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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, September 27, 1880, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1880-09-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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XCVI--VO. 141.
WILMINGTON. DEL.,
MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 27. 1880.
PRICE ONE CENT
WW'RAh FMHS.
:l aW awe
l te fair
th'eR'D
ML EXHIBITION,
)V£rv,
Wednesday, Thursday,
AMO FRIDAY,
L 291b, Hfitli and Dot. 1.
|0N Ol'KN 1*0 'I H E WOULD.
.
pKX.BAMMK OK KAIK.
1 exhibition
, Aiir'oiiitur
II11 MariufAc
Hi
Sert. >
i, fruli.
({'Üii'.l display <»f house
uB
M I" a.
m.,
I
Y lilt'
so<n«o.
I..*«» «
.,tr*»tt
•'S, pi
i.— Colt
T, Sept. I ».ht 1.30 p
ill«, t»» cl» 1
nr.eijO'i. -M**i
Phr-o,
«.P
m., Bicycle
ii
Mimic Knnl.lt
KrtX
:
I
.
•las*», p
pur- -*T hi
ANNUAL FAIR
!1L CO UNTTY
nltiiral Society,
LkTOJST, Is/LID.,
12, 14. am 15, 1880.
[IÜM8, - $38)0.
ill p.
of the
I tliis.
■I.
-i! regal
•T pi
• N
*1 Twit mg a*
•lain
.
improve! g
nds,
and owing
irouiids to
id
Is.
n. 'Ü.
a r. »»
ps to wa
r ites will be givei
kmUUu
jiv
lor all kinds of
lie lord
the
Ilbits opet
fro
Oc
l.i
ap
|H...,t <•!
"opt
l iais of speed
ent.iipurj]
ii add
[tis
iui Kll»t. K, N,•»•rotary,
El let on Md.
ESTABLISHED
133».
ING & LANGE,
OS
SB
I
IKinds of Provisions
[ !l Krause street,
a > l M IKOTf'N. I»F 1
0RRELL
CARPET
w carpetings
•'peeiaily f,„
T riADE
1 tally
frien i>
visit from
""blltVIi;
I'KIt'KN.
,#niR tin»,
1,11 •: Mock and it also
'Oh many
re,, r
MIC, AI NS
■Mlle worrell.
r M N,,: TF.MPI.H.
©h t fxttg ®mtU.
fiNTKKED AT WILMINGTON POBT
AS NKCONI» CXAfttB VIATTBR.
HANCOCK,
The Great Soldier-Statesman.
ÖBN. liDTTKIiFIRI.D, who fought at
Gettysburg with Ilanoook, line also
come out for tho Democratic candi
date. (.ike Sickels, ho says he cannot
«o for Garfleld or tho party that is
arerso to the poacc and unity of the
whole country. Ilo fought out the
war In 1885 and holds that it should
not ho contiuuod any longer.
The New Phase of j'$ 820" has be
come somewhat of a mania, and has
reached Washington. The figures were
inscribed upon the stone steps and front
door of the handsome residence at tbe
corner of Thirteenth and I streets
owned by James A. Garfield, on Satur
day night.
John Sherman found $329 written iu
nine pencil on an envelope received in
the morning mad front the First
National Bank of New Yoric. ^
$329 was marked consp.ciiously upon
the pavement in front of Boss Shep
herd's house.
A secti ou of the DcGolyer pavement
was marked $329.
James A. Gat field's seat in the House
of Representatives was labelled $329.
Further $329 developments
peeled to-morrow.
New Haven, Sept. 23.—To-day j on
every pavement iu tho city and a t
thousands of doorsteps is written in
chalk, "$329."
ex
The South pays nearly $10,000,000
of internal revenue while blistering
New England States only pay $3,713,109.
Hochkepp'ii
language!
Will gl
and
German and French to bot I» ladies and
private lessons i
II English br.niches, especially Iu
gentlemen, boy* and girl»
dtlior at his
lilies
>m«e
at private
ild engage him
esidenc
a private teacher
and daughter« and he will
uner«niiiy for almost
Mr. H. has been
omc of our most
Give him a gejer
Ft
Ml. I
for their
teacli Uor a In <1
the vamc amount as one.
and is still teaching ii
prominent families.
ouh patronage.
Now Cloths
prepared to show you some
i.id leading sly les of Fall and
Wh 1er Cloths. Cusslmores, Worsted«,
Cheviots, etc., ranging from S2.UU to S7.00
per yard, which l will make up In the
latest and most becoming style, at the
very low» si cubli price. Please call and
before the ru !i of fn I trade coin
FEH l> CAtlSoV,
233 Market street.
I
if the
cnees.
sepl0.tr.
