OCR Interpretation


The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, August 27, 1883, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1883-08-27/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

£
a.
aiette
j

à
\
*
c
\
Entered at the oost office at WliminjTtonrDe t. , iù «ecorê-claaa matter.
____ __& -
\r 0 L. X^t-NO. 103
WILMINGTON DEL , MON DAY, AUGUST 27, 1888.
PRICE ONE CENT.
HHVTAHJUt.
R „WARD-A RKWARD OF FIVE
III'NIIRED " W-AK8 1* ln-ruhT offerwl
fc ffi.ÂïffeS r r lHSÄiSr
l1 "" : htïlicbeek bones, voice peculiar line an i
»r*<? it rown hair and small dark eyes, sharp
c r*cke*t. t r |vn nHA8 ü# BU) KLEY.
ehlu 1W* governor.
FOR RENT.
r-oR RENT — FART OF HOUSE TO A
r s'** 1 '• r,u " My 'in7 tatsau.stbket.
" I T H ■■ "ll —
WANTED.
_ anted -WOMEN TO WORK IN A
" ,. f i» ,,nery by MOIB'8 CANNERY.
_ - _ ■
h>h a alu.
'OK KALE
F
100 Acres of Standing Timber.
chiefly YELLOW PINK and MAPLE.
. mile of railroad and three miles of
ila -• nt to other la r ge and line tracts
Und. ihe growth ft which is likewise
S!. the mark"!. For j.rtlcul.r. •• to location,
C»liTl' etC " r ''tlAZlETTR OFFICE.
POR SALE -STORE AND FIXTURES
r ill »«rocervlt E. Oor. Ninth and Madluon
urreM. htorefor ^'«Jj^'Miirket 8t.,
at the store.
Within
water,
id ii
mjflMf
FURLIV SALES.
ail
F
PUBLIC SALES.
Hepl 1. Superior dwelling, Delaware avenue,
»ylvanla avenue.
lot» Naff property be
d Delaware avenues, also
slut A
Klrst-cl'
•.t Ivan la
8
Sr
the Forty Acres.
loll •
Srpt. 15. -Solid high lot a
bridge.
svpt. 22.- Exec lent lots, high Und, Eleventh
Eleventh street
*1.
lota over Third street bridge,
id miscellaneous lots and
•t. fl.-Business
t. 1». -Sundry
sell will please send In lists
Partie» desiring
ImincIlHtely.
tug.23 3t
UFA LI) A CO.
EU WARE AVENUE DWELLING
.1 IV11 ii. i. avenue tot.
1)
PUBLIC SALE
-OF TH Bi
Tiiree-story brick
Superior dwelling
?
-NO. 1210 DELAWARE AVENUE—
gond lot In
Pennsylvan'a
Saturday, Sept. 1st, '83,
in., on the premises. Wilmington, Del.,
postponement, withdrawal or underbid
selling
llh K
iH.:fp.
without
din.'.
uh oi
Briii.h
n»tru»ted with superior
«ml Marble Work by a practical
. all high t ulllngt,2 Rath
Wash Basins,
km
stationary wann nasins,
Marble Vestibule, Ba^
* , front Flazza,ttid.! v
nlenc s. Lot 32 ft. 4ln. fr
•. and over 10Ü ft. Iu depth,
nditiKH and views.
Tim l"i in Hie n ar 1» 33 ft. wide on the square
veraglng over lOuit. In depth, fr ntlng on I*
, directlv opposite the beautiful
lawn and >ilia property of Mr.Grant. Delaware
«i properties are now scarce In the
i' advancing In value. The acces
e properties to the Pennsylvania,
lo, railroad depots, to clfurches,
all the busluess centers,
»»•1 KUlie beautiful Brandy wiu . is Evaluable
K
'1 dry
liar,
Ihr
on Del
n arkf
ilblllly ofil
Bab lim
1
V
TUniS OF «ALF, — For the Dwelling fl.
rtgage properly secured by
the balance one-half In cash
other half In approved not»* at three
»Hli Interest from day of sale. Two
dollars to be paid as forfeit money when
Ï Si ttlement io be made on oi befor»
ir 8th, at noou. Possession
11'in a I
ad i
'Ivy, Sep
uç>n Mitietm
11,000 may rein at
uni-hall cash
mortgage,
U the other half
<*e months with Interest
Hundred dollars to be
ruck off. Taxes
•I Hi
fr-S'l
I
foi
forfeit money whe
to be paid by seller. Titles clear.
