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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, November 04, 1882, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1882-11-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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Kntored et the dohi uüice
Wuuilnfctuo, Del., uh *u<v>n<i-clAM matter.
y 0 L. XI^NOIOI.
WILMINGTON, DEL.,
BATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1882.
PRICE ONE CENT«
AMVSEMKSTg.
T^TSSTopErA HOUSE,
/JRAM' u ' r MAKONIO TEMPLE.
Monday. November 6, 1882.
"rfÂSiîînenu'r'ReWeiô
M. B. LEAVITT'S
Whirlwind
Famous
Ugantean Minstrels.
on-Famoni Foody Comedians— 90
10 —Specially Selected Stars—10
Gljrantcan Octette of Vocalists,
jd 8olo Musicians ln Brass Band— 90
10 -Solo Musicians tn Orchestra— 10
...riinif Drnsrtutt From the Relics of Ancient
1 Minstrelsy.
ViamffiOct*.
•ale at V. Y. Thoiuaa A
not 2-41-30
MuftioN
ml Neats
;UN 'U OPERA HOU8K WioTM|iaiR
Lsday, November 7, 1882.
KB. G US WILLIAMS,
In hi.
JOHN MISHLER,
character.
IIip (tcrinaii Policeman In
One of the Finest.

Idnuna dcplctlnar llKi In New York, In pro
Mt Mil lari» by J<w. H rad ford, »upported
lit OF THE FINEST** DRAMATIC CO.'S
r IN AMERICA !
fji|er the man»K<'iuent of Mr. John lUckabr.
[ilsiLtii'in % And W cent*. Reserved neats 75
Late. F. Tlioina» A Co.*§.
LrtilalT »Rending will receive a handsome
CJinlr. DOVJMt-30
fob OPERA HOUSE.
ledncsnay Ev'ng, Nov. 8, '82.
THE SLAYTON
peal Jubilee Singers.
the nsxarrr or
The Provident Society.
■nt*. to all r»nrt* of thi lu
br re«*iTed
; no
had ml C.
; to __ ...
and after Monday Novein
nov4-4t
«c..,-«
KUTlim».
BÜCE-uiviüËNÏÏr~
It NATIONAL BANK OF DELAWARE
AT WILMINGTON, NoV. 3. 1882.
«• this diiy (teriaredu
tctnilullftnprrftluin* for thc last six
lit on tltnuud, clear of taxes.
K. II. KNVBANKN.
_ Cauhlor.
a •HvMi-ml
mouths.
PCE-THE COUNTY TAX COL
U.< IMRStjlNF.notice that they will be at
■ omc«to rrrüT« tKx«« from 10 to 12 a. in.,
iron»2to4 p. m. unir.
w 1 l , W rOBD '
__C ollector«,
E-^WOURNED DAILY HEB
! £ I States Circuit Court
m at s, * th »n<i Kin*
Mut unMi A! «!' '' lo< k *• »»•. from the
- m .k ,, 81,1 Proximo, Sundays ex
all ptrfcuun qualified may apply
1 ■ . H. R. SMITH,
Clerk U. 8. Circuit Court,
« I ofBre will okh'd every i-vcnlnr
fiL*2« n « u rieetton day to accom
Fsons who may wish to «lerlaru their In
OCt28,31,3
rur
A
_ HKll 1 WAfiTKV.
«2S;-* u °OD JOURNEYMAN
ASP*
or123-121
10K ItEXT.
* œST.-WE HAVE ON OUR
ShzlitoÏÏ l '">l r »t> | c home« for rent
B» « to m per month.
II KALI) A CO.
nur goods.
I STOCK
br
by
real
to
• OF —
[SUES,
velvets
and VELVETEENS
of
the
Trc
the
**complete and includes
specially good bargains.
"''»' tlie rest our 26-inch
Velveteens
'«meeting with
■"«y sale.
011 Monday a line of
^est and
at $1 per
of
the
a very
We also
F
most desirable
r 111 Gimps and Braids in
r 5 " 1 ' colors for Dress
Pf. an( l invite the at
L7° Indies (whether
L*** 8 01 not) to an in
! 0 their good qualities.
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
S
1
2
4
4
A.
SPENCER,
Market Street.
3
1
2
wt3i-2m-tt8-M
on
J'titnoXAi.
h.
I
Oil
Now
Ready.
Il'" to'.ï 1 ' tori-irn^'J* RJT* 1 Twvel
uou5°Word8; For
Sri?' Ronciu., ,*• ">*'<•■ : Abbre
<<» Roman', ,.J ,lon : Ktl,,., c tU'. r.r
10 «lied. AUI CNT»
:
J.
'
j
la,
1'OhtTIVAI. MKKTtSiia.
democratic
mass meetimg
— AT—
CHRISTIANA,
«
—ON—
Saturday, November 4th, '82,
AT 7.'k O'CLOCK P. M
To be addressed by
Hon. Charles B. Lore,
HON.
T. N. WILLIAMS,
and H. R. PENINGTON,fifcq.
The Newark Band will be
All are invited.
in attendance.
-••J-St-60
democratic
mass meeting
-ox
Saturday, Nov. 4, '82,
at 7.30 p. m.,
AT
SIXTH â KING STS.,
CHAS. B. LORE, ES(f„
Will arliire*
the
eotlux.
The issues of thc campaign will be fully
and fairly discussed ; Stalwartism portrayed;
corruption expo*ed ; thc Tariff reviewed,
and Delaware's danger und disgrace in Stal
wart hands justly handled.
