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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, December 20, 1882, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1882-12-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XI"NO. 199.
PKIOE OISTE OEK V
WILMINGTON, DEL., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1882.
Il A y ou AIT» O KO AMI.
In
i)

S,!
JV'
U

Kb
nrf
ami
t**
il •
T^T
C
the
•i
greatest bargains
been offered in
Wilmington In
Hint have
Pianos and Organs.
Tin finest and heat stock only kept.
No Second-Hand Trash.
the
lb,
N.
\\
Er cry Instrument In the warerooma le
fresh from the factory.
EVERY PIANO WARRANTED for 10
YEARS end kept is tunc for three years.
every organ Warranted for 7
YEARS, anil
Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed
(iKANI>, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT
tii.
•n
PIANOS
By the following famous makers:
WOODWARD A BROWN, Boston.
ERNEST GABLER, N. Y.
EMERSON. Boston.
PEEK & SON, N. Y.
EDWARD M'GAMMON, Alhauy, N. Y.
Y. WAGNER, Baltimore.
And others.
At manufacturing prices.
Now Pianos $19()andUpwards.
IN
the
D.,
aril,
or,
said
ORGANS
—BY—
the
fil'H DETTE,
». SHONINGER,
COLON A DE,
'
TAYLOR & FARLEY,
BELMOUNT,
F. WAGNER,
LITTLE GIANT.

the
1~
Aud many others.
Btt
ALL NEW AND FRESH FROM THE
FACTORY,
From $30 and Upwards.
this
the
Inna,
for
W Come mid examine stock and satisfy
yourself.
F. WAGNER,
Piano and Organ Warerooms,
72t> Market Street,
of
the
fur
WILMINGTON, DEL.
dcci-112-tr
nMUSTEK'S NOTICES.
JJEGISTEK'S ORDER.
Register's office,
a*d|«5 (*«., Del., November27, lSff-'.
application or Thomas B. Brlson,
ntrator D. H. N. of Joseph N. Locke, late
"f Wilmington hundred. In said cou nty, de
and directed by the Register that
rutor aforesaid give noth «* ofgrant
of Administration upon the estate of
with the «late of g muting thereof, by
•iits to bt posted within forty
•h letters, In «lx of the
of the county of Newcastle,
«Is against tin*
N
1
In
Adm
■ d,
.
>ln
IvcrtiM
tin* dale of
publk nl
all persona having (!«
alible by
case ma«!c and pro vH« «t.
e to lK)liiMrtc , «l within the
t the name
N
\n«i
It
4
lltf
pri.Hi lu tin- dki.aw Aitn Gazette, a
pap«-r mihll*ilic«l in WllniiiiKl
• d therein Hire«* weeks, (e. «». d. )
under tho hand anil seal of office
D.. s. }nfthe Register aforesaid, at Wilmington,
( —) m New ChmU«* County, aforesaid, the «lay
M«l year above written.
, ami to he er
Ive
». C. BIGGS, Register.
NOTICE.
having claims, against the estate of
present the same duly attested
beforu Novcml>er 27,
lrnMdctlie act of Assembly In such ease
! aud provided. THOMAS B. BRI80N,
Administrator, D. B. N.
Ail.lreos: Wilmington, lK*l.
off
All |>(
tlie (lei'i
I« die A«lndnl»tratôr
a
d,
nov27.in,w,r,2w«l-w
gEGISTEB'8 ORDER.
ltKfUKTEK'rt OFFICE,
' CASTLE COI NTY, DEL., Oct. 18th, 1882.
» thcRimlication of Joseph Fugt., Exe
b'iill Vy'atson, late of Wllniln
In »nid comity, deceased, it I«
t« «l by the Register that the Adinlnlstimt
>:»ld give notice or granting of letters 1«
niary upon the estate of the deceased, with
in*-date of granting thereof, by causing adver
urments to be misted within forty days !r«;m
the «tat«* of such letters in six of the most public
places «.t the county of New ('nsU<\ requiring ull
Prruor.-« having demands against the estate to
the same, or abide by an Act of Assembly
made ami provided; ami also cause
, - - be Insert»«! within tlie same period In
UV'.uviLY Gazette, a newspaper published In
ftUnilngton and to lie continued therein three
Wt «kH, («*. o. d.)
Nl
v c
huil
dir.
Util«
>n such v
the s:
under the band and Kcal
4 ^* »Office *»r KegDtcr aforcsahl, at Wilininu
}*• s. >ton, lu New CiHl««ninlrnforeMi«!, Un»
'^ v *' '«lay and year above written.
A. C. IlIGGH, Register.
k. -A ll |i«T»ons having claim» against
'■stat«* of the deceased niunt present the same,
/.attested to the Executor, on or belore
18th, 1883, or abide the Act of Assembly
•«ch case mads and provided.
JOSEPH PUGH, Executor.
: 619 North Eleven that reel, Phlla.
novIl-tts-3w
ÜV
I*
Nor
ibi
Oulv
1 " I
Ai1.ii
PR OEESSI ON AJj VAJIUB.
J. P. BURWELL

49» w /tA REMOVE HIS OFFICER
residence.
To hi*
NO. 712 WEST STREET,
•HER THE 1ST.
NOVEL
ect30-lm-14!
[)KS. J. N. & J. B. HOb >BN8ACK »
& tJ - N v * J* 1*. HOBENöAv *\£iuTr by
E™? * r m. Philadelphia, either by ttn d
• tou p' n^ r n ® tlie hourB of 18 *• m to 2 p.
diu«« ' î r( ' t '* Whosoever should know his
m Hn< * the way to improve it should read
"WISDOM IN A NUT-BHELL."
receipt ot iliree-ccnt stamp.
«MW1
nt
* pt!4-l-14
JJAN1EL H. FOSTER,
K, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
NO. 11 EXCHANGE BUILDING,
(Seventh and Market streets.)
WILMINGTON. DEL.
I
my2-10
John C. COLE,
* OTA BY 1-miLK^AND JUSTICE OF THE
No. lOiWÙlBUib.treeC »•
h 11 JACOBS
, -manufactuber of—
««•ROVED RUBBER
-
HAND 8TAMP8,
"'^InieUble Ink tylC ' * ad f ° r marklng Linens
^•«1«. SIXTH AND SHIPLEY STS.
