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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, November 25, 1882, Image 2

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d&ozctte*
(Crrreum» m 17*4.)
PUBLISH HD EVERY DAY, EXCEPT SUNDAY
BELL Ac TAYLOR,
lairoaa aan> Prauraaaa
hunn, av Oumire.
«tv .Arr or Twt City at 8«
CtMTt ecu Wtta, oa Twentv-Fiv* Cent» pm
Month, Pavama to the Regular Authorized
Collector, ano to no other, on at the bo«»M*
OM« Yean, . . .
•* Months, . ,
$3 00
1.5»
Tnaaa Month*. . .
.80
9m Busmiss Omet
Editorial Room« are con
nected with THE Wilmington Telephone Ex
CHANGS, ano News or Advertisements may be
SONT IN TK». »«AY AT
time between the hours
O* 7 A. M. AND 8 P. M.
Mown all Letters ano Telegrams to
THK G AZETTE,
Wilminotsn, Dee.
*}
WILMINGTON, SATLKUAI, NOV. *5
Prosecute the Illegal Voters.
As t*.c appearance of' a great smoke
dearly indicates the presence of fire,
charge« of fraud at the recent election,
coming freely from both parties, form a
strong suspicion that cheating and trickery
must have been resorted toon that occasion.
I h<
This being the cate, certainly measures
should be promptly taken for the urrest and
punishment of the guilty parties. The
crime against free suffrage is one of a most
heinous character, and no matter which
party suffers justice should be done in every
case. The Democratic party cannot afford
to condone Republican frauds.while the Re
publican munagers would be only too glad
to pounce upon Democratic corruption if
any could be found.
The frauds committed under the manipu
lation of certain Republicans, on the seventh
day of November, were of the most glaring
character, and embraced bold forgery
well as persouation, perjury aud illegal
voting. The signatures of several county
collectors were lithographed, their seals
fraudulently counterfeited, and receipts thus
manufactured used iu Wilmington and
Chiistiana Hundreds by non-resident negroes
from various parts of the county, who had
no light to vote at their homes.
Here was a wholesale scheme of fraud,
even exceeding in infamy a plot discovered
several years ago, when a safe in one of the
city departments was used as a receptacle
for forged tax receipts, intended for the
qualification of parties w , ho had no legal
right to a ballot, iu this case the proofs
are ample and conclusive, and wo doubt if
even a packed jury could save the perpetra
tors from deserved punishment.
No tear of counter charges of Democratic
frauds need deter the prosecution of these
cases. If fraudulent votes were cast for the
Democratic ticket let tliu perpetrators be
punished as promptly and swiftly as though
they were of the opposite party. The pros
titution of the ballot is a crime deserving of
severe punishment,
political interest it presumes to
and the illegi l
deserves even
as
matter which
serve,
Democratic voter
verer punishment than
because the
his Bepublican c> rnpetit or,
Democratic party «•» ti.is county has for
y«8rs fought for til- purity of the ballot, and
be n forced to contend time anl again
against the worst specie* of fraud at the
bauds of u few
rupulou» party
time
ibr party expedient ** but for prompt action
aud th * work of purtftettion should be con
tinued ^el^>ntles^y «»»Hi «»very known fraud
ulent voter ami rnsninulator of corrupt
schemes acainst th'* purity of the ballot finds
his rightful place behind the b
a prison cell.
n*
Th t)
manager^.
ix
Do
ed door of
The case op G<
eral J. R. Chalmers, of
Mississippi, one of Hubbell's pet Southern
statesmen, who was in danger of being de
prived of his certificate of election as
a in cm
her of Congress, by reason of the arbitrary
action of the Secretary of State in rejecting
a number ol vote« c
fur him, gave certain
Republican paper, a pretext lor making a
bowl agaimt Soul in
Returning Board
manipulations,
that General
We
are glad to kuow
Chalmers is likely to
receive the certificate he is justly
entitled to, but are sorry none of the
papers that were so excited over this Injus
tice to General Chalmers have a word to say
about the gros« injustice to Furnal J.Lynch,
who was d* priced of the - like of Sheriff of
New Castle c »uuty, lo v. hi -h he was honestly
elected, by the unwarranted action of a few
inspectors in throwing out euough Demo
cratic ballots to retui
a small majority lor
ballots
his
competitor,
be ti counted, as they of right ought
to have been, Mr. Lynch would now be in
possession
liud
them
f the office, instead of being
compelled to seek his just rights iu the
courts.