All honest men are cordially invited to be
present and learn the plain, unvarnished
truth.
v2-3t-5fl
(IRANI) RALLY!
A
Grand MASS MEETING of thc DEMO
CRATS of Wilmington, will be held at
Sixth and Kmg Streets,
—ON
Monday Eve^, Nov. 6,
At T.Î10 o'clock.
Hon. T. F. Bayard,
Will aildrcHB the meeting upon
STATE I BAUES.
All who (li'Hiro tlmt the hoi lor of
br maintained ar
fr<*in tlir oblo<|iiy aud dl.sL'nu- i*
•»liould tile lb publicans,
Harrington A Co., get
Government; nil who
high credit of Dclawar
honest nnd cc
by Democratic ollldal
real Const It n Ilona I n
to tin* well
State shall
«t people preserv'd
i- which would follow
he h'lulersht
maintain
pos
tin
w
leal udml alstratloii of affal
II ) iho are In favor
vtiich will
tli elntercsts of all tli
of the fc'W, at tin
ho are In favor of
it for all hut no
.
l>r
people und
of the innsi
: 1/hi Ta I
is; all
system of edue
schools'': all wh
the extravagauc
ry by thc
pt 11
d shot
xcd
Stalwartism, and
>f thc
"1-1"' '"î
diolutnah • robbe
ruent tteinu) die
Trc
aided bye
HtrcuKtli.
initiation to prev
the hands of a
squander your m
mous taxation.
» Con k î
your d<
falling
li
hh
ofllc 1
v.
y
int
e fr
; liv
id
pt ^dil'.ga
•ho w
with cnoi
ov3-3t-AG
yoi
cy
rule SA LA'.
jpOR SALE.
100 Acres of Standing Timber.
Chlufiy YELLOW PINE aud MAPLE,
I thr.*e miles of
<t ilm
with! I
water.
' rallroin
of timber laud th<- growth of vvlWcli Is Ifkewlm- on
the market. For particulars as to locution, price,
terms, etc., address,
•cpt22-d, w A*-l f
e inlli
d ud la
(iAZETTE OFFICE.
F OK
SALE.
36 Desirable Dwellings.
807 Washington
1 3-story brick, N
street.
1 4-story brick,
1 2-story brick,
1 3-story brick. 13 Market s
1 3-story brick, 1MB Limlc
2 2-fltory brick, W1 & »v
1 2-story-brk k, 308 S. V
4 2-story brick, 910, 918,
1 2-story brick, -MX* Mon
1 2-story brick »ton-, N
*7 000
6 009
GIG King stre
WHMlilnKt
.00
■ft
•ll
I .iinli
J fi
Bi
Gon euch
Elm st.
1
Ti
W.
2 000
lor
sir
831, 833, 83i I
cor. Elm ami
S 2-story brick
rust
1 2-story brick, N
Harris»»
2 2-story brick, 1133 & 1134 Elm
4 2-story brick,
VanIturi'ii str
4 2-story brick, 70*4, 708, 710, 712 Brow
7
.. l 100 each
W
,.. 1 700
•ci. 1100 each
South
311. 313, ;
cli
... 1 100
.. 1 500 each
1713 Wright
3 2-story brick, 707, 7U9
street....
1 2-story brick, 1107 W. Sci-oml
2 3-story brick, Bth ami Franklin sts
now in course of erection. Also val
uable truck farm on New Castle ave
nue, containing 12 acres anil good
buildings. Price .
... i :ioo each
100
.... 10 000
1 condition nn»l
nu 'viir be »old
li
The above dwellings
contain fr<
on terms t
n
5 to 13 I
It the purchaser. Apply to
job. L. CARPKNTfcli,
807 Washington street.
dA*
o«t 21
I 7OK BALE .—1
Hooineil hoiut
five bay windows a
Well and all waste
Terms easy, Also
•"fcTfc.SïïîîK.uiGï!
A NEW FIRST-CLASS in
■r Sixth
I French; haw
,1 .-.il
dcrdraliied to
•s, price fie*
i vestment
•h street.
Ç 1,260
( lier h
! i
:
Q.REAT RUSH
FOR—
O YSTEHS!
J. T GA ®^®2vENTH AND SHIPLEY STS.
baa added morr help to Id. *>o»;ne", snd Is
able to trnmdy «" P«r.on» will OY ^srKlWat sh^ort
ïïüftf Mr'T.nSÏ ÄJI SfStrS will
U promptly attended tu.
uc 12-lui 14
POOK MR. HARRINGTON.
A TIRED AND BROKEN-DOWN
MAN DEFENDS HIM.
LEVI BIED'S LAST LONG TALK.
A Fervent Plea For a Chance For the
Républicain to Run the State—That
all That Is Wanted.
Is
1 he Republicans held a meeting last night
fm Fourth street near Shipley, being at
tended by about 273 shivering men, who
stood for two hours listeuing to Mr. Bird's
opinions. John G. Baker was chosen chair
man, and thus he spoke when introducing
Levi C. Bird, Esq., the orator of the
niug:
lelloie Republican* and Workingmen
e are here to-night to hear a discussion ou
State issues alone. We expect to present to
you good and sufficient reasons why the
Democratic party, now passing In review
before us, should be hurled into oblivion
aud kept there. We have showed them be
fore where they have done wrong, but they
started out with the cry of abuse. We will
show, through Mr. Bird,that the Democratic
office-holders have been robbing you for
years. They have had a chance to reform
for years, but bave not takeu It. They have
plucked thc goose aud want more, and yet
cry "fraud, fraud, fraud !"
