements—-Impotency—
Disorders of tho Kidney«—and Functional
difficulties generally.
The Appllancesare strongly charged with
Electric Galvanic and Magnetic Influence,
of different degrees of intensity, suitable to
all eases, and conditions, and eJTeet. Cures
where medicines have failed.
References to numerous Physicians and
''illustrated Pamhplets explaining the
principles of tlieir action. Cost, etc,, free on
Address
application,
DR. BRYAN
147 East Fifteenth Street,
New Yors.
JaoiTdly
EPILEPSY OR FITS.
»
Samaritan Nkrvinx, the
_ Nervo Conqueror, cures Epileptic Fits,
Convulsions, Spasms, St. Vltu« Danoo and
all nervous disoases ; the only known poe
ltive and Bure cure for Epilepsy. It has
been tested by thousands and has never
boon known to fail Inaslngleoase Inclose
stamp for circulars, giving evldcnoe oi
cures. Trial package free, Please give
namoof express office when ordering med
icines. Also send names and address of all
persons subject to K P 11 î pt i° I ÏÜÏV ONn
Address, Dr. 8. A - RICHMON.D
JanDd &wly B ox, 741, ttt- Joseph», Mo.
R A In < L A m?n ! Handkerohlefb, all prices aud
kind» ust received.
WM. B. SHARP
4tii and Market
Flour and Feed Store,
jVo. 4 East 7tli st.
Constantly on hand Flour, Feed, Hav,
Huûw and Farm Produce, of excellontquul
ft« Alan vegetable and flower seed in
laree supply^ m season at Philadelphia
price«.
Orders
attended to.
dec!» ôuii
for Coal rooelv«I aud.promptly
Agent.
lMport,,I, ' »«*
covc^jr#
#
8C *» , ' ,rr »*♦"■ i» D *«
dbis uibusii OAUUD BTLlVlMaOB
OAMI8MB IH THE BLOOD—ttULPH UE
CABBOLATB OF BOD4 AN ABSOLUTE 1»RE
V1NT1T1 AND REMEDY.
Dr. G. D. Bete«, a lending physician
Chicago, of tbe homoepathio school,
bas published a brief treatise o a scarlet
fever diptberia, erysipelas and kindred
diseasts in which be advanced and sup
ports with much ability some entirely
new views in regard to the nature and
treatment of theee diseases. As tbe re
sult of a ssriae of mioroscopic observa
tions, confirmed by experimental treat,
ment, be baa satisfied himself that
these diseases are caused by living
ganiatua in the blood, infinitesimal par
asitas which are generated and distribu
ted accerding to fixed laws of nature.
Having found their way into tbe blood,
these minute organa oauae a veritable
blood poison. From this startling poi
be inferred that the way to ouro the dis
ease was to remove tbe eaese, and ac
cordingly began the edminiairatien of
carbolic acid by the stomach to destroy
the poison germs. The writer says :
"In diphtheria the result was noth
prompt and gratifying, inane cases re
covering rapidly under the administra
tion of this antiseptie, when other mess
•raa offered bet little hope. Observing
how seldom erysipelas appeared
S ieal cases where I used carbolic aoid
reasings, I was lad to rtgard this dis
ease of septic origin; and to-day the cer
tainty with whieha case of erysipelas is
arrested by tbe internal administration
of an effioient antiseptic is as complete
demonstation of the presence of sap.
tic germs in the blood, or is at least, as
convinceing to my mind as though the
germs could be seen through the mi
croscope."
The same line of treatment has satis
fied him that scarlet fever is as clearly
of septiu character as diphtheria
and he says that during the las
years he has treated hundreds of cases
of scarlet fever and diphtheria on
this plan, administering the sulpho-car
bolaleof soda (a chemical combination
of oarbolio acid with the sulphite of so
da) with unvarying success. He has
satisfied himself by its administration
the blood and tissues of the hntnan body
may be thoroughly disinfected without
exciting any toxic effects of the drng.
Administered to children breathing an
atmosphere loaded with scarlet fever or
diphtheric contagon, it acts as in abso
lute preventive, with exception! so rare
and with symptoms so light when any
appear, that ouo is forced to believe that
the fault was rather in an insufficient
dose than in the agent. Given when
either of the these diseases has devel
oped an attack, and within a few hour-s
the activity of the disease has ceased
and the remaining smyptoms speedily
fade cut into health.