Wilmington, Delaware.
MOTIOAU.
J^otice'
In tiik matter, o
Petition or
Eli C. m
K TIIE'
Chancery,
Castle County.
In Purtltion.
order of the Chancellor In
i) i Mb' » . y. -at the September
*7P* .4** P** r »«ns having any Urn
or «*»*»♦* «• Eli C. Mote,
!î î «" , î 'm ' Vl »er, George 8. Mote. Jacob II. Mete,
'liwvJ. Aiken. Com V. Ta vlor.
S,! "VL 8, *V»te, Margaret It. Varuall, Isaac T.
JV' V 1 ;VV n r» , A™w t **. An il n,w Mote, Mary K.
atlr.l.i RAmho, Margaretta It. Stewart,
rSfWJ? m Lofinan, Jsme» II. Casho, George.?
Cn-.ho. Margaret E Caulio, Anna Ch»Uo. Joseph
U- M 0, e, Jesse II Mou, Abraham i. Mote,
%î n r r,s «.M 0! ''' Theodore II. Mote, Itanhiel III
t/iViI ;T'lw' IO i l «'• DDworth M. Bwk\ngbnrn,
Kb hard Gilpin> Buckingham and Mary M. Bnek
nrf ,n the lands and
premlKcato which «nid cause relate» are hereby
notified to Ole a petition netting fortb die nature
ami amount o f the same in the office or the
IbelMer In » hancerjr for New Castle county, ten
t** y ï& fore V'" U * ,r ' 1 MONDAY In February, A.
il • i . .. Rn ' 1 to appear and prove »aid lien or
lien# at the ensuing term of the court, before the
rising of the court on the third day of the term.
.... LORE A KMMONH, Trustees.
W I LM I NO TOW. Dee. 19tll, 1««.
T^T OTICE.
ARKOLD8.NAUtlAIN.et.al.
C hristoph tn ». N u
«t. al.
* Si
. et, *1.
EUH.
'KT
the nVi
f
ill
tec20-wJks-6w
In Chancery,
^ . New Castle C
uty.
Of Partition.
In pursuance of an order o T tin* Chancel loi
the above cause made st the September term. A.
lb, 1882. All persons having nay lien *r liens
affecting the Interest or estate of Arnold S. N
dalu. Estellii Naudaln, Mary J. Narnia! n.
Alex an h Naudaln. Joseph CJ. Naudaln,-Merritt
N. Willetts. Christopher Naudaln, Horatio N,
\\ IIlefts, Laura E. Wllletsand Merritt N. W lletts
F.. Willett*', deceased, or. either of
In the lands and premises t • which said
notified to file a petition
mint of the
In
tii.
mi r< lau »
! hereby
setting forth the tiatu e und
•n the office of the Register In Chancery for New
Castle county, ten day* before the third MON
DAi In February. A. D.,1883. and to appear and
prove «aid lien or lien» ut the eiumluv term of
re the rising of the court
!
tlilril any of the term.
J. II. RtDNKY. Trustee.
(iec20-wÄ8-0w
Wilmington, Dec. 19, 1882.
VOTICE.
IN THE M ATT K II
petition ok Thomas F. ,
li
Chancel
)F : New rustle f
inty.
>, THU* Eh <
B a y Alto Kan
mau kl
Thom a
F. Bay Ain
TKK OK Fl.
Cause
Ot Partition,
der of the Chancellor in
Rav.
Victor Di Pont
Iii pursuance of
the above r
D., 1882, :t
nffectltiK the int
aril, trustee of Mnhcl Buy
Bayard, ru»tee of Flor
Lock

the September term. a.
» Imvin* an 4 * Hen or liens
or «state orTboina» F. Buy
rd Kane, Tho
.. , . . _jo Bayard Lockwood,
or, Victor DuPont, or, either of them, in the
lauds and premises to whieli said cause relates,
otitied to die h petition setting forth
of the ►aim* In the office
> t Chanrerv for New Castle
nty ten days before the third MONDAY In
February, A. I)., 1883, and to appear und prove
said lh'ii or liens at the ensuiii* i-rm of the court,
ore the rl tng of the court mi the third day of
GEORGK GRAY. Trustee.
dcc2u-w*s-6w
tie
II
I;
• hereby
the
' the Register

the te
V> II.
NOTOÎf. Dec. 19. 1882.
\TQTICE.—GOOD-FITTING CORSETS,
1~ HYGIENIC INDKBWEAR for ladt* h,
: nlso good shoulder
Mit-*, t;. K. WARD,
No, 106 East Seventh street.
h Ihire
miste»
Btt AC FIL ut
dccIMJf
pLKCTION—NOTICE
Thf. National Rank of Delaware,
at Wilmington, Die. 7, 1882.
Notice U Ucruby given t*» the stoekhoUcrs ol
this Institution, that an election will lie held at
the Bunking Houw>, on Tuesday, January 9th,
Inna, lietweeu the hours of 2 and 4 o'elock p. in.,
for the purpose of electing seven direct«
if.lL EWHANKH, Coahk-
sul
serve forth
dee.7tjnn9
JjVLECTION.— NOTICE.
First National Bank, »
■Wilmington, Del., Dec. 8, 1882. I
Notice Is hereby given that the annual meeting
of the stockholders of this bank will bo held at
the Banking House on Tuesday, the 9th day of
ry, 1883, between the hours of 2 and,4 p.m.,
fur the purpose of electing
rve ns directors tlie ensuing vear.
decH-tJanlO GEO.D. ARMSTRONG,Coahier.
ine stockhold«
OTIOK. -ELECTION.
N
;al Rank. )
ok Wilmington, Dec., 8. 1882. i
ual election f«ir nine Directors will he
held ai the Bank.ng House, on Tuesday, the 9tli
>f J.-tnuarv, 1883, between the hours of 2 ami
lock, In the afternoon.
JOHN PEOPLES, (ashler.
The a
ib-cH-tJ
OTfCK.—ELECTION.
N
N ATIOK AL BAN K WILMINGTOX& Bit AN DYWI N K
. DfceinlM 1
>f tin- stocklioble
s hanking house
•rfl, 1882.
