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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, March 15, 1877, Image 1

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The Daily Gazette
. Library of Con gre—ljTTfl
iL L XXXVf-NO 233
WILMINGTON. DEL.. THURSDAY. MARCH 15
, 1877.
PRICE ONE CENT
Harder the Times the Lower the Prices.
It*
At No. 3 W. THIRD Street
and
At tooo MARKET Street
(Tenth A Market Sts.)
will be found thestores of the
Great Canton and Ja
pan Tna Company, which
are now selling good tea and
ooffise cheaper than any
house In this city, we mean
Just what we say. All we
ask Is atrial of our goods_
We hare a good roasted cof
fee at 20ot per pound, and
Jays coffee strictly pure and
the very finest quality, and
all grades of teas from 40cts
to #1.00 per pound.
JAPAN TEA
JAPAN TEA
JAPAN TEA
IMPERIAL TEA
IMPERIAL TEA
IMPERIAL TEA
OOLONG TEA
OOLONG TEA
OOLONG TEA
YOUNG HYSON TEA
YOUNG HYSON TEA
YOUNG HYSON TEA
MIXED TEA
MIXED TEA
MIXED TEA
MIXED TEA
Li VA COFFEE
IjiVA COFFEr.
Cava coffee
I tiVA COlFEE
Vtctm COFFEE
StfAlBO COFFEE
tic* BO COFFEE
UcAIBO COFFEE
IjiryRV COFFEE
Eu-VKA COFFEE
Kora coffee
lOCVBA COFFEE
I RIO COFFEE
15(0 COFFEE
IK 10 COFFEE
IrIO COFFEE
®EA CANTON & JAPAN TEA COMPANY,
No. 3 West Third Street and g
NTH AND MARKET STREETS.
-n«rg~ «TOI»*».
and Brace Depart-,
ment.
mechanical appliances un.ur
Un extent and variety by that of any |
similar establishment In the country, i
Itb upwards ol'
Twenty Tears* Experience
living them, we feel confident of our I
rin "ive entire satisfaction to al 1 those
■rvices in this direction.
It*
lug our s
OUR INSTRUMENTS
istructed In the best manner, of the [
laterials,and of varioua sises to suit |
Se«, from tbe smallest lnfantto the |
1 adult.
(K HAVE A PRIVATE ROOM
klr adjustment, while our prloesare
lernte and so varied by our extensive
tin as to suit tho pockets of all.
Hundreds of persons
after trying the larger
cities have expressed
tbel r gratification of the
facilities and economy
with which they have
been suited at our es
tablishment.
4
»?
E. BRINGHURST * CO.,
Apothecaries,
(.Cor. Sixth and MarketHtreets,
Wilmington, Del.
y. E. WILLIAMS,
DRUGGIST,
ntlt and Market Streets,
Keeps a full line of
DRUGS AND MEDICINES,1
■re, fresh, and carefully selected for
ftxSING PRESCRIPTIONS AND
tlN'U ORDERS for FAMILY USE.
k-IHE BEST QUALITY 0BTAINA
er PftCrificing quality for cheapness.
cond— REASONABLE PRICES,
al attention paid to compounding
JP.IPTIONS CAREFULLk AND AC
CURATELY. BY
_W. E. WILLIAMS. Druggist.
Ninth and Market streets.
Wilmington. Del.
Co
l;
S MARTIN,
»'■lirai BOOT a SHOE MAKER,
4 East Seventh Street.
taler work
specialty, and
I tno btst manner and af
te rat
Repairing neatly and
ly attended to. Call and *e
me.
V 7 /
vewaia
r/p.
ent/iöon,
//eic/iant //rn/ci,
C C(töt 3c/ //fiat,
•r
. O
//Oe/.
Ä meUt ° f forcign and domes
em
feb377dly
or,e but first-class workmen
pn. O'CONNOR,
>erchant Tailor
has .removed
West Third Street,
Gne.Uoor from Market.)
U^m«r n , s *au5 1 Vo d a [? n A , ' ort,,,ent0 '
8 SPRING
Ï. wiU.|make
AN1» NIJMMKR,
up at price, to «ul.
'mils a
Specialty.
îUtf
STEPHEN DOWNEY,
B factory
"«oil Turning,
^ and Circular Sawing.
• ;Ä l ÄpÄrr ,Tura -
' » n ir Ml ^ ird & Tatnull Sts.,
xirn I NQTOS ' del -
1 Hulis. 0 111 7'imbar suitable for
~ ._febis-am.