Mr. Bird said that as a tired and broken
down man he would give his arguments nnd
his reasons why the Republican party
Delaware is entitled to favor aud the vote
every man. He did not come as an office
seeker, and thanked God that there was no
office In Delaware that he would have, and
there wouldn't be for a score of years; iu
fact he might add there was none he eould
get If he wanted It. Ho then waded Into the
Democratic speakers as being all office
holders. He was not going to abuse any
man for his political convictions, and ad
mitted that there were as many honest Dem
ocrats as there were honest Republicans,
thank God. '
The Democratic party, ho said, had been
in control of the State of Delaware
sinco 1855 without intermission, and now
they had forfeited all rights, claims and de
mands for thc support of the people. It
wuk a singular thing but only within the
last ten days had they concluded that the
people wanted some changes in the Constitu
tion. He gave Mr. Bates a rap on the sub
ject of representation, and dwelt for some
time upon the subject, arguing that the
Republican party had always been talking
for representation according to population,
while the Democrats only took the
matter up a few days ago. He
pitched into the landlord and tenant law
as unjust and terrible, and added further
that it w as a damnable law, a disgrace and
an outrage. He grew very dramatic and hit
right and left against certain constables who
he said were only fit to go to the Devil. He
also found fault with the Démocrate for
"favoring a freehold qualification," as if it
took a man to be a freeholder to bo honest.
The tux on horses, mules, and Jackasses
share of abuse, as
being an Imposition on the poor man who
makes his living from his horse and cart,
In speaking of the Democratic party he
exclaimed : "From what they say of poor
Mr. Harrington one would think they were
dusted and whitewashed every day them
selves." They complained, he said, that if
the Republican party got into power Mr.
so-auil-so would be Senator. We can't please
them, no matter what we do. They want
to dictate to our chairman and our candi
dates. IJe thought the uniform ballot law
was a "darling" and defied any man to find
any «piece of paper provided by thc State
which was not defective according to the
law, and could bo thrown out as well by a
Republican as a Democratic Inspector. If
thc* Republicans got ln pow'er the uniform
ballot law would be repealed thc first half
hour they were in session. For God's sake
have it changed, for It is not right, not just,
and is an infringement on thc first right of
a citizen of the republic.
He said that thc of the Demo
ev<
w
of
cam« in for Ite
He said that thc economy of the Demo
cratic party was thc economy of a rich man
and not that of a poor man, and that the
party in power had pointed with pride to the
damned spirit of economy which had pre
vented the building of blind asylums,
bouses of correction and normal schools.
Referring again to Mr. Harrington, thc
orator said that if the Democratic speakers
were all pure angels, were dressed in white
and had wings—hadjnever committed a sin,
why then the people of Dclawaro might
understand why they could drive a dagger
tlireugb a plan's heart, his wife's heart, and
the heart's of his children. It couldn't
hurt him, but it did hurt his wife and chil
dren. Is it manly or courageous to drive a
dagger In, in, In, to a woman's heart ? It is
the " part of an Infernal coward. It is
cowardly,and no man will do It. Thank God
the curtain will soon fall on the campaign
of abuse. They have abused this man, but
read their own records. Some day it will
come home to them, maybe, but I hope
not, to their children.
The different Democratic orators were
ridiculed and the theme of each alluded to
in a sarcastic manner. The mixed school
question was taken up and discussed at
length. The circular recently Issued on the
subject of "mixed schools" was character
ized as a wicked, malicious, nasty, Demo
cratic lie, aud he would convince cvefy man
that, it was a lie. No Democrat ln Delaware
believed that the Republicans wanted mixed
schools, no colored man wanted them, and
no Republican in Dclawaro has been or Is
now in favor of them, and whoever says he
is is a liar. A long array of figures was
given to prove that the circular, which
seemed to have aroused thc speaker's ire,
was a lie. lie again thanked God, this
because he had no religious bias.
Give U8 a chance, ho exclaimed, to run
thc State. We love the State, we love her
institutions, and want to improve them.
The Democrats thought thc Republicans
had no right to open their nloutns. Give
the Republicans a chance, and if you don't
like them, iu two years you can turn them
out.
In concluding he said : There is going to
be an election on the 7th of November, and
it is going to be a fair one as iar as the Re
publican party is concerned. There will bo
no fight if we can help It. Wc are going to
have every Republican vote, whether white
or black, It he has a right to vote. No
amount of bulldozing will prevent It. We are
going to be there thatday with our garments
on, and if a black man, who has a right,
wants to vote, thank God, he will, and
Democratic constable will Interfere. That
is the kind of election we are going to have.
The days were when they wore the spurs,
but we have them on now, and every one
who has a right to vote is going to do so.
Certain. That's all, and there will be
trouble if he don't. We have the
keys to the Town Hall this time.
We can go in blindfolded, and know
what cell to go to. But wc trust
God there will be no trouble. When the
ikjIIs open we will be there and stay there,
and what is right will be done and what is
not right will uot be done. Wo propose to
fair count or it will bo a hot day the
Thursday after the election,
scare worth a damn. With the admonition
to all to vote, and to see that his black
neighbor did likewise,the speaker concluded,
und bade the crowd good night.
have
We ddn't
TBE CANUIDATKH.
The state and County Ticket»— Namen of
Tboae Before the People.
The State and comity election will be held
on Tuesday next. The polls will open be
tween 8 and » o'clock a.
p. m. Following la a complete list of the
candidates of both parties :
STATE TICKET.
OOTERNOR.
. and close at 5
Democrat.
Charles C Stoekley.
Itepublican.
Albert Currey.
CONGRESS.
Charles B. Lore.
Washington Hastings.
