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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, October 20, 1882, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1882-10-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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InturM »I tile Duel ol
et WltiulnKlon, Del.
id-olu. nutter.
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l XI-NXX 148.
n* A _____
WILMINGTON, DEL., F
PRICE ONE CENT.
1
a Y, OCTOBER 20, 1882.
M»»* '""CAmmgB*
JJj" glSAN ** >U ®*J**™'
Gwffiyasa&'ffsi
S***/£!M Ja heretpy ff
Im • 1iarl« 4i *ton floUMC.
« tfiil 7.% Christian# Hi
lll.l to *HI IlltOXtcu
•juarl. to
MOM
Httt
la
Ol
AStl
far
IX I
iititle* than
IÏ .«ml the following
tun I < of ai» I «I district, rsc
i.ii, to *1! :
I \ lu* I». Wallace,
Timothy McCarthy,
îïlîïli Holland,
■7 BSuShEBTY.
> tu I
UP III'- !>"
pplicjsti'
■gift
fSallsght-r.
John
H« B
»USA
SARAH SHEARER.
_ I
«ri of lb' wtlliln mentioned premtMM,
with *■> Aï 1 of
male *nd provided, do
Än that I «hall »RP'T to the
Toe Court of <iriier»IHe..|i>n. ofthe
•idfjedver, of tin* Hute of Deli.tr«
.(ir (■•■Ikfount,, ou Monda, «ha euh
4 berneat, hein» the »rrtd.v of
D, a. I».. for I le* UM! u» k
.'attirn ou Delmwore str»
In th* rlty or
School Dto
,| Water strerta
\>w Cattle Imndiea,
»«.Ho M-ll lotoxleatlBir Hqn4f* In
•l.TZ, ,i lt „ one quart, to b« drunk
the tallowing respectable
gent» of »aid district, rucotmnend
Inn i
P
Win. Herbert, 0
Jno. J. Block,
A. < Gray.
J. K. V. PUtt,
KtlwardT. Ksiup.
Joo. W. Coffman.
SAKAI! SliJbAKEH.
l - 1, PATRICK LONG,
EK OF the within mentioned premises,
mre with an Act of Assembly In such
Ikii).! prosl>M. do hereby give notice
U| iDpfv Iu writing to the honorable, the
s the Court of General desslons or 1 _
r " - j of I »eta ware.
Monday, the
t. A. i»„ i Hta, being
a license to keep
corner of Chesti
Lai
III
an Upiiv
V
■■
>u rt. ta
juthwe
In tin- Tenth ward, of the
VÜrnmirtuii. IM., and to sell Intoxlcatlnx
l»lr*quantities than one quart, to be
« The prcuiUcu. sud the follow!
kcitlfu-. residents of said ward, recoui
kiaald application, to wit :
•* »gellte
John Brown,'
John Ciillin,
■as Pie
i k M thee,
Victor ix-hun,
Mb liael Met aff
I'atrlek Itlley,
Kdw. Dougherty,
Thomas O'Neal,
Charles Shields,
kj of mi
nut
lu<
UK re
K a
\ I
lift.
• Ing.
I
I*
iknion,
•Tty,
Woran,
PATRICK LONG.
BCE. - 1, PHILIP PLUNKETT,
(fSEROFtlie within mentioned nremtses,
qlliarr with an Act of Assembly In such
Hrittmlprovided, do hereby give i
I Oil I apply In writ mp to the honoralde, the
Softhe < »urt of G> lierai Messt«
liai Jill Delivery of the stats of Delaw...,
Ifor New (.»Nth- county, on Monday the
k) uf November lient, A. D., 1*0.
Ike dr»t day of »aril court, for a license
frp au hm or tavern at No. 106
ward
and
eta quantities than
» the premises, and the
ll/en- residents of said
ml application, to wit :
W. H. Quinn,
Richard Booth,
Geo. 11. Gray.
Janie* Merauly,
Nicholas Jenny,
■Michael Rafferty.
Nsthauiel Melchior,
Charles \N eyL
V K. Morrison,
I leak y oc.
K. Mnarks,
McVey.
• • H . G. Gross.
PHILIP PLUNKETT.
:: » ! i (
of the
NtreeL In the bucond
of Wlliiniiglon, Del.
■ It v
litoxlriitliiir lli|
, I
re»w
d tl»
• • »
Ford,
tan I Hi,
BrUn.
». Lewis,
«I Kern«,
'.fcbortlj,
iL Kjuilmni,
I ö ross,
Y. Ilipjrins.
...
? !'...
i" fa
n
M
I,MARY PLUNKETT,OWNER
«I within mentioned yremUea,
lv
do IhtHiv give n
«tminguni,,. lutiiorahle, the Judges of
El»«?r u ,i ra !> Peace and
wm .iftiifsui«-oi Delaware, In aud for
S"**? 41 'tan.lav the 20th dav of
B x1, A - l, M ItaC. being the first day
United^ la te»
aud 6'rench
ward, of the
aud to sell
quantities than one
iwwpni I , 1 ., P rt '*u !»«•«, and the fol
inSSâ ii rcuhleuto of said
jut*. A. Hau maun.
J D. liarner,
Nathaniel Melchoir,
"*liu Plunkett,
" • H. Qulun,
1 »trick Plunkett,
«•«■urge Duffy,
Michael Kenny,
G. H. liurrough»,
Daniel Reed,
Suiuuel A. Gifford.
tice that I shall
tourt, fo
II
northwest ci
>•. In ttie Hen
•f Wilmington,
■dag Uquorit In I
••be drunk
rw
Del.,
i*»
•toaolagi
Neu;
H,'
k.. •
Utah
Wl-,:.
N Sun., h
iFlior, 1
WARY PLUNKETT.
lea of the
1 th.- ïu I 1,r *Worcester Co., Ms»».,
tpllUcpwItliHn i'*. premia«;».
