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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, August 08, 1883, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1883-08-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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XII -NO 87
WILMINGTON, DEL, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8. 1888.
PRICE ON E CENT.
UV1TAKV*.
pWARl»--* heViTbY "ffore.1
111 N Ïn ',1 »liprehomloii ol OollWwooil
■ »»™". »' ,',',1 from Jail at OocroBtown,
iii-Minday roorutn«, desclp
inches, retber
voice peculiar due end
Governor.
..
I : Id*)'
rv High
live feet ten
ui ■
FOB KENT.
PAKT « . F HOUSE TO A
1U7 TATS ALL STREBT.
8«A
fob halb, _
nVsAL? -Tan 7Tb established
table buBlm-Hi of 15 yean' stand-
A V,Kla g'Hrtl bus lues*. Satisfactory
n„* aonig « ,S. out; m health being the
Vu a splendid opportunité ior
-.
«02 Market s tree t.
_*TORE AND FIXTURES
• v s K. Cor. Ninth and Madison
Son* Kb'«
ent*>i' r bb
rhl
Ijtf t*
K SALE
I!
.1. T.
yJ4-tf
lit SALE
) Acres of Standing Timber.
( flv YKLLOW PINE and MAPLE.
- ne mile of railroad and three miles of
' u . „t to other la ge and line tract»
\ i.ii.i 'lif growth ol which Is likewise
' r particulars as to location,
*' 1 ' "'"oAZiCTTK OFFICE.
t.
rVJtl.IV HALJKH.
'chancery' NEW CASTLE CO.
Trustee's Sale
-of—
iEAL ESTATK !
if the Court of Chancery
in ami for New Castle
( haulhers in vacation
A. 1>.. '*83, will be
peer Park Hotel, lu
.rtu. of a He.
Del
t Still
osud to
ewxrk,
ir »dll', iu
esday, August 21 st., 1883
ti I »CLOCK, a. m ,
nds, tenements »ucl heredlta
l, -ituate In White Clay
on it tv ol' New Castle, beginnlQK
Christians reek, a corner o
>hu<| of .lohn Mo. I iaon, thence running and
ton tli<*n , M itli UkiuK I» line a poplar stutnp.
X i'lii.i m irk .»? Will am jJhnstouaud
north 42 degrees, east
»limit Ihr e feet north
d Wil iam Johnston
t c dies to a small s ut
of Chris liana creek;
perches to centre
the bed or • hau uel of
ous nicanderlngs thereof
place of beginning, con
oi laud, more or less.
\|| that certain tract or land
Ii of Andrew Kerr, William
, John Miller, Job
'liana creek, and the road
k lo Ua> ylaml line, cont in
'Ixty-four acres aud twenty
<1 terms made
r said by
Jolis li. RODNEY. Trustee,
ptaw is or by his attorney.
CHANCERY NEW CASTLE CO.
AT io.;
«I,
hM'i'li
■>
» k ;
"K 1
N". I
K.u
»»>'
liv.l
' laii'l.
p rclif
will li. Riven
Imi' ami place af
Trustee's Sale
-OF -
;KAL ESTATE!
oi' Chancery
New Castle
une, A. D.,
at the C-/urt
til.' Co.
r , Iu and f.n
»tn day of J
die sale
111 ' U'iliningtou,
ill
.»-•■•I
silay, August 21st, 1883,
AT II O'CLOCK, A. M.
■rltied real
estate, situ
lugtou, bounded and
:
of \V
•ii
land witli a three-storied brick
icreon erected, beginning at a
north • riy side ofThlr I street
went y-eiglitfeet from the east
it street, thence northern and
i. istr -et eighty five feet four
t ake in a line of late Wl-Uain
I tli nee by said line easterly
*et eighteen feet to a
line southerly and parallel
md through the middle of
*ix inches wide between
house belonging to John
air Inches to the said side
r< bv westerly eighteen
ing, containing fifteen
are feet of land, n
1.
»Ir. il .ti».
uf Wain
- itli \\ at
h
Mallei
h I
I" adjoii
*1* I. Ril
by
rrupted
with Die
lie lionses adjoining o the
mied, which communicates
fi
KI'IIIM
Mild city with a two-story
cd; beginning
olusettv land <
■eet, between Poplar
cwtth the s <id able of
a corner of land
w or James Ritchie,
northe ly, parallel
mired feet to a ttake,
vitlt Be ond street nlne
along
tin afore
;• land place of beginning,
said cltv, with a brick
beginning at th
t, between Poplar
at the distance oi one
* ester» y side
northerly parallel
Iglity-iix feet eleven
westerly eighteen feet
iherly by a
reet eighty-six teet
f Third street
at a
ii the
A
•I
•I )
fee
IMi.ik
file
i'l 1*
■tt'h la d; the
h
TI
I'lciguly l'i'î
the I
L
J
. li
Uni
I,,
said side
crly eighteen feet to the
II
'Willi
Of iM-glltid,,^.
Ill
m give
and terms made
lace aforesaid by
t DUPON T. Trustee,
or by bis attorney.
'I' :i um nl
VICTOR
*>tt t noons.
lecial Notice !
8. H. STAATS,
i-MARKET STREET—405
During the nei
30 days will make a
keeping reduction
LN the PRICES OF UIB
•''PRiNG and Summer—
Stock of
®EKY, GLOVES
-AND
Merino Underwear
r°k LADIES'
GENT» AND MI»SE8,
Kreat reduction In
iso.s and Sun Umbrellas !