NEW CASTLE COUNTY TICKET.
STATE SENATORS.
Swithin Chandler, Solomon M. Cuitls
Alexander B. Cooper, James M. Wise,
HBPRR8BNTATIVES.
Jr
Henry M. Barlow, Robert J. Han by,
George II. Bates, William Canby,
Robert C. Justis, K. Lewis Armstrong
William Cooch, Theodore F. Clark,
Albert N. Sutton, John Pilling,
William A. Cotnegye, Alfred G. Cox,
James V. Crawford. J. Moody Both well
-EVY COURT.
Edmund Haman,
John T. Chealre,
James II. Mackey,
Serick F. Shallcross,
James T. Taylor,
George C. Rothwell.
Henry Whiteman,
J. Frank Reybold,
Wm. J. Stroud,
Joseph Cleaver,
D. B. Maloney, m
William II. Money.
SHERIFF.
Purnal J. Lynch.
James Martin.
CORONER.
Frank E. Smith.
David H. Wingate.
KENT COUNTY - TICKET.
STATE SENATORS.
Wilson T. Cavender,
Samuel D. Roe.
John Moore,
Jos. M. Charniers,
REPRESENTATIVES.
James Temple,
J. Thomas Lowe,
Thomas II. Denney,
James Williams,
Ezekiel C. Frazer,
Beulah L. Lewis,
Robert Y. Watson.
William A. Farriea,
William P. Seward,
John M. Downs,
•I no. C.Durborough,
Cyrus P. Rogers,
Wfliain W. Seeders,
Garrett L. Ilynson.
LEVY COURT.
David 8. Wilds, John N. Clark,
David M. Clouds, Ric hard M. Cooper,
.Thomas C. Cabbage, Joeiah Steele,
John W. Kirby. John T. Johnson.
HUEBIPP.
John S. Herrington. Andrew Caldwell.
CORONER.
Amo« Illnsley.
SUSSEX COUNTY TICKET.
Spencer Hitch.
STATE SENATORS.
Edward W. Houston, Charles II. Atkins
David L. Mustard.
William J. Stewart
REPRESENTATIVES.
G. W. Rislcr,
W. A. Jacobs,
T. J. Perry,
James Rawlins,
8. II. Mesrick,
Thomas Duke«,
8. J. Wheatley.
Charles J. Blair,
J. D. Rodney,
SUnqon Pennewill
John T. Bette,
John S. Bacon,
Peter It. Burton,
James II. Tyre.
LEVY COURT.
Jesse B. 8tevenson,
John A. Marsh,
II. B. Mitchell,
E. F. Salmons,
W. H. Handy,
Jos. R. Richards.
John W. Bennett,
Sam'l P. Ka ugh ley,
John T. Calhoun,
Henry Bonn urn,
Thomas H. BrowK,
John T. Long.
SHERIFF.
Isaac Wootten.
Joshua Phillips.
CORONER.
Noah II. James.
Levin T. Hearn.
The following are the polling places of
the respective voting districts in this city :
First ward, First district—White Horse
Hotel, southwest corner of Second und Tat
nall streets.
First ward, Second district — Barnum
nouse, northeast corner of Fifth and Orange
streets.
Second ward, Third district—Felton House
southeast corner of Second and Walnut.
Third ward, Fourth district — YV(tail's
cigar store, Maryland avenue and Madison
street.
Fourth ward, Fifth district, at (he south
erly window of thc City Hall. %
Fourth ward, 8ixth district, 8. W. corner
of Fifth and Spruce.
Fifth ward, Seventh district, Lafayette
hotel, 8 . W. corner of Niuth and ShipleV.
Fifth ward, Eighth district, 8. W. corner
oi Seventh and Madison.
Sixth ward, Ninth district, on Seventh
street, between Market and King.
Sixth ward, Tenth district, S. W. corner
of Fourteenth and King.
Seventh ward, Eleventh district, South
east corner of Tenth and Orange.
Seventh ward, Twelfth district, Logan
House, corner of Delaware avenue and
DuPont street.
Eighth ward, Thirteenth district, Northeast
corner of Eighth and Pine.
Eighth ward, Fourteenth district, South
west corner of Eleventh and Pine.
Ninth ward, Fifteenth district, Old
Academy.
Tenth ward, Sixteenth district, South
east corner of Jackson and Pleasant
Eleventh ward, Seventeenth district,
Beech street, near Maryland avenue.
it
He
the
thc
-î rests.
CITY LAW BREAKERS.
Varions Offen tiers Toe the Justice Mark at
the City Hall.
Peter Panmotz was arraigned before the
Mayor for using abusive and insulting
language to a Shipley street lady. Peter is
the owner of an organ and monkey, aDd It
Is alleged that the latter Intruded on private
property, and when Peter was remonstrated
with he bccamo abusive. Fined »1 and
costs.
Charles Rider, colored, an old offender,
and who was only released from prison yes
terday morning, was charged with drunk
enness. He pleaded guilty to thc offense,
and was fined 92 nnd costs.
Mrs. Mary Kelly, was arrested for drunk
enness and disorderly conduct at Fourteenth
and Orange streets. The officer making the
arrest experienced a great deal of difficulty
in bringing her to thc City Hall, being struck
in the /ace several times. Mary denied the
charge of drunkenness, but admitted strik
ing the officer. Fined 95 dollars and costs.
THIS MOHNINO'8 SESSION.
Richard Webster and John E. Thomas
were arrested last evening by Chief Hawkins,
at Fourth and Shipley street^, for drünkeu
ncss and disturbing a political meeting.