HEALD AC«>.,
Seventh and Market streets
Agents to effect the sale.
D i
»ug.25,27,'29.31
REGISTERS NOTICES.
REGISTER'S ORDER.
, KgOIHTER'S OFFICE, i
Ntw l asile County, Del.. July 26, 1883. f
lpon tin; application of Asenath Demptey, ad
ministrai. >r of John Dempsey. late Of
HUiiu day ( reek hundred. In Balucounty.de
.1 .' 11 .«»ordered ami directed by the Register
Ui»! the Administratrix aforesaid give notice of
fronting of Letters or Administrât! >11 upon
"S.^ ,aU ' l of l,le <lccease«l, with the date of
ftrautlng thereof, by causing advertisements to
ÏÏ.iW 1 forty days from the date of
such letters In „lx of the most public places of the
or New ( asile, requiting all persons
against the estate io present the
r abble by an Act of Assembly ln auch
<!•• and provided ; and also cause the same
b... v 1, . 1 . s, ' r, '"' within the same perlo«! In the
1 a u Gazkttk, a newspaper published In
Y)" l ° ^ con " nue<1 iherela three
1 c «,vM ,ven un 'te r the band and Beal of
**• «• ><Mllceofthe Register aforesaid,at Wll
Jh'b'Kton, In New Castle county afore
Wd. Hie day aud year above written.
B. C. B1UGB, Register.
NOTICB.
'■"i..
having dp
UUlt,
Ih
th* i!* r90n ?* lav,n l? claims against the estate of
" ,UB t present the same, duly at
Juiv 91 \'L. l1 " Administratrix, on or before
»,3 lw < °r abide the Act of Assembly
IftSPf P n '* provided.
\A TH DEMPSEY, Administratrix.
AH'lrths: Newark. Del. al6-3w
In
[REGISTER'S ORDER.
KkgiSTXB'S OFFICE.
,, w ( a8tl « L'o., Del., August 20th, 1883.
r application o' John F. Burwell
of Kllz,beih M* Burnell late
ceasiu 1 i l,K, °. n hundre«!. In said county, dé
liât * th* directed by the Register
«uintarv granting
tiUithL îf u . on „ tl "' «state or the deceased,
Mveri L, granting thereof, by causing
lrom iiiti .liV 1 be.poated within forty days
put, h., Çuch letters In six of the most
«quIrin» i'i'i 8 wl tl,fc county of New Castle,
theutnli! . a Persons having demauds against
«ÄK pruHi'iit the samp, or abide by an act
andii KI ,„J.? *n such case made and provided;
u 2 tl1 « same to be Inserted within the
Bex hiianuM»- » 1. V . the Daily Gazbtt*, a
®°ntlnut 1 tllUr. } 8h , e i' lu Wilmington, and
» Y!«r«*ln three weeks, (e. o. d.)
(i ^ f jîjyen under the haut» and s«*alofofflce
( Jv.Il t ?.. «.t Register aforesaid alWUmlngton
' J »y»nd C^nUe county aforesaid, the
> year above written.
1
aforesaid give
of letters Testa
•i
b<
8. C. B1GGB, Register.
IfOTICB.
All pei
ns having claims against the estate ®f
to iliY i.**« ,T î U8t »resent the same duly attested
t>„ 1 ,-m ,7r !. .' r or before August 20th, A.
pïuvldjf 1 ° f ,,10h
the >|
JOhNP. BURW'ELL.
Executor
Btreet, Wilmington, Del
ang21-8w
A Mresa :
712 Wt
TREES.
^KKëü.
rKDlT ' 8h ADK AND ORNAMENTAL TREES
IN GREAT VARIETY.
APPLKh,
1 Î'.AKS.
^HKRHIEö,
And all v
RASPBE'GRE«.
Hl ACKBEKKIES,
STRAWBERRIES,
GOOSEBERRIES,
CURRANTS,
PE
arletles of trees that
das» nursery.
kept In a flrst
tar-if* K , Uaraut ««d true to name,
price-list.
WILLIAM F. PETERS,
No. 0 West Seventh Street,
(Exchange Building«)
■"«»•«inaa
WILMINGTON SHOE HOUSE.
FACTS !
ASTOUNDING BARGAINS
May be obtained by
simply calling on us and
making known your
wants. We have every
thing in the line of Boots
and Shoes, from the
cheapest to the very best.
All the latest styles and
patterns on hand; also all
widths and sizes in
Slippers, we can please
you. Solid comlort will
be found in a pair of this
solace-giving, ease-pro
ducing house foot-wear.