The writer cites a number of towns
and neighborhoods where thiB remedy
was used, and in every instance it opera
ted either as a preventive or a complete
cure while the disease was raging very
fatally all around. In conclusion he
of
or
nt
in sur
t two
says:
'•I earnestly commend it to the atten
tion of the boards of health in all our
larger cities, and of the true physician
everywhere. In bringing forward this
mode of treatment I gave it first to the
S rofession and afterward to the public,
esiring that my same should appear
only in so far as it might commend the
treatment to those who had confidence
in me. My task is ended when the sul
pho carbolate of soda shall have won its
way to public confidence, as it has to my
own. I cannot dismiss this subject with
sut a warning: to those who pretend to
make use cf this agent, but use so small
a quantity as to be utterly valueless I
do not know that this ugent possesses
any other therapeutic properties than
as an antiseptic; and, to be useful as
suoh, it must be given in quantity suffi
cient t? disinfect the blood ; otherwise it
will be
diseases as a spray of an atomizer in ex
tinguishing a conflagration."
The remedy is so simple and available
that tbe discovery is one of great im
portance, and deserving of the careful
attention of the medical profession
everywhere.
useless in the face of theee
A BARTENDER'S STORY.
ROHAXCl OF KBAI, LIKB—KICHAUD VON
KROKIO't CAR SB It.
New York Herald.
A handsome young German, with
quite a military air, walked into Essex
Market Court yeatsrnay morning, and
stepping up to thejudgea bench, said he
was Richard von Knronig, and was there
to answer a charge of desertion preferred
by a woman named Charlotte Koch.
Von Krontg acted in a very dignified
manner whuo addressing Judge Murray,
he told hie boner in a few words that the
compliant had no claim whatsoever upon
him; that, in fact, he was not married to
her, though he admitted that he had been
intimately acquainted with her for some
time past. Ina subsequent conversation
Judge Murray the accused told the
following story : He is the eon of Rich
ard von Kronig, Sr., one of the wealthiest
residents of Anhault Dessau, and judge
of the Circuit Court of Anhault Beruberg.
He entered tho Prussian army at aa
early age and remained in it till he rose
to the rank of first lieutenant in his regi
ment, in which he served through the
late Franco-Pruaisan war. After leaving
tbe army he indulged in a long course of
dissipation, became a deep drinker and
heavy gambler, and finally embarked for
this country to get rid of nie debts, trou
bles and old associations. He landed in
New York with very little money, and
after seeking employment for some time
finallv accepted a situation as bartender
in Buckheister's hotel, in Fort Lee.
Charlotte Koch, a fine-looking German
girl, was employed in the same place,and
thus the acquaintance between thim
sprang up. Chorlotte claims that they
lived together as man and wife till a
child was born to them, when Von Kro
nlg left her to her fate. She came to
New York penniless and to look for her
recreant lover, and being taken very sick
here was sent to the Chanty hospital on
Blackwell's Island, where she is now
lying in a convalescent state. Judgo
Murray convicted Von Kronig till Char
lotte can be braught to court to testify.
with
Georue U, Pettibone, Superintendent
of the Howe Sewing Machine Company
for the State of New Jersey, is accueil of
having embezzled from ten to twenty
thousand dollars.
WHAT THE FIGURES ILLUSTRATE
The New York Herald has an article
tp show that because five New England
States, tbs four Pacific and eight Western
States cast their electoral votes tor Hayes
these different sections of the country
will be quite satisfied with the result of
the action of the electoral commission. It
assumes also that tbe whole of the South
ern States, whose votes, with the excep
tion of South Carolina, were cast for Til
den, will cheerfully acquiesce in the
fraudulent perversion of those votes
whereby Tilden was counted out, and
will exercise an important influence in
counseling acquiescence in that republi
can administration which the returning
boards of Florida and Louisiana and tbs
vote of Mr. Juatioe Bradley have contin
ued in power after it had been repudiated
at the ballot-box. But whilst it may be
conceded that there will be ''no serious
resistance" anywhere, as tbe "Herald"
says, "to the completion of the couat and
the inauguration of Hayes," and that the
democratic party "will stand by ita pledge
to abide by the decision of the eommia
sion "In spite of disappointment and a
deep sense of Injustice," the "Herald" is
wrong to infer that Mr. Hayes, beaten on
tbe popular vote by more than two hun
dred ahd fifty thousand majority, and
beaten alao on the electoral vote if
count could have been bad, will be en
tirely acceptable to the opposition even in
the eighteen States whose electoral votes
he undoubtedly obtained. Of the thirty
eight States composing the Union twenty
one have at this time democratic State
governments, and although three of these
—California, Nevada, and Oregon—cast
their electoral votes for Hayes, the ma
jorities in several of the recognized repub
lican States are so small that they maybe
said to be almost equally divided between
the two great parties. Even in Ohio, Mr.