? BOOKS,
r ."»"'»'.ulJlDhed.
• Magazines, ^
flew
All me
spapers,
and Weekly.)
ß l»nk Books,
Stationery,
(Daily
• Games,
^ r °n.imwd a ®d S 1?8e™t nt • rUc,e *
^LMIN QToN.
, n '£feetlt!
' macs woo ml
ll
DEL
H--8INUER8
Safety Guard
PLVMBBBs.
T , ,
Robert Hutton,
Humber and Gas Fitter,
, " X il KOI,
IYo. 107 Kinir St
*
Does nil kinds of work In his lino in the
Sest manner and at the lowest figures.
Orders thankfully received and promptly
aatended to.
h* 11 a 11 for s ile vervl chean.
nov2Sdfim
Oils and Lamps of different kinds kept
WM. 8. WATT,
No. 1009 Market Street.
1 'LUMBER,
STEAM A ©AS FITTER,
AH materials'. In my line of bnsln.ts
itantly on hand.
con
tf
Wilmington, Aug. 3d. 1876
y^NDREW MCHUGH
PIIACTICA.L PLUMBER,
Steam and Gas Fitter,
No 501 Walnut Street,
Wilmington, ml.
•«"Plumbing, Gas and Steam Fitting ol all
descriptions executed in he best manner, at
the shortest notice, and on moderate terms.
anl9-tmaroh25
BOOTS A.ND SHOES.
GREAT ATTRACTION!
AT THE EAST END
Boot & Shoe Store,
S. E. Cor. 9th and Spruce Sts.
Call and examine my stock of Gents, La
dies, Misses and Childrens hoots, shoes and
gaiters, all of which ure selling at prices to
suit the times.
Custom work a specialty, and done in the
best style and moderate rates.
Repairing neatly and cheaply done.
aug4-ly
WM. HOUCK.
JAMES MONAGHAN'S
nsrzETW
Boot and Shoe Store,
N. W. cor. Sseond & Jefferson Sts
Having laid in a full assort
ment of Gentlemen's, Ladies',
Misses'and Children's Boot«,
_ Shoes, Gaiters and Rubbers
— are made of good material and
In workmanlike manner, I am prepared to
supply the citizens of Wilmington and vi
cinity with all goods In my line at priées
to suit the present financial crisis.
Custom work a specialty, and satisfaction
guaranteed.
Thepublic are cordially lnvitcdto give me
a call and learn my prices.
deol0-3md JAMES MONAGHAN.
aîTof whicK
New Store ! New Goods !
Low Prices !
AFTER ALL. 'AFTERJALL, IAFTER ALL.
Tbe best argument we can offer the people is
Lowest Prices fob Qdalitt of Goods.
This we do offer in every
Boot, Shoe or Gaiter
we sell for Ladies, Gent«, Misses, and
Children. We have a fall and complete
stock for the coming season, which we invite
the public to call and examine.
LADIES WHIT* KID ERS
SPECIALTY.
I
Particular attention paid %o
CUSTOM WORK.
JOHN K. BABCOCK,
f- w. Cor. Second and Marke
pr24 -3m
JOUAT a. U1KZEL,
MACHINIST,
No. »06 E..t Second Street, and
No. 513 Orange Street, (np-.talrv,)
Keeps ou hand and makes to order Ills Pat
ent Bolt and Rivet Cutters, Drilling Ma
chines, Meat Choppers, Improved Pipe
Wrench, Punching and Cutting Machines,
all of which are very sujierlor for the pur
poses Intended. He also repairs Guns,
IMstols, Locks, and does light Machine
Work generally. All kinds of edged tools
ground In the best style.
A person with some knowledge of ma
chine work will be taken as a partner, as
the subscrlber'has more thau he can attend
r tronage respectfully solicited
JOHNG HIRZEI..
otPubllo
betl7'76wt
THE
Harvest Home Range
IS THE BEST
COOK STOVE.
It has a ver/
It is neat ami beautiful.
large oven.
ONLY TWENTY DOLLARS;
with all the cooking utensils.
For rale only at PICKELS' UPTOWN
STOVE STORK, 10th aud Market street..
I feb21-4t.
MERIT RECOGNIZED.