Wtl.MlN
Tbc annual meet lit
bunk will l>< Ucbl at till
DAY. January 9. lNNi.1
4 «'clock, p. in..for
t«»r* t«i
«ln'9-tjanlO
«»f this
TUE8
of2 and
tlie purport' of ch<»o*iHK nine
• f»*r the « Ksulnir year. .
«». NOW I. AN D, Cashier.
n the ho
N
OTICE.
—TO—
DELINQUENTS FOR COUNTY TAXES FOR
THE YEAR 1882, IN WILMINGTON HUN
DRED.
All persons who have not yet paid County taxes
off property for the year, 1882. are hereby notified
that unless they pay during the present month.
The amounts «lue will lie collected by legal process
•lied.
1 the e.
WILLIAM KYNK,
Northern r
DiNtrivt.
II. D. BEDFORD,
District.
Coll
<
Collector Sou the
dec2-li
OTICE.—I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE
THAT I intend to prefer a petition to the
•ml Assembly of the State of Delaware
next session, praying lor the passage of an act to
divorce me from the »»omis of matrimony with
N
Ge
an„. Charte. K. M„h|en. iA M0UU5N .
r 25-1 ml
J^OTICE TO BONDHOLDERS !
Delaware State Bonds !
.. ok State Treasurer, j
. Del., De< ember 1, 1882. s
By virtue of an act of tlie General Assembly,
* Dover, March in, I8sl, I hereby gl\e
holder* of Delaware State bond» that 1
aiteml at tho Philadelphia National Bank,
ïclty of Philadelphia, durliiK the business
hours of that bank, ou th<- firr-t t b r e* j-'* « ni
of January, im prepared 1o nay oft aud wdeem
nil tU« i. onds of the said Stale
«m both inclusive, of Series A, of the denomina
tion of one thousand dollars each, ol the l»»ue of
Um bona» of the Slat** of Delaware, under date of
July 1, 1881. »11.1 Il)»t from mi'l »&r tho aatjtllljt
d«> ol*January, '^TttEYNOLI^
ov23-2twdÄwtJ»n1 State Treasurer.
office
Dov
I*
shall
In th«
will cease.
AMUSEMENTS.
' rand opera hol m 9E. onictemi>[ ^
(t
Saturday, December 23, '82.
play.
Elliott Barnes' Greatest A merle
Only a Farmer's Daughter.
A inusl pi-rfM-t rcprcmiUtlo». aspLjcd
10 NIG UTS IN NKW YORK.
Most Excellent Dramatic Company, led by the
Most Dramatic Queen,
AGNES HERNDON,
The Famous Htnpe Beauty.
Alfred Klink and Little Mamie Gilhoy,
The Greatest Living Child Actress.
—and—
ARTISTIC- ORGANIZATION.
V COMPLETE
*i a ■** in advance. «lecJJ-u m
LEL'TTUticS.
TNaTl'rVTE HALL, ]iTn ASDMARKET .
and
I Tuesday, Wednesday, -
Thursday,Dec. 19.20&21.
-A course of
IIEATII
—by
LECTURES
ILLUSTRATED
dr. HALE!
Of Edinburgh, Scotland.
subjects:
Turoat and KUluevs '' THIIK^DAV
Stoiusdi, Lj'Tj.„"lectures ' for ladies only.)
«Bg'ïsr.'s«
AW >, ■ »"(U...
n
WAN THU.
W ANTED.—TO RENT AN ENGINE
OK from four to six hor»u power during
the winter. Adeln»» 'V,"
decl»-If GAZETTE OFFICE.
pom nicy t.
POR RENT— THÄ HOUSE Ml SHIPLEY
1 STREET Will he rented low. until March 2ft.
dec2u-8t llKALl) A GO.
roll SALE
I jV)R BALE.—MORTGAGES^, 0,7 AND 8
PER CENT, not one cent lo*>t by us in « years'
Investments of |2, OO.uGO in Eastern and Western
m ortgag es._ [decSÖ-ft tj _HE ALP A CO.
F or sale.—a farm of one hun
dred and FORTY ACRES. Situated
in Christiana hundred,
ville; term» easy. Apulv
docI 8 - 12 td£ 4 tw
SALE.
mile south of Centre
the premises
LEWIS GRAVES*.
pOK
100 Acres of Standing Timber.
Chl.llr YELLOW PINE and MAPLE,
mile of milroa«l
wstor, and adjacent to other large and fine tracts
timber land the growth of which Is likewise
the market. For particulars as to location, price,
terms, etc., add res»,
sepm-d,
poli 8ALE.
32 Desirable Dwellings.
1 8-story brick, No. 807 Washington
street.
1 4-story brick, 610 King street.
1 8-story brick. 13 Market street
1 2-story brick, 21« Washington street 3 500
* 2-story brick, 902 A WM I Anden street 2 000 each
1 2-story-brlck, 308 8. VnnBuren street 1 500
4 2-story brick, 918. 918,920, 922 Elm st. 1 600each
5 2-storwbrlek, 827, 820,831, 833, 836 Lo
cust street.
1 2-story brick, N. W
Harrison s
2 2-story brick, 1133 A 1ER El
4 3-atory brick, 30», 311, 813, 315 South
Van Buren street.
4 2-Story brick, 706, 70S, 710, 712 Brown
street. l bOO each
3 2-story brick, 707, 709and7l8 Wright
street. 1 600 each
2 3-story brick, 9th and Franklin
lu course of erection. Also val
New Castle ave
within
d three miles of
GAZETTE OFFICE.
17 000
. 6 000
1 100 each
1700
t 1100 each
(1
jet.
. 1100 each
uable truck farm
, containing 12 acres ami good
buildings. Price.
. 10 000
The above dwellings are in good condition and
contain from ft to 13 rooms each, aud will be sold
terms to suit the purchaser. Apply to
JOB. L. CARPENTER,
Ninth and Ilarrtsou streets.
Jb.
uov21-lmdA*
rUBLlVKALJCa.
H EAI.D & CO.'S PUBLIC SALE SAT-
- TTRDAY, DECEMBER 30TII, 183'. 8KND
IN LIMT OF HOUSES, LOTH, FARM», STOCKS,
BONDS, Ac.. WITH OR WITHOUT LIMITED
PRICES BEFORE SATURDAY, DECEMBER
:3i>.