Gen. Chalmers from Republican papers, but
we hear not a word from them in condemna
tion of the
We hear plenty of sympathy for
cts by v,
deprived of his office.
hieh Mr. Lynch was
Inspector Dolan, of the Tenth Ward,
whose conduct of the election was admitted
liy both parties to he perfectly fair and im
partial, has in h:s possession four fraudu
lent tax receipts captured Irom negro men
who attempted to vote Illegally upon them.
If this Irani« was tried so boldly In a strong
hold of Democracy, what must he the
extent of the frau 1 practised iu the
precincts, where Republican inspectors
in lull charge of the polls.
Investigation is furnished by the election iu
tills city und it should not tie neglected.
upper
were
A wide field for
Tiip. bulls and bears
having an
exciting contest in the oil markets of
Weitern Pennsylvania, and yesterday the
ioriner got a very bad " black eye," the
losses footing up millions of dollars, out of
which the bears profiled to a corresponding
degree. Meanwhile the market is obstructed
und legitimate traffic almost suspended by
tho manipulations of these speculating
gamblers.
When
about the condition of trade, to which ex
pression has been given by disappointed
politicians, is dissipated, it is learned that
the prospect for general busiuess ia about as
good as it generally is at this time of the
year. Business prosperity in this country is
not dependent upon the rise or fall of any
political party.
the ridiculous nonsense
ALL
Widespread destitution, it is said,
111 prevail in Ireland this winter, aud much
iftering already exists. Although crop
failures are the direct cause of much of the
threatened suffering, the condition of Ireland
is mainly due to its form of government and
stands forth a« a fearful monument to Eng
land's brutality and folly.
Etik CoHMiasiOKBB Raum, It la now
•aid, la Id f.vor of a reduction of Internal
retenue taxation,
ter; revere rebuke to bring public official«
to a aplrlt of deeent compliance with the
wlabes of the people. Mr. Kaum vanta the
retenne reduced to a point at whlct It will
yield about 1100.000,000 per annum, but be
will probably won learq that the people
will demand the aboliahmeut of the entire
•yatem.
Yesterhat's gale w.i Terj hear; over
the great lakea, and reporta Irom Buffalo,
Detroit and other placra Indicate that the
•hipping (uffered oererely.
TfANAMAKI.lt'a «TOBE.
It aoraetinxs takes a
Soma of the Art Idea He Has In 19 and
What They ore Worth.
Philadelphia, November 20, 1882 —As
the object ol trr.-ati-Ht 1uu*reat to people out
side of the city limits, is Wanamaker's, aud
as this is so immense in extent and so varied
iu the character aud quality of its exhibit«,
a retvme of lu contenta to be carried on
from week to week will no doubt be accept
able to all readers who purpose visiting or
ordering by mail or express goods from Its
almost Inexhaustible stores.
Beginning with what at tbit seaeou Is
probably moat in demand, dresse« for maids
and matrons, that portion of the store that
will be first sought, will naturally be
readymade suit department, where all visi
tors may learn of those best qualified to de
scribe the prevailing styles aud colors, to
getber with the prices of the exquisite crea
tions of art or the more substantial, yet
equally becoming costumes designed to
please sober tastes aud purchasable at prices
that will attract all classes of buyers. This
readymade suit department for ladles la on
the corner of Chestnut aud 13th streets, and
is under the direction of a most tasteful and
capable designer, who has only recently
returned from abroad, after studying the
styles presented in the great emporiums of
fashion on the coutinet of Europe and in
Great Britian.