Wriïï Droit Iba 1 ! 01 . to such
^»PPlv In wH i.. ,ü . h ?£* b . y K' ve
•nfthe .mM r* K to* 1 "* bouorable, the
«Äl UliL 0 /, "riv™ 1 Sessions of' tbe
Ihr Nh, ,1 '\\ r J of U,e "tote of Delaware,
1 Novp.i!u.I .w° u . u 1 y I 0,1 Momlay, the
sk?"«*? L-'* 'ifejs.'aa
V. to »ell lutoxlcatl
quart, to he
»nil the following re
in» ol Hitl<| ward, recoiu
», to wit :
r ranci» x. Jacquot.
•»Ulto-A, KrauHpe,
ä:*
* u P || '*atl
fHwt,
it' K| rt.
iML
■jtoot*,
JWn.
■•'Mill.
nj
■ Alien,
AugiiHt Ten wege»,
••'»lui llau»on,
A. F. Me»u|i-k,
J"hn Gibbon»,
Dunlcl Morris,
M. Fellhleiuer,
John Fry.
Gottlieb Minium le,
J' »«. ».Miller.
« hu». Mummele,
" ui. Al»cnt»cr
r«eick,
«son,
ffVr.'
L. J. LEA.
ÎVekT.V tajTJUCX SULLIVAN,
iü lr 'ï»ni| ■!,. Rt southwest
°r'l,*-«'ilvr u n ,u V t Blre, t ' ln lhe
,le au«l Mali.Jhulngton. county
Itlth iHli or Delaware, In compll
inent-wjf the Act» of the
v \\\ Klyes notice that I »hall
•I («i/iVn 1 of u ' , "' rn!
I r . v "«••'very of the »Ute
autii „r V*"'»e county, on
. "I November. A. D., 1882,
' a licence
I h Irl
■■
in
«Ulf I»,
:
il
lh.
I
ÎJlN*. tt(ia
ttSKj;«.
:
Jrt, f«
'•ni, for th«* sale
In I«-«» «iiinntltieH
tin- prciulscH, ami
citizen» or the »Hid
vl* :
n
tu
s
milk n
ih
* , »npUcatlou,
Ja. oi, w. nui.
< harle» »tewurt,
ÎÂtfîeg&nrv
•Mu; tf'ESsr*
...kür, 1 ;,
IrlrkHu.f,'«.,
jÆïflfc,
\\ illftMiii Mt-Knlghl.
„ A . 1 .V*» ll,k,p Boon,
1 A 1 RK 'K MULLIVAN.
t
u 1)111,, „
wilt,,,;
i i î""iiui,
Ja
•Ä,
.
J;
one f ,
Ï.HHuk .»BET,, BRUNNER,
k»l* l, " , 1 *ltli .(„ a.., 1 ' tnenthmed premises,
l*si. t ,r '»vi«|e«l .1 ol Assembly In such
^h. 1 I •' 1,1 w iUiiiJ in»» r * !l » y K,v '' uol,re
1 "Iirt ,,«• (A?,, honorable, the
JNfH*bi llverv Ar Sessions «it* the
,,f J'* « 'mi,. Y«,,,', IV ta,e tf 1 Delaware,
■»Si '."■"»•"•r in-xi 0 ,'l Momlay, the
**• " r —" ■ J.- A. D., wai being
' lleens«- to keep an
*, at the
5Uv,
; -H II
h tl,,
1 D.-law
ue ami Dupont
"" /'by of wii
„r. art > to he drunk o
Hi w
fiUtoGlu
»In
the
r'« A,. citizens,
M'oiuincnd said applh-a
jgaas
»Hui, 1
Ubainbers,
£ 1 H. Davis,
j boni## Downey,
:,*• High ter,
Hlt'harcJ Walker,
j oit il v^r" uumk<!r '
John ri 1 u 'G'ounell,

ni Lape,
'MftABETH mtllriNKR.
I,
'Hilt,,,,
* *»Sr,
BP* '
wV 1 "*tuin
jruTicw.
DEMOCRATIC
MASS MEETING !
—AT—
Fourth and Market Sts.,
—ON —
Friday Eve'g, Oct. 20.
AT 8 P. M.
Tl* meetlug will [>t addreued
Usues by
GEO. H. BATES, ESQ.,
HON. W. G. WHITELEY
and GEO. GRAY, ESQ.
Cltlaen. of BOTH PARTIES ar« Invited.
OCm-lUi-42
on State
a
ATOTICE.—NEW STOCK IN THE DIA
MONl>STATE LOAN ASSOCIATION, Oral
umynient now out: nod.ltt nor propert): Intoruat
«Tshiplky V/hrSP. l ' u d * y or *•
G KO Kg K C. MA KIM. MecroUry.
NOTICE.— RENTING AND COLLECT
i : «AMi 5. E . NT8 4 •Declalty, by GEORGE C.
BARI8,SOI Shipley Ht.. Kcal E»tat« Agent. »,2X-lm
oet14-151
AM Vs BMKNT&.
C JRAND OPERA HOUSE,
M MAMONIC TEMPLE.
Saturday, October 21st, 1882.
THE CELEBRATED
RINGGOLD BAND
?
Of Readiug, Pa.—26 Pieces.
la
of their matchleM concert«, anHlnt«*<l by the
dlMUngulahed elocuttmilat,
MR. JOHN M. STEPHEN.
» his popular and humorous selections. Duets
by Messrs. J. Winter» and T. II. Hugh; C<
net koIom by Mr. W. T. Kck, aii<f(iar
touet solo» by Mr. Mamucl Mchalck.
Admission, Including reserved seat», &'>
•nt». Admission to balcony only without re»c
cents. Male three days In advance at Mcs>
Thomas A Co'»
d m
•t 18,20,21-30
QRAND OPERA
Monday Eve'g, Oct. 23, '82,
HOUSE.
MASON 10 TEMPLE.
Ttie Latest A merleau Sucre»»,
Alice-The Harrisons-Louis
Auri flier
wcrful Drnmatlc Company, In Leou
*» brilliant literary effort.
anl
44
VIVA,
Or, "A Sister's Sacrifice.
Price of admission 35 and 50 cunt«: reserved
»eat» 75 cents. Beat» for »ale at C. F. Tho
Co.'», three day» lu advance.
ectl9-4t-S0
IfffLP WASTED.