Benson's Capcme rorous Plasters recel
?T «Îm 1 *? 1 ? 8 ! 1 *™ 1 on, Y «ward of merit
the Philadelphia Exposition, over all arti
cle* of like character, proving by the high
est medical authority In the world, that
they are greatly superlor toordlnary porous
plasters, and not a patent medicine—as
nostrums were allowed to be exhibited
there. Benson's Capclne Porous Plaster
positively the best external remedy ever
devised. They relieve pain at once, and
cure where other porous plasters only re
lieve alter long use. Over three thousand
physicians now recommend their use ; and
they are sold by druggists everywhere_
Price 25 cents.
IMPORTANT TO EYERY HOUSEHOLD
no
"Improvement" Is the watchword of the
hour ; Its development and re-slevelopment
In the ambition of every true American_
Porous plasters were Invented ln 184Ö. For
thirty years their com position remained un
improved, until Benson's Capcine Porous
Plasters were Invented. They differ from
all others In their greater medical activity.
lltey will cure disease in a few hours that other
porous plasters, liniments or compounds
require days and weeks of continuous wear
»nd use to simply relieve. They are supe
to electricity and more powerful. It
not a nostrum. They are endorsed by over
three thousand physicians and druggists
meeting a great want; a remedy for exter
nal diseases which relieves instantly and
cures quicker than any known medicine_
Try them and you will not be deceived_
Purely vegetable. Price 25 cents.
uovlGeod At
rior
;uu;
No' 4 Bulfinch Street Bos'on.
(OPPOSITE REVERE HOUSE.)
THE
SCIENCE OFILIFE;
OR, SELF PRESERVATION.
MORE THAN 1,000,000 COPIES SOLD.
(Sold Medal Awarded to the Author by the
"National Medical Association,"'
March 31st, 1876.
J UST published bythePEABODY MED
ICAL INSTITUTE, a new edition oi
the celebrated medical work entitled the
"SCIENCE O. LIFE,
ERVATION." It treats of Manhood, how
lost, how regained and how perpetuated
Cause and cure of exhausted vitality, im
potency and premature decline in man,
spermatorrhoea or semlnel losses tnoctur
nal and diurnal) nervous and Physical
debility, hypochondria, gloomy forebod
ings, mental depression, loss of energy,
ggard countenance, confusion of mind
d loss of memory, impure state of the
blood, and all diseases arising from the
errors of youth or the indiscretions or ex
cesses of mature years.
It tells you all about the morale of gen
erative p
8ELF-PREH
lia
an
ysiology, the physiology of mar
riage, of wedlock und offspring, physical
contrasts, true morality, empiricism per
version of marriage, conjugal precept and
friendly counsel, physical Infirmity, its
causes and cure, relation between the sexes,
proofs of the expansion of vice, the mis
eries of imprudence, ancient Ignorance and
errors, means of cure, cure of body and
mind. True principles of treatment, ad
dress to patients and invalid readers, the
author's principles . The price of this book
is only »1.00.
THIS BOOK ALSO CONTAINS MORE
THAN FIFTY PRESCRIPTIONS FOR
THE ABOVE NAMED AND OTHER
DISEASES# EACH ONE WORTH
MORE THAN TIIE PRICE OF THE
BOOK.
Also another valuable medical work
treating exclusively on MENTAL AND
NERVOUS DISEASES; more than 200
royal Octavo pages, twenty elegant en
gravings, bound in substantial muslin.
Price only S-'.OO, barely enough to pay for
printing.
The book for young and middle-aged men
to read Just now, is tne "Science of Life
Self-Preservation. The author has return
ed from Europe in excellent health, and is
again the chief consulting physician of tho
Peabody Medical Institute, No.4, Bullfinch
street. Boston, Muss.— Republican Journal.
The Science of Life is beyond all compari
son the most extraordinary work on Physi
ologgy ever published —Boston Herald ,
Hope nestled In the bottom of Pandora's
box, and hope plumes her wings anew,
since the Issuing of these valuable works,
published by the Peabody Medical Insti
tute which are teaching thousands how to
avoid the maladies that sap the citadel ol
life .—Philadelphia Inquirer.
It should be read by the young, the mid
dle aged and even the old— N. 1. Tribune.
The first and only medal ever conferred
upon any medical man In this country as
a recognition of skill and professional
vices, was presented to the author of these
works March 31st, 1876. The presentation
was noticed at the timoof its occurrence by
the Boston press, and the leading Journals
throughout the country. This magnifi
cent medal is of solid gold. set with more
than one hundred India diamonds of rare
brilliancy. . .. . .