On entering this department will be foiftid
on one side of the store au immense stock of
coats, pelisses, dolmans, etc., while on the
other side fur wraps of every descrlptlou are
displayed for inspection, in woolen gar
ments light mixed eloth coats of excellent
shape, with seal cloth collar and cutfs, are
In all sizes for $0 each, as are also plaiu
cloth trimmed with plush, for $6. Imported
ulstcrettes, in seven different styles of doth
aud ornaineutatiou, very stylish und pretty,
some with plush trimmings and others with
astrachau and braid at $20 and 825. These
are of a very superior make aud sold at suc h
prices are greatly below value.
Bilk dammsse coats trimmed with plush,
very fine and beautiful, are $30, while wool
inalala&c, almost as handsome as u silk,
trimmed with fur, which forms both collar
aud muff, entirely uew and original iu de
sign, may be bought for $25.
French coats, profusely trimmed with
braid, aud iu a variety of colors—sage, terra
cotta, green, gendarme blue for the youth
ful.
inaturer years—can be obtained for $20 and
$25. The exquisite material, work aud
trimmings on these coats ure particularly
worthy of notice.
listers of heavy cloth, in quiet checks,
than which nothing can be more comfort
able, are from $14 to $10, w hile the most de
sirable of all the imported cloth wraps is
one which iu style is something between a
dolman aud ulstcrette, uuobtrusive though
elegant, at $35.
The cloth pelisse, by some called redin
gotes, trimmed with a ruching of the same
material, may tie found here of every quality
aud in prices ranging from $13 to $30.
If something in the fur line is deemed
desirable the shopper can turn to the op
posite side of the store and iu*{* a ct some or
all of the many fashiouable fur garments,
which, owing to the immense demand for
them this winter, are here in the richest pro
fusion and at moderate prices.
At this department they will learn that
the seal holds its own
well
more sober tints for those of
the leading favorite
in the world of fa.shion, although the
natural beaver is highly esteemed, aud the
ever-beautiful chiucillu is hardly behind
them iu the eyes of those who kuow its
value.
Rhadarqes and gross-grain, fur
lined circulars may be had at $22 and up
ward to $120. Seal coals, slighC? longer
thau last year's styles, can be had from $7.*»
up to $250, while dolmans, coschraan , s
capes and tippets are here, varying in size
au<l quality and price ; lur trimmings,
which sell by the yard, from 40
Hull i
•uU to $•.><).
arc alio to be hud for ornamenting wrap« of
every kind. After seeing all that if. worth
looking at on the first floor the shopner will
•end to the second story, where the stock
room for ready-made suits is situated. Here
all the
! styles in wool aud novelty good«
are found from simple and lightly trimmed
skirts and basques of all-wool flannel,
plainly and neatly made lor $5 up to elab
orate costumes iu cashmere, silk and other
woolen fabrics nt $35, $4u and $50, On
this floor, too, arc exhibited shawls of every
description, the chief, wool, Scotch and
Broche from $5 to $50, with imitation Indios
from $25 to $125, and the superb Valley
Iudjas that, cost anywhere from $200 to
Less expensive India® of the
Chudda, Dccca, etc., range from $35 to
$ 200 .
$2.000.
Passing out of this room into the next
will be found a magnificent assortment of
fringes, laces, buttons and the like, not for
sale there, however, although their dupli
cates may be found in the various depart
ments on the main Hour; but these ure to be
used ou the elegant dresses exhibited here
cost urnes fit for an empress, or better still,
for the representative American woman of
more thau royal grace und beauty.
These magnificent robes are generally
combinations of plain and brocaded velvet
and silk, richly trimmed w ith real lace
other costly ornamentation and
from $100 up to $250.
live portion of this department is that
recently opened, consisting of parlorR, ex
hibition and fitting rooms, devoted to
ordered work. These parlors, covered with
Wilton carpet, furnished with ebony, richly
upholstered, ar« brightened aud beautified
with the open-tiled fireplace, brass andirons,
shovel, tongs and fender, the whole sur
mounted by a carved oaken mantel. Scat
tered throughout the rooms are unique
ebony cabinets and tables, while the dull
richness of the paperhanging brings out to
perfection the pleasing pictures upon the
walls.