Mme- Demorest's Patterns
take pleasure in
HuhhoIi »V Hponc
trouncing to tlialr customers th it they
. Dernorest's Patterns'
eeelved M
»ort Polios, Journals, What to W
h
, etc.
sep!5-tf.
jnt
lor the pi
Moot luxa To-NlRül.
MONDAY.
friends' Social Ly
Division, K. of P.
Unir»
Shields Library Association.
... Tribe, No. «, I. i ). It. M.
Delaware Lodge, No, I, I. 0.0. F.
Herman liodge, No. *», I. O. O. b.
Lodge, No. 1 k
Min
Washlngto
. II. A. M.
•11, No.-/
Wilmington !
Washington Lodge, No. 3, A.
Union Encampment, No. 7, I. O. O. K
.star of Bethlehem Division, (colored) 8
»>1 T,
Wilmlngt
I tunk, K. of 1*.
Wll
No 3, O. U. A. M.
. U. F.
Division, No. 1, Uniform
and Brandywino Council
AmuseinentN.
I'KltirOitMANOK SATUnilAT EV1CN
INO.
TIIK
On Saturday evening a good sized
audience assembled at the Opera House,
to witness tho performance of the Kentz
Santley Novelty Company.
The audience was
ed in the performance, as they expected
Novelty Company, but when
the curtain was rung up for the opening,
the same old performe
ted in a circle as has been seen in this
eity several times witli Madame Kentz's
Female Minstrels. In fact it was the
-aine company that appeared here last
Spring, and the programme was about
the same, there being but one or two
changes in the songs, while tlio olio did
not vary much. There was very little
applause as the audience failed to see
any tiling to applaud as the songs were
old, the jokes flat, and the performance
as a whole was good for nothing.
JOE JEFFEKSON.
doubt disappoint
t,o see a
were seen sea
been inflicted thus far
After having
this season with tra-hy performances, it
will be a reliof to our amusement loving
people to know that they will have an
opportunity of en oying an evening per
formance of legitimate drama.
It is with pleasure that the announce
ment is made that on Monday evening
next Joe Jefferson supported try a
phenomenal company will appear attire
( >p»ra House, rrt Sheridan's great play of
lire "Bivals."
The name of Jefferson has become
almost a household word, owing to his
irsonation of the character of liip
Winkle, and hundreds of those
him in that character
ill I pi
I'll
who have seen
will no doubt desire -o see him
dv He will be supported Mrs. John
Diow, Frederick Kobinson, Maurice
Barrymore and Rosa Rand, all °f whom
are well known in this city, having ap
neared hereon several occasions, and
hrongh their good acting have become
favorites.
come
Cough Hyrnp the pronto hsAulo"K«lnco
decided that It Is the best cough remedy
ever introduced.
1
FIRST EDITION.
in
OLIVET'S REOPENING.
PEOPLE LISTENING TO CONQKATULA
TOKY SPEECHES AND GETTING
PAINT UPON TIIKIIl CLOTHES.
Olivet Presbyterian Church, after be
ing closed for repairs, was reopened and
rededicated, Sunday afternoon. There
opening had been postponed two
three times, on account of various ob
stacles, and many who were present
this occasion wished it hail been post
poned another week or so, in order to
give the fresh paint upon the seats time
to become thoroughly dry.
To this service the congrégations of
the various Presbyterian churches bad
been invited, and uususpecttul
trap that avval ed them the guileless
ones entered and took sea s until every
one of the sticky, freshly painted benches
were full, and extra seats had to be laid
along the aisles to accenti|nodate the
people who still kept coming. The lat
ter gazed enviously at those who came
earlier and secured the regular seats, but
the sequel proved that they were the
lucky ones and had no can He tor com
plaint.
Services commenced at 3:30 o'clock,
and they had not proceeded far before
the unlucky congregation realized that
their clothes were slicking fast to the
bucks of the benches, anil that a liberal
supply of paint was found tp adhere to
their garments when they
loose. However, as the damage
done and nothing could be gained by
leaving then, ail hands sat <|uietiy until
the end.
Pastor Maliery, after the opening ser
vices, called the attention of iho people
to a number of blank cards find lead pen
cils lying on the seats, which he said
were designed to receive the subscrip
tions of all wlio felt like contributing to
wards paying for tlio improvements
effected in the church. Twelve months
ago, he said, the room below was no
thing but a store room anil a cellar;
now it is one of the neatest, brightest
and most cheerful Sunday' School and
prayer-meeting rooms in the city. The
cost of this improvement, however, was
all paid for, and now it is desired that
aid bo extended to the congregation, to
enable them to pay for the painting,
fri scoing, carpeting and general renova
tion of the main auditcjrium of the
church. Mr. Maliery also warmly com
plimented the members Of Olivet far
their tireless energy during the progress
of these improvements, many of them
having worked with their own hands to
hasten and perfect the work.