Altogether In Its execution, and the rich
ness of Its materials and size, this is de
cidedly the most noticeable medal ever
struck In this country for any purpose what
ever. It Is well worth the Inspection oi
Numismatists. It was fairly won and
worthily bestowed_ Massachusetts Plough
man, June 3d, 1876.
Catalogues sent on receipt of 6c, for
postage. . , . fl
Either of the above works sent by mail
receipt of price. Address PEABODY
MEDICAL INSTITUTE, (or W. H. PAR
KER, M.D. Consulting Physician,) No. 4
Bullfinch street, Boston, Mttss.,opp. Revere
House.—^e aut j lor consulted on the above
named diseases, as well as all diseases re
quiring skill, secrecy and experience.
Office hours, 9 a. in. to 6p.m.
June 29 1876. TuThdkS-Awly
, or
ser
M ATTINGS_We have now in stock
white and check Canton mattings by
• he lece. made at th
Fonrih aud Market
JOHN L. MALONE,
PLAIN & ORNAMENTAL
MARBLE WORKS
DELAWARE AVENUE & MADISON
STS., WILMINGTON, DEL.
Constantly on nand an assortment of the
beet marble of the different kinds which lie
is prepared to work up into Monuments,
Head and Foot Stones, Steps, Mantels and
House Work in generul. Havingalong ex
perience in the business he flatters hlmsel
Eat be can give entire satisfaction t« all
who may favor him with their patronage.
The public sore invited to call aud inspect
ms work and learu his prices. uovS7-76-ly
The Mate of the Constantia,
BY CAPTAIN HOWARD.
Thirty.« re yearn ago no -better ship
sailed the salt ocean!than the Constantia,
and no better ootefrander ever walked
the deck than Captain Raymond Harris.
His usual voyages were to South Araeri
and back to Boston; and, in nearly
of these I had the good fortune to sail
with him as first officer.
Wt had a long passage from Boston
Lima on one of these voyages and were
ordered back to Boeton as soon as the
ship could be discharod and reloaded.
Our voyage was a pleasant one until
we entered the northern latitudes, when
our thick jackets were speedily put in
qui8ition.
We were but a few miles sonth of Cape
Ann, when we had completed
rangements. It was very calm, and
the sun set clear; bat there was a coppery
hus at the west that we did not like.
More sail was set, hoping to run
some safe harbor before the storm, which
was so quietly yet so certainly brewing,
should come in its might.
The hope was in vain. The ship
forty minutes more was lying in the
trough of the sea. with foresail and main
sail split inte strings, and the
terly helpless to repair or prevent any
afll damages: Nothing but ruin and
death stared us in the face. The decks
were a mass of slippery Ice, stud wat*r
that was rapidly freezing, in which the
men were sometimes standing to the top
of their great boots.
One little fellow, scarse fifteen, a slight
delicate boy, named Oilbert]Harding,was
striving to imitate the "old salts" in their
composure and bravery. The captain
had ordered him to go below; but he had
begged so pitifully not to bo left there
alone, that he hadreveked the decree and
allowed him to come on deck for a short
time.
The sailor's voices, when they spoke
him, were softened to a half tenderness
that was touching to hear. One of them,
blunter than the rest, said :
"Gilbert, what do you think your
mother is doing now?"
A tear started to the boy's eye, but he
manfully resistedjweeping and answered
in a low voice ;
"She is singing; she always is at this
hour; and to-night her song will be :
( ■
our ar
crew
'•Star of God! when winds arc mocking
All his prayers, he'll fly to thee !
Save him though on dangers rocking
Far—far at sea !"
I knew by the way the sailors hushed
their roagh voices to a whisper, how ten*
der they felt toward this child, so gentle,
so tougbtful of Ills mother, so reverent
his God.
The single hope that the storm migh?
soon abate was fast leaving us. Every
moment we were nearing the rocks, and
expecting to hear the terrible crash that
would part our already disabled vessel
into fragments. It came at last—a dull,
harsh grating, a creaking, gToaning, in
describable noise, that seat a shiver
despair into every heart; and then she
parted amidships and fairly broke into
pieces.
For myself I knew no more. Some
thing cold, hard and heavy touched my
head, aud I swayed to the deck beneath
its chilling weight. When I awoke
from that dreadful torpor I was sheltered
in an old ruined rope-walk that stood just
above the line ot the beach—left • for
dead !