in price
But the most utira"
Opeuing out of the largo parlor arc other
charming bijous of rooms, umong
a dark one, the floor of which is
with a handsome sage-colored carpet, with
the furniture of pale blue satin,'and the
wulls from floor to ceiling composed of
French plate mirrors, ami which is bril
liantly lighted for the exhibition of evening
colors, and a study of the effect of such
color* by gaslight.
hich is
R) vc red
An entrance to this
liltle parlor seems to the uninitiated like a
veritable visit to Fairyland, inasmuch as
the visitors find themselves duplicated and
•duplicated so many times that the minia
ture apartment seems transformed into a
vaftt saloon,and they in the midst of a crowd
of people. Nothing better could ever be
devised for showing A meric
they look in royal robes.
Description can give but a vague and un
satisfactory idea of all that is to be seen and
purchased iu this most complete department
of its kind iu Philadelphia—or perhaps the
world.
queens how
THE LARGEST RETAIL STOCK OF DRY
GOODS.
Stbawbridge & Clothier,
Dealers in Drt Goods Exclusively
Eighth and Market Streets. '
A (iooil Magazine.
On: Little Ones for December i« a
charming number for small children, ^.. w
letter press and engravings are equal" to
those of any magazine published. Large
type is used and the stories are written in a
comprehensive aud intelligible manner,
is issued by the Russell Publishing Company"
Boston.
The
It
"Kougli
Kats.»»
Clears out rate, mice, roaches, flies, ante,
bed-bugs, skunk», chipmunks, gophers. 15
cents. Druggists.
JOHN WANAMAKKK'tt.
r jX)-DAY
John Wanamaker's.
Saturday, Nov. 25.
-At—
lthadame of about all the fash
ionable colors; $1.50 for $1.25.
Not reduced. We don't like
to reduce. We don't mark
down so many goods as you
think. We try to let other
people do the most of that.
Successful merchandizing is to
have enough of every thing; too
much of nothing; to sell every
thing for a protit, and still be
at the bottom of the market.
But the most careful aud vigi
lant buyer will get caught
sometimes. When we do get
caught, we mark down with a
cheerful satisfaction that isn't
an every day experience.
All we mean is this : When
we offer something at half
value, please remember that it
is a good deal more likely to
be a fortunate bit of buying
than a loss. But no matter
what it is to us, be very sure
that the gain to you is just
what we say in the papers.
JOHN WANAMAKER.
Next-outer circle, south entrance to
nislu butldlnx.
Serge with silk embroidered
dots; $1.50 for 75 cents. There
couldn't be a better illustration
of what we've just been say
ing.
JOHN WANAMAKER.
Third circle, southeast from center.
In so big a stock of laces,
and kindred goods that go with
laces, there must be some that
oughtn't to be here, for one
reason or another; some that
we had better half-givc-awav.
We mean sheer loss now; sueli
loss as goes on more or less in
every merchant's trade. There
are two ways of treating goods
that don't go readily : one to
keep them to cry over; the
other to force them off by hall
giving them away. One staves
off the loss a little while and
keeps the whole stock dull;the
other faces promptly the inev
itable loss and keeps the whole
stock bright.
For a few days half-price
such things are a feature of
our trade.
JOHN WANAMAKER.
Southwest side of center counter.
Will j ou read some good sense
about men's shirts ?
Since the stoppage of A. T.
Stewart & Co., we make mort?
shirts than we sell,
all the shirts for their trade
and now we wan't sale for
them. But we're not going to
ask you to buy shirts because
we want to soil them. We're
not quite so daft as that.
Our shirt for a dollar is the
one. It is a better shirt than
we can afford for a dollar. It
costs us a dollar to make and
sell it. But there it is and we
We made
want more men to know about
What is there to know ?
Think of every part of
shirt; just how is the best way
to make it.That is the way that
shirt is made. The linen is fine
enough, 2200.
good enough, Wamsutta. The
front is three-ply of linen. Be
tween front and arm, where a
shirt breaks down first, it is
two-ply. The yoke is two-ply.
The wrist opening is two-ply;
but the meaning of that isn't
quite clear, unless we say that
you can't tear it there. Added
to all these points of care and
generous provision, the shirt is
made to perfection,
ing.