If your shoemaker has
disappointed you stop in
we can fit you.
We make a specialty of
TRUNKS.
h*.
to
r
of
of
all
be
M
In
Wilmington Shoe House,
h*
C.
to
424 MARKET ST.
GEO. D. CLELAND
-PROPRIETOR
UttU 1iOO Its.
Special Notice !
S. H. STAATS,
405—MARKET STREET—405
Durl »g the next SO^lays will make a
SWEEPING REDUCTION
IN THE PRICE4;OF|HI8
—Spring and Summer
Stock of
HOSIERY, GLOVES
-AND
'jauze Merino Underwear
rOR LADIES, GENTS AND MISSES,
Also a great reduction In
Parasols and Sun UmbreUas !
We have found it necessaiv to take this step,
stock, before commencing
out and enlarge our store. Come and
genuine bargain.
In order to reduce
secure a
S. H. STAATS.
FR O FES til ONAL CARDS.
JOHN C. COLE,
VOTARY PUBLIC, aND JU8TIOK OF THE
PEACE
viaris Bnlldlnn, No. 101 WestBUtb street^ reje
hOBU 0*11,
RS. J. N. A J. B. HOBENSACK,
I)
Those afflicted with the effects of SELF-ABUP H
and MKKCUKIALIZATION should not utbltaw
to consult J. N. A J. B. HOBENSACK of 2W N.
Second street. Philadelphia, either bv mall or by
uerson, during the hours of 8 a. m to* p. m., and
1 Advfeefkee. Whosoever should know his con*
Improve it ah«»u ; 'l read
« I tlon and th« way
"WISDOM IN A NUT-rtH KLL>. ' '
stamp.
' reeelT 1 * three-«
He*-»
T. GARDNER'S
J.
-CELEBRATED
ICE CREAM.
PICNICS,
EXCURSIONS,
and FESTIVALS,
for family
delivered
supplied at special rates. Small
purposes a specialty—packed in Ice and
to all parts of tbe city.
J. T. Gardner,
N. W. COR. SEVENTH & SHIPLEY BTfl.
NOTICES.
XT OTIC « — THÊ M EMBER8 OF WIL
Iv MINOTON Lo gi-, No. 1, A. O. U. W.,and
the order In general are requested to meet ti*
lodge room, ^hlptey street above Fourth
Wednesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock ha p, to
tend the funeral or our ate brother, H. F. Apple
by By order, M. T. DANN EN H K KO, M. W.
Attest : «. B. UNDBltWOOP, Recorder. 27-2t
vr otice.—tcTthe school commit
Av tee of Ne- Castle county. The School
fund haabeen distributed and placed to the. credit
of each District, In the Fanners Bank at New
Castle. JOHN M. HOUSTON,
State Treasurer.
A
AUGUST 20 188».
XT OTICE -ANY WEIGHTS,
IT OR measures requiring Inspection
KIuk »treat.
Jacob deary nf,
Sealer of Weight» ami Measures for New Castle
county. icas-tf
OTICE TO DELINQUENTS
City and School Taxes For the
Year 1882.
SCALES
may be
old
of
who
and
that
the
co
its
The
"U.
of
lor
and
and
and
the
a
but
less.
but
aud
of
Ills
It
tent
was
this
day.
side
all
this
ings
in
to
well
a
the
of
ual
left at 828 A 880
collectors ol city
this notice to all
tlicir names pub
lished that they had better call aud settle,
tlre-i of sending and waiting
alaoto those who owe a cantltatTo
iven their bills no attention,
h*. published no matter who they
their positions may be.
EDMUND PROVOST.
Collector of Northern Dlstrlci, north of Hath
street.
We, the undersigned,
school taxes, do hereby give
those who w sb to avoid having
them; and
tax and have
their names will
W'lttt
DENNIS K A V w.,
th of Sixth
Collector of Southern District,
street.
Office No. 10 east Sixth street between Market
d Klug streets. Hours: 8 a m.
: 2 n. in.
aug24 8
to 8 p. in.
r J'AX PAYERS TAKE NOTICE.
City and School Taxes tor '83.
The under Igned Receiver of Taxes for the cl y
of Wilmington, will be at No. 10 East Slxtfi
between Market and Klngstre
first day of July, 1883, between the hours
of 8a»«d 12In the morning and from 2 to 6 In the
aft rnoon for the •■urnose of receiving taxes. On
all taxes paid durlne the mouth of July there will
be a deduction of five percent.on every dollar
eg paid durl g the month of A
and Including the fir-t of September the face
the bill will be required; all taxes unpaid on
next day alter the first of eptember, »hall he bi
ased by the ad dtlon of live per centum, on
the amount thereof. EDMIJN D PR V« >-»T,
Receiver Northern District, Including all North
of Sixth street.