While my body was so weak (hat
could not lift a linger, my mind
active that I could not stay to arrange
ything that had already occurred, but
hastened on the result. I should fall
asleep, I imagined, aad my living frame,
powerless and inert, would be carried
away to a tomb, where 1 might again re
vive to new horrors.
I was relieved of this burden of dread
by the entrance of two gentlemen, who
at once attracted me by the spirit of
benevolent sympathy that diffused itself,
as it were, all over them.
"Great God!" exclaimed the taller of
the two, a noble-leoking man; "look
here, Ashley! This youug boy is not
dead !"
A young boy ! I could not turn my
head, but I felt that thie must be the
Gilbert so beloved by our captain.
The gentleman continued :
"Here, Ashley, take this brandy flask
from my pocket. I put it there last
night, tbinkinr it might be wanted."
A faint choking sound told me that it
had taken effect. Then a weak but sweet
voice, that sounded like music' to my
ears, said :
"Where is Captain Harris ? where is
Mr. Howard ?"
The moment my name was called the
■pell was broken that had been set upon
my faculties. I feebly moved my arm
toward the spot whence the sound pro
ceeded, satisfied that it was Gilbert's
voice that uttered it.
"Heavens! Ashley, look there!" ex
claimed the one whom he had called
Dean, and the latter instantly approach
ed me. A draught from his flask revi
ved me still further.
"Call some one, Ashley. These poor
fellows must have warm blankets, and
fee errried to the hotel."
We were taken to Ashley's Hotel as
tenderly as if we were infants; and as
all the other beds were full, Mrs. Ashley
offered hers. It was a warm, comforts
ble room, with a blazing fire upon the
hearth. I lay there, my eyes fixed on
Mrs. Ashley's face, for hours, as she sat
by the fire. Something in her counte
nance seemed so familiar that I longed to
address her as a friend.
My childhood was a lonely one. My
parents died when I was very young,
leaving my little sister and myself de
pendent on a*rangers. Caroline was
adopted by a gentleman living in Boston
while I was taken care of by a fisherman
whom my father had once in his employ,
when the world went well with us.
When I was eleven years old, I went to
Bea; since which I had neverseen my sis
ter. Mrs. Ashley's face brought Caro
lina's childish look back to me. I asked
her a few questions when I recovered,
and found that my heart had been true
to early memories. She was, indeed, my
sister Caroline. Parted so long, there
was strange sweetness in our reunion.
She now sleeps the slumber that is never
broken on earth. Each year, some one
who has loved me falls away.
My poor Gilbert is still spared to me,
although that dreadful night's work
crippled him for life. We were all that
were saved—I, to take care of him, and
he to b)e?B me with hiB true and beau
tiful affection.
A number ofîéavy Montreal capitalists
have applied to Parliament to incorpo
rate a company to lay a cable between
Canada and Ireland.
was so
The Hope ef the South.
The change of feeling at the South,
from despondency to hope, caused by the
moderate and conciliatory sentiments of
the President's Inaugural address, is al
most miraculous. The entire Southern
press, with the exception of a few bitter
partisan sheets, of no circulation and In
fluence (the hired organs of the carpet
baggers), and the great mass of the
Southern people, agree in declaring that
if the President will only act up to the
meaning of his fair words, the South
will at once experience a revival of all
her depressed and languid interests.
They do not ask nor expect Hayes to
recognize Nicholls and Hampton; they
appreciate the political difficulties of the
President's position ; and they do not re
gard such a recognition as necessary to
relieve the South from her doubt and
distress. They only request that the
President shall not interpose his opinion
or his patronage or bis influence between
the rival governments of the two con
tested States, but simply let them alone
and withdraw the Federal troops which
are not needed there to preserve the
peace, and which only intensify and pro
tract the local dissensions. Perhaps the
Southerners are too saDguine in hoping
for sueh great results of good as oirect
consequences of a change of Federal
policy toward their section. Their feel
ings, however, are largely shared at the
North, where the merits of the question
can be impartially and calmly judged.
At the meetings lately held in New York
and other Northern cities by Republicans,
to "strengthen the hands" of the Presi
dent, the greatest stress has been laid
upon his promised pacification of the
South—by letting her alone—as the one
thing most conducive to the return of
business prosperity. No public speaker,
and no newspapei of any party in the
North, so far as we are aware, holds a
contrary opinion. The President would
undoubtedly have an overwhelming ma
jority of his fellow-citizens at his back in
standing by the pledges that he has made,
and we hope to see him do it. If he did
not quite bring about a millennium at
the South by giving her people the right
of self-government, he could at least re
store peace and an increase of prosperity
to two of the Southern States which are
now suffering from a contention that
would cease to exist but for the one
sided interference of the Federal arm.