It fits most people. Maybe
it won't fit you. Very well,
then don't have it. But will
you try one on, and find out f
We needn't quarrel about the
fit in the papers. If it don't
fit you, you dont wan't it, and
we don't want you to have it.
The last advertisement
want is a
it.
a
The muslin is
us to sew
we
man going about
with one of our shirts that
don't fit.
We are told that this shirt
is actually worth about twenty
five cents more than any other
dollar shirt in the market.
We don't say it. We have
reason to think it may be true.
JOHN WANAMAKER,
W vn t iAi f ■\î cm 5 e ' 1318 Chestnut; first
Middle Market street entrance.
counter;
JOHN WANAMAKER,
C ïn B «îrJL'K 1 ^ irteenth and Market afreets,
and City-hall square. Philadelphia.
rlNANVIAL.
fpHE AKTXZANS SAVING BANK.
no. mt MAitKirr strebt,
Iwcoaron.Tan Jahi ahy wth. urn.
receive deixurit*from 9 a. m. until 4p. m.
1 on Tue*'!») - and Saturday evening*
irom 1 to 8 o'clo* a.
SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDEND,
Regularly mad«.* tn April and •Jctuber. When
dividends are not withdrawn th»iy are accounted
as deposit*. Thus iwruiaiinut depositscompound
their Interest twice lu each year.
MAN AOl*M:
Open to
IH
Ijv-org-i W. Bash,
Ü ;orp- 8. I »pelle,
M. !.. I.l«'lit«*m.t**ln,
Kdwa.tl Darlington«
•l»d* !•.
, William II. ft wilt,
Anthony Hlgglt*.
GEOROF. W. Ill 811, President,
E. 8. t'APKLI.f , Vire President,
K. T. TAYI.DK. Treasurer.
J. il. MATHER. Auditor.
Clement B. »myth,
Charles W. Hew land,
Nathaniel K. Iteuson,
tlenn F. Dure,
Hastings,
NNhsard 1'uwy
fWbZl-ly
L eihst national hank
mV WILMINGTON.
RZrwSlTOKY
« IM BLIC Mu.NET
—AND—
FINANCIAL AGENT»
-or
THE UNITED STATE»
Edward Bett*. President,
URO. D Armstrong, Cashier.
PAID CP CAPITAL. #500,000.
phla, New York and Boston Exchauift
furnished to regular Depositor* without charge.
I M soo«nt days? MONDAY» and TlIUTWDAYh
tl.» a. m.
Phil Ml« I
DIRECTOR*:
Edward Betts,
Clement B. »myth,
OeorK*.* tV. Bm.li,
Daniel James,
•lohn H, Adam«,
.lames C. McUouia
William Tutnall,
Kit Garrett.
»amuel Baucroft, Jr.
nl-ly
R. R. ROBINSON & CO.,
BANKEI13 AND BROKERS,
Fourth and Market Streets.
TOR HALE:
2.500 Delaware city 4S percent, bonds.
Buy and sell si.xk« and t>ords one
Letters of er**d!i nvMll-tlde In all iiartsoftbe world
and draft* on EnjcLind, Ireland,V
and HwItserUi..
•e.Gerinntiy
7.1-iy-sn
URN HY L. KaVMONP. ALONZO PKWERUX.
JJENRY L. RAYMOND * CO.,
STOCK BROKERS,
NOS. 4 AND C PINE STREET, N.
Buy and sell lor investment, and carry on
moderate margin all
the New York Stock Exchange,
class privileges at favorable rates,
distantly located from Wall strict
wishing to invest sums ranging
from $50 to $1,000, arc invited to
write for us for particulars. Complete
Financial Report maih'd free. Small orderr
executed at current rates. Refer to Ban kora
Members of N. Y. Stock Exchange, OlHciaU
of New York Central Railroad Co., and
prominent Manufacturing and Mercantile
Business Houses. References and terms
mailed on application.
■unties dealt in on
First
Parties
NE\r JTHLICATIUNS.
1883 .
HARPER'S MAGAZINE.
ILLUSTRATED.