Rev. A. N. Keigwin, of West I'resby
teilau Church, next addressed the audi
He congratulated Olivet people
also spoke of the great influence or the
ctiurch upon the comtnunily, both spirit
ually and practically. I(e urged the
members to study the word of God, and
pi ay for his bis holy spirit to rest upon
both pastor and people, thus establishing
a bond of perfect union ijrhicb will in
sure success and make Olivet capable of
doing a mighty work for the cause of
the Lord.
Rev. J. Howard Nixob, of Central
Presbyterian church, congratulated
Olivet congregation for their handsome
work. The promise of God, he said,
would go with them and their pastor,
and aid them in the greiit work of the
church.
Then a collection was taken up, Pas
tor Maliery saying he lipped it would
realize enough to pay for all the work
that had been done upon the church.
Ho announced that next Sunday the
Lord's Supper would be celebrated and
a number of now members received in
to the church, and also returned thanks
to some unknown person who had pre
sented the church with a handsome
comm union table,
of a little boy four or five years old,
also acknowledged^ and Mr. Mal
iery hoped that as a little boy had been
liberal those who wore larger would
givo much more.
Rev. Lafayette Marks, D. D., ol
Hanover Presbyterian church, made a
brief address. Ho said ho judged
from the faces of the audience that
they felt, as did Peter on the Mount of
Transfiguration, that it "is good to be
hero." lie hoped that truoprosperity
which depends upon the presence and
power of God's holy spirit would over
attend the people of tins chinch.
Pastor Maliery next came forward
iliag and announced that the collec
tion had realized enough not only to
cover the cost of the church improve
ments, but to pay one half the cost of
organ that had just been pur
or
01
of the
lied their.
ence
The contribution
was
-«•
sin
a now
Then Kcv. F. B. DuVal, of tbe First
Presbyterian church, being called up
on, made a brief addr'wn, at tho con
clusion ot' wli ich, in honor of tho suc
cessful collection that had just been
made, lie requested the audienco to
rise and join in singing tho old, famil
iar long metre doxolog|T, "Praise God
from whom all blessings flow."
Their was an awful, tearing, rip
pling sound as tho audience slowly
wrestled their clothing from the sticky
benches and rose to their feet. Thoy
joined in tho doxology, hut each
mentally wondering iiow much paint
still left on the seals, and estima
ting tlio olianccs of saving their
by a liberal application of tur
against being compelled to
was
a
clot'
pent ine,
ptircltaso now outfits.
With a fervent prayer and tho bene
diction by Mr. Maliery tho audience
dismissed and as the pooplo tiled
tho full measure of tho damage
wrought hy those freshly painted
benches could be seep. Nearly every
had a broad streak of paint across
was
out
man
his back, while some of tlio silk dresses
by the ladies wére almost ruined.
Only those who took tlio extra seats
and chairs in tho aisles escaped the
gcnoral infliction. There is a lucking
fear in the minds of Olivet people that
the grace of the Lot'll did not linger
long in the hearts of thoso who attend
ed tlie rododicatiou of their handsome
little church on Sunday afternoon.
worn
A NEW WATC1U STATION.
Tho Philadelphia, Wilmiugton and
Baltimore Railroad have made the jail
, a t au ,i nl08t 10 l|ablo employes ill
[
K
democratic nomination.
it
the
in
a
DAVin W. nUOHBS FOR COUNTY ASSESSOR
IN TIIK SOUTHERN AND JOS1AH MCCALL
IN THE NORTHERN.
A Democratic nomination for candi
date« for County As«e««ors came oil on
Saturday afternoon, but attracted very
little interest. The candidate« were
David W. Hughes, present incumbent,
Jam«s Monaghan and Wm. H. Qnlnn
in the Southern District, and Jooiah
M'jéîall and Henry Brown In the North
ern D.«trier. The vote was as follow« ;—
at
of
5
ly
HOUTIIKKN DIbRICT.
s -a
•C9 « B
Ward«.
K 3 o*
- W W ZÎ
67 «9 97
- 22 75 1Ü
- 90 32 5
30 10 3)
48 2 15
349 32 10
:
First
Second
fijir.l, E. P.
" W. P.
Fourth, K. P.
" W. P.
113
133
Tenth
Total**
Hughe«' majority over Mouagha
over Both, 212.
391
702 290 200 1192
412;
Northern district.
'5 *
WARDS.
ri
ü o
E £
H
Fifth, E. P.
' W.P.
Sixth N. P.
" 8. P.
Seventh
Eighth
Ninth -
120
142
0
14
- 17 18
- 50 12
- 93 77
4 57
35
170
01
300 199
559
Total«
McCall's majority, 101.