ANTED—A LAD AS AN APPREN
TICE
W
the printing buslnc»». Must be
about 16 year» of ugc, have a fair cducatloii
be well recoinineuded. Till» 1» an opportunity
aeldotn offered to learn the bu»ln«'H» Iu all of it»
branches. Apply In the hand writing of tbe
applicant to TH E J A M KS A WEB B
octlS-lf Printing
•ry Company.
FOR SA LF..
P'OK
100 Acres of Standing Timber.
Clli.fly YELLOW PINK »ml MAPLE,
wttblu one mile of railroad and three mile» of
water, aud adjacent to other large and One tract»
of timber land the growth of which 1» likewise on
the market. For particular» a» to location, price,
term», etc., addrcaa,
aeptza-d, w Jt»-lf _GAZ ETTE OFFICE.
Y?OR SALE.—ONE TWO-HORSE EN
I GINE AND boiler in good condition ; will
be aold cheap. G1LLEMP1F. A <'<>.,
Octl4. tf No. 106 Shipley street. WIL, Del.
SALE.
I aH)R SALE.—a NEW FIRST-CLASS 13
Roomed house, cornerHlxtli and French; ha»
five bay window» and all modern Improvement* :
Well aud all wa»te water undcrdntliieil to »ewer.
Term» easy, Also other house», price from f 1,260
is, Oui. Chance for goo«l luvcHtim-nt. Apply,
U. ft C. TIN DAL, 701 French »tr«*et.
FURLIV SALES.
RUCTION SALE
—AT—
211 King Street,
LMIN'OTON, DKL.,
ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 mt,
Mr». Kate Hauhy will w-ll a
»lock of CHIN A. GLASS»
at tf o'clock a. ni.
octl9-2t-12
P ublic sale the entire
TIN WARES. Sale
STIDHAM ft SON,
REGISTER'S SOTIV ES.
REGISTER'S ORDER.
Register's officb. I
New Castle Co., Del., 8«*pt« i»her 2*>th, 1NK2. I
Upon the application ol Ellen Kelly. A«lmln-
.»tratrlx of Fraud» Kelly, late of Wilmington
hundred, in »al«J county, deceaaed, It 1» ordered
and directed by the Register that the Admlnlatra-
• afore»ald give notice of grunting of letter»
Adnilnl»trauon upon thee»tateol thedeceased
with the date of granting thereof, by causing
advertisement» to be po»ted within forty «lays
from the date of such letters In »lx of the nm
public place* of the county of New < astle,
requiring all person» having demands against
the estate t«» present the same, or abide by an act
of Assembly ln such case made and provided;
- be Inserted within tb^
Daily Gazbttk, a
of
uni also rau«; th«* same
same period ln the _
•wspaper published ln Wilmington, and to be
mtlma <1 therein three weeks, (e. <». d.)
i Given under the hand and aenl orofltae
h > of the Reg later aforesaid at W il m 1 ugt .m
w Jin New Castle county aforesaid, the
4.V .nd year .bo*, writ«..,
L.
ROTIf B,
All persons having claim» against the ***tat** °*
the «leceaseil must i»re»« nt the same duly attested
to the Ailmlnlstratrix.on or before 8ej>t. 29th, A.
abide the act of Asw-mhlv in such
ELLEN KELLY,
Atluiiiilstrator.
D., IHM», -
case made
<1 provided.
: Wilmington, Del.
Addre«
sep29-mwf-3w
FROFESMIOSAL CARDS.
. J. P. BURNELL
I) ,(
«4- WILL REMOVE HIM OFFICER*
esldenee.
T«i his new
NO. 712 WEST STREET,
NOVEMBER THE 1st.
*t20-lm-ir.
C. COLE,
JOHN
JtOTARY PUHLIC, e AND JUBTK'K OK THE
If art. Building, No. 101 Weil Blslli «treet. Tcle
phuiiecall..n
J-pVNIEL II. FOSTER,
attorn ey-at-la w,
017 MARKET STREET,
myvio
NO.
WlLtUNUTON, DEL.
IMPORTANT ORDINANCE
THE B.fc O.R.H.ASK FOR RIGHT
OF WAY.
HOW AN ORDINANCE WA 3 KILLED.
A Hnrprls« to the Membsm of Council
Wlio But Their Boot in It Before They
Knew It—The Weekly Routine liusliieoM.
Abuer Bailey of the Eighth ward
called to the chair at the meeting of Coun
cil last evening in the absence of President
Conrad. After the reading of the minutes
of the laat regular and staled meetinga the
routine order of exercises was taken up.
The Water Committee recommended
the petition of the Pioneer Coach Com
asking that the water main in the
ward
was
that
apany
Ninth
extended to their stables be granted.
The company are to pay two-thirds of the
oott of the work, which will be $425, the
yearly revenue amounting to $40. Report
adopted.
The Street Committee reported having
directed the Street Commissioner to repair
the streets at the corner of Tenth and
Union, asked for by James Hunter aud
others. Report adopted. The same com
mittee reported adversely the petitiou of
Peter U. Furry, asking for a drain on Tenth
street from Pine to 8pruce. They also re
ported that they would attend to the resolu
tion of William H. Quinn in regard to safety
gates aa soon as it was properly worded.
Thomas B. Hlzar A Son were awarded the
contract for building a sewer across Dela
ware avenue at a coat of $2,500. The Street
Committee reported adversely on the bid of
Hlcar A Son far a sewer across Madison
street, aud recommended that three lengths
of 28 luch pipe belouglug to the Water
Committee be used. On motion the matter
was relerred Jointly to the Waterand Streets
Committees. A communication from Chief
Engineer Cotiwall referring to the overflow
of water at the intersection of Market street
and the P. W. A B. railroad In the Ninth
ward was referred to the 8treet Committee.
Mr. Garrett said the
mittee had a petition asking that Kirkwood
street between Tenth and Eleveutb be
graded. It would coat, he said, $200, "but
as the committee had no money" it could
do nothing. Mr. Menton thought it could
be done for $25. Finally, on motion, the
Street Commissioner was instructed to do
toe work with the city teams, the dirt to be
used for filling in other places.
City Treasurer Pierce reported a balance
$01,208.06 in bank to the city's credit.