Harper*«, Mai a/ire
• will* Gw beiTtn
IU.^1 m»|Miiar Iltiih ..
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*«»e, »»*• antiior .
uv . uirmr uiimiK-r,
»«•gin* It* nlxth-slxth vol
er number, It Is
r;it« «l iM-rlodicnl In
in It*
tin*
\
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urg.
tin*
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Wf
tltb-.l
3
K.
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lmore
III
,";,a
eesBlr ■
for tha U/rttwr eut rt.»iu
tbruupl tSXVXNjts sturh »,
Iu lit'.
1 art 1-11
III.
liii
u ll
nt
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1883.
HARPER'S BAZAR.
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ft.OO «iach.
^mlttam*. should he
Newspapers are
without the expre
Bkotiieks.
Address :
olunie.
1 table. Tor blnd
ntceipt of
na«le by r
old ehaucc «>.? lot».,
copy till* ml vert JM-mcnt
order or IlAK.»Kit .*
Office
der or DrafU to
Harper & Brothers,
NEW YORK.
bo« 28-2tdA*
HAII.UOAO LINK».
T)niLADF.LPIIIA, WIL- rS JiJM«
I minuTon ANI» MüinK
BALTIMORE RAILROAD.
OCTOBER, til», \m.
Trains will leave Wilmington a« follows for :
Philadelphia an»1 Inii-rm. «Rate »lat Ion »-«.18*7. Oft,
I0.au. >. m. 2.ao. 4 .no, 7 . au. *. wv. p. m.
rhlU'li liiltla (expre**>-i.nO, 2.23 i. «.JO. 7.M, HAS,
u.no,a.an. ». Mt ll.M. a.m. 12.16, lïb, ft. 17.6.10, «.38,
7.28 p. m.
Mew York—2.00, 2.28. «.»A .88, 11.81 a. m.
*12.1«, LM, 2.30, ».17, 7.2«. p. m.
ftatttmore and Intermediate stations— 1.06, 9.17
iu.il> 1.
. 8.no p. m.
Hal tiro ore and Kay Linn—8.67 p. m.
Hal It more and Washington —1.42, 4.81, 8.09 9.17
a. in. l.ttJ, *1.«, 4.U0, 8.57. 11.04 p in,
Baltimore only—1.06, Irt.tOa. m. 119 and
Train* lor Delaware Division l«}%e for:
New <'astie—8.00, 0.10a. in. LlA, 3.00. 8.25 p. m
Harrington and Intermediate station»—0.10 a. m
1.08. 8.25 p. m.
Del mar and Intermediate stations—9.10 a. in.
1.05 p. in
8UNDA1 TRAIN».
Philadelphia sn*l Intermediate station*—S.lOam.
12.® m. 5.*». 7.80. 0.M, p. m.
Philadelphia and New York '2.00, 2.28 a.
6.3H, 7.28 p. in.
Baltimore and Washington -1.42, 4.51, 8.06, f.17,
in. 11.01 p. in.
I. 5.17,
Baltimore—1.06 a. m.
For further Information passenger* are tt
ftorred tu the time tables posted at the depot.
B#*Truln* marked thus: (•)
upon which ex
J. It. WOOD, General Passenger Agt,
CHAS. È. rUQH. General Manager.
» limit«!«)
; pres»
fare D charged.
A TEA MS HU• LISES.
ÇHANGE OF TIME !
FOR PHILADELPHIA AT 7 A. M.
ON AND AFTER MONDAY.
OCT. »»Til, TUE STEAMER
SAMUEL M. FELTON
»9
U
will leave French xtrcct wharf at 7.00 a.
nt 7.50 a.
..Hook
«IChesp'r nt 8.10 n. in. ami rt
turnln? leave* t*hlU<Irlphta at 2.30 n, m.
rare from . *
ticket* 25 cent*,
excursion ticket*. Ifteeiit*
R«mh| to return
«Hlntion train*
cent*: l.inwooil (lluoki, 40
® cunts.
Wilmington,
». From llook
•«•nt*; excundon
Jlie*»U-r, lOccr
Tickets will lx) s
by W.A B.K.R.
r.