A number of witnesses testified that Web
ster hurrahed for Stockley and Lore, during
Mr. Bird's address. The defendants denied
the charge. Each fined 92 and costs.
Bush Sanderson was arrested for throw
ing filth on the front door steps of Mary
Wilkinson. A number of witnesses were
heard on both sides and as the case seemed
a little mixed, the Mayor reserved his deci
sion for a few days.
Jonas Heck was fiued fifty cents for the
same old "drunk."
Thc witnesses for the prosecution, charg
ing Reese Pyle with having dancing and
music in his store on Sunday, were heard.
The case was continued to this evening
when defendants' witnesses will be heard. '
Mr. Lore'll Meeting.
In case it should ruiu to-night the Demo
cratic meeting at Sixth and King streets to
be addressed by Charles B. bore, Esq., will
be adjourned to Institute Hall.
JOHN PAYNTER SPEAKS.
TALKS BY HIM AND MR. GRUBB
LAST NIGH.T.
LOCAL ISSUES FAIRLY MET.
The Economy and Fairness of the Demo
eratic Government Iu Delaware—Re
publican Leaders a Bad Lot.
The Democratic mass meeting at Mary
land avenue and Linden streets was at
tended by over 500 people, residents of the
Third, Tenth aud Eleventh wards. James
McGrath presided, und John n. Paynter,
Ksq., was thc first speaker. Mr. Paynter is
a favorite in Wilmington and he was well
received.
In opening he gave a laughable descrip
tion of the New Constitution, "this lighter,
tug boat, traveling lie, marine nondescript,
or seiui-laud monstrosity, which lias been
going about through Sussex giving the
people a free humbug show, with a whistle
about an weak as Jim Loflaud's voice and
with orators who cannot moke a charge
worth answering." He spoke of how the
Republicans had been making appeals to
the people to vote the Republican ticket be
cause they were going to win and they
should be on the best side. They had found
that wouldn't work. They were not the
strongest side, and now they had com
menced to make Insane charges against the
Démocrate which will not hold water and
which the people will not believe. Passing
rapidly, thc speaker said he had no doubt of
Democratic success. Everything pointed to
a victory of the Democratic tickrft. There
reason to throw that party overboard
and many why the Republicans should not
get into power.
To show the wisdom of Democratic rule
in Delaware he proceeded to discuss the
a a
STATE DEBT,
about which the Republicans had raised
such a noise. During the war a draft was
ordered by ttio National Government and
the draft commission which sat in Smyrna
and afterwards in Wilmington was the
most corrupt thing ever inexistence. This
fraudulent conscription of a fraudulent
commission was done to carry the State
for the Republicans, and it could have
crippled the farming and manufactur
ing interests of the State by taking
away ite best men. The whole State
cried out for relief and tha Legislature gave
it to them, appropriating $4,000,000, so that
each man drafted could get $500 with which
to purchase a substitute. All that debt is
paid off but 9100,000, and the debt is now
but little more than 9700,000, 9000,000 of
which was lionded for internal improve
ments in the construction of the Junction &
Brtakwater and Breakwater & Frankford
railroads.
Mr. Paynter showed how this debt had
been advantageously handled ; how it had
been reduced steadily and how, with the
credit of our State held high abroad, it was
funded and a new debt created at 4 ^er
cent., which sold at a premium, and said
that in a very few years under Democratic
management the whole debt would be wiped
out.
Alluding to the honesty of Democratic
officials ho defied any one to show a single
Instance of a Democratic officer being a de
faulter, and ho quoted the encomium of
Anthony Higgins, Esq., upon the Delaware
officials
fldent
State's money had ever been dishonestly
used. The Democratic party is the party
of the people, by the people, for the people,
and what an amazing contrast there is be
the Democratic party in this State
and the Republican party ! He instanced the
ill-disguised indifference of the Half-breed
leaders. He said Messrs. Smithers and
Massey, who wero good Republicans at
heart, were going about on their own hook,
even they did not want to
when he
that not
said he was con
i dime of the
tw
but he was
see the Dover ring triumph.
The speaker then took up the assessment
laws, and the prepayment of a tax as a pre
requisite to voting, which the Republican
leaders had dcuounccd as unconstitutional.
He defended the assessment laws, aud said
they were necessary in view of the ways of
the Republicans in endeavoring to have their
negroes vote two years on one tax. He re
lated the Republican management of
the negro votes in Sussex when
Republicans would pay their taxes and
keep their tax receipts unless they would
vote tbe Republican ticket. The assessment
law was necessary in view of the wholesale
corruption and intimidation practiced and
it wa.s as much of an offset of this as is the
uniform ballot law.
In conclusion Mr. Paynter spoke of the
facitious allusions which had been made to
him for using the term "Great and Glorious
Democracy." His only hope was that he
would die a "great and glorious Democrat."
He thought it was the proudest name any
man can bear. He went back and reviewed
the history of the Democratic party from
thc days of Jefferson, and said it was an
ganizatioi oi which any man could be proud.
<>r
I. C. ORURB, E9Q.,
was the next speaker. At the outset of this
campaign, he said, Chairman Dick of thc
Dover Ring had announced that he had the
Democrats on thc run. As things looked
now It seemed to him that the Dover detach
ment oi the old Grant gang had monkeyed
with the buzz saw when it was lu
motion. Wo have been accused of
abusing the other side, but we haven't
abused them at all. Even if wc did abuse
them they should not complain, because
they came at ur. with their worst end. Mr.
Grubb congratulated the Democrats upon
the bright prospects for victory. The polit
ical condition of things is most cheering.