It is the belief of the closest obser
vers of affairs in Louisiana and South
Carolina that if Packard and Chamber
lain were once definitely told that the
President would not recognize them,
and if the regular troops were with
drawn from those States, the difficult
ties would be almost instantly compo
sed. Neither Packard nor Chamber
lain has had a hearty support even
from the minority which Voted for
them. Since the de 1 ivery of the in
augural address, which gave no com
fort to either of the pretenders, their
strength has visibly declined. Great
numbers of voters who sustained them
at the polls are now anxious that they
should retire, and leave this opposi
tion, which comprises a majority of all
the best and most substantial men in
tbe two States, to take charge of the
local governments. It is mentioned as
a fact in Republican papers that
"Gov." Packard's authority is not
speeled outside of the St. Louis Hotel,
in New Orleans (his executive quar
ters), and he would not be recognized
even there but for the presencsof Gem
Augur's force in the city. "Gov."
Chamberlain's standing in South Caro
lina is equally slippery,
some evidences of respect from his
partisan ft lends, but he can collect no
taxes—all these going into Hampton's
treasury. Only the moral support of
the regulars at Columbia enables him
to keep up a show of state. Both of
these bogus governments would col
lapse in a night without bloodshed or
disturbance of any kind if President
Hayes would only call off the bayonets
which alone prop them up. It would
be a bloodless victory for rightful,
iionest and frugal government at the
South. It would be a blessing to tho
whole country. And, viewed merely
as a party measure,it would give to tbe
Republican organization a real popu
larity and strength which it now lacks.
EATING VS^JMNKING.
If you would keep from drinking so
great a quantity of ardent spirits, cat,
eat more. Eat nutritious foad. Eat
something whenever you lake a drink.
The drunk in ail cases, comes from tbe
stomach full of whisky and no food.
There is a simple rule yet to he learned
by many, and that is, they do not eat
enough of real blood, bona nerve and
tissue making food. You may half
starve to death on salt fish, potatoes,
cabbage, turaips, fried liver, stewed
kidney, and a score of other dishes
that please the taste, but add little or
nothing to the bodly force. Eggs.tbe
best steak, mutton and bread are what
one requires for strength- It is this un
conscious half starved condition which
causes so much of the craving for a
temporary increase of strength and
that is quickest gained through a glass
of whisky: that gives, for a few mo
ments, a spasmodic impulse to the
wheels of life sending them whizzing
and spinning arouDd tor a few mo
ments, then comes reaction, and they
turn more sluggish thau ever. The
best spirits in the world reside in good
blood, the worst in bad. It is that
which send false imaginings, suspi
cious and despondencies to the brain.
all
to
in
in
or
to
re
M
of
of
I
re
He receives
A dreary note of sorrow comes trom the
vine districts of France. The phylloxera
the minute destroyer of the roots of the
her destination by this time,
vine, is laying waste after district district.
Burgundy, Champagne and Loire are
threatened, and no remedy has yet been
discovered.
The President yesterday nominated
and the Senate confirmed John J. Knox
as Comptroller of the Currency; William
Sherman, Assistant Treasurer at San Fran
cisco, and Bdwin G. Waite, Naval Officer
at San Fraucisco.
the
of
al
In
the
that
the
all
to
they
the
re
to
and
the
con
the
pro
the
the
laid
the
one
of
the
a
in
did
at
re
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A Full Account of the Sassafras
Scandal.— Tbe Balt Gazette gives a
full account of.the terrible horse-whip
ping of Dr. Jos. JLort, at Sassafras, re
cently. It seems that tbe doctor had
betrayed and slandered a young girl
named Kate Taylor. On the night of
tbe 10th of February, the doctor was
at home conversing with Mr. and Mrs.
Prysr, when a knock was heard at the
door. Mrs, Pryor responded, and
four men entered. Two of the party
are believed to have been William
Taylor and a friend named Joseph
Turbit, The entire party rushed into
the hall and passed into the parlor.
Lori's face blanched with terror
cocked revolvers were pointed toward
him. He offered no resistance, and
was handcuffed. After being hand
cuffed Lort was gagged, placed in a
light wagon, and borne rapidly away.