Also I
« ! ül ! D(1 lt nere
** out »n U « eeourat
»• to take thl« step,
before commencing
1 »tore. Come ana
LIL STAATS.
10 HAIM'S
CHINESE LAUNDRY,
lift 11 M oh'lay, July
Ml EIN»
IflAUn
1«. at
GOAL.
J. L. & C. CO.
—FOR—
L
1 M E
—AND—
CEMENT,
C O A I
—AND
WOOD
-GOTO—
Jackson Lime & Goal Co.,
SHIPLEY A KING ST. WHARVES,
mru-e
COAL,
WOOD, LIME
—AND
SAÏD!
H. A. BROWN,
FOOT OF WEST ST.
MTCOAL AT THE REDUCED PRICE8.
TELEPHONE, !W.
ailKti-iiu42
TRAN IMPORTATION.
COAL. COAL.
BUSH'S
WILMINGTON AND PHILADELPHIA,
STEAM FREIGHT LINE.
»alls dally from Pier 2. So. Wharves, Phlla. and
Foot of Frehch Street, Wilmington.
FREIGHT HANDLED CAREFULLY AND
DELIVERED PROMPTLY.
COAL! COAL!
ANTHRACITE !
BITUMINOUS !
CAN NEU !
Particular attention given to retail orders.
G.W. BUSH & SONS.
m 10-1 y»
AM NOW PREPARED TO DELIYER
ALL SIZES OF COAL
c
SUPERIOR QUALITY FOR FAMILY USE
- AT—
THE LOWEST MARKET RVTE8 !
All coal well screened and put in cellars.
B. F. TOWNSEND.
OFFICE ft YARD FOOT OF FOURTH BT.
4uF* Telephone communication with all parts of
city.
BVMMJEJB KJEHOBT8.
HOTEL ALBION,
V
ATL \NTIC CITY, N. J.
open. Elegantly fur
nished and first-class In all Its appointments.
LENTZ A 81 EG RIST,
Proprietors.
Season of 1888
J«2
ESTABLISHED 187».
—ENLARGED AND IMPROVED 1883—
City by the Sea.
ii
SHELDON HOUSE,
OCEAN GROVE, N. J.
Finest summer and winter hotel on the coast.
Largest, (accommodating SOO) leading and most
central one In the Grove or Asburv Park.
Passenger Elevator. Hot and Cold Bea Water
and Electric Baths, bteam heat and ail modern
Improvements.
PERFECT DRAINAGE—NO MALARIA OR
MOHQUITO».
OPEN ALL THE YEAR !
W. E. SHELDON,
Sole Owner and Manager.
Terms moderate.
myM
M 'COLLUM HOUSE,
CAPE MAY CITY, M. J.
Open June 23d, 1883.
Delightfully located In full o ean view. Just
built, with all modern Improvements and fur
nished throughout with
moderate. For particulars apply to
PETER MCCOLLUM,
Proprietor and Owner.
w furniture. Terms
«17
BRO.,
DICKINSON
"All Night House,
». W. COR. FRONT AND WALNUT STB.
Wilmington, dblawau.
A choice brand of Wlnea, Liquors and Cigar
always on hand. ml2
DELAWARE COLLEGE !
-r'Fhe next term will commence—
WEDNESDAY- SEPTEMBER 5TH, 1883.
Three courses of study :
L, SCIENTIFIC AN • »A.GRICPLTU
RAL AND LITsBARY.
. For
PBE8T. W. H. PURNELL, LLD..
augS-lmlB Newark, Delaware.
CLAHS1CA
*Bott __
catalogues and other Information apply to
are admitted to the das«
N OTIC 1C».
VIDEN D—N OTIC EL
ornoK or w ilmi noton r
Wilmington
IMOTON Coal GamC'o., i
, Del., August I, 1883, J
The directors of the- Wilmington Coal G*» Com
pany have this day declared a dividend of three
dollars per share for the p«»t six months, payable
WM. P. TA * LOR. Treasurer,
demand.
R, Treai
ohlpley
augi 10t
no
itn ei,
\T OTICE.—ANY WEIGHTS, 8CALE8
XV OR measures requiring Inspection may be
828 ft 830 King Direct.
JACOB DEAKYNK,
and Measures for N
lifl
Sealer of Weight
county.
< ■. -ii.
ieas-tr
J^JOTICE.—PROCLAMATION !
Whereas, The Board of Health has evidence
of he urevaleuce or Veliuw Fe\ »rin Hav
elsewhere in the island of Cuba, and
Wmkrkas, Authority is lodg.d In this Boar,
t«'«•»tabilsli a quarantine in any
which It Is deemed expedient or necessary to pro
tect the public health. Therefore It 1» hereby or
dered that no vessel coming from Havana or any
foreign or home port in which Yellow F
known to exist, shall approach within one mile
of the city limits or shall land any passenger,
goods, wares, or merchandise without haviiv
flm notified the Port Physician of this city, anfl
obtained from htm s cerilücate that such vessel
is free from dlneasc. And any person violating
this order shall he subject to the penalty in such
This or «er to be repeated every ten days at the
discretion of the Boar . DR. L. P. BUSH,
Board of Health.
HUkI tf
t
so
as
a
the
all caset in
.. _ ent oft
E. B. Frazer, Secretary.
'I'AX PA YEK8 TA KE NOTICE.
City and School Taxes ior '83.