The people are bound to smash the machine
in politics wherever it is Is found. In Del
have the same system of Re
mbllcan bosses as in New York and
'ennsylvania, and the people will never let
them get Into power. The Democratic
ticket wears no collar and owes allegiance
to no boss. There is no government by
)eople where Dick Harrington aud Judge
• isher say who is to be the Governor.
Mr. Grubb went ou atsome length making
a ringing speech declaring that the Demo
cratic party was the friend of the foreigner,
and warning his hearers against unlawful
official Republicaa Intimidation
day, and when he concluded the meeting
adjourned.
.1 ware
Missionary Meetings.
A meeting of the Missionary Society of
St. Paul's M. E. Church was held last night.
Mrs. Lothrop, of Michigan, delivered an
hour's address on the work of the Foreign
Missionary Society, and what it has already
accomplished. The 8cott M. E.Church
iliary of the Women's Foreign Missionary
Society also held a meeting last night which
was addressed by Mrs. Knowles, a member
oi thc executive committee of the Women's
Foreign Missionary Society. The secretary's
report was read, giving the work of the
branch during the year,and 23
w'ere added to the list
new members
Trustees' Sale This Afternoon.
L. W.Stidham A Sons will sell a number of
valuable properties at trustees' sale this af
ternoon at two o'clock, at their auction
rooms, No. Ill East Fourth ßtreet. The
sales are mado under the order of the Or
phan's Court. Charles B. Lore and Harry
Emmons are the trustee» ln charge of the
properties.
COUNCIL LAST NIGHT.
Hixer A Son IU>l«Mo<t From the Sower
Contrwt After a Long ULhjumIoh— Coun
cil manic Kloqaenee.
President Conrad occupied the chair at
the adjourned meeting of City Council last
evening. The meeting was held for thepur
pose of taking action on the refusal of Hirer
<fc Son to enter Into a contract to build a
sewer across Delaware avenue, between
Clayton and DuPont streets. The Council
was iu session about two hours, most of tbe
time being consumed by Garrett and Quinn,
who again endeavored to expound their
statesmanship, evidently to the di6gyst of
the other members, as a number of them
left before the close of the meeting. Several
Couneilmen suggested raising a 6ubscrip
tion to rent a hall for the two statesmen, so
as to give them each a chance to fully ap
preciate their own rhetorical eloquence. The
two orators expressed themselves last even- I
ing as being more fully determined to I
occupy time than ever before.
When Council had been called to order I
the sewer question was called up. Mr. File I
stated in view of the fact that Hlzer A Sou
had fully understood the plans and specifi- I
cutfon of the sewer, when they handed In |
their bid. and as the mistake of. the con- I
tractors was not the fault oi Council, he I
thought that they should bo held to their I
contract. Mr. Filo then moved that Hizer I
& Son be compelled to complete their con- |
tract, as entered into with tbe city. !
'1 he plans and specifllcatlons of thçjgwer
and contract, were on motion read by the
ie*
1 resident Conrad explained the matter in
the light he saw it. He said he did not I
think that Council could hold Hizar <te Son
to their contract, as it had not been finally
entered into with the city. The bond of I
? >00 which accompanied the bid, was simply
as a guarantee of good faith. The best thing
to be done is to declare the contract off, and I
request Hizar A Son to pay-the expenses. I
Mr. Hizer being In the chamber was al- I
lowed the privilege of explaining his post- I
tion in the matter. He stated that he did I
not fully understand the depth and lines of I
the sewer and was consequently deceived lu I
the cost of construction. An amendment I
vras the/i offered donating the stone to Mr.
Ilizer to build the sewer. After a lengthy I
discussion the amendment was lost. The I
original was then taken up and withdrawn I
by Mr- File. I
A motion to declare the contract off and
compel Hizar A Son to pay the expenses In
curred was then made and flually passed. I
Mr. Beecher presented a petition from R.
r. Dairy, asking for the use of twelve feet
of the street in front of his busiuçss. Re- I
ferred to Street Committee. Mr. Garrett
introduced an ordinance to change and re-1
establish the grade of Seventh street between
Locust and Buttonwood. Referred to Street
Committee. The attention of the Street
Committee was called to the bad condition I
of the pavement on the south side of Third 1
street, between Pine und Spruce. Council
then adjourned to meet this afternoon at
4.40 o clock, at Front and Clayton streets. |
Dr. James V. Crawford's Position—How I
He Will Conduct Himself If Elected— I
D on't be Deceived. 1
To TnE Editor of tiie G azette : Please ]
allow me space in your paper to correct some
reports against a valued citizen of this I
county. Report has reached here that a few I
Protestants in the city of Wilmington do I
not intend to vote for Dr. James V. Craw- I
ford, legislative candidate irom Appoquini- I
^ UD( ^ rc< ^- I
Now, my fellow Democrats, I am a Pro
testant in feeling, and I say, honestly and I
candidly, to you that you will commit a
grave error if you fail to vote for the above
named gentlemen. I have known the Dr.
for 30 years, and a more moral, refined
and noble .linn does not reside in our State,
and I assure you that you need not have the I
least apprehension that he will go against
your interest and favor the Catholic element I
of this State if elected, ne has repeatedly I
assured me that such a course I
is foreign to his thoughts and any
man who heard his manly speech at I
thc great Democratic rally at Townsend on I
Thursday evening last knew he spoke the I
truth when he declared to the vast con-I
course of people present that If elected he
would not legislate in the interest of any I
the campaign falsehoods started by our op
ponents to catch your vote» to bol^r up a
rotten and lost cause.