1er ; -st
pUBLIC
REAL ESTATE!
SALE
-OF VALUABLE
In New Castle Comity and State of Delaware.
By virtue of the ta*t will him! testament of llurry
Murren, deceased, of Mill Creek hundred, New
Castle county, 1 will offer at public bale, at the
l EE it PARK HOTEL, In Newark, Delaware
on Thursday, 1 Hit day of January, A. I»..
1883, at I o'clock in the afternoon,
tlie following real estate :
1 t ract of laud situated
nty. Déla-
ie iw,s$ a res. more or less, with a
me ihv ltiug, 11 roouiH in good «pair;
barn, new, 45 by GO feet, granary, hog and hen
house, the land 1» rolling, good natural soli. In
lair order, divided in suitable fields well watered:
this farm is situated
No, I. All that farm
in Mill Greek hundred. New Castle c
ware, contai in
I
ithin 1
where good school» and churi
No 2. Adjoin» No. I and e n. talus
with a stone dwelling und bum thereon, erected,
the land is ro ling, divided iu convenient fields n
air order and goodquallty.the LIKE INTEREST
of John L. Elliott only is sold in this tract.
No. 8. Contains 212 acres, more or less, situa
ted In New Castle hundred, within about 4'i
mil k of Wilmington, it Is divided in 7 fields under
good fencing, the soil is No. I and is In a good
stale ol imtnovon ont; the buildings are a frame
house in fair order containing 6 rooms; large
barn In . oml order, granary, hog and poultry
house, this Is a pood farm. The undivided
half Interest only will be sold in this farm, the
other naif belongs to Janie« It. Ray, Esq,, and
the farm Is iu the tenure of Mr. Thomas Sack,
who will »how the sann* to any one want ng to
* >l No. U 'L*ïs the Robert M. Black farm, situated
n of Glasgow, ln Peilender hundred,
d will be sold In two tracks. No 1, containing
•tth the buildings there erected,
rot the widow of said Robert
is 43 actes, which is marked
ds, the soi I is a light. Loam, und
Ü miles of Newark,
dies ure located.
the
aboiit 184 u
subject to tin* «low
VI. Black, lal.l «*»
«I bou
by
m?p alilo of lilidi state of Inti,
und r hedge fence, In part ami laid «*11
veulent fit Ids, '*lt'» two good
nning through tld» tract. N
original tra* t, and will contain nl
without any improvements, except fencing; o
thl» tract there Is abom « acres of woojf an
Umber, the soil is good natural «luality an«t
make a good farm. .... ,
No. 1, 3 and 4 will be sold subject to dower of
Aim lia Warren, wblow of tlie. late Harry Warren.
Also, the subscriber will sell at saue time
rim-«- 100 share« of the stock of the National
Bank of Newark, Delaware. 'I orms at sale.
NELSiA WAHREM Execi
Of IIA BUY WARREN.
vauk. DEL., December 12, 1882.
B.— I. Amelia Warn*«, widow of Harry
I. will join With the Executor
Impie title, to the
purchasers
Is s
con
of water
of the
I« l»i
100 lier
il
dec eased .
Ni:
de
«•Veal estate by the i
ne 8 per e«* ton tlie amount of p
ev In lieu of my dower.
AMELIA WARREN.
«1
in
a I
paying t<
«kels-w&sÄwH
H EALD à CO.'S REGULAR l'UBLIC
KAI.K* OF Stock«, Bmi.U Luiuuk Dwell
tnirs. Kann», Lotsand other Heal Estate, alter
nate Saturday» 2 p. m. Next sale Saturday,
December 80.
dccl8-3t
FOUL PLAY SUSPECTED.
tho Body of Insane
Marks of Violence
John Leiniuger.
Reading, Dec. 19.—District Attorney
Kaufman gave instructions to-day to have
the body of John L. Leininger disinterred
inasmuch as foul p'ay is suspected. Lein
inger is the man who was reported to have
been crazed with lever and jumped from a
window and thence iuto a creek, where he
was frozen to death. His body was buried
at Womelsdorf, and to-day Lcininger's two
brothers lodged information to the effect
that they believed their brother had been
foully dealt with. Leiulnger was about 50
years of age and lived alone with a
housekeeper, eight miles from Womels
dorf. The housekeeper's name is Pusan
Putt, an elderly and respectable woman.
She was also before the district-attorney
and her statement, although contradictory,
seem to implicate a man of Leiulnger 's ac
quaintance in the alleged foul P^ a y* H is
further alleged that the deceased had
wounds on his head which were infiictwl by
the suspected man in tbo absence of the
housekeeper who is in no way suspected.
Whether Leininger fell out of the window,
whether ho died from exposure, or whether
the wounds were inflicted by pat tic* who
wanted him out of the way, or whether
there was a conspiracy to kill the old mau,
is to be learned by the jury of inquest which
will be summoned to-morrow, when the
body will be disinterred and examined by
physicians.
Verdict ln h Damag« Oase.
Elkton, Md , Dec. 19.— The case of
Daniel J. McCauley, of Ellicott City, vs.
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company,
which has been on trial iu the court here lor
to a sudden eonclu
several days past, came
,1011 tills momluB, tho court ordering a ver
dict for the defendant. McCaulCT ia a
miller and barrel nianulacturer at Ellicott
Cltv and sued the, railroad company for
overcharge of freights on barrel Btavcs and
hooppoles from 1870 lo 1878, the amount
Involved being about »3,(500. At the con
clusion of plaintiff's evidence the defense
offered prayers that the evidence was not
legally sufficient to recover. The court
ruled that tho payment of the overcharge
was made under a mistake of lav.', and as
Ignorance of law is no excuse the prayers
were granted and verdict ordered lor the
defendant. The case was removed here
from Baltimore county, where McCauley
had obtained judgment for »1,200.
ABOUT THE NEW» THIEF.
A "Stupid, Narrow-Minded Paper Hham,"
and it* Indecent Method*.
r Morning organ of to-day. J
To the Editor of the Morning New* —8ib:
Is it not time that the small orgau called the
Republican received some attention at the
hands of decent people ? This contemptible
paper, that practices daily upon the people
the most unblushing and transparent detua
gogery, has now commenced its attempts to
bulldoze the business met of this city into
advertising in its columns and characterize
those that estimate it at its true value and
decline to buy spece in its columns as
nabobs, and as having contempt for the
poor, etc. It is plain to be seen who it
mean sin this evening's editorial, as there
are but two very large coal firms in town
aud one of them is
n >er; so it must mean the other.