DENN I-* KANE,
Receiver Southern District, Including all South
of Sixth street. aiigl-lm
OTICE.
Thomas H. Morrison,
t. b
lb.
I
up to
i he
In Chancery,
New Castle County,
William Morrison,
et. al.
Partition.
In pursuance of an order of the Chancellor In
the above cause made at the February term, A.
i>., 1883. All persons having any lien or IU*
affecting the filterest or estate of Thomas If.
Morrl . n. William Morrison. An
Haimiel Morrison, F - ancis Carson. Eliza J. Car
, James P. Morrison, John Morrison. Ellen
M rrlson and Ellen (J. MorrUon.or, either of
them, In the lands and premises which said
cause relates, are hereby notified to file a petition
setting forth the n&tu e and amount of
In the officeolthe Register ln C hancery for New
Castle county, ten days before the fourth MON -
DAY In Sep*ember, A. I)., 1883,and to appear a-.d
prove said lien or liens at the ensuing term of
ihe court, before the rising of the court
third day of the term.
Wilmington, Aug. 6, 188<.
th*
J. H. RODNEY, Trustee.
HUg6-mAs-8w
J^OTICB!
TiikBtatbof Delaware,
—TOTH*—
Sheriff of New Castle
OO;, Ure ting :
Wherea , Annie M. Mingus, by her p< t
ic Judge of our Huperlor Court filed
the I*r thonaiory of the naul court In
to** New CoHtle eoun y. for the cauHC o com
plaint therein alien d, uiih ma<1e application to
said Judge» that a decree -»«av be pronounced
dlsso ving the marriage ex lutin between
petitioner ami herbu band Robert C. M. Mingus
We therefore command y
h* retofor î cc
C. M. Mingus
theJudges of n
to b he d at Wilmington, on Monday, t e seven
teenth day of September next, to answer the al
legation ot the said petitioner, according
Act of Ass inbly.lu such case made and r<
and also to do and receive what the said
shaU then and there cons!"
New Castle County,
tttlon to
in the
you Ii
ded, that you summon Robe
that be be and a
said court, at the
thereof,
ii,.
bled
»-ruin him In
this behalf, as to the court »hall seem meet aud
with the pi ov talons of the said Act of
Assembly. And have you th *n there this writ.
Witness, the Honorable Joseph P. Coinegys
Esquire, at Wilmington, the twenty-t'lr i day
••fMay, A. D., eighteen hundred and eighty
three. GEORGE A. MAXWELL,
Issued May 31st, 1883.
|l-ltw3m
Prothonatory.
OTICE !
1 The State of Dklawark
—to
SHERIFF OF NKW • A8TLE
County. Greeting :
Whereas Montrose A. Fallen by his p t
the Judge» of our Superior Court, filed
office of the Frothonotarv of the »aid court, n
and for New CaBtie county, for the cause ofcorn
K 'alnt therein alleged, has made application lo
e said Judges that a decree may be prom
lug the marri' ge existing bet
titloner and bis wife Ann E. Fallen.
We therefore command you as you have been
heretofore commanded, that you summon Aim
that she be a*>d appear before the
said court at he next term there«»!
New Castlfc county
titlon to
in the
jen the pe
dDsol
E. Fallen
Judges of
to be held In Wilmington, on Monday, the se -
en teen th day of September next, to answer the
allegations of tlie r-ald petition, and also to show
cause, if any she has, why a de< re • of the said
court should not be mude dlasolving themarrlaue
existing between her and the said petitioner,
cording to the Act of Assembly ln such c
aud provided, and also to do aud receive what
the said court shall then and th< re connu
ccrnlng her In this behalf as to the court shall
and consistent with the provisions of
the said Act of Assembly
Witness, the Hon. Joseph F. Coinegys, Esq.,at
Wilmington the twenty-third day ot May A. D.,
eighteen hundred and eighty-three.
GKO. A. MAXWELL, Proy.
Issued, June 9th, 1883.
The above Is a true copy of als. summon No. 19,
September T, 1883, returnable September T, 18&3.
JAMES MAR FIN, Sheriff.
Wilmington, Juce9, 1883.