Chief Engineer Mclntire reported 40 men
employed in the Water Department, the
pay roil for the week amounting to $336..55.
Street Commissioner Zeblev reported 33
men and three double aud eight single
employed on the street during the week with
a pay
The
had appointed John C. Patterson, Esq., and
City Solicitor Turner tdtyrepare a new city
charter and revise and consolidate the exist
ing; charter and ordinances.
Petitions and communications were re
ceived aud referred to the pr«
tees as follows : From Johu T.
ing the attention of Council to the erection
of several frame buildings on Elliott avenue;
W. T. Danen berg, asking permission to set
curb on twelfth street near Walnut ; Henry
Mendenhall, asking for a lamp on Eleventh
street between West and Washington ; Len
derinan Brothers, asking permission to set
curb on Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Laurel
streets ; L. C. Kent, asking for the grading
of Fourteenth street between Washington
and Jeffersou streets ; James Ferry, asking
for grading, curbing and paving iu the
neighborhood of Tenth aud Bennett streets;
Robert McCauley, asking for a lamp at
Tenth aud Bennett streets ; E. G. Shortlldge,
asking for a gutter on Vandever street be
tween Buena Vista and Palmer's row.
Bills were presented and orders granted
for the payment of the following bills :
Adams A Bro., $1.40; John Collins, $55;
Elizabeth Taylor, $120.
Mr. Beecher presented an ordinance which
he said was "the inoat Important that had
ever come before Council, as it would bave
a great influence upon business, and —"
But, while Mr. Beecher was just getting into
a neat little speech written in a memorandum
book, and by some said to have been
dictated by Counsellor Bird, Mr. Menton,
who temporarily Ailed the chair, cut the
gentleman's oratory short, as out ol place.
It was unkind, and Mr. Beecher felt it.
The ordinance was then read for the first
time aud the second time
"An Ordinance authorizing the Dela
Streets Com
of
tefttm
roll amounting to $235.11.
Law Committee reported that they
er com mi t
lliott, call
its title, which
was:
ware Western Railroad Company to cross cer
tain streets in the City of Wilmington,
it ordained by the City Council of Wil
mington."
Section 1 of the ordinance declares in sub
stance that the Delaware Western Railroad
Company is hereby authoriz«îd to construct
aud use a double railroad track crossing the
streets hereinafter named at such grades as
are hereinafter set lorth. Beginning at a
point in the northwesterly boundary line of
the City of Wilmington between Eleventh
street aud Pennsylvania avenue, crossing
Union street, Pennsylvania avenue,
Thirteenth, Liucoln, Fourteenth, Scott and
DuPont streets, Sixteenth street, Delaware
avenue, Gilpin avenue, Shallcross avenue,
Lovering avenue, Wawaset street, Brandy
wine creek, Jessup road, Snuff Mill lane,
etc.,giving the grades of the streets and
avenues ; and also suitable and necessary
sidings, turnouts and switches, subject,
however, to sueh restrictions aud regula
tions as have been, or may be made by the
City Council for the purpose of regulating
the speed of locomotives and cars within
the city limits.
The railroad company is to pave and plank
between the tracks ou grade and to erect
bridges where necessary. The ordinance
concludes as follows : " And the said city
hereby vacates to the said railroad company
the bed of Sixteenth street from the
southerly side of Scott street to the northerly
side of DuPont street. And provided further,
that the said railroad company hereby agree
to indemnify and save, harmless, the city
from any and all loss to j*ersons, corpora
tions or property, which may be caused or
occasioned by their crossing any of the
before stated streets."
It was moved and carried that when
Council adjourned it adjourned to meet at
the City Hall at 2 o'clock Saturday after
noon, o visit the Logan House, the site of
the propos(*d new railroad station, and that
the City Surveyor aud engineers of the
Delaware Western railroad be invited to ac
company them.
As soon as the ordinance had been read
all order in the room seemed to come to
end, and when the ordinance amending
ordinance regulating the health of tlie city
was presented for its third and filial reading
it was impossible to hear the clerk. Finally,
restored anil the first section of
the ordinance was read,
was to be taken oil the motion to make th«*
words the first section, objections were
offered by members who seemed anxious to
tet away. Some wanted copies printed, as
they "did not know what it meant," and
when a vote was taken the motion was loët
und the ordinance killed, much to the
chagrin of Mr, Talley who wished to move
that 100 copies of the same be printed.
Council then adjour ned i n di sgu st.
"Ah 1" moaned a widow recently bereaved,
"what a misfortune ! I know wbat kind of
a husband I have lost, but bow can I know
what kind of a husband his successor will
bo I'*
!
order
When the vote !
■ jtwMt pikrs.
Fishing for Stones at Hhtcu» Hook—The
(Government Work There—Waiting for
the B. * O. Bond.
The Marcus Hook folk« are once more
happy. The lost pier, which suddenly took
a header into the mud some weeks ago has
been found and a greuter portion of It fished
from the bottom of the river. It lay em
bedded in the inud 18 or 2U foet b**low the
surface at low tide Many of the stones
were broken loose from the mass, but the
whole pier undoubtedly toppled and tell
in one lump.
A scow and dredging machine belonging
to William W. Taxis of Philadelphia haa
been at work one week under the direction
of United States Engineer Locke of thia
city and already a large number of the huge
granite blocks and lumps of concrete, used
to fill In behind the stretchers, have been
brought to the surface and piled on the old
landing and the small old ice pier adjoining.
The scow Is taken to the site of the upset
Ice pier, where It Is loaded with stones, then
pulled inshore and unloaded. Good head
way is being made and it will not be long
ere the whole pier will be recovered. The
laid dry and fastened to each
other with Iron clamps or braces this shape
, smelted lead being poured around
them to hold In position. The clamps were
made of iron about % of an inch thick and
, 1>2 inches wide, the length about 1 foot and
the lapped ends about 2 Inches long.
The cause of the disaster is said to be very
clear, and an old resident of the Hook, In
conversation yesterday, said it didn't sur
prise him one' whit when the pier
over "For," said he, 44 lt was only
an experiment, and a costly
proven. Had there been any heavy Ice last
winter both of the lower piers would have
gone as they Just rest on the top of the
piles. As it is, the companion of the lalleu
pier is fast settling, and no one would be
surprised at any time to see it roll over and
out of sight."