Total vote iu both JisiticiF, 1751
The following Inspectors were nomi
nated
Fist Ward—Austin V G ay nor.
Second " Dennis J. Gallagher.
Third " James a. O'Donnell, East
precinct, and Frauk Kune, West Pre
cinct.
Foui th Ward—Sohii Aiken, East Pre
cinct, and Wir. B. Highluud, West Pre
cinct..
Tenth Ward—Joseph McCaftorty. In
this ward the vo'e wa>*: MoCafferty, 213,
M J. McCloskey, 137; Thomas H. Ivan*,
30.
A New Catholic Church.
The corner Htone of a new Catholic
t ) be built near Ashland
laid yes
oon, with appropriate cere
edifice will be known
a« St. Patrick's Homan Catholic Church.
About «even hundred persons atteuded
tiie exe cises. The Ancient Order of
Hibernian", numbering about sixty, and
S*. Paul's Beneficial Society, mitnberitig
about 50 member«, together with about
r citizens, atteuded
onial
di, that
station, on the D. W. U. It ,
tmday aft
Ch
»»nies. Tbe
three hundred of
The church will be of trame, 40 feet
wide, 6') feel, long, and lfi feet from the
floor to ihe ceiling,
were conducted hy Ut. Rev. Bishop
Becker, asslMted by Revs. Father Tay
lor, Kelley, McGrenna and Kelley.
Wiihlu the cavity of the stone
placed several ecclesiastical papers, the
uatue of the Blahop of the diocese, an
old coin, and the official records of the
church. , , ,
At the conclusion of the laying of the
corner stone Bishop Becker addressed
those present and during his remark«
said »he stone was laid for the purpose
of affording those who resided in the vi
cinity who so desired to worship God
afier the teachings of their father-; *_
bend the kuee before the altar ot the
same church before which over 200,000 -
000 cbriHiiauM are now bonding it.
He desired those present to under
stand that religion must come from on
high, it was impossible for it to come
truin this earth. Men may form sonietie«
or "congregation«, hut they never can
arise to. tho supernatural condition to
which the word of God is essential. All
tlie men on earth conM not mako a
church. It is not in members bur i*u the
word of God, which, when it speaks,
must bo obeyed.
In speaking ef the Catholic ohurcb he
salu that it came directly from God, for
Christ says: "1 shall found my church
and ;the ,gates c of hell and the power of
darkness «hall not prevail against If"
Noonecau fail to sue that the object ol
I,tils was to bring from on high the teach
ing power to »lirect men to gaiu souls
for God. There was but one idea in the
coming o." Clnist, ami i hat was tbe divine
plan to effect tins trausac.iou. iu ordei
to prove to mau that he was something
more than mortal, Christ - performed
mauy miracles, therefore you are bound
to listen and obey his commands. He
lias commanded you to go teuch all na
tions without regard to race or color,
and as his commands are divi
must obey them. He has said that "1
itb you always," and he has
fulfilled his promise, for being divine he
could not make a prom se and break
'M. going »id
The ceremonies
to
will be
It.
In referring to the Catholic church
Lhe speaker said that uo other church
could look over the laps»» of ages and
claim to be
church.
He church comes down fi
Lies, ami uuless a church can show it«
oredet tial-». it cannot cl im this sanctity.
The Catholic church could show its
Apostolic origin, and could therefore
show itself to be the church born of a di
vine promise.
In closing his address the Reverued
geuilwmau «aid that tho Catholic church
das lined to do a great amount of
good in this country; it is interwoven
with material history, and was the firs!
to assert the right of religious liberty ol
this continent. He urged upon the con
gregation the necessity of working hard,
and clear their church of debt. He did
uot be'ieve in covering with mortgages
would he receive it in that.
He would not take the church
ui.ivsrsat as th«» CaUiollc
The claim made by the Catho
the Apos
uor
dllloti.
less it was free from debt.
A Yankey Clrl is Lucky.
In tire secluded lnlorrd town or Oaril
uuupl y """1" wüaiM» a d'wrm haÇe
enloyetl all the pleasure that a well-*p ut
theot ndl ensures... WUu
company prior to the Almost
drawing. In the name of tpelr little three
to*M' aT fcaupbln?*Ne'w^Orleans ILaToTu
would have had the same effect If ml
dreeaeilto lhe same person, 31» Broadway,
York City), and now that young
gootU I s' «oncer u ed! 'hr r e'r't lek e* °d re w
Sue-naif tbe caplUvf prize ol bU UOj dollars,
Who will be the uexi 10
Invest In tbeUiand Monthly DlstrlbuMou
Oct. 12th at New Or ieaa«,L>. Bept.22.