1 he undersigned Receiver of 'taxes for the cl y
of Wilmington will be at No. 10 Kant Sixth
t. between Market and King street» _
the flr«t day of July, 1883, between the hours
of 8and 12 in the morning and from 2 to 8 In the
art moon for the purpose of receiving taxes. On
all taxes paid during the month of July there will
be a deduction of live pur cent, on every dollsrand
all taxes paid durl g the month of AuguBt up to
ftP d jRF lu ' l . l,| F the September the face of
the bill will be required; all taxes unpaid on the
next day after the first of eptember, shall be in
creased by the ad ition of five per centum, on
tiie amount thereof. fclllMi; N I) I'R VOnT,
Receiver Northern District, Including all North
of dix th street.
DEN KH KANE,
District, including all South
augl
afier
Rei el
So . tliei
of Hlxth street.
OTICE.
Thomas H. Morrison, ) In Chancery,
,. r vs. • New Castle Couuty,
William Morrison, \ . n
et. al. J Partition.
In pursuance of an order of the Chancellor li
the above cause made at the February te
D., 1883. All persona having any lien «
affecting the interest or estate of Thomas II.
Alorrl » u, William Morrlaon, Ann Mon iaon,
Waanuel Morrison, Francis Carson, Eliza J.Car
Jamea I\ Morrison, John Morrison. Ellen
M rriaon aud Ellen C. Morriaou,or, either of
them. In the lauds and premises to which aald
cauae relates, are hereby uotifled to flle a petition
setting forth tiie ualu e and amount of the same
In tiie offlecofthe Register in < hancery for New
•Htle c <» u »ty. ten <l»y* before the fourth MON
DAY In Sepiemner, A. D. t l8H3,and to
said Hen or liens at the ensulhx
J court, before the rising of the court
third day of the term.
, J. H. RODNEY, Trustee.
WilmingtoN, Aug. «, i88i. augö-mAs-öw
llet
appear a..il
Him
y OTICE !
Th* »täte of Delaware
-^TO TH- —
New * astle
)
New Castle county
». 8 .
Sheriff
County. Greeting :
Whereas Montroje A. Palleu by his p» tltlon
the Judges of our Hupei ior Court, Hied in l
office or the Protli »notary of the said court, n
and for New Castle county, for the cause of com
plaint therein alleged, has made application to
the said Judges that a decree may be pronounced
dl«8ol ing the marriage existing between the pe
litloncr aud his wife Ann E. Pallen.
We therefore command you as you have been
heretofore commanded, that you summon
Pallen, so that she be a'<d appear betöre the
Judges of our said court at he next te
th<
thereof
beheld lu Wilmington, on Monday, the se -
tee nth day of September next, to answer the
allegations or the suiil petition, and also to show
cause, ifany shehas, why a decree of the said
court should not be made dissolving the marriage
existing between her and Die said petitioner, ac
cording to the Act of Assembly in such c
and provided, aud also
the said court shall then
receive what
const.
cernlng her in this behalf as to the court shall
and consistent with the provisions of
the s-ild Act of Assembly
Witness, the Hon. Joseph P. Comegys, Esq.,at
Wilmington, the tweuty-tliird day orMay A.D.,
eighteen hundred and eighty-three.
GEO. A. MAXWELL, Proy.
Issued, .June 9th, 1883.
The above is a true eopv of als. summon No. 19,
»eptemberT, 1883, returnable »eptemberT, 1683.
JAMES MARI IN, Sheriff.
le 12-1 tw
lo aud
WILMINGTON, June#, 1883.
LIOBNHE APPLICATIONS.
N otice. — i, Bridget sweeny,
THE OWNER ol the houBe situated at the
northeast corner Mudison and f'hrlstlana streets.
iy of Wilmln ton,
t Delaware, in com
vith the requirements of the Acts of the
General Assembly. In such case made and pro
vided, do hereby glv» notice that 1 shall apply In
writing to the Court of General Sessions or i
l*eace and Jail Delivery or the »täte Oi Delà*
d for New Castle county, on Monday the
day of »eptember, A. 1). 1883, being the
term of said court, for a license for said house
inn or tavern for the sale i herein of Intoxi
cating liquors if! le s quantities than one quart,
he drunk on the premises, and the following
respectable citizens, n sidents of said ward, re
mineud the said application, viz :
John C. Laver)', Martin McGrath,
Michael Newell, Michael Fagan,
Jas. M. Griffin, Daniel Msier,
Jacob W. Hill, Frederlch Hoch,
Win. H. Blake, David My
Mulllu, Alexander Moon,
Matthew Gropp, Patrick Dillon,
M, Hacken berg, Patrick Carney,
James A. Hourke, Michael Miirpny,
Thomas I FltzsInunoup.'J s. Monaghan,
Henry Wltt.il. Edward A. Hi gins,
Wm. G. »chwarz, Dennis Bradley,
aug6-3t BKIuGKT'SwtENY.
Die Third ward of the ell
couuty of >■ e*v Castle. State o
jdlance with the
I
11
in
hi
LOCAL LACONIC».
Deviled crabB at Fullmer's.
Roast dinners at Fullmer's.
Soft shell crabs at Fullmer'6.
Ice cold salt oysters at Fullmer's.
An excursion to Silver Grove will be given
by Bethel A. M. E. church to-morrow.
A horse valued at $500, the property ol
H. A. Brown, died suddenly of colic læt
night.
A branch china store will be opened by
William Lawton at 507 King street In a
short time.
The excursion of the West Presbyterian
church to Atlantic City will leave French
street wharf, to-morrow morning, at ffi80
o'clock.