The two piers, built a little over a year
ago, were placed upou 102 piles, driven
within two and three feet of each other, ac
cording to position, and sawed off eveu
eighteen iuches below low water. On top
of the piles a platform was built and the
stones placed on that. The theory Is that
the piles were notdriven sufficiently through
the inud, and one side having settled the
stone work lost lt6'balance, so to speak, and
came to grief.
The four old piers, further up the stream,
built shortly after the war, were built upon
a different plan and
as when first put up, although
was badly jarred and had some stones
badly loosened at one time by being struck by
the steamer Illinois of the Pennsyl.auia
line.
A
stones were
k fl
topp
built
It has
apparently as good
of them
The old piers were built upon cribs, con
structed on shore arid taken out and sunk
in position. When the crib settled, being
one piece, the settling was uniform and not
irregular as with the plain piling pian,
i The government engineers ure very re
ticent about the whole matter, and It Is said
t is very desirable on their part that the
story of the "lost" pier be kept as "mum"
as possible. Iu fact, those having charge
of the construction of the last two piers are
rather chagrined at the failure of their
work. Of course the government will lose
the cost of the construction, will foot the
bill for fishing the stone from the river, and
pay for the rc-c .;.of the pier. It !a not
known when the work will be commenced
or upon what plan It will be done. It is al
most too late this season to do much, if any
thing, and the probabilities are that when
spring comes there will lie two piers to re
build instead of one.
The Marcus Hookers don't worry much
about the matter, as it gives them work
during the "off" season.
Proposals for an eighth pier have been
received and opened and possibly the con
tract has be« u awarded ere this by the de
partment at Washington. It will be located
on a line with the inside row of other piers,
to the south, and very near to the Felton's
landin
Frank Tigeon of New York—for crib pier,
$10,000 ; pile pier, $16,000. Leiper A Lewis,
Chester—crib, $16,000 ; pile, $14,000.
Chester firm will
course provided sufficient security is given.
On Wednesday afternoon one of the gov
ernment coast survey vessels spent several
hours in taking surroundings and ruuniug
lines iu the viciuity of the sunken pier.
At the end of the secoud landiug is the
old and smallest pier of the lot. It is about
half the size of the others and nearest shore.
The stones in it are fastened in the same
manner as those iu the one
grappled lor. The clamps, however, are
made of round copper about three-quarters
Inch iu diameter. On the top course
of stones all but two pieces of the copper
have been removed at different times by
thieving men and boys, who have stolen the
metal to sell as Junk. The two pieces leftare
hacked and bent and so firmly imbedded in the
stones as to be secure,
upper corner the large 6tone has been
pushed several inches out of place by a bar
used in wrenching out the copper.
The residents of Liuwood or Marcus Hook,
or Marcus Hook or Linwood,which ever it is,
xioußly awaiting the action of the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company.
Two lines have been
the new road. One passes midway between
the P., W. A B. station and the river, while
the other passes over a mile to the westward
of the present station. Land is held at good
figures and property owners are smiling at
tin* prospective raise iu prices of real estate.
"If the road
right ; if it does not, all wrong," they say.
ace. There were but two bidders :
The
doubt do the work, of
being
Of
At the right hand
in the viciuity for
through the place, all
LOCAL OPTION IN CECIL.
A Correspondent Hays It Has Not Been a
Failure ln Any Sense.
A correspondent of the Oxford, Pa..
Pre»», in alluding to a recent article in the
Gazette upon the violation of the Local
Optiou law in Cecil county, which the Pre »»
iu part copied, says :
"As a resident of the county and a close
observer of the working local option we
assure you it is a grand success. We have
only one-half the number of public houses
that existed under the license law, and there
is not one-fourth the amount of lhjuor drank
then. We have less crime
committed as the result of drinking, as i6
shown by our court records. The carousing
round public houses day and night, the
treat and being treated, the waste of time
aud money that were so lamentably preva
lent under the license system is virtually
well nigh a tiling of the past. Trade and
business of all kinds, save liquor selling,
has never been better ; store bills are less
and more promply pai«l and the wives and
chlldreu of drunkards are better clothed aud
fed.
The people of Harford county are to vote
local optiou iu November and the
friend« of temperance expect soon to have
! that wise law iu force in Delaware. The
whisky party is greatly alarmed iu Delaware
and Harford county, and are spending
money freely and sending out false reports
to papers as freely to
from ruin.
The t* mperanct*
well satisfied with
option. They never expected to stop
drlnklug entirely, but they did expect to
largely reduce the quantity of ruin drank
and the temptation to driuk and in this
they have not been disappointed. When
Delaware, Harford county aud Chester
county become 41 cloth«id and in their right
mind " on this question we «hall have «till
less rum drinking in Cecil.
!
their vile traffic
l-eople of Cecil arc very
l the results of local
rum
I
CURREY AND SLAVERY.
THE CANDIDATE'S LOVE FOR
HIS OLD CHATTELS.
FISHER'S LATTER-DAY SYMPATHY
NUsn-Ilnw Judge
for Prosecuting
Slavery Cases and Bottled Ul» Sympathy
For Twenty-four Years.
A 'dory With Two
Fisher Took Hi« F«
The colored vote which has already
proved a troublesome quantity for Delaware
Republicans bids fair to be more trouble
some. The course of Mayor Wales toward
the colored men will be Imitated to the letter
by the State leaders. Mayor Wales thought
the time was not ripe for colored men to
hold oitice ''because the white man had
borne the heat and burden of the day," and
Mr. Carrey lias stated on more than one oc
casion that he would not appoint colored
men to office. Dick Harrington has said
the same thing
It is not surprising that Mr. Currey should
entertain such an opinion in view of the
Attitude which he has heretofore maintained
toward colored people. Mr. Currey was
never an abolitionist, and like so many
people lu Sussex he was a slave holder up
the emauclpaticu of the black people. Ji
how many negroes Mr. Currey owned it is
impossible so state, but it is certain that the
present Republican candidate for Governor
was in full accord and sympathy with slavery
aud the black people he held in bondage did
not get their freedom until slavery was made
unlawful.