The wagon was driven to an unfre
quented woods a short distance out
side of the village. Lort was than
partly stripped of bis clothing and in
formed that he could take his choice of
dying by his own banh or of receiving
a terribly castigation. He chose the
latter. Young Taylor was assigned to
do the whipping,and had provided for
the purpose a new whalebone whip.
The victim was securely tied and the
whip applied until it was completely
worn out, and tho blood was stream
ing from the Doctor's back, which
was lacerated in a shocking manner.
It is reported that he was then struck
on the head with the butt end of the
whip and knocked insensible,in which
condition he was left on the ground.
After the assailants returned to Sassa
fras an alarm was given, and a party
started in search of the Doctor and re
moved him to Mrs. Pryor's residence.
His wounds were thought at first to be
of a very dangerous character, but
were afterward found not to be as
severe as at hrst apprehended.
General at Last.
A ve A tt orT ,.
WAshiNQTON, March 18.—Attorney
General Devens states that he intends
to appear in person before the Sup
Court in cases to which the ti
States is a
Williams,
reme
nited
party. During the term of
Pierrepont and Taft social
and political occupations absorbed
their time so that they could not
attend to the court business of the gov
ernment as did the old attorneys gen
eral. Indeed, during Grant's term,the
Department of Justice became a cen
tral bureau for the manufacture of
state governments,as Carl Schurz once
aptly expressed it. Judge Deveus
proposes to return to the earlier usages
of tha department over which he pre
■ides.— Balt. Gazette.
HANGING BY WHOLESALE.
On Friday next, seven criminals are
to be hanged at Aiken, South Carolina.
They compose, in part, a gang of de
speradoes and ruffians whose crimes
were murder, riot, arson and rape.
They are all negroes, with one excep
tion, and one of them was formerly a
preacher. The jury that convicted
them was composed of eleven negroes
and one white man. Confessions f
nearly all of them bave been obtained,
and tbe number of crimes they com
mitted is almost incredible- Tbey
were a portion of a hand organized to
murder and plunder.
roin
A YOUNG MAN SMOTHERED IN HIS
COFFIN.
At Leu St. Kemy, in Belgium, a young
man of eighteen years, who was believed
to be dead, was placed in a coffin and
buried' A great number of mourners
accompanied the funeral. One of them
pronounced a eulogium upon the charac
ter of the deceased, the usual prayers
were recited, and the coffin was lowered
into the grave. The grave diggers had
begun to fill it with clay when they heard
several knocks given from within the cof
fin. Terrified, they ran tc call the curate
and inform the Mayor, in the presence of
both personages the coffin was opened.
The unfortunate youth, who had been
buried alive while iu a state of lethargy,
had made despefate efforts to break opeu
the lid of the cofliD, but uselessly, and
had died of asphyxia.
('LAIMING the Honok. —According to
tae statement of Blaine of Maine he was
the inventor of the plan that has been
suggested to Mr. Hayes for holding new
elections of State officers in Louisiana
and South Carolina, Suppose now he
suggest to Hayes that as his own title to
the Presidency, according to Blaine's in
terpretation of it, rests upon the same
foundation as that of Packard to be Gov
ernor ot Louisiana, he should procure a
new election for President of the United
States .—Baltimare Sun.
The Boston Herald says an injunction
has been served on three Boston banks,
forbidding the transfer of certain Govern
ment bonds and other securities to the
parties to whose credit they were placed
on deposit. These securities are believed
to be part of the plunder stolen from the
Northampton BaDk.
Democratic Majority in the Sen
ate. —Washington, March 13.—For the
first time since 1861 the Democrats had a
majority in the Senate to-day, and Mor
ton did not dare to offer his report on
Kellogg. For all party purposes Republi
can control of the Senate is gone.
The Pan-Presbyterian council to be
held at Edinburgh next July bids fair to be
one of the most illustrious sectarian gath
erings of modern times, and if its deliber
atlons shall he at all commensurate with
the preparations now going forward it
wiil'mark a new epoch in the history of
the church.
Ben Hili/s Successor A Democrat
—Atlanta, Ga., March 13.—Reports
from the Ninth Congressional district are
meagre, but the indications are that
Bell, the regular Democratic candidate
is elected by a fair majority over Speer
Independent Democrat, and Archer, reg
ular Republican. Tbe official figures,
however, may be close.

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