The Phœnlx hose carriage is expected to
be ready for service again by Monday. Wm
Bullock, at Tenth and Tatuall, is doing the
repairing.
The residents on French street between
Fifth and Sixth, are complaining ol
the condition of the street. The
recent heavy rains have washed the street
to such an extent that the large stones used
in the macadamizing are left lying loose.
of
The Rffeota of a Fall.
Mrs. Alanthea T. Triggs accidentally fell 1
down stairs at he- residence, 508 Lombard j
street, about 6 o'clock last evening and j
broke her right arm at the wrist.
A Four and a- Half Pound Carp.
A leather carp weighing fbur and a-lia'f
pounds, caught a few days ago in the Bran
dywine by Col. Enoch Mo^re, Jr., and pre
eeuted by him to Dr. Shortlidge and Jacob
Puscy, is supposed to be one offne fish with
which Councilman ' mith's pond was stocked
a lew years ago aud which were afterwards
washed out by a Iresliet.
Death of a Well-Known Conductor.
One of the bpst known conductors
Maryland division of the Pennsylvania rail
road, Andrew Simpson, died in Philadel
phia late on Monday night of Bright's dis
ease. He was about 35 years of age aud
had been connected with the road for about
15 years.
» hi
AN AWFUL TRAGEDY.
A HUSBAND SHOT IN BED BY
HI8 WIFE.
A OEAZY WOMAN'S FEAEFU1, DEED
Rendered Wild by Pain and buffering,
She Shoot* Her Husband While He
Peacefully Sleep» Beeide Her In Bed.
Baltimore, Aug. 7.—representative
of one of the moat artotfx.r»tic families in
the United States, and a member of the
family of General Washington, was shot
and killed early this morning by hfs wife,
whose birth is equal to that of the slain
man's. The tragedy occurred about two
miles from Relstertown, Baltimore county.
Lewis Lawrence Conrad, a well-known Bal
timore lawyer, was the victim, and the un
happy woman is his wife, Minnie Worthing
ton Conrad. The husband and wife had
been living for some time at Montmorency,
the estate of Mr-*. Martha G. Worthington,
Mrs. Worthington, who is the mother oi
Mrs. Conrad, was awakened about 1 o'clock
by her daughter, who ran into her room
crying:
"Mother I have killed my husband. Oh,
my Godl I have killed him."
Mrs. Worthington sprang to her feet,and,
rushing to her daughter,discovered that she
had in her hand a small revolver. Mrs. Worth
ington's shrieks brought her son John Tolly
Worthington to the scene, and together they
hurried to Mr. Conrad's room. They found
t hat gentleman lying upon the bed, his head
in a pool of blood and a large wound in the
left side of his head, from which the blood
was slowly oozing.
AN INSTANTANEOUS DEATH.
A messenger was at once dispatched for
Dr. J H. Dickson, at Reisterstown, who ar
rived at the house shortly after. The doctor
saw at once that life was extinct, and upon
examination found that death bad beeu in
stantaneous. The ball had entered the left
side of the head, about an Inch and a half
above the ear, and had penetrated to the
centre of the brain.
The uews of the terrible occurrence spread
rapidly, and by daylight a number of friends
and acquaintances had called to &6certaiu
the truth ol the report and condole with the
family. Mrs. Conrad had in the meantime
been removed to another room in a violent
state of hysterics. She was perfectly rational,
however, and gave a lucid and clear statc
me t as far as her excited condition would
permit, going to show that the shooting may
save been accidental.*
RESOLVED UPON SUICIDE.
The lady has been suffering since last Jan
uary with
and lK)wels, which at stated periods seemed
almost to derange her mind. She stated to
tiie doctors that last night her suffering was
so great that she h (i resolved upon suicide
as the only method of relief, and to that end
had taken to lied with her a small revolver,
and secreted the weapon beneath her pillow.
Between 12 and 1 o'clock she said her suf
ferings became unbearable, and she seized
the pistol, resolved to end her life. In turn
ing it. around, however, the weapon exploded
killed her husband. She does not re
member whether her husband awoke or not,
but from the position of the body it is
thought that Mr. Conrad was awakened by
his wile's movements and raised up and en
couraged her to remain quiet.
ACQUITTED BY A JURY.
The admonition coming suddenly upon
her, it is thought, startled the lady, and In
her excited and nervous condition the
weapon exploded. A Coroner's jury re
turned a verdict that the death was from ac
cident.
This verdict, however, is not in accord
with the views of many people in the neigh
borhood, who believe that Mrs. Conrad, in
moment of temporary insanity, pointed
the pistol at her husband's head and fired
There is a streak of insanity running
through b >th branches of the family, John
Tolly Johns, one cousin, having committed
suicide two y« are ago, and Ned Hanson,
another cousin,having murdered Mr.Charles
White iu a fit of insanity a few months ago
Mrs. Conrad was once a handsome woman,
but Is now emaciated by continued sick
is
in
acute neuralgia of the stomach
is
as
MEMBER OF THE WASHINGTON FAMILY.
the 3d day of
Mr. Conrad was born
July, 1839, in the State of Mississippi. He
entered the Confederate army at the break
ing out of the war, and
captain
father was Charles M. Conrad, at
tary of War under President Fillmore. Mr
Conrad's graudlather was a nephew of
General Washington, and his grandmother
Nelly Custis, daughter of Mrs. Wash
for some time
General Buckner's staff. His
Secre
ington.