Before cloning my communication f »l«n
wish to say .ÄTe". men
of ray State. I see that the miserable Dover
ring whose actions were conceived in sin
and born in Iniquity have tickled the vanity
of a few good temperance men by placing
them on the Legislative ticket a» a cover to
get the temperance vote. Now while I am
heartily In accord with the moral wave
sweeping over this State, I cannot lend my
influence nor give my vote to any temperance |
the Republican ticket because he
has left principle and morality and the bet»
»ffluitol 6 hL 0f lf he »K ' e P U , bllca V P ftrt y and I
affiliated himself w ith a class of men whose I
leader Is an aspirant for the United States
Senate. What an Insult It would be to the
fair fame and dignity of our State If such al
man was to take the place of that honest. I ?
tried and true Christian gentleman, the Hon.
Ell Saulshurv. I
In conclusion, I frankly say to the tem- f
pcrance men of this State that you will if
never succeed In your grand mission while
you countenance dishonesty and iinmor
allty, and imperil the honor and dignity of y
Our little Diamond State. ' * I to
Very sincerely, yours,
Kichard TowKsKvn I
KICHAHD Townsend. I .
A Ringing Rebuke of Harrington and the
* . n ? T f r "'"F'" in
An extended and very able communlea- at
"œ^7ÂATa d  Tr ;:r rip ,', thc
of to-day, signed A Garfield Republican. I
It is a scathing arraignment of the Stalwart of
methods, and but for a lack of space It
would be published entire. I
"î^f cvc"Tnar C W r?ch'lTmeHted 0l d 0 r 8 l , W1
i ever a party richly merited defeat at I
party of^Delawar^to-dav ** It*® epu * >I * ean I our
" course, in |
as Its ctoisei? 1 * *° 8ta ° d f V rth
hands ^ot an , wh0pc
thTt.sw H.ilr R ?° Po V )ma! '
u.Vi' ,T th f'r deeds can wash clean of their I
dark dyes, Is an oitcn affront to every honest j
man within its ranks,''and concludes to this
effect :
"In conclusion, Mr. Editor, I repeat it
that the party thus putting a premium upon I
inih 'i"T ,, C1,11 'V 0 1 " . vlrt , u ? I by. selecting !
such a man as Mr. Richard Harrington for J
^ 0 puïl?c r an b «mna^ tl0 to° f tir1irto K ^
rteßy earned'a Hgkfto 4c ye a Ä bo"
on the ear Tuesdav itFvt nnd trn. wh.° X
,ki6
at all a convert to the tenet of Dc notracv- Gc
to the extent of his humble IndlrtdS^L.
paclty expects to add some little weight to f n
the Public Hand that shall deal the blow "
_ _ u uiow.
~ -caught
A Sudden Death. I
A CANARD EXPLODED.
Townsend, Not. 3,1883.
A WARFIELD REPUBLICAN.
Mrs. Neheralah Siuex died suddenly of
heart disease last evening at the residence I
of her husband, No. 621 Madison street. Sho
had been nnwcl some time, but yesterday Lone
was thought to be In a fair wa, to recover. 1 from
WAR ON DOVER'S RING.
Sower
Coun
A CANVASS OF SPIRIT IN
KENT.
at
last
thepur
Hirer
a
between
Council
tbe
Quinn,
their
of
them I Dover, Nov. 8. — This has been a lively
Several I week among the Democrats in this county.
I The largest and most enthusiastic meetings
so ever held In Felton and Frederica were held
ap- there on Thursday. There were large pro
The cessions. At Felton speeches w ere made bv
even- I Hon. T. F. Bayard, Hon. George Gray and
to I R. K. Kenny, Esq. At Frederica there waa
au immense crowd. Speeches were made
order I by Senator Bayard, Hon. George Gray and
File I E. T. Cooper, Esq. There was also a meet
Sou ing at Little Creek. It was large and J. P.
specifi- I Saulsbury, Esq., J. L. Heverln, Esq., and
In | Thomas Young, Esq., spoke,
con- I At Hartley there was a meeting at r which
he I there were at least 600 present, and it waa
their I addressed by Hon. J. L. Wolcott R. K.
Hizer I Kenney, Esq., and Joseph Burehard. This
con- | afternoon there was a large meeting at
! Kenton, and Gray, Wolcott and J. P. Sauls
bury, made speeches. This evening
the E. T. Cooper, Esq., and Willard Saula
bury Jr., Esq., addressed a grand meeting
in at Hazlettville. Large meetings will be
not I held to-morrow at Milford and Smyrna
Son with Mr. Bayard at, Smyrna and distin
guisbed speakers at Milford,
of I Secretary Wolcott speaks on the last day
of the canvass at Laurel, and other places
thing in Sussex. E. T. Cooper, C. L. Williamson
and I R* R- Kenney and Willard Saulsbury, Jr.*
I Esqs.,have a meeting at Ma6ten's Corner to^
al- I morrow night. We have four meetings
post- I Monday. At Blackiston's there will be
did I Nicholson and J. P. Saulsbury, Esq.- at
of I Hill's «tore, W. T. Causey, Esq., Daniel
lu I Hirseb, Esq., E. T. Cooper, Esq., and C. L.
I Williamson, Esq.; at Brownsvilfe, on Mou
Mr. tla y night, Hirsch Cooper and H.»R. Lewis,
I Esq., will floee the campaign iu Mispillion
The I while Wolcott will have a large crowd at
I Lebanon.
I Nicholson and Day had a large meeting
and In Willow Grove on Wednesday night last!