Past actions of men are sometimes
awkward things, and Mr. Currey will find
his position on this subject particularly
awkward. Some of the Republican cam'
paitrn speakers have gone so far iu heated
partisan utterances as to almost charge be
fore ignorant audiences that if the Demo
crats got into power again Che negroes
would again go into slavery. Something of
this kind was done at Townsend the other
night. George V.
dressing the Republican meeting there aud
iu speaking of Democratic opposition to pro
gress said that by a man's past acts and
positions you must judge his future course;
by these you may judge what he will do
again if he gets a chance. He then said
colored men were getting better educated
and know this, when a man in the audiance
called out that the colored people were
educated enough to kuow if the Democrats
got into power they would put the negroes
into slavery again. "Does my friend mean,
that if they get into power we will have the
same kind of slavery we were once cursed
with f" asked Mr. Massey. "Just assure
as God made Moses," said an old Republi
can on the platform. "And God made
Moses," said Mr. Massey, very positively.
In view of Mr. Currey's position the sub
ject of slavery it Is very dangerous ground for
the Republican orators to walk upon. A
good many Interesting things can be told
about him, and among them how many
colored voters in Sussex will have nothing
to do with him because he wa6 cordially in
concord with slave-holding,and because,it is
stated, he treated them badly. Of course,
there is nothing very horrible in a man
having held slaves before the war, but the
fact th«*« l.e did will, of course, explaiu why
it is that he Is opposed to colored men hold
ing offices ; and as Mr. Massey says, a man's
past actions will show what he will do again
if he gets a chance.
to
UBt
Massey, Esq., was ad
AN OLD CASE.
The subject of old slavery «lays is a fruit
ful one for interesting reminiscences. Ex
District-Attorney George P. Fisher has been
out in an interview in the copying machine
at Third and King streets for some time In
which he alludes to a case In which a negre
woman was tried for aiding a slave girl to
escape to Mt. Holly, N. J., where she was to
marry a white man. Mr. Fisher was then
Attorney-General. He says the woman was
arrested and thrown into jail. He saw, he
says, that she was the victim of a "deep
machination" to throw her into slavery. He
g<jes ou to say that though he did uot press
the case, and did not think »he ought to b <
convicted , she was found guilty, sentenced
to the pillory aud lashand also ordered
to be sold to the highest bidder and
taken beyond the State. The ex-District
Attorney then goes on to tell how John L.
Bacon, now a candidate for the Legislature
on the Republican ticket in Sussex, came to
him to devise some way of getting the
woman bought off. She had sold for $700,
he says, aud to this point allusion will l>e
made further on. Mr. Fisher directed him
to an anti-slavery man named Hunu, so the
interview' runs, and that Hunn raised $400,
that he (Bacon) picked
there, and put $200 t
woman's freedom was bought aud she was
sent out of the State. Afterwards she sent
back to the kind-hearted Mr. Bacon the $200
he is alleged to have paid out of his own
pocket. In order to make political capital
the following is appended to the end o! the
interview :
"We have only to add that the Sheriff
who sold this poor woman was Charles C.
Stockley, the present Democratic candidate
for Governor of Delaware."
Iu the course ot the article reflections are
cast upon the ow'ner of the slave, who was
assisted to escape by the woman tried, and it
Is made to appear that the owner was the
leader in the "deep machination" to sell the
free colored womau Into slavery. The gen
tleman in question, now dead, Is Nathaulel
Hearn of Laurel, one of the finest aud most
upright men who ever lived in Sussex
county.
Above is given one side of the story whieh
ex-District Attorney Fisher has flung to the
windB apparently to damage one man—Mr.
Stockley, the Democratic candidate for
Governor—who as Sheriff sold the woman,
and thus carried out the orders of the court
which were given after the then prosecutlug
attorney, "pure of heart and clean of soul,
had convicted her against her will, beiug
convinced that she was the victim of a
"deep machination" to make a slave of her.
The Gazette has goue to some trouble to as
certain the true facts of the case, aud they
show that ex-District Attorney Fisher has
wilfully distorted them. The case took
place in 1858, aud the womau who was tried
was Elizabeth Marsh. Siie was convicted
aud the following certified transcript of her
trial, conviction and sentence, shows that
she was not scutcnced to the pillory and
lash :
up $100 here and
to it himself. The
Indict m't— Aiding
slave to runaway.
True Bill.
State
Ti
Elizaiikth Marsh, negro.
April 13, A. D., 1858, the said defendant, Elizu
both Marsh, appears at the bar of the court
and pleads "not guilty," whereupon a jury was
drawn and sworn, and after I ear lug evidence
returned into court with a verdict of guilty in
Hhe stands indicted.
manner uml fo
Whereupon it is ordered by tbe Court that said
defendant, Elizabetn Marsh, negro, pay to
Nathaniel Uearn, the owner of Mary Ann
Hearn, negro, the
sold to the highest bidder as a servant for the
term of seven years, and that she Is now com
mitted to the custody of the sheriff of Sussex
county until this sentence la carried Into execu
tion. Wm. Ellkoood, C. P.
of $60U,
1 that she he
This record also shows that Mr. Fisher was
carefui to draw his fee in the case, amount
ing to $2.4W. It shows more than this. It
shows that at the sale, made necessary by
the conviction secured by Mr. Fisher, the
woman brought $460, being sold to James
U. Boyce.
If the rest of Mr. Fisher's statement then
is true John L. Bacou profited by the case,
I because he says $500
raised by the
abolltlonlrt», «ad tbta waa $100 more than
was needed to boy the woman'« freedom,
and that he put 1n $800, which the woman
afterward« paid him, Only $400 wag neces
sary to secure the woman'« freedom, and
wj^y wp# It necessary to «end Mr. Bacon
Another case wa« had at the, same tfme
for precisely the same charge. It was that
of Louisa Ouey, otherwise Louisa Smith, for
aiding the same slave, Mary Ann Hearn, to
escape. Mr. Fisher was also prosecuting
attorney and he likewise secured a convic
tion, and got his fee. The woman was also
sold and brought $165.