Mr. • onrad owned large estates in New
Orleans and was very wealthy. He married
Miss Worthington about 13 years ago. The
issue of the union is
11 years old. Their domestic life has always
heretofore, been a happy one. The Worth
ington family is one of the most pominent
in the country.
child, a boy about
The Return of the Champion.
Officer Pierson returned from New York
yesterday afternoon, bringing with him the
prize of the champion swimmer of the police
department. He speaks oi his treatment by
the Nonpariel Boat Club, by whom he
entertained, iu the highest terms. The
officer says that the report published in the
New York papers that he caught hold oi the
pier and rested is false. The current was
strong that he was repeatedly carried
back, aud when he finally got above the
pier, he was dashed against it by the force
of the curreut and pushed himself off, as he
was seen to do by the referee. The
championship badge is of gold and alto
gether about lour inches long; the
pin is a gold crown inscribed
"Police Gazette Medal, Champion Swimmer
Police Department." Pendant to it is a
half globe suspended by two gold chains,
upon which is engiaved " Police Gazette
Medal." The globe is surmounted by an
eagle with flags on either side and a laurel
wreath beneath, from which hangs a shield
containing the name of Richard K. Fox.
proprietor of the Police Gazette , by whom
the medal was awarded. The prize is now
indow of Samuel
it
in
Flnger Amputated.
While engaged in hoisting barrels at the
ware house of the Jessup & Moore Paper
Company, Patrick Hagerty, living on east
Se veut h street, had his hand, so severely
crushed in the block aud tackle that am
putatton of one finger was necessary. I
on exhibition in the
Hawkins, cigar dealer, No. 618 Market
street. The Nonpareil Club also present« d
the champion with a handsome gold spoon
and he also receivt;d a handsome gold
locket from a party of ladies who witnessed
his feat.
Opened Yesterday.
Yesterday, the camp-meeting at Joanna
Heights, on the Wilmington and Northern
railroad, opened for a ten days session.
During the camp au extra train will be
every day, leaving Coateville at 7 a. m., and
the camp grounds at 7 p. m. The travel
yest' rday c ver the road to the campgrounds
from north and south was very heavy.
BASE BALL.
TRe galokstep* Again Beaten-Other
Oam«H and Notes.
HABRfHBriio, August 7.—The Harrisburg
Club won auother championship game to
day from the Quickstep, of Wilmington.
Fox and Cueick were the battery for the
Quickstep, but Casick was knocked out in
the sixth innine by Foy'b wild pitching.
Burns and McClosky were the local battery.
The home team had 12 hits with a total of
15. and the visitors five hi«* wifi a total of
six. The Harrisburgs had but one error, a
missed fly, the Quickstep making five er
rors, all damaging. The score follows:
Harrisburg.
Quickstep..
.. 2 00001200—
.. 00000100 0
OTHER GAMES.
At Reading, championship game:
Brooklyn
Active...
6
:
.. 04106200 3-16
.. 20 2 000000—4
At Pottsville, championship:
Tren*on
Anthracite. 01001013 0—6
At Philadelphia:
Athletic.
Baltimore ...
Philadelphia
New York...
At New York:
100000000—1
.12006012 0—12
. 000000280—6
. 00000100 0-1
. 00200020 X— 4
Allegheny. 000100000—1
Metropolitan. 2403006 2 x-16
At Providence:
Bo ton
Providence. 000 2 0100 1—4
At Detroit:
010200 i! 10— e
Detroit.
00 2 000400—6
Chicago. 000000000—0
At Clevelad:
Buffalo.
Cleveland.
At Cincinnati:
St. Louis. 000001020—3
10040001 0-6
000001000—1
00301100 0—6
Cincinnati
At Columbus:
Kclipse. 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1—6
Columbus. 0 1 0 0 1 1 4 1 0—8
At Lancaster yesterday the Reading Club
defeated the Ironsides by a score of 10 to 9
iu a 12-inning game. Pyle, the late pitcher
for the Quickstep, pitched for the visitors.
NOTES.
The Allegheny club has signed Morgan,
late of the Brooklyn.
It is said that Manager Philips, of the Co
lumbus Club, will have charge of next sea
son's St. Louis Club.
Leary has signed with the Harrisburg Club
and O'Brien, also released Irom Baltimore,
will play with the Quickstep Club of Wil
mington.
Harbidge, of the Philadelphia Club, was
presented with a very handsome and expen
sive gold badge by his west Philadelphia
friends during yesterday's game at Recrea
tion Park.
The Western newspapers don't seem to
think much of Philadelphia's American
Association ball club. One says: "If the
Athletic ever wins the championship the 8t.
Louis and Cincinnati nines ought to emi
grate."
Tom Mausell, of the St. Louis club,walked
thr< ugh an open elevator door where there
W8 8 no elevator at Cincinnati on Sunday
night and fell about 10 feet, severely injur
ing his right leg and knee. Dolan takes his
place
Harry Pyle, late pitcher of the QuickC
steps, who was given his release last week,
is now playing with 8am Fields' new Read
ing nine. Pyle is a good pitcher, and had
many friends in this city, who will deeply
regret that his unprofessional conduct com
pelled the Quickstep management to release
him.
In the last four games with the Baltimore
club the Athletic won three, and made 35
runs, 33 base hits, for a total of 40, aud 41
errors, against one game, 29 runs, 41 base
hits, total of 56, and 71 errors for the Balti
moreans. Fifteen of the Athletic's base bits
and just half of the total bases were made
in yesterday's game, with Henderson pitch
ing. Em.slie proved the most effective
pitcher for Baltimore, while Corey did the
best work foi the Athletic.
the nine.