Hayes's own State, a change of3,600 votes
would have given the election to the dem
ocrats, while 1,500 votes in New Hamp
shire, 500 in California, 100 in Oregon,
2,500 in Kbode Island and 500 in Nevada
would have effected a like result in those
States. Indeed, so narrow at tbe last
election was the margin between the re
publicans and democrats,in States claimed
and held by the former that a change of
8,070 votes in a poll of 1,154,071 votes
would have given forty-nine additional
electoral votes to Tilden. Even in the
New England States the republican ma
jority in a vote of nearly 700,000 was less
than 87,0000; in the Western State» in a
vote of 2 , 00,000 but 182,000, and in the
mountain and Pacific States but 5,785.
The actual democratic majority on the
popular vote, and accepting the Loui
siana returning board count forthat State
was 250,670, and the actual net demo
cratic gain in nineteen States was 906,
456. It is well to remember there thf ngs.
a fair
WA.DE HAMPTON ON THE PRESI
DENT'S ORDER.
WASHINGTON AND GRANT CONTRASTED.
On being informed of President
Grant's older forbidding the white
military organizations of Boutb Caro
lina to parade on Washington's birth
day. Gov. Wade Hampton issued the
following proclamation :
" 'Exkcutivb Cham bbr Columbia,
B. C., Feb. 20, 1877—His Excellency
the President cf tbe United States
having ordered that the white militia
companies of this State should not pa
rada on the 22d inst. to celebrate Wash
ington's birthday, in deference to the
office he holds I hereby call upon these
organizations to postpone to some fu
ture day this manifestation of respect
to the memory of thatillustrious Presi
dent whose highest ambition it was,
as it was his chief glory, to observe
the Constitution and to obey tbe laws
of this country. If the arbitrary com
mand of a Chief Executive, who has
not sought to emulate tbe virtues of
Washington, deprive tho citizens of
this mate of the priviege of joining
publicly in paying reverence to that
day so sacred to every American pa
triot, we can at least, by our obei
deuee to the constituted authority,
however abruptly be the countrymen
of Washington. We must, therefore,
remit to some auspicious period,
which I trust is not far distant, the
exercise of oar right to commemorate
tbe civic virtues of that unsullied char
acter who wielded his sword only to
found and perpetuate that American
constitutional liberty which is now de
nied to tbe citizens of South Carolina.
Wadb Hampton, Governor.
Fair Promises froi
Gov. Hay».
Judge Mackey, of South Carolina, was
inlMacan. Ga., last week, and gave to
the editor of the Telegraph and Messen
ger an account of his visit to Gov. Hayes
and said that the following were the ex
act words used by the Governor on that
occasion, they having been committed
to writing at the time. Gov. Hayes
said; "I regard the presidential contest,
in the form that it has assumed, as most
uncertain as to its result. I shall perform
no act to influence that result, but do say
unreservedly that the 'great need of the
Booth is good government, and if I am
President I shall use all legitimate agen
cies to foster the establishment
long disturbed section of intelligent and
honest local self-government."
in that
In a Bankruptci Cask in Boston
the United States District Court has
very strongly laid down the rule that
inducements must be offered to
creditors to sigh a composition. In
the case referred to the creditors
asked leave to record a composition,
but the court refused it because it
appeared that the signature of one of
the creditors had been obtained by
another creditor, who told the signer
that he would consider the signature
a personal favor, upon the strength of
which his trade would in the future
be given to the signer. This fact, the
court held, vitiated the composition,
not merely destroying the effect of the
signature. It further neld that in such I
a case it made no difference that tbe
composition was advantageous to the [
creditoi s.
From Washington Union.
Inell|flt>le Electors
It «u Mr. Juitioe Bradley's misfor
tune that be should bs selected as the
fifteenth member of the Slecteral
Commission— the umpire whose flat
was to decide the presidential_ _
Whichever way he decided, if bia
was the casting and decisive vote, he
could not hope to escape censure and'
attack. The criticism, however, to
which his unenviable position as um
pire—an umpire with ns decided poli
tical proclivities and bias as any of his'
colleagues—unavoidably exposed bin,
is. after all a small burden compared
with that to which he has exposed
himself by his conflicting votes in the
Florida and Louisiana cases. That
there may be no doubt abeut the con
flict, we quote the several propositi vus
upon which he voted,first one way add;
tbea the other. In the Florida case
Judge Abbott offered a resolution
that—
a
is
of
a
"this Commission vW receive the ev lA s wsn
relative to the eligibility of F. C. Hues
S hrles, one of the persons named in corn
cate NO. 1 as elector."