Vill a fair minded public just for a mo
ment consider the two firms—the one mak
ing the charge, and the one charged with
bciug nabobs who have «o use for the poor ?
What has this paper firm ever done for the
pay their employes lair
liberal tow ards the benev
' jiwf city ? Js their name
ever found on subscription lists for public
or private charities ! Have they ever been
known to give anything or do anything of
any moment for anybody but themselves?
Do they ever exert themselves in any
way for the poor they prate about ?
If they do, it must bo in
such au exceedingly private manner that no
one ever hears of it. I will venture the
assertion that the firm they abuse because it
can see no profit in advertising in their paper,
gives more in public and private charity,
and for public benefits, in any one year of
their existence than the paper firm has
during the entire lives of all its members ;
that they pay their men as good wages as
the other men in their own line of business.
Does the paper firm do that or do they de
pend upon low priced and underpaid labor
to turn out their stupid paper ?
Did anybody ever know the Republican to
do a generous thing for a poor man or any
other mau for that matter? And yet the
people who write *n its editorial columns
have the impudence to charge with indiffer
ence to the poorer classes a firm which, for
generosity, both as a firm aud individuals,
has few equals anywhere. It certainly is
time that this stupid, narrow-minded paper
sham was taken at its true valuation by
everybody ; it has long been so taken by a
large portion of (he community. And now
that we have a decent Republican newspaper
iu The Morning Neun \ dou't see what
people want of this incompetent and ignor
ant apology lor u paper; I will not Insult
the respectable new »papers of the city by
tailing it a newspaper. Justice.
Wilmington, Dec. ID, 1882.
a
advertiser in the
poor? Do they
wages ? Are they
ol e ut institution .*of
s
A PLEASANT EVENT.
A Surpris© Party and » School Examina-
tion.
A correspondent studs us the following :
Tho clear, crisp morning of Saturday,
December 16, developed a plan, which had
been arranged to surprise our old friend
George Woodward, now living near Du-
Pont's station. At the early hour of 11
o'clock a number of spanking teams,
freighted with jolly gents and pleasant
ladles and baskets, pre66od to overflowing
with delicious edibles, (just sucli os the
Mrs. Woodwards
how to fit up) burst upon the family with a
mingled feeling of surprise uud joy—this
thought rushing to the front, "Where shall
we put the people?" But instantly
overwhelming one came, "How many
friends we have." Eighty-two persons sat
down to the sumptuous feast. Grandmam-
mas and babies, sweethearts and lovers,
joiued heart and hand to make the scene a
gay and festive one. A brief speech
from their pastor Mr. Graham, called
forth one from the host, who
assured us all how happy he felt to have us
with him. Ju the evening quite a number
oi the guests repaired to Centre Grove
school house, where an attractive program
was carried out with great success. The
stage decorations w ere artistic and complete.
On either side of the building were letters,
' Welcome to all." most beautifully orna-
mented by the teacher, Miss Stanley, who
deserves all credit for her enterprise and
industry. Miss Stanley's handsome face
and Intelligent mind combine to
add brilliancy to any entertainment, but by
many prettv girls aud
re exhibition will be
and Klalrä know
the support of
bright boys, Centre G
long remembered ami wc would advise our
beaux to take advantage of the .first oppor
tunity to be present on tbo next < cession, so
that they can get a peep ot the three graces,
the Misses Goddley, Husbands and Palmer,
who, no doubt, will soon »wfcirc from school
days to fill a larger sphere. Miss 8tanley
was presented with a pair of lovely vases by
the school. The proceeds of the entertain
unabridge Web
aient are to purchase
ster'a Dictionary for the use of the scholars.
Contributor.
COLQUOHOUN*» NKW STORE.
A Formal Opening of a Now Delaware
Avenue Pharmacy Yesterday.
W. C. R. Colquohoun received the well
wishes and congratulations of many hun
dred friends yesterday afternoon ami eve
ning on the occasion of the opening of his
handsome new drug store at the southeast
of Delaware avenue aud DuPont
It has just been completed, and
corner
street.
stands opposite the site of the proposed
passenger station of the new Baltimore «fc
Ohio railroad.
The building is very handsome Internally,
and it is a three-story structure with 14 feet
front aud 56 feet depth. The drug store is
completely furnished In all it« departments,
and the prescription department is particu
larly well supplied. It is provided with a
pair of Henry Troemner's scales, which
so evenly balanced that when two pieces of
paper of equal weight a'c placed on it the
writing of one's name in lead pencil on one
of the pieces will tilt it. The store is one of
the finest in Delaware.
Mr. Colquohoun treated his callers to re
freshments served by Sewell Hall, the well
and favorably known caterer and steward.
A. M. Strickland
tractor and furnished the mill and
work. The bricks were furnished
H. Beggs & Co., and laid by Thomas B.
Hizar & Son; the plastering was done by
John Larkin, who painting by Charles G.
Tazewell,
Stewart &
George F. Hodges,
furnished the hardware, «Tames & Bro., the
glæs, B. L. Kent the lumber, Charles Smith
the tile floor, and George W. Stradlcy the
heating apparatus.
was the general con
nter
by Sames
plumbing and gas fitting by
«Jones, and the upholstering by
. Carlisle <& Co^,
«I. V
Christmas Services.
Christmas day will be ushered in at Holy
Trinity Church, Sevent h and Church streets,
by a high celebration of tho Holy Eucharist,
at 12 o'clock midnight, on Christmas eve,
the traditional hour of our Lord's birth.
A second high celebration, with sermon by
the Rev. Louis K. Lewis, Priest-iu-cbarge,
will be held at 10.80 o'clock a. m. The
music at both services will be rendered by
a chorus and orchestra, uuder the direction
of Edward Henry Etkel, choirmaster.
Navigation About to Close.
The Delaware and Raritan canal is closed
for the winter. The Chesapeake and Dela
ware" canal is still open. Ice is forming
thick in the rivers of Maryland, and steam
boat navigation will shortly cease.