FARMING IN LANCASTER.
Tobacco Raising—Some Comparisons That
Will Surprise Oar Delaware Farmers.
[Special correspondence of the Gazette, j
Refton, Lancaster Co., Pa., August 7.
—A Delawarean visiting Lancaster county,
is surprised at ths reputation it h: s secured
for the excellence of its farm lands
wouders that Delaware has not secured
world wide fame for Its lauds. True, Lan
caster county has arrived at a high state of
cultivation, but there are lots of land no'
five miles from Wilmington
better than any in Lan- aster county.
Why, the farms up here do not average
over 20 bushels of wheat to an acre, while
any good farmer near Wilmington raises
that much, aud many of them have as high
as 30 and 40. Of course the higher figures
are exceptional cases. When your corre
spondeut left Wilmington corn had beeu
opened in the market for sale for some
time, but here It is, with few exceptions,not
ripe yet, and where I am stopping they had
corn i or dinner yesterday, and they
thought it such a wonderful thing
they told all their visitors about their
having corn
He
good if not
early. Another thing that
contributes to the value of land ia, that the
(armors are economical, thrifty and seien
tifle. When I say scientific, I mean they
use the latest improved farming Implements,
farm o i certain and determinate principles
and utilize every foot of land Nothing goes
to w&cte. Something is found to grow
foot of ground and
li stance where the
on every
it is a rare
same a 1 tide is grown the second or third
year on the same land. One year the Lan
caster county farmer w 11 plant corn, the
next he will let the land go as pasture and
then follow that with either wheat or oats.
The tobacco is then put in and kept there
for twu or three years.
There is oue thing that this county leads
in and that is the price of land. One
cannot buy any kind of a farm
whatever for less than $200 to
$2 r i0 an acre, and some land brings
as high as $300. These seem like high fig
, but they are (acts. A iarm near hen
was sold at executor's sale a few days ago
and the terms were cash. The whole farm
of 85 acres brought $16,830, au average of
$198 per acre. In cousequence of this no
such large farms as you meet with lu Delà
seen here, and it is a rare thing to
meet with one containing over 125 acres; 90
and 100 acre farms are spoken of as large
ones- The main cause of these enormous
prices lor land is the growth of tobacco in
these parts. Tobacco has done much for
Lancaster couu'y. It has made many of
the farmers wealthy and made its land val
uable. It pays better than any
other product of the land,
but requires considerable outlay and
attention. Two acres will require one man's
constant time and attention. It amply re
pays him for everything, aud if It turns out
well, will bring him all the way from $250
to $100 an acre, and it is more toward the
latter figure than the former. Since tobacco
has been grown here some farmers who
were worth very little are now very wealthy
and retired, and ruu their farms on shares
with tenunts. There is no reason why it
should uot do the same for Delaware
farmers. It pays better than peaches and
can stand more, and Delaware soil is re
mark ably well adapted for it.
t AFTER THE FIGHT.
t the Champion Slugger Thinks of the
Maori Giant.
w York, Aug. 7. —Sullivan, the pugi
tift for Boston this morning. Prior to
•parture, he said he bad experienced
difficulty in knocking Slade out than
pec ted.
what respect?"
ell, you see, I have always thought
that 81ade would come to the front and.
mal e as good a light as was in his power
when we met in the ring. Now, I don't
want you to think that I am bragging at all
but that is just what I wanted him to do.
If ftjom the beginning of the fight he had
put Llmself on the aggressive, and then
giveln me more chances for good openings,
I w<|»uld have knocked him out in a jiffy."
"You see," continued Sullivan, "there is
one great point in such matches which the
public generally don't understand."
"What is that?"
"Simply this: That the harder a man
fights the more liable he is to be 'downed'
by ijis antagonist if the latter happens to be
the pore scientific of the two. Slade seemed
to khow this and held himself principally
on the defense, hoping to tire
wayl Now all the tim« I was pummeling
awa^* to break down his guard I could have
letting him have it where the
blovj*s would have told bad he been fight
lug."
out to- that
DM
"What do you think of Blade's nerve?"
"Oh, he's got lots of that, and it's a very
good thing to have when backed bv science
and strength. But Slade is not a very hard
blttelr, and could have a good deal more
science than he has."
"From the standpoint of the prize ring
what do you think of the comparative merits
of Slade, Wilsoi. and Mitchell ?"
"The latter ranks first. He is plucky, has
lots bf nerv» and will make as hard a fight
as hi|i can, and if he gets knocked out you
may be sure it is owing to his antagonist
beinÇ much the better man.
wonit stand up before a man aud resorts to
tricks in the prize ring to down bis antago
nist. As. lor Slade he is still pretty
'fresh.' However, he may yet be a good
man "
Now, Wilson
THE SLUGGER AT THE HUB.
Boston, August 7.—The unwonted spec
tacle! of a crowd which packed Washington
street solid ior half a square, and ran over
into two cross streets; a police captain, two
serg(|auts, and a quarter of a hundied pa
trolnieu lining ,one side of the walk, and
no ousted officers charging through
crowd iu the middle of the street and mak
ing 4 reluctant passage for the horse cars
was presented this evening, on the occasiou
oi the opening of a new barroom.