Eleven carrier pigeous from Tom's
River were released at Middletown, N.
J . on Saturday morning at 20 minute*
oast 11 o'clock. The first bird reached
its cood at Tom's River, a distance of 3Ö
ml lea? at H.44 A. M-, making the dis
tance in 24 minutes, lhe remaining
minute later.
Lottery
N,
birds were one
THE STATE CAMPAIGN.
The Dover Sentinel claims that what
it calls the "Sauisbury family ring,"
dictated the Kent County Democratic
ticket, nominated last week, while the
Republican , of this «ity, asserts that
the "ring" was completely overthrown
in the selection of the same ticket.—
This contradictory Republican testi
mony simply proves that the ticket is
a good one, nominated by the Demo
cratic people of the county, and not by
any
out
A
to
ire
cl
p
or set of men.
James Pennewill, Esq., of Dover,
addressed a large lt-publicau meeting
at Harrington last 'Tuesday night on
campaign issues.
The Democratic Coun'y Convention
of Sussex will meet in Georgetown,
October 12lb,to nominate one Senator,
seven Representatives, seven Levy
Court Commissioners, a Sheriff and
Coroner, and appoint a Central Com
mittee. In the afternoon a mass meet
ing will be held at which a number of
5 ood speakers,including lion. Samuel
. Randall, will be present and address
the people.
Hon. Thomas F. Bayard will address
an out door meetiug at Ilarnngton.on
Thursday night next, uuder the aus
ricesof the Hancock and English dub.
t is said excursion trains will be run
over both roads to accommodate those
who wish to hear the speaker.
Tho Republicans of White Clay
Creek Hundred will have a grand ral
ly in the Exchange Building, Newark,
on Friday night next, October 1st.—
Addresses will be made by E. Brad
ford and F. Eden Bach, Esqs., of Wil
mington.
Messrs. B. T. Biggs, I. C. Grubb,
II. C. Turner, and others, will address
the St. George's Hundred Democratic
meeting, at Middletown, Friday even
ing next. Let there be a large attend
auce.
Mr. W. W. Roth well, of Middle
town, is meeting with much success in
canvassing for "Forney's Life of Gen.
Hancock," in this county.
John 8. Bacon, of Laurel, nominat
ed as a candidate for the Levy Court
by the Sussex county Greenbackers,
respectfully declines. Wm. E. Can
non, of Gumborough, also declines the
nomination for Representative.
A Hancock and Englisii Club, with
sixty enrolled members, has been or
ganized in George own.
THEIR RANKS DIVIDED.
WM. WALTER PHELPS REBUKES THE
REPUBLICANS FOU WAVINO THE
BLOODY SHIRT.
Fv.rAM 0 r nu rm,n William,
Phelps, of Bergen county, N. J.,
of the speakers at the Republican gath
ering of the Fifth District Campaign
Club, at Library Hall, Jersey City, on
Friday night. To the consternation oi
tho Republican leaders, the speaker de
precated the con'inued waving of the
bloody shirt hy the party orators when
no occasion for it existed. He had, he
said, sojourned in the South, and had
carefully studied the people. The only
objection he found was that Republican
tradesmen were not patronized because
of their political predilections. He ap
plauded the Southern people for ostra
cizing carpet-baggers, and congratulated
them on their prosperity.
So much uneasiness was caused by
these declarations that Congressman
Brigham, fearing their effect, arose, and
began to contradict the statements of Mr.
Phelps, however, plainly had the greater
weight with the audience, as it was
known thaï he had resided in the South,
and knew of wbat he was talking. It
was also known that the contradictious
were based on mere hearsay, and were
only repetitions of what Mr. Brigham
had read.
Some of the Republicans of Hudson
county, alarmed by Mr. Phelp's out
spoken convictions, try to smooth it
away by saying that ho is erratic.
Walter
was one
IMPORTANT MEETINGS.
The following Democratic Ward and
Club meetings will held to night, and
as.all are important they should be well
at fed net) :
Second Ward, attlie Capelle Building,
above Second, at 7.'3D
King street
o'clock.
Third Ward, it the Water Witch en
gine house, at 1:30 o'clock.
Fourth Ward, at Sienger Hail, Fourtli
street, below Walnut, at 7:30 o'clock.
Fiftli Ward, at tho Lafayette Hotel, S.
W. corner of Ninth and Shipley streets,
at 7:30 o'clock.
Sixth Want, at tho Flaunix engine
bouse, at 7:30 o'clock.
Seventh Ward, at the Engine House,
Tenth and Shipley streets, at 7:30
o'clock.
Eighth Ward, at tho Uayard Club wig
Nintli and Lombard streets, at
wain,
7:39 o'clock.