Mr. Stockley's return of the sale is aa
follows :
Elizabeth Marsh, negro, sold for
seven years.
Costs retained.i
January 19, cash paid N Hearn— 246.46
Louisa Oney, negro sold for seven
years.
Costs retained
January 19, cash paid N. Hearn - 100.41 166
Mr. Fisher neglects to mention this last
case in bis interview.
$400
$104.66
166
64.59
A TENNESSEE TRAGEDY.
A Father and Hon Just Acquitted of
Murder Shot by a Bank President—The
Murderer Slain.
particulars of the bloody affray In
Knoxville, Pa., which was reported by tele
graph In yesterday's Gazette, are given,
as follows :
Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 10.—This place
was thrown into the greatest state of excite
ment this morning by a terrible tragedy
which occurred In the main street of the
town duriug the busiest hour of the day,
which resulted in the killing of Thomas
O'Connor, one of the leading and most in
fluential residents of the place ; the death
of General Joseph A. Mabry and
his sou aud the wounding of two
or three spectators of the affray. The par
ticulars of the affair are as follows : This
morning at a few minutes after 10 o'clock,
General Joseph A. Mabry, Major Thomas
O'Connor and Joseph A. Mabry, Jr., fought
to the death a three-cornered fight in the
main street, which began yesterday after
noon by General Mabry attacking Major
O'Connor and threatening to kill him. This
was at the fair grounds, and O'Connor told
Mabry it was not the place to settle their
differences. Mabry then told O'Connor he
should not live. It seems that Mabry was
armed and O'Connor was not. The cause
of the difficulty was an old feud about the
trausfer of some property from Mabry
O'Connor. Later in the afternoon Ma
sent word to O'Connor that he would kill
him on sight.
Full
m y
THE FIGHT COMMENCED.
This morning Major O'Connor was stand
ing in the door of the Merchants' National
Bank, of which he was president. General
Mabry and another man walked down Gay
street, on the opposite side of the bauk.
O'Connor stepped into the bank, procured a
shot gun, took deliberate aim at General
Mabry and fired. Mabry fell dead, being
shot in the left side. As he fell O'Connor
fired again, the shot taking effect in Mabry's
thigh. O'Connor then rushed into the bank
and got another shot gun.
About tills time Joseph A. Mabry, Jr., son
of General Mabry, came rushing down the
street. He was not seen by O'Connor until
he was within 40 feet of him, when he fired
a shot from a pistol, the ball taking effect in
O'Connor's right brfeast, passing through
the body near the heart.
The instant Mabry fired, O'Connor turned
and discharged the shot gun at him,the load
taking effect In young Mabry's right breast
and side and he fell, pierced with 20 buck
shot, aud almost instantly Major O'Connor
fell dead without a struggle. Young Mabry
tried to rise but fell back dead.
THE DEADLY WORK OF TWO MINUTES.
The whole tragedy occurred within two
minutes, and neither of the three spoke after
he was shot. Geueral Mabry had about
thirty buckshot in his body. A bystander
was palnfally wounded in the thigh with a
buckshot and another was wouuded in the
arm. Four other
pierced by buckshot. The affair caused
great excitement, and Gay street was
thronged with people.
Geueral Mabry and his son Joseph were
acquitted only a few days ago of the murder
of Moses Lusby and Don Lusby, father and
son, whom they killed a few weeks since.
William Mabry was killed by Don Lusby
last Christinas. Major Thomas O'Connor
was president of the Mechanics' National
bank here and was the wealthiest man in
the State. Colonel E. J. Sanford, the vice
president, takes Immediate control of the
bank.
had their clothes
OFFENDING THE LAW.
Hearing# Before the Mayor Last Evening
at the Hall.
Daniel Moore and James Wilson were
both very drunk, and had been for two days,
and for their hilarity were given 50 cents
and costa each.
Jo
y
onahan was accused of assault and
upon Michael Haughey. The
batte
prosecutor seemed loth to push the de
fendant and wanted the Mayor to be "as
aisy" as he could. Michael Sullivan, who
boards at the same place as Monahan and
Haughey, said the whole trouble come from
Haugbey, who had had four suppers.
Haughey threatened to cut Monahan, who
took the knife from him. The landlady,
who had been summoned by Haughey, gave
that worthy the credit of the whole row,
saying he had behaved in a disorderly man
ner. The Mayor dismissed the case, telling
Haughey that if he had auy more witnesses
he would be found guilty himself.
George R. Cadwalder was arrested by
int Jones at the P., W. A. B. oil house
ing drunk and disorderly. Fined $1
for
and costs.
Three
young fellows last evening liuked
d proceeded up Market street and
arms an
tried to imagine they were having a good
time. They swaggered from
pavement to the other and pushed people
in their march. Finally one of them
kicked over a basket of oyster shells
standing by the curb. Two officers had
been following the "funny" fellows and
t«x)k two of them to the Hall where they
were fined $2 and cests each.
Edward Cassidy was again arraigned for
selling liquor ou Sunday. Two black men
testified to having obtained liquor iu the
place last Sunday. Walter Bacon appeared
for the defendant and said the witnesses
were unreliable and made a habit of getting
liquor under false pretense, and intimated
that there was a scheme laid to entrap
Cassidy for reasons that were obvious. The
Muyor held the defendant in $300 to appear
at court.
side of the
New Car Shops.
It is reported that the Baltimore A Ohio
Railroad Company have purchased a large
tract of land in the vicinity of the Logâu
House, where large car and repair shops
will be erected In the event of the road pass
ing through the city.
Dhrl.tl.na Hun.lred Democrat..
Christiana Hundred Démocrate will hold
a meeting at Charlee B. Dough-rty'» hotel,
at Rleimr Sun, on Tuesday evening next at
7.30 o'clock. Able speakers will address
the gathering.
Meeting of the Delaw a
The annual meetin
Bible Society,
of the Delaware
Bible Society will b# held in the lecture
room of the Central Presbyterian church on
J Saturday, October 21, at 4 o'clock p. m.
A FIELD DAY IN KENT.
THE DEMOCRATIC RALLY AT
HARRINGTON.
THE ISSÏÏEB FAIRLY DISCUSSED.