Cultured Boston turned out 10,000 men
ys and half the force of a police divl
as
of
one
he
now
will
her
be
; m
and
sion to witness and assist. The place Itself
gaudy with cut glass and mirrors.
Haifl a dozen barkeepers lined the glitter
ing tfar and waited for the orders of patrons.
(Ner the door, in raised gilt letters a
foot high, was the legend "John L. Sulli
van," and in a private reception room back
of thp front saloon, fresh from his triumph
over the Maori, the famous slugger received
the congratulations and the adulation of a
select few admirers. The general public,
however, were not admitted. The
police, tor this occasion, officiated as
"boujneers" for the saloon, and
mittsjnce to everybody except sports who
held invitations, reporters and a few favored
statesmen and gamblers. Periodically the
blue coats made a rush on the crowd and
drov<|; them off the sidewalk. Occasionally
the rougher element in the crowd would re
sist this summary treatment and would be
clubbed, and in some instances arrested; but
the epampion and bis friends and customers
were saved from annoyauce and the magis
tracy of law vindicated,
stone's throw of the residence of Wendell
Phillips.
!us«d ad
I
All this within
sl
THE STRIKE.
Cutttilig the Western Union Wires—Strike
of Railroad Operators.
Ne'Iv York, August 7.—While the p
dispatches describe g the Sullt van-Sl
ress
lade
fight were being transmitted ^to Boston
and other New England cities about 11.30
last liight, the wires suddenly ceased to
work« After some delay circuits by way of
Albafiy and by Toronto and Montreal were
secured, and the dispatches were transmitted
by thi|'se routes. To-day the lineman of the
company found that the wires at Scarsdaie—
poiijit on the Harlem railroad, about 25
miles from New York—to the number o*f
twently nine, had been cut, evident y
t>y experienced bands. The wires
comprised the old Mutual Union,
American Union, and Atlantic and Pacific
lines. They divide at thi6 point, some going
to the) nortf and others to the east. Only
the laitter were cut. At Coscob, where 39
wires of the Western Uaiou Compauy cross
the rikrer by meaus of a cable, it was found
that t|he cable-box hud bcun demolished and
the cable cut close to the draw. Other dam
ages l ad alrfo been doue to the
the cpmpany. A large force
were i|ient out, aud during the morning the
repalis have been going rapidly forward.
The company has offered $1,000 for the
rest apd conviction oi any one who inter
feres aith its wires.
A reward of $1,000
ing by the Brotherhood for the arrest aud
conviction of any Western Union employes
fouiu| maliciously interfering with the wires
of that company. A similar reward was
offered for the identification of any agent of
the company offering a bribe to striking line
lo interfere with wires. Members of
the Brotherhood assert that the company
have ordered their own employes to cut the
wires in order to turn public sympathy
from the strikers.
In the suit ot Marrlon, Biddle & Marrion
against the Western Union Company, to re
cover $200 damages, for the alleged refusal
to transmit a dispu tch on July 26, the court
to day denied a motion to dismiss the suit,
but granted a motion made by counsel for
the company for a bill of particulars.
Chicago, August 7. —Reports from the
which the Brotherhood of Tele
property oi
of linemen
offered this ev
railroads
graphe** 0 ordered a strike were to the effect
that i|
city except the Wabash have lost a single
man On that road two operators quit work,
and t(ie managers say that only oue quit be
cause he belonged to the Brotherhood.
It ik now stated that the demand upon the
Chicago aud Alton road for a gcneial in
creasiji of wages and the restoration of dis
charged men emanated from irresponsible
parties, and that the master workman of
the lc|»cal Brotherhood is very much incensed
there it.
Th« city council last night passed a reso
lutloiji of sympathy with the striking tele
grapljers, and holding that the strike should
be hr ou ht to an cud speedily
the dimage to business resulting from its
continuance.
Washington. August 7.—At a meeting
of th<! Federation of Labor h< ld here this
evenijjg resolutions were adopted expressing
sympathy with the t< legraphic strikers, and
petitilming the Senate Committee on l duea
tion jo consider the propriety of asking
Congress to authorize the Postmaster Gen
eral to selz , in the name ot the people, the ;
enfin telegraph system uo* iu oj eration, j laet
coud uct the business of transmitting tele-!
graphic messages as a part ol the Govern
meutoervice. 1
The
for
ir
on
of the roads running out of this
account of
.
THE BUSINESS WORLD.
DETAILS OF BARLOW'S FAIL
URE IN VERMONT.
FINANCIAL OEASHES IN BOSTON.
Latent Particulars of the Troubl
of the
Vermont Bank and Railroad President —
Failure» In Beaton.
8t. Albans, Vt., August 7.—Details of
the Barlow failure show a very bad condl
tiou of thinks. It is believed that the Ca
nadian Pacific syndicate deliberately put
Barlow into the hole ou a specious contract
to buy bis road for $3,500,<00, ou thé strength
of which they advanced • him from time to
time $1,300,000, which he used for various
improvements and extensions, some of
which he would not otherwise have made,
they representing that they were to take the
road a.ni wanted it put in shape.
By this meaus they got control oi a ma
jority of the bouds as collateral, and then
made a prg u*t of th^ accident last week to
break off the negotiations and demand the
payment of the loans. They will thus,
probably, get the road lor the amount ad
vanced aud it will be almost indispensable
as the Eastern outlet ol the Canadian Pacific.