MEAT AND VEGETABLES
FARMERS'
THE
PULSE THIS MORNING.
FEELING
A PEEFEEENOE FOE KING STEEET
Tlie Idea Prevail« That a Division or the
Street Markets Won't Work—A Long
List of interviews.
Yesterday we gave a number of interviews
with property owners and householders con
cerning the proposed tinkering with a divi
sion ol the street market. Ths result of the
Gazette's labors excited considerable in
terest and comment and showed plainly the
feeling of those directly interested. This
morning the pulse of the farmers was felt,
so to speak, and below the result is given :
It will readily be seen which way the wind
blows with the producers, and while all
of them were not interviewed a sufficient
number were seen to indicate clearly the
prevailing sentiment. It is a matter of
especial note that a large number are in
clined to the belief that a market house
would be better both for buyers and sellers,
and will have to come sooner or later.
All the farmers are weary with the con
tinual changing of the market laws, tired
of the scramble for places, and anxious for
a final settlement of what has for many
years proved a question.
THE INTERVIEWS.
The following persons interviewed were
picked out at random, and their expressions
in regard to a choice of locality, the ad
visability of a division of the market, and
their ideas concerning an in-door market
briefly given.
William T. Nickerson—Very well suited
here; French street wouldn't be a good
place—too much dust; King is the best
street in Wilmington for market.
Valentine Forward—Don't want to move,
but willing to have the markat where they
put it.
M. H. Calley—Satisfied with it on King
s reet; think division would work badly;
wouldn't like it; market houses would be
belter.
Robert 11 arkuess—Dou t want to move;
division would work badly.
T. S. Harkins—No use in moving; not in
for it; if a change is made it should lie to
market houses; aivisioj would be bad.
H. W. Mouseley—Don't want to move un
less it is to a market house; division won't
work.
James Springer—They have uo business
to move ; division wouldn't work ; market
houses would be well for some, but small
dealers would be injured.
E. F. Foster—Makes no difference to me.
Mrs. E. M. Moore—Don't make any differ
ence to me, but it would make it worse for
buyers.
Amos Brown—Would rather be here;
haven't thought much of the proposed
division ; 11 large houses were made it
would be better.
Saille Ralston—They can't do It; I don't
waut to move; it is useless; two markets
would spoil the whole thing; it is better as
it is; market houses won't do.
Mrs. Beeson—Don't make much differ
ence; couldu'-t place it any better; better all
together; if houses were used stall rents
would be so high small dealers couldn't
stand it.
W. T. Miller—Whatever majority docs
I am willing : prefer King street, however ;
rather take French street than Madison.
Mr. Rambo —It makes no difference to
me, but I would rather stay.
E. II- Ellison—It would be an advantage
to divide.
- Armor—Satisfied where I am ;
Kiug is a good street, and stores are handy ;
market houses would make people pay
more.
Joseph Hunter—No, sir, I dont waut to
move ; don't think division would work ;
houses wouldn't work ? it is well enough as
it is.
E. B. Kerns—Leave the market where it is ;
a division wouldn't be good ; the people
would cross to the opposite sides of the city
to buy ; a change would make confusion.
Robert G . Miles—It wouldn't matter where
I went ; division would be a good thing.
Mrs. Getts—Don't want to go; don't thiuk
it a good place on French street; market
houses would be » good thing if all weut
into (hem.
Charles II. Mofl'ct—Wouldn't make any
diflcrencc in a change; market houses
wouldn't suit poor people.
Robert Taylor—Better be as we are; divi
sion has to be tried to see how it will
work; there will have to be some change.
J. R. lloffecker—Madison street would
be the nearest for me; a division ought to
work.
J. Langley—Dou't think much of the
change; division wouldn't work well; bet
ter all be in houses.
Mrs. Robinson—I prefer King street as it
is too dusty ou French street; a market
house would be better.
T. F. Moore—King is as good a street
G. T. Remington—There is no U6C in
dividing or moving the market. Market
houses would be first-rate.
Mary A. Burriss—Want the market to
J:
J. Moore—Keep it here by all means.
F. Yeareley—Would rather stay here.
E. B. Talley—It is as good a place as any
here; two market streets won't work; on«;
day all farmers would be in one place and
next day in the other; market house would
suit all.
W. S. Ellison—Doesn't matter to me, so
long as I can sell out.
Benjamin Atwell—Don't want to go; pre
fer to stay; division wouldn't work; market
house would be best.
E. Sheppard—Don't want to move; divi
sion won't work and market people won't
seperate; butchers are uow crowding the
farmers out; Louses might not work as
small dealers couldn't rent stalls.
Mrs. Mason—It makes no odds to me
what they do.
John Pasehali—Prefer to remain on King
street.
J. J. Conover—Farmers would never go
to Madison street ; would rather go to
French, but prefer King.
Joint E. Crockett—Don't feel like moving,
think market houses would be a disad
vantage to buyers.
James Tusli—I am opposed to the divis
ion of the street, want it to stay on Kiiyt.
and would not go to Madison; do not care
to have market house.
It. Sutton—Don't want the market moved
to either French or Madison. Would like
to have a market house, but better prices
could be secured on the street market.
S. L. Wcldic—Have signed to keep the
whole market where it is, but would sooner
have a market house.
John Thompson—Would sooner have it
fixture. Market houses
here ns it is
would be better.
Lewis Sutton—Don't
what they do ;
wherever the market is the people will fol
low it.
R. N. Suttou—Don't care whether they
move or not.
Mrs. Annie Douglass—Am decidedly in
favor of letting it stay; am satisfied with
King street aud don't
house.
Mr. Russell—Don't want a removal dr
division.
S. B. Winter—Am opposed to the ordl
nance, and don't- care whether they have
market houses or not.
; for a market
stay on King; street. Market houses would
be an improvement.
Elizabeth Chandler—Am contented with
King; street, and don't care either for a divi
sion or lor market houses.
Joseph Steelman—It is foolishness to talk
of removing; the market to French street.
Let it stay here or give us market bouses fit
to stand in.
Mrs. Thompson—Better let them where
they are; division would make us too far
apart.
A. N. Hamilton—Not in favor of moving,
don't think division would work.