!f.i
on the In
I
nt»; WilinliiKtou,
« liesier, :ti
pOR NEW YORK.
«b-TOi
Electric Line ol Steamers
B.I1. from Kin, .trv'ct wlmrf, WünilL.ton,
TUESUAV8.
TUUIIHOAV8
and SATURDAYS,
•1er 14,
MONDAY»,
at 2 o'clock, p) m. t
Kotfit River, New York.
<1
.d fro
WKDNRSOAYS,
»ml KHIUAVH,
st 4 o'clock, p. m. Freight carried ns low
s* by any other line. For rate*
apply to
— ABBOT, M Houth »trcct, N«*w York;
E. ANDREWS. Wilmington, Del. 5-2«- 1
A NCIIOR UNE.
UNITK.I) STATKS MAIL BTKAMKUS
»all Weekly to and from
«i GLASGOW, via LONDON
DERRY,
Cabin Tannage, fen to fso. Ret
Besond Cabin,$ 10 . Return
Cabin pa**engM
PaaM-nger Accommodât 1
»täte room»
NEW YORK
«110 to «14C
Tickets, $75.
bonked at low rate*
î celled. Ai
irer* book«*«
i any, lui)
Mal» 1
. , k * P*
at low.-«t rat. s t«> or from «
Norway, »wedvn, Denmark, Ac.
Kor hook« of 'Tour. In Srotluid, ' r,tn.,pliinA
A' ..apply to HKNIIKKSOS llllurilKlol. N...
Wk oy^AMUKI. K. HKTT8, AUain. Kxprv.a
tV llmliitfton
CO A Ja.
J AM NOW PREPARED TO DELIVE1
ALL SIZES OF COAL !
—or—
SUPERIOR QUALITY FOR FAMILY U»F
—AT TRE
AT THE LOWEST MARKET RATES !
All coal well screened
putln cellar*.
B. F TOWNSEND,
OFFICE A YARD, FOOT OF FOURTH »T.
, A^TVlepbonlc communication with all part*
of the eltv. aug 12 -
SOMETHING NEW.
Connellsville Coke
Crushed for Family
use.
.
Egg, Stove,
Small Stove,
and Chestnut,
Comparing with corresponding Anthra
cite sixes, $7.00 per 2,000 pounds.
NO DUST!
NO ASH !
NO CLINKER !
NO WASTE 5
HEAT INTENSE ! TRY IT !
Chas. Warner & Co.,
Market Street Wharf.
i
j
I
!
-100
PEIRCE & COOK,
Real Estate and Stock Brokers,
». E. COB. SEVENTH AND SHIPLEY STS.
J. Jackson Pkikcx.
Edgar H. Cook.
sep29-l-i4
»nSfAt »TAU
gUBSCMB* tor
THE SUNDAY STAR.
fct
ADVERTISE IN
THE SUNDAY. STAR,
(4
— tu« —
Only Sunday Newspaper
-IN
WILMINGTON.
All the Local
-AND —
Telegraphic News 1
Strictly Non-Partisan.
8UFERIOR ADVANTAGES AS AN
ADVERTISING MEDIUM.
ITiE STAR
ar
5?
Ia stirvod to subscribers
roughout the city
early on Sunday mom Inga at the
moderate price of
TWELVE CENTS A MONTH. PAYABLE
AT THE END OF THE MONTH.
8INGLE COPIES, THREE CENTS
ADDUE8H
J. B. BELL
NO. ßOa KING ST
v - »»rji'Kw*
**•»«?* Him,!
v un« 1 ni j^*
V
ristm
S. H. STAA1
No.
405
Marke t
J u *t o|i«ned
an olegtijt it<
new
GOO
Hultablu for tbo approwy,
Christmas Holij
1 'oiihUUQk of
Silk and Linen Uandkel
1 PLlSfc AND^fÄS^ 1 ;'
Book», ÊTr. ; KANU
"auk.
-made Zephyr (i
Siiecialtv !
Ali«
A l ; v|
Hand
Be»l<h'»Hi
♦•mile«* v;
fifty
FANCY
and USEFUL
AT VEIIY Low
AH
PHD Ls|
New Dre** (iooii*.