Ninth Ward, at lhe E. L. Martin Club
he&dquarlers, at. 7:30 o'clock.
Tenth Ward, at tlio Hickory Club
headq laters, Linden street and Mary
land Avenue, at 7:30 o'clock.
Tbe Hancock Vote
will hold an
Important meeting, this evening, ill the
Capelle Building, King street, above
Second.
The members of the Terrapin Club
are requested to meet at the otlice ot Es
quire Win. U. Brady, at 7:30 o'clock
Litis evening, on business of importance.
In arlititiou all tlie campaign dubs
will meet, to-night, to arrange for ottonii
ing the grand Democratic parade, iu
-row night, a general in
Chester, to
vital ion having been extended to all the
Wilmington clubs. The Secretaries ot
the various organizations are respectful
ly requested to notify Chief Marshal
Wm. B. Norton, either personally or by
pos i of the action laknn hy their respec
'i™ clubs, by three o'clock to-morrow
afternoon.
The First Ward Democrats will meet
at t |, e Ueorgo Gray Club headquarters,
Front street, near West, at 7:30 o'clock
to-morrow evening, lor tha purpose oi
organizing for the county campaign.
WHAT MORE, INDEED?
Mr. Bird's Fourth .Street Speech.
From
"I coldure you in the name of
thin« stored. 1 appeal to you in the
name of God, 1 appeal to you in the
name of humanity. 1 appeal to you in
the name of the Republican pa^iy. My
colored filends, what more can I ask ot
you ?"
ery
Prom N. Y. Sun.
CHEERS FOR HANCOCK.
REPUBLICANS ANGERED AND CALLTNG
FOR CHEERS FOR JEFF DAVIS AND
GEN. LEE.
Philadelphia, Sept. 25.—A re
markable scene occurred in Broad
street to night,at the Republican mass
meeting. A week ago to night the
Democrats had a parade, and turned
out with 20,000 men. The Republi
cans strained every nerve to make a
larger display to night, and there were
probably 25,000 men iu the procession.
A stand was erected in front of the
Union League building, from which it
was announced that Blaine would
speak. An immense crowd gathered
to hear him before the procession
started, but he spoke very briefly on
account of the noise. There were
many Hancock men in the crowd, and
some one started a hurrah for theDem
ocratic candidato. This aroused the
ire of R. Stockett Matthews, who be
gan to harrangue the crowd. He said
such scenes might be expected in Ala
bama or Mississippi. "Why don't you
hurrah for Jeff Davis?" ho shouted,
and the crowd jeered and derided him.
"Cheer for Robert E. Lee," he called,
"cheer for Robert E. Lee. He was as
great a General as Hancock."
crowd laughed again, and then the
cl eer was taken up and Hancock's
name went up from thousands of
throats. It was a scene the Republi
cans were not looking for. The pro
cession was a very line one. It was so
long that the leaders decided not to
p trade through the city. The column
was divided into two parts,one march
ing up the length of Broad street, and
the other down. The effect was novol
and beautiful.
From the N. Y. Herald.
senator blaine's speech.
Senator Blaine was introduced by
Mr. Baker, and camo forward amid
considerable cheering. Ho said:
"If it were possible to elect General
Hancock President his success would
mean not merely a change of adminis
tration but a change of dynasty. It
would be a political revolution in the
government of tho most startling char
acter, for to place tho rebels «f the
South in command of tho nation is
quite as radical a change «os would be
occasioned in England by unsealing
the House of Hanover and restoring
the House of Stewart." At this mo
ment tho crowd before tho speaker
ayed violently In tho direction of the
platform, and tho police had great
trouble to prevent tho ropes from be
ing overthrown. The agitation was so
8 iciu Mian ti.c U| . VU Kvi am uuu lotmine
for about two minutes. "My old For
ney," continued Senator Blaine, amid
groans and some cheers, "desires to
use Ueueral Hancock, who aided in
1803 to keep them out of the govern
ment, to bring tho rebels back in 1880.
(Loud and tumultuous cheers for Han
cock on the right of tho stand)—"All
honor to Haucock for his conduct in
1803, say I." Here followed a pro
longed interruption, at tho oud of
which Senator Blaine said : "This au
dience is too vast lor any one man's
voice to reach eveu a snull part there
of. The election between Generals
Hancock and Garfield is also too vast.'
Here the speaker was again interrupt
ed, and ceasod talking for nearly one
minute. "So far as the candidates are
concerned," resumed the Senator from
Maine, "more than mere confidence
in the two men is demanded, Tor both
are individually honorable. If it were
a mere conflict between Garfield and
Hancock,to use an old English expres
sion, I should not care a toss up which
man was chosen."
SPEAKING UNDER DIFFICULTIES.