Address«** by Senator Bayard, Attorney
Oeneial «Gray, I. t. Grubb, (Jeu^rsMiuau
Martin and Juliu *1. Fay* tor.
[Special correspondence of Th« Gazstt«. J
Hakkinoton, Dbl., Oct. 90.—In Um
steadily falling rain for two hours
afternoon an immense crowd of
and Republicans atood, patient and Inter
ested, before Cole's hotel, and listened to ad
dresses by leading Democratic speakers; and
fully 1,000 people gathered around a
stand on the outskirts ot the town to hear
Senator Bayard on local issues and maters
of State importance. Æ
At both meetings Mr. Borden pr^Rded,
and the first speaker was Attorney-General
Gray, who argued long and earnestly on
the general question that there was nothing
in the Democratic government to Induce the
people to make a change to the questionable
leadership of the Republicans In thia State.
Mr. Gray's speech was well considered and
very forcible.
Grubb Esq.,
of his
i yesterday
Democrats
ht
at
He was followed by I. C.
who during the cour»«
that
remarks
claim that the Republicans were the
true friends of the school system waa false
and hypocritical. With one-half of their
voters negroes, the Republicans would be
compelled to give
ted the fact that one of their owu leaders,
James R. Lolland, voted in favor the Civil
Rights bill in 1874 when it contained the
provision requiring mixed schools in every
Slate, and th it afterwards he voted against
it when the mixed school clause was strick eu
out.
said
the
them mixed schools. Hs
cl
Congressman Martin, the next speaker,
handled the subject of Democratic economy
as compared with Republican extravagance
and said the 1,500 school houses proposed
by Dick Harrington at every cross road
would cost $500,000 before they were built.
TUB EVENING MEETING
was a decided success, despite the bad
weather. Senator Bayard spoke first aud
his reception was enthusiastic. He dwelt
chiefly with matters of Stole government,and
laid particular stress upon the fact that De
aware has been governed economically aud
well. He urged the people with
earnestness, not to trust the leaders
Republican party who had not that purity
of character or that honesty which inspired
trust. He eloquently said that the honor
of a State trusted to bad hands lor
even a short time might tarnish it and
its good name forever. T
Republican leaders was dwelt upon
length in a general way,and the people were
warned against the evil effect of profligate
rule which had been crushed in the District
of Columbia. Mr. Bayard's speech was
listened to attentively aud was frequently
applauded.
John II. Paynter, Esq., of Georgetown
followed in his happiest mood, and he made
many telling hits which he illustrated with
side-splitting stories,
it was impossible for the people of
Delaware to give control to the class
of men who were seeking power for the Re
Ë ublican party. He congratulated tbs
•emocrats on the Ohio victory aud said
Delaware would give a larger Democratic
majority than ever. The meeting was a
very successful
i
great
of the
he record of the
at
He argued that
A TENACIOUS CERTAIN.
Clinging to a Man's Hand After Belag
Scalded, Cut
[Louisville, Ky., Commercial.]
A peculiar case of poisoning was devel
oped yesterday in the case of Ifair. Conrad,
the tobacconist, who lives on Market street,
near Thirty-fourth. Attached to the house
iu which he lives is a very large yard. For
some years back Mr. Conrad has been much
interested In floriculture, working in his
garden every morning and evening. Earl/
yesterday morning, Just before breakfast, hs
trimming some dead sprigs
l rosebush in one corner of i
from a
his yard,
was
small __ _
when he heard something hiss.
He took bold of the dead member and had
u it when he felt
rt of the right
just gotten the clippers upo
a painful sting in the fleshy
haud, aud at the same time his ear marked
the cessation of the strange noise. Hs
jerked in bis haud, upon feeling the prick,
but to his great horror there came along
with and fastened to it a large mottled
snake with a head on it like a shovel. Ths
snake measured about two feet in length
and about six Inches round the largest
of the body. It bad sunk its teeth Into his
hand and still held its grip. So tightly had
it fastened upon him that no amount of
shaking or pulling could induce it to drop
. He ran to the house with the snake
dangling
the dining room.
At the sight of the snake the women ran
shrieking from the room, and it was some
time before he could obtain assistance. At
first every one thought that he was trying to
frighten them, but one look at his livid
countenance served to destroy all such
thought of Jokes and sport. Almost every
conceivable scheme was tried to loosen ths
nold of the reptile, but without avail. Ths
reptile's tail waa cut, his head was beaten
and his whole body dipped into boiling
water, but still he held on to the hand of ths
terrified man. A large crowd soon collected
and an old colored woman, experienced
with all kinds of crawling animals, volun
teered her services. She said be would
never let go until it thundred, and accord
ingly set about to make some of it artificially.
But before thiB could be successful she said
that a hole must be made for him, for un
less he
hold on forever.
part
from his hand. He rushed Into
shelter convenient he would
She procured a large
stocking and held it close to his head, with
his tail aloft, while a man in the next room
beat a bass drum. The first thump that
was
a flash of lightning and dropped
stocking, where he was killed.
From the time ke bit to the time he re
leased his hold one whole hour was con
sumed. Mr. Conrad's hand begau to swell
and change color, turning to a bright yellow
tinge. Dr. Doherty was called in. When
he arrived Mr. Conrad's whole arm waa
swollen. He was unconscious, frothed at
the mouth, and twitched violently In every
muscle, suffering excruciating pain and
showing every symptom of blood poisoning.
Proper antidotes were administered, and
for a while bis life despaired of, but last
night he was still living and considered
out of danger. The reptile was a spread
ing viper.
the snake loosened his hold like
into the
A G. A. B. Visitation.
Last evening Department Commander
John Wainwright, accompanied by officeiw
from the National and St-ate encampment#,
aud a delegation from Reynold# Post of
Newark, attended the regular meeting of
DuPont Post. The visitor# were
supper at Gotwal's restaurant. A
regular business a camp
and addresses were mad«
jgv|^a
the
fire was started
e by Choate and
Purnell. Songs, ballads and social chat
occupied the evening.
A number of black men engaged in a row
on Market street about 8.30 last evening and
one of the number was cut oq the hud wit»
a blackjack.

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