In One of the most pleasent incidents of the
I campaign has been the fact that the ladies
R. bave taken a great deal of interest in our
feet meetings. The speakers have had bouquets
Re- I showered upon them wherever they
There is every prospect of a large Demo^
re-1 cratic majority in the county, although it is
vei 7 probable that the Republicans bave a
,a **ge corruption fund upon wnich they de
pend.
I Borne of the Republicans are getting sick
1 Dick Harrington. One Republican to
da y acknowledged before other Republicans
at tbafc hé believed that Dick Ilarrimrton would ~
| control Currey if elected. He 6aid, further
more, that Harrington was bo credit to the
porty ; also, that he or bis fellows had
cheated Lichtenstein out of the nomination
I *°t Mayor of Wilmington.
I * RALLY AT Townsend—a pine axd
1 THUBIABTic meeting.
] [Special correspondence of the Gazette. ]
Tt AtBRND, Del., Nov. 4.—One of the
I finesfrural political meetings ever held in
I fbe 8tate took place here last Thursday
do I n D?bt. It was the largest ever held here,
I fully 1)000 persons being in attendance. A
I 8ta fc« decorated with an abundance oi flags,
I flowers and evergreens was erected iu front
of tbe store of W. A. Scott, ami across the
I roa(1 was suspended an immeuse banner 30
a *®et in lengih. Excellent music by the
Middletown band interspersed the sneaking,
The ladies of Middletown took quite an
interest in the way oi decorations, &c.,end
neurly all the houses in Middletown
I decorated and illuminated,
The meeting was called to order by F.
I w - Hess, who named the following officers:
I President, Dr. J. V. Crawford; vice presi
I dents, John Weldon, Richard Townsend
CyrUB Tatman, Collin Ferguson, S.Findley!
I Joseph Whitlock, John Lind, Daniel Clay
I f° n > R* A. Cochran; secretaries, R. L. Nau
I daln, J- P- Hern and F. W. Hess. «
Addresses were made by George H. Bates
Es( l » James L. Walcott, Esq., and Richard
I Townsend.
^ t( ? about 1°° listeners,
herc la.t n^l tZ "Z ,, wc i re H Dt ". ocrat, .
f 11 "'F" 1 ' The > fanned the air, but
. 7 n ? P or Posc, there was uot one
Ä'ÄLV 116 " ^ m ""' Uem< "
ïïLît mJSihi£ U 'ir i
Senator 'füllte!? ^HH UCUl0, i!!« by a ? aUlB8:
to âi-Â ^
Ethïframi™ ( 5 a j r / 1n & ton ßald he >
Wu^AS^ST lb *" "
Uemwrato went J"' ' B i n S gtOU)
E!L" ?*?* to tl,e , wcl1 , knowu
pepj £ * disappointed, he
| ® v 1
I Pennsylvania's Governor Declares That
I He is In Fnll Svmn&thv win. « ,
.,„1 fnèm
" ,
al , B ° a8 * tion ln Pennsylvania politics just
I ? ow 6 ; declaration of Governor Hoyt in
Vi *V C In dept'ndcnts and of Stewart.
I The declaration is In a letter read at
f ndo P«n d Çnt meeting in Horticultural Hall,
if î, I, D ' Bht ; '"Which the Governor says:
All P roud »n d generous minds will resist
,n ! lu P uf ', t °V , 6erf >Iom, and will leave to
y lllaln8 and reta ners thdr badge of servitude
I to tihe ntrudmg feudal system. Any
characterization of those engaged In this
I movement which flippantly classes them as
I . 8orcheadB , aIld . k ^ ke rs' mistakes the
voting power of Pennsylvania manhood.
Ten thousand of the best instructed, most
conscientious and spirited citizens have
I*" th i 8 me f. Uod « f Uprootdug palgable
in the future the halls of the Lochiel House
at Harrisburg will no longer resound with
thc tr( ' ad of iÆ y "to
I mon 6elf-rcspectiug and honorable delegates
of the Deonle to "«»orauit aeicgaies
"ton to "slated^ tickets
I arranged programes. * *
W1 ? >' ourultlm ate success will have been
I mado an exhibition of moral conrafro <>,
I our State and the reaping of bcueS re
| suits, from peaceful methods, which shall
moro K™" dl y 'ban ever demonstrate the
«imnlty of the people for self-government."
The letter Is regarded all over Pennsyl
I vmita by the preis as the death-knell of
Camcronlsm.
t
Illegal Negro Voters to be llrought From
the Country Districts and Voted In Wll
mtngton
« »"« recently corns to light that various
Ä W °' kC ^ ° f "T Rt P'' bllca '* P a r'y
bolding meetings In various hundreds lu
,ki6 "unryespeelally in Peneader and Bt.
Gc 8 /° r the pUrp ? 8e °f "««aining the
???!' of J , ^ÎT! a . 1 , not e . ntlkled *? a , ballot -
f n i *, TO ad ' ,1 ' ln 8 JJjem to come to this city
to,nd4i. ^ her ° fr0m tboee
hundreds to identify these men, and if
they will be dealt with to the ftill
extent of the law.
A LAEGE MEETING AT TOWNSEND, ;
The Kent County Campai^—
Democratic Hallies—Republicans Who
are Out of Heart.
Knthusiastto
Cbpeclul corresponde acc of the Gazette. 1
on
/
B*
w ere
uot
HOYT OUT FOR STEWART.
base submis
and pre
# * *
ANOTHER SCHEME.
uono nome ill.
ScwelJ C. Btocs, Retrister of Wills lia
Lone to hi. home In Middtotown suflir w
from an attack of chlÜ. »n" f.T.r' *

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