"So far as the country's interests are
concerned"—(shouts for Garfield and
tor Uanceck). "If we cannot carry this
discussion beyond personal friendship
there is little to be said." (Wild cheers
for Hancock ou the right.) "Cheer for
bim as a military man und I am with
you, but I say to you as Pennsylvanians
•dial the great question for you to con
sider is whether the industrial system ot
the United States shall be tampered
with by new and untried hands, who
4 et their inspiration from the same ene
mies to this laud who built and l&uucbed
the Alabama. I do not say it of my
wn knowledge, but I am assured that
British free trade ideas are being pushed
.n ibis land with all the might of British
jold. This gold may not be here at
this moment, but it is remarkable that
for the first time iu our history tracts
printed by tree trade leagues in London
ire being sent here by the thousands to
influence votes for General Hancock. II
I weie a democratic campaign agent 1
would go to London witli a copy of the
Cincinnati platform and say to the
English people, "Here is a party that
•an be of use to you iu breaking down
ihe great barrier between the wealth
iiid prosperity of the United States and
your constricted and waning commerce.
LJiis party will give Great Britain con
tiol of the commerce of Its country.
What the rebels wanted to do for you as
Englishmen, it will now do. Free ships
>s our cry—don't you see? Ail this I
la say au d much more, and who
doubts that I should come back with a
campaign fund of ample proportions.
Now, my fellow-citizens, the only
thought that l have travelled 500 miles
to impress on the minds ot the people of
Pennsylvania, in whom I have pride
and honor of birthright, is that the elec
i on of Hancock is a menace, it not the
Instruct ion of the great commerce of
heir magnificent Commonwealth. With
this idea in your minds you will give a
large msjoiity for Garfield in November
(Cries of "Go on," "Tell us about
Maine," "How did it happen?" Ac) 1
will now retire feeling the inadequacy
of my voice.
The above shorthand report of the
speech conveys a more perfect idea of
the speaker's manner, and indicates the
reception it received more clearly than
any description could. The Chairman
next introduced Thomas F. Marshall, ot
Pittsburg, who spoke tor ten minutes.
Congressman Mathews, of Baltimore,
followed, and Wayne McVeagh closed
tbe speaking. The parade then began
and continued uulil midnight.
St. Julien trotted a mile in 2.134
Beacon Park, Boston, on Saturday.
The
SECOND EDITION
^
j
Our Republican contemporaries
have been strangely silent during
the past few days as to the final out
come of the el: cJon in Maine.
Practically the retr -ns are now all
iu, and show an unquestionable ma
jority for Gen. Plai ted of from 200
to 300; but the Stalwart organs have
not been able to find root.» in their
columns for the announcement of
this highly interesting fact. After
all, it is hardly to be wondered at
that journals which before the elec
tion were predicting a Republican
majority of from 8,000 to 10,000
should be suddenly struck dumb
the discovery that the majority
with the other party .—Baltimore
Gazette.
A young mother must have some rest,
ut now is this to be accomplish! t.wben
; less and cries constantly?
the baby is
Simply by using L>r. Bull's Baby Syrup.
saved by Warner'SSaffe Kid
ney 'and LiverCu: e.—E. B. Lakaly, Selma,
Ala.
My life
aepl5-2w
To be ? or not to be ? That is the ques
tion. Wtether 'tis nobler In the miutf to
sutler tbe aches and pains that human
tlx sli is heir to, when overtaken by a
severe cough or cold, or to purchase a
bot de of Hines' .'■'yrupof Tar, Wild Cherry
and Hoarhound, and by thus opposin'
en them. Sold by all draggle*s, '26 and »)
cents per bottle. sep'22-lm.
MARRIED
PIERCE—McDOWELL,—On Sept. 27tb,
issu, at Wilmington, Del., by the R«v.
Tiios. M. Eastwood, Mr. William Pierce
and M rs. Amelia MoDowell both of New
Castle county, Delaware.
NEW ADVERTISEMENT».
ANTED—House carpenters.
WM.G. PIERCE,
202 King street.
W
Apply to
sept27-Ht*
L OST—On Sunday night on Sixth street»
between Poplar and Pine, a gold
neck-chain. A suitable reward will be
paid by returning it to
sep27-2t* 408 E. SIXTH STREET.
N OTICE,—A meeting ot the Democrats
of the Ninth Ward will beheld In
the Martin Club room, on Monday night,
Lhe 27th lust,, at V/ x o'clock. A full at
tendance is requested.
se27-*
UEO. T. BARNHILL,
President.
N OTICE—A meeting of the Democrats
of the Sixth Ward will be held at
the Phwuix engine house, this (Monday)
•ulng, at 7,30 o'clock. A full attendance
is requested as business of Importance
will be brought before them.