Barlow owns $175,000 oi the $200,000 capital
of the Vermont National Bank, aud it holds
his paper for $310,000, secured by $450,000
rtgage bouds of tiie Mom real, Port- •
I Boston railroad, with $50,000 ac
The collateral is
flrsfc
land and
cr>.ed interest coupons,
considered good for the debt The bank's
liabilities to depositors are about $330,000.
The effect of the failure is to depress busi
ng affairs here to day. President Brainard,
of the Trust Company, says that the deposi
tors will not lose mu^h, but the latter are
not so hopeful. The trust company's last
statement showed 2,100 depositors, with de
posits of $600,000
Several railroad men, including Governor
Fairbanks, held a conference to-day at Bar
low's residence. The statement that the
Comptroller approved of the bauk's loan to
the Southeastern railroad was incorrect.
The Comptroller faid it was too large and
suggested its reduction. The First National
Bank expected aud prepared for a run this
morning, but none took place.
MORE TROUBLE IN BOSTON.
Boston, Aug. 7.-Wright, Wooster &
(Jo., wool dealers, at »6 Federal street,failed
to day and made an asslgumedt of all their
property, for the benefit of their creditors,
to Lester Goodwin, oi Newton, oue of the
firms employees. The firm is one of the
prominent wool houses of Boston, and has
done a large business, and the liabilities
thought to aggregate a heavy figure The
concern stood iu very good credit, and has
been considered worth from $100,000, to
$i5i|00» , and the failure is the course of no
little surprise to the trade.
gaids the liabilities, nothing is yet
definitely known, but those conversant with
the firm's business are of he opinion that
they do not exceed $3oo,000. The bulk ©f
this is thought to be owed to the banks,
which have, in the majority of cases, the en
dorsement of John Wooster, lather of Mr.
Wooster of the firm, who is currently re
puted to be worth $500,000, aud who is not,
as far as known, engaged in outside busi
ness, having lettred from the trade several
years since.
W. C. <fc R. M. Silsby, tanners, Troy, N.
Y., have failed in consequence of the failure
of Henry Whitten & Wylan, of Boston. The
Troy aud Boston firms have dealt quite
largely with each other, the former h aving
both bought hides from the Boston firm
and consigned the leather manufactured to
Iu the mutual transaction the
Messrs. Silsby came to owe the Boston firm
quite largely for hides and advances on con
ments.
H. McClure, tanner and furrier, of
Peabody, has also failed. The liabilities of
not definitely known.
The Herald says there were reports in
Lynn this morning of several iailures
count of the suspension ol* Charles W.
Clements, among small manufacturers.
Most of the shoes made for them were for
Mr. Clemente' trade. Samuel Gale wa6
among those reported as embarrassed. None
of the factories aflected by the Clements lall
employ over 30 or 40 bauds, and It is said
their suspension will be only temporary.
The Shaw failure is thought to be
lar-reacliing iu its effect upon some of Lynn'»
business men than the public has yet been
given to understand. The C. H. Ward
statement is thought peculiar, aud places
one of the city financiers iu a position which
he was not thought to occupy.
It is asserted that several suspensions will
occur amoug the small Lynn
during the ensuing lew days, but it is
thought that
volved in any case.
The Traveller says: William B. Fowle,
treasurer of the Auburndalc Watch Com
pany, failed last night. His liabilities are
now supp sed to be small, although nothing
definite has yet beeu learned. The failure
will undoubtedly involve the Auburndale
Watch Company, whose liabilities, it is
thought, will far exceed the assets.
The Funeral of Mr». Smith.
The funeral of Mrs. Charles Smith, who
died suddenly of apoplexy on Monday after
noon, will take place from the residence of
her sou Charles E. Smith, 14< 3 Jackson
street, to-morrow afternoo i. Services will
be held at the house at 3 o'clock and inter
ment will be made ih the Wilmington aud
Brandywine Cemetery.
AI
I kern
sl f.
these firms
on ac
m »re
ufacturers
large amounts will be iu
Two if tlm l u mbers of tl-• B.mrrt
nealt!. w* re inlaid at the ntqvilnf^d H
laet « veiling, ui. l as t ,.*v ver. not r ir
forced bv a sufficient miin'wr to start K «
the meeting ...„fi '
poned. a*ny post
Fruit Shipments.
The shipment yesterday of fruit over the
Delaware railroad was the heaviest up to
date and consisted principally of peaches.
The total of 93 e:
lows: Jersey City, 47; Philadelphia, 29;
Boston, 6; Chester, 5; Wilmington, 3; Hart
ford, 2; Baltimore, 1. This is the largest
shipment to date.
were distributed as fol
Kxour»lon to Mt. Cuba.
On Monday next St. Peter's Catholic
Church will give an excursion to Mt. Cuba
the De' aware Western railroad. The
excursionist» will leave New Castle
special train for this city and then be trans
ferred to a special train ou th« l». W. R. R.,
leavirg here at 8.15 o'clock.
Off
Last evening Councilman Nowell, John
Logan, Edward Mellon atnl t wo others left
this city on the yacht Willi mi B. Norton,,
for a few day's cruise down the bay. They
will go a6 far us Lowes and spend the time
ir gunning and fishing. They will return
on Saturday next.
.A Launch at ftnacli '» Shipyard,
Chester, August 7.—The Alasklan,
Iron side-wheel steambo.it, built for the
Oregon Steam hip C
Puget- 8 me 1, was la
day. The
beam uu-1 U firot h -Id.
a Cruise.
use on
cd :«i Roach's t.o
sel is 26G ft' et loug, 30 feet
lioarti ot lftcai h

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