11 T
For that resolution Mr. Justice
Bradley voted, and it was adopted by
a vote of eight to seven. The evidence
relative to the eligibility of Humphries
was evidence showing that on the Ttb,
of November, 1870 the date of hieap
pointment, Humphries held m offlae of
trust and profit under the United States,
to wit: the office of shipping commis
sioner at the port of Pensacola, by ap
pointment of the Circuit Court of the
United States for the northern dis
trict of Florida. This evidence, aa we
, Justice Baidley held competent,
and it was admitted. In the Louisiana
case. Mr. Justice Bradley signed, and
by bis casting vote carried a decision—
"that it is not competent to prove that any
of said persons so appointed electors a*
aforesaid held an office of trust or proflt un
der tho United States at the time when they
wore appointed."
The offer in the esse of Levis.ee,one
of the Louisiana electors named in
certificate number one, was that 04
the 7th of November, 1876, he held an
office of trust and profit under the
United States, to wit: the office of
commissioner of the Circuit Court of
the United Slates for the district of
Louisiana, This evidence Mr- Justice
Bradley voted "not competent,
other words, Judge Bradley voted op
posite ways upon the same question,
and, unfortunately for himself, voted
one way when the Democratic case
was weak for want of proof, the ops
Dosite way when it was conclusive and
the proof not disputed.
The effect of Mr. Justice
first decision in tbe Florida case was.
as we stated at the time, if honestly
meant and adhered to, "a substantial
and important victory for the Demo
In the first place, it stultified
tbe decision of the majority, (includ
ing Judge Bradley,) that it was not
competent to offer evidence aliunde
the paper opened by the President of
the Senate upon the subject of the ap
pointment of the electors. Now, the
Constitution of the United States ex
pressly provides that no person hold
ing an office of trust and proflt under
the United States "shall be appointed."
The inconsistency between the decis
ion that no evidence aliunde the papers
should be received, and the exception
that evidence touching the eligibility
of an elector would be received, lay
iu the fact that if it was competent for
the commission to go behind
tiflcaie or the returns, either or both,
to inquire into the qualification of a
pereon certified and returned as ap
pointed, it was necessary equally com
petent to inquire whether any such
persou had in fact been appointed, or
whether there had been any appoint
ment at all. Further, if honestly ad
hered to, the decision concurred la by
Judge Bradley, admitting evidence of
ineligibility in the case of the Florida
elector, applied to the cases of the
Louisiana and Oregon eloctors, invol
ved the loss of at least three votes to
Mr. Hayes, without which he could
not possibly be elected. This wan the
substantial advantage to the Demo
crats in the firstruling of the Com
mission upon the admissibility of evi
dence, and this is the reason why that
ruling has been reversed. Having
voted to admit certain evidence Mr.
Justice Bradley now votes to exclude
it. How he is to reconcile these con
flicting votes—not with each ether,
for that is impossible—but with his
judical character and reputation, is his
affair, not ours.
In
Bradley'»
crats.
the cer
A G AMBLER'S MOREY WELL USED
The will of Miss Maty Danser, wh»
died suddenly in New York a few
weeks since, ' has been made public.
Hiss Danser was tbe only child of the
late Matthias Danser, the well-known
sporting man, who attained such no
toriety seme time ago through the rob
bery of coupons belonging to him,
and who died not long after his loss.
By the terras of Mr. Danser's will, his
property, which was very large, was
divided equally between his wife aud
daughter. His widow did not long
survive him, and her property was also
willed to the daughter. Miss Danser
was well known in religious circles,
and was widely esteemed as a devout
member of the Methodist Church aud a
benevolent woman. At the time of
her death she was about thirty-five
years of age. The estate amouutato
11520 , 000 , of whicn $185.000 is distri
buted among relatives of the family.
The remainder is bequeathed iu vary
ing proportion among thirty-one re
ligious, benevolent and charitable so
cieties of New Y'ork.
Miss Alice Miles, daughter of the
I kite Dr. Richard H. Miles, of Charles
couaty, recently made an uneuccess
[ full attempt at suicide. Cause—unre
quited love.

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