E. H. Gallagher—Better be where it if;
division won't work.
Mrs. Gathers—Best where it is; division
wouldn't last long.
Lewis Negendank—Rather be on King
street; division wouldn't work.
Thoe. Cloud—No use to change ; division
won't w ork; many would not come ; French
street is too dusty and Madison too far
away.
F. Pratt—Rather stay where we arc.
E. Mouseley—Feel as if they ought to let
us alone ; if they move too much they might
move some of us clean out.
0. Magargal—Would rather stay where I
am unless extra inducements are offered.
Joseph Brown—Don't care what they do ;
the city folks will have their own way.
C. B. Connell—If they touch the market
they will make a mess of it; in course of
time houses will be best; division won't
work.
C. Jordan—Want to stay, but am satis
fied anywhere; better build a market house,
it would be better than freezing every
thing. 4
William M. Smith—Have no choice; don't
care much.
WHmer Talley—Don't want to move;
haven't considered the division; am satis
fied with street markets without too many
restrictions.
C. P. Mews—Want to stay; division won't
work.
Andrew Monlhan—Don't want to move,
division wouldn't work ; w hat is wanted is
market houses.
Mrs. Chalk—Perfectly .satisfied ; not par
ticular.
R. K. Morton—Can't better It ; don't
think it would work ; would inconvenience
all hands ; nothing to be gained.
1. 8. Fredd—Don't want to move, but
don't care, as Council will do what it
pleases wtth the countrymen ; would be
satisfied with a house ; just as good one
place as another.
William Proud—Don't think it would
make much difference.
Jas. Smith—Don't waut to move; don't
think division well ; would be bothered all
the time ; all farmers would get to one
place.
Mrs. E. C. West—Doesn't make any
difference, but I prefer to stay here; the
market should all be together.
John Moss—The market should remain
here. The street suits as well as a market
iiouse.
H. F. Alexander—Favor King street; on
French street arc two engine houses, a pub
lic school and other things which would be
an annoyance. Then it's two duety; I
would sooner Lave a market house.
M. Michner—Would sooner stay on Kiug
street. If 1 attended regularly I would
sooner have a market house.
C. W. Purncr—I favor having the market
King street. I*don't wan't it ou Madi
Mrs. Miller—Want it in King street or
market house.
Anton Morick—Let it stay here or give us
market house.
George D. Simon—Sooner have market
stay, but favor a market house.
I. H. WaiHwright--Want it to stay here
and don't want a market house.
Samuel Hall—Would prefer Kiug street
or a market house if it don't cost us too
much.
son.
JOSEPH'fii RAIMENTS.
Tatnall Street Lad Endeavored to
Get a New Suit of Clothes.
Joe Connolly is a boy about 7 years of age
and lives at 220 Tatnall street. He is an
enterprising lad and yesterday concocted
what be thought was u grand scheme to
secure himself a new suit of clothes. His
brothers had been provided with new out
fits and Joe felt aggrieved, concluding that
his father had slighted him. The neglect,
■: he considered it, rankled in his little
bosom aud he sat himself down to ponder
how to secure other raiments whereiu to
clothe himself, thinking, nojdoubt, that the
mercury would be very low when he re
mained behind. No sooner was a plan
devised thin it w'as put into exeention.
Upstairs Joseph trotted during the absence
ot his father and while hi6 mother
engaged in lier household duties
and there he shed his entire outfit
and strutted around iu hi6 birthday cos
tume with a match in his hand and deter
mination in his face. Crawling under his
mother's bed he piled his clothing on the
floor, struck a match and in an instant the
much-detested pants, coat, etc., were smok
ing and burning in the most approved
fashion. Running down stairs, again
Jœeph informed his mother iu a very
matter-of-fact manner that the bed was on
fire. The women then smelled smoke and
gave on alarm of fire, which was responded
to by Harry T. Derry, a young man work
ing uear by, Seizing a couple of buckets
of Water, Derry rushed into the house and
upstairs where all danger was soon averted.
The clothes were totally ruined and the bed
was somewhat burned. It is said that
Joseph will get his new suit, but owing to
the chastisement he revived will be able to
save 1 hem for some time as he feels most at
ease by taking his meals from a mantel
piece.
ID
The Vl.lt of Comuiamler-ln-Cnlof VanD.r
loort Last wignt.
Tho Department of Delaware, G. A. R..
was visited yesterday by Commander-int.
Chief Paul VanDervoort of Omaha,
accompanied by his Aide J. B. Jones of the
same place. In the evening a cordial recep
tion was tendered him, when in company
with department officers he visited all the
post headquarters whore all the posts were
assembled. After this a parade was formed
at Fifth aud Market streets and proceeded
to the lecture room ot the («rand Opera
House, in the following order :
Platoon or20 police, under command of
Chief Hawkins, assisted by Sergeants Sova
and Decker; Commander-In-Chief aud1 staff,
Department Commander and statt, Smyth
Post Drum Corps, Smyth Post, with about
75 men, commanded by Senior ^ ice Com
mander Jacob B. Slifer; DuPont lost Drum
Corps, DuPont Post, wJtit about 75 men, iu
charge of Commander S. S. Johnson; Sum
her Post, with about 40 men, with Com
mander Simeon Hood in charge; delegations
of Watson aud Reynolds 1 osts.
Here addresses were, made by Department
Wainwright,CommandcrV anDcrvoort,Presl
dent 1 urnell of Delaware College, Colonel
S. A. Macalllster, Dr. A. Kussel, Post De
partment Commander-in-General \\ . S.
McNair, and others. Mayor \\ ales was
present, tho music was good and a pleasant
social time was spent alter the speaking.
James S. Hutton, formerly a Tennessee
journalist, and now Charlotte Thompson's
advance press agent, w as in town yeste«dav.
Mr. Hutton is a gentlemanly iellow and, un
derstsnds his bustuess thoroughly. V
A GRAND Alt61 Y RECKPTION.
j
;
I'EKSONAL.
NEWS TO-DAY BY W:
FORENOON TELEGRAMS
THE " GAZETTE.''
TBIED FOE SUICIDE ASD MABEL
A Big Fort Kdwards Fire To-day— A Ba
Suspends This Morning—Foreign Dot'
by Atlantic Cable. *
London, Dec. 20.—The speech of .NÏ
Bigger, a member of Parliament for Cava,
in Waterford yesterday, in which he dt
nounced Earl Spencer, forms the subject of
universal conversation.