Ac., at *
■^yiLLIAM B. SHARP,
Fourth and Market
New Dress G
AT RK.MJCKD PlUCft
Colored and Dress Silk
Direct from the Import««
Cloths and Cas
Tus lariteei stock w,- lj tt re cv< r
-Also a full Hue of—I
Carpets aitd Oil C 'loi
From St rtats to}:,(/) p,. r vi
I
WM. B.
SIB
Fourth and Markq
lntimnsi »,
J^OTICE.
Walt
MA90I IO 1M
have the
illy«
•f.irr
I III!
itIful ded
esdy.fur lu»pvcth
el b
/. JAMKS BELT,
A pot I
Sixth
d Market
II
EALTH 1.8 WEALTH.
NF.ItVr.
• for II v?l
DU. K. i. Wr.' !
TREATMENT, a »|*.
Gull VU Ini
\
lb
trio
1*
y. ihvui
o
It
Ag
I
In. lui/, u
li. on
I .i
ho
nl
•ip
X
.ill.
f.
•I*
the purrliitM'i
moiM-y If tin
Gnanmt
Druggl
mllU'toil. D< !
i;.
.
•Und M
EVERY
nd h
Should
'■«i »y
Premature
C j'0n
1.IIV nntl Health,'
Beta.
in p
!
I*
M VJMtlM) AM» MX«
AdJrcw, U8ÜICAL AND SCROJCAL
117 JL 1.7th n
EVERY /!'R0F. MARSTQN'5
MAN
b« 1 l»rblllty.
SHOULD
read
I U11LS1()> KKHtUI
Ufcbicj
eil |>l
ti
will
1 PUEE WW
INDIA
till- 1 H.lrld • "I AS- U', 1
<'A. 'll A K K A NU I*.\ ' A 1.1-1' ■
IIIIIIIIA IIIION :
rlorln II«vor
IMS V. I'll 11
Fn
T
ini'
at >
«1
.
» 1
, i;i i W.i
th«r rule
V.
r ui;oK<
Washington, D. Fj*
Lxuuihiati
«•limn«*, of nil 1
or inveniloiii
. not u i
o advisfl that
■i
saim* claw
whethei
■end Ifji'JO, •<» |M»y G. 0 ' 0 '!!
drawing* required i»> » *•
able when nppl lent hm I*
attorney'* fee an;
ffiïïiï OT&iÄ»
that y
cuti i
• 'lit
\U:
ilnui t<
I tl
I.om
ey 1
Is patenti
Iris bent Jilt* Min en
the udvl«H*«M'
is had. De'.i.
i ol Lnheli.
far
I
examinât!
Registration
Rr-i*sii('M hpc
Application* in revlv
or r orfcitcil La*«** ■
to secure your
ling of tho cwn
it tun request
PrttPiit.» that he riN-ci
Washington, T». C.,a«
ing the tlUoof tho In
filing your applicaU 01 «. A»
uUl coat you nothmy. i* »* * _
•Hrtflll «•**«• rut loll W n* 1
f IS« i
ic*. If
'
.i fin« 1 ■
, i .nt
<1
Uli*
I
-I
nil
lottiul client* in ah»"
nphlet relating to du
Ive
. 0 . 1
GEORGE E. LE
,1 Noli«'mor■ *
iju Poteau
, WASIH^
«
Attorney
615 Fifteenth Street
Mention this pai«?>
1 F
Frank James' Surr
agents
James
Brother»
io„.J. D-.- ,
count of their
and h'«' IJfJ
WANTED
th«'
I
iv n
M
Outlaws.jo)
and thrllfiiig
invhö'i'.v
I 'I
in
» «f
iw aub«»y**\
inîr.vlnir»"f • l ( ' | < |f t l j!i l 'lïn'iîn
noNAhJ* »"îvîuced tim« «
Irilliirs«"''' I' 11 " .
hlc »ui ru l'or Uau' 1 '*-.
A no :
partlrnl
balnhle and pr t , ,
Uwe, M' X.-.*:«,! township, «j"
N. W. ***

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