UEO. C. WARD, President.
it
D ISSOLUTION of COPARTNER
SHIP.—Tho partnersnlp heretofore
ËckeC printers. Is this day dissolved by
mutual consent. The remaining partner,
Edwin F. Eckel, is alone authorized to re
çoive all debts due the late firm, and alao
to Kettle all claims against it.
J. HARRIS GLATT8,
EDWIN F. ECKEL.
Wilmington, Hept. 25, 1880.
HPKOIAI. NOTICE
Edwin F. Eckel will continue the bus
iness of book and job printing, at the old
stand. 610 Market street, and hopes that .
with Increased facilities for th6 produc
tion of superior printing to receive th6
same liberal patronage that has hereto
fore been bestowed upon the old firm.
_ sep27-3t
F ifth ward democratic mekt
1NG.—A meeting of the Democratic
Citizens of the Fifth. Ward, will be held at
the Lafayette Hotel H. W. corner of Ninth
and Shipley Sts ,on Monday evening. Sep
tember 27th. at« o'clock. A full attendance
is requested. JAMES CARMICHAEL,
sep. 25-2t _ Presldeut.
T enth ward democratic meet
ing.—a meeting of the Democratic
citizens ol tbe Tenth Ward will be held
at the corner of Linden street and Mary
land Avenue, on Monday evening, Sept.
27th. at «o'clock. A full attendance re
RO BERT COTTI N OHA M,
President.
queued.
sep2ô-2t.
jpROPOSALS FOR CONSTRUCTING A
HEWER.
Office of the Street
Commissioner,
No. E. Sixth SL
Wilmington, Tel., Sept. 87, 188U.
Sealed préposais will be received in the
box In the City Council chamber until
7:30 p. m. Thursday, September 30th, 188U,
for bul.dirg a double sewer from the north
side of Second street down Adams to the
south side of Pleasant street or follow the
natural water course if directed by the
Street Commissioner. The sewer will be
about 193 feet In leugth The walls will
be built of stone furnished by the city.
Walls to be two feet thick and about fl
feet high, depending on the nature of the
ground; the excavation for the wails
must In »1» cases be carried deep enough
to obttiin a firm ami solid fouuüattou,aud
ust be plauked. The bot
in verted arch ol two and
}
if necessary
tom will be ,
a half leetradius, well paved with good,
hard brick »aid dry and grouted witli good
iiv draulic cement; the sewer will be oov
ered with Hag stone Ö feet long 18 Inches
wi»ie and ü inches thick and well fitted on
that there will be no cooking
ilie walls sc
movement.
All open spaces between the edges of
Lhe covering flag stoue must be closed
with small stones laid in good cement
mortar. There will be four Inlets with
branch sewers at Beoond and Adams
streets. The walls of the inlets must be
built of good hard brick laid In good ce
ment mortar and at least 13 luches thick;
the inlets will he covered with iron plate«
1 leet Cliches long 2 leet 6 inches wide
and \y, inches thick, with shutter In top
»nd iron grate bars In front; the atone
walls of tue sewer must be laid in good
Hydraulic cement mortar composed of
equal parts of cement and clean river
sand; the Bide walls and pavement of the
sewer must be plastered with oement
■uortar and made us smooth and true to
»lue as possible. Bids are requested to be
made staling price per llueal foot for
main sewer, me p ice per lineal foot «o
include 1 lie cost of putting In branch sew
ers, luleis, excavation and back filling
and ail tin* material and labor necessary
to complete the work (except the atone
»or the walls). The contractor must be
responsible lor all accidents and have the
work completed ana tho street all cleaned
up uud the dirt removed to wherever the
« reet Uommissionor directs, within six
ty days ir»>m the dale tho contract is
«warded. For every day thereafter there
will be a f»»reflt ol ten dollars per day.—
t he work must be done iu a good and
work maul ike manner, according to the
plan furnished by the City Hurveyor. The
execution of «aid work and the perform
ance ol the contract shall be under the
tlrectiou and supervision of 'he »Street
Commissioner and the work must be ap
proved by him bei» ro It will acc pied by
the Street Committee. A bond with se
curity iu the
must accompauy each proposal tor the
good faith of the bidder. And the pere >n
or persons to whom the contract may be
awarded shall Five a bond with security
of one thousand dollars for tue
failli I ul performance of the contract. Tl e
City Council reserve the right to reject
any or all bids. A11 bids must be proper
ly big red, sealed and endorsed. ,l Fr»»po
sals for constructing sewer" blank propo
sals or any further information that m«y
he desired will bo furnished on applica
tion to
of five hundred dollars
lie
L. P. LYNCH,
Btreei Lommi»s-*ner.
sep2;-lt

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