Dublin, Dec. 20.— It I* stated that the
government Intends to deal Instantly wiii
Mr. Biggar on account of his attack on the
administration of justice in Ireland and ou
the character of the Viceroy.
Madrid, Dec. 20.— In the Chamber of
Deputies to day Senor Dominguez, Marshal
Serrano's nephew,demanded that Romans be
instated in the army and navy and in the
public administration, and that changes be
made in the presentation of institutions in
the direction of liberty. The Minister of
War stated that reforms in the War Depart
ment were under consideration.
MARRIED in court.
A Girl Who Tried to Kill Herself,
Trial, Acquitted and Wedded to the
Man Wlio Drove Her to the Deed.
New York, Dec. 20.—The first prisoner
ever tried in the general sessions uj>ou the
charge of felonously attempting to commit
suicide was arraigned yesterday. She was
Dorothea Christina Matzen, a tall German
trirl with blue eyes and wavy flaxen hair.
Her face was pale, and it was said that she.,
was still suffering fit*m the effects of the
poison she had swallowed. Assistant Dis
trict Attorney John O'By rue said that she
had been living with Franz Huber, No. 120
Chlstre street, as his wife. She asked him
December 0th to marry her, and he
refused. Then she steeped a box a matches
in a cup of water and drank the water.
She was taken to a hospital and her life
was in danger for some days. The first
witness had been called, when there was a
stir near the door. A short, stout, heavily
bearded man pushed in with Charles K.
Lexow, counsel of the Germau Legal Aid
Society. Mr. Lexow said, " this is Franz
Huber, your Honor, for whose sake this
poor girl, it is alleged, has attempted to take
her life. He desires to save her from im
prisonment and marry her."
There was a hum of interest among the
spectators.
"This is^an extraordinary
respect, your Honor," Miss Matzen's conn
eel said. "The poor girl here was % singer
of repute iu Germany and was engaged to
be married to Huber. He wrote to her
some months ago, asking her to come to
this city and become his wife. She came,
and finding that he would not marry her,
she tried to rid herself of a life thaï was
hateful to hcr. I suggest that a juror be
withdrawn and that being acquitted in this
way, she may be allowed to marry the man
of her heart."
" 1 have not the slightest objection," said
Mr. O'Byrue.
Judge Gildersleeve ordered that a jurorO#
be withdrawn. The interpreter told Mis ♦..»
Matzen that she was acquitted. She turned
smilingly toward Huber. He advanced a
step and then fell In an epileptic fit brought
ou by excitement. He was carried
into Judge Gildersleeve 's chambers and
a physician attended him. Miss Matzen
ioliowed and endeavored to be of assistance
in carrying Huber. When he was restored
to conscicncness he asked to have the cere
mony performed at once. He was supported
into Judge Gildereleeve's private room and
married there. Then he and bis wife went
away, hand in hand.
A Big Bank Suspends.
Rochester, N. Y., Dec. 20.— The city
bank, rated the third strongest In the city
closed its doors this morniug. There is said
to be a deficiency amounting to half a
million of dollars. The cause of the sus
pension is said to be speculation in stocks
and oil by the president, Charles E. Upton.
Great excitement prevails.
] ndiCAtions.
Washington, Dec. 20—10.30 a. in.—For
the Middle Atlautic States slightiy warmer,
cloudy wither, rain or snow, nortliehst to
southeast winds: lower barometer.
in every
(

if
A Heavy Fire To-Day.
Saratoga, N. Y., Dec. 20.—Philip C.
Thebus' grocery block at Fort F.dward wss
burned this morning. Loss, $90,000.
NEWARK NEWS.
An interesting; llnrcU of Local Happen
logs—William Dean's Hange
of the Gazette. 4
[Spec
correspond«
Newark, Dec. 20.—The death of Dr.
Clark's wife has cast a gloom over the en
tire community. Mrs. Clark had many
friends, especially amongst the poorer
classes. She was ready to assist them,
visitiug their homes and supplying them
with their wants aud making their homes
happy. The funeral services were coud ucto
in the First Presbyterian Church yesterday
Her remains were taken to Baltimore. ^
leaves a large fortuue to be divided among
her relatives. She was a large contributor
to the Fist Presbyterian Church in clearing
oft its debt, in building a new parsonage and
in sustainin'? the pastor.
The Workingmen's Mutual Debating
Society is not attended by as many working
men as might be expected. William Deau
and William Homewood patronize the
society and do considerable spouting, and
the questions are of considerable interest.
honea^government.
^JffeJhUting of ice on White Clay Creek is
fotiu&i briskly. It is from five to six
inc^ff thick and considered the best ice that
|, a8 b e( . D C u^ for several years,
William Dean's economy
0 f a serious accident in one of his
dwelling houses. In the kitchen there is
one of the newest improved ranges with u
water boiler. Mr. Dean thinking then*
wa8 f OU niueh 6t.eam escaping, shut it off.
j n a ß bort time the boiler burst, blowing
the raugc to pieces, fragments of it going
through the coiling. Charles King and
David Constantine, carpenters, were work
ing in the kitchen at the time. Both men
were struck with the brokeu pieces of the
range. Constantine who is newly arrived
from England offered up a fervent pray«
for his narrow escape, as he thought h
time had come. He does not admire the
American improvements,
xiic prizes competed for in the public
sc hools will be delivered on Friday evening
j n the college oratory. Short addresses will
\ w delivered by President Purnell, Professor
Mackey and the Rev: Mr. Hutchins. A
Christmas tree will be erected and theschol
ars , about lJKLwill receive their candies
! and oranges. The money has been given by
j cotise ladies and gentlemen belonging to th •
i town, and the.Commissioners have spared
llf> p a jna to make it a success. The Indr.
j pendent band have volunteered to play sc
; lect pieces lor the evening,
i Bed still keeps up in price.
j butchers supply this place and appe
j have a perfect union in the prices. W
about the Chicago dressed meat selling at a
very low price in your city, ami some of our
1 citizens contemplate trying it.
the result
new
êi
la
About nine
ar to
e hear

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