1el2-ltw
THE NEWSPAPER NAllOfl.
the
the
5,
He Spendet!» Hla Vast Wealth in Building
Himself a House Upon t*»e Bill-Top
[Hunday Star.]
Yesterday afternoon Mr. George W. Hum
phry, exchange editor of Every Evening ,
opened bids for a dwelling house and
awarded the contracts for bui' ding the same
to Peter U. Furry, the lowest bidder. The
building of the house will be proceeded with
at once, with a view of having it completed
betöre cold weather sets In. It will be
located on the west side of Rodney street
between Second and Third,
commanding a fine view of the city and the
Delaware river, and will be ol brick, 20 feet
6 inches front by 45 feet deep, with a shed
kitchen in the rear, bath room, gas, hot and
cohl water, etc. The main building will be
three stories h gh, the third story being
under a mansard root. A tower, 10
feet in diameter, runs up the front to
a height oi three or four feel above the sum
mit of the roof, bo arranged as to form
roomy bay windows for each story. This
tower will be surmounted by au astronomi
cal observatory, in which the "Judge" will
mount his six and a half-inch Bra«hear re
flecting (elescope. The building will con
tain nine rooms, besides the bath rooir and
shed kitchen. The upper room of the tower
Mr. Humphrey will fit up for his library and
smoking room, au important part of the
furnishing being a divan, upon wbich he
hopes to find time to recline for a few mo
ments occasionally in the laziest of attitudes.
The lot upo«> which the bouse will stand has
a front ol 51 feet on Rodney street, giving
ample room for a good side yard, aud, al
together, the "Judge" expects to be pretty
comfortably fixed when he gets into his new
residence.
elevation
0
.
13.
4
Iù.
10
iv.
j
Still Putting Them Up.
Mr. Thomas Ford is just about complet
ing the row of nine houses on Harrison ;
street above Second and will shortly begin
the erection oi five more on Van Buren !
itfdcti
THE "BK?» QUARTERLY.
THE COLORED PEOPLES AN
NUAL JUBILEE.
SCENES ALONG FRENCH STREET.
A Large Number of Visitors -How They
Looked and How the Day wan Spent—
The Sendees
"Bless the Lord, they're all here," said an
old colored man in iront of the African
Union M. K. Church yesterday, and it really
looked as though all the dusky inhabitants
of Delaware, Pennsylvania, Muryland and
New Jersey bad congregated on French
street between the creeks. Both sides of the
street were packed with the colored people
who had come to take part in "Big Quar
terly." They had come from every direc
tion, by steamboats and traies, until about
5,000 strangers had arrived. The steamers
Delaware, Edwin Forrest, Major Keybold,
Susie McCall, Wilmington and Felton
brought large crowds from Philadel
phia, Salem, Delaware City, New Castle,
and Chester. The P. W. & B. and Delaware
Western trains both brought large crowds
from various points. Fully two or three
thousand more would have been on band
from lower Delaware and Maryland but the
railroad company refused to run trains on
that road on account of the trouble on the
train two years ago.
Upon the arrival of the trains and boats
the objective point was the little African
Union Church on the west side of French
street below Ninth. All manner oi vehicles
were here to convey there who wished to
ride. The wagons were of various colors,
shapes and conditions. From the fancy
co 1 led omnibus to the old dearborn with
its ouard seals. One attracted considerable
attention, ii was devoid oi springs and the
curtain was t* rn Id several places. On the
sides was chalked the sign "hacks fur the
church." In place of seats were four or five
ropes drawn
The horse looked as if he had
limes and on his right rump bore the brand
"U. S.,"a tell-tale of his age. An old darkey
of about (55 winters was iu charge, and the
team excelled the famous "one-horse shay,"
lor it looked as it would all come apart at one
and the same time, horse, driver wagon
and all.
The scenes on the street were interesting
and in some cases amusing. The dress of
the crowd attracted the most attention. In
a large number of cases both the men and
women were dressed neatly ai d stylishly,
but the. large majority were got. up regard
less. Justice could not be given to the pic
turesque and many colored costumes that
drere worn by some of the dusky damsels.
Among the men more tasLe was displayed,
but some of the older ones wore suits that
would discount a Carneross or a Wilson.
Here ami there could be seen a dusky belle
aud her beau, and their utter disregard ol
of the critical eyes of others was supreme.
Ills attentions to her, his politeness, and hi*
dignity when he met one ot his ordinary ac
quaintances. was calculated to awakeu ad
miration aud wonderment iu the looker-on.
All the day French street was lined with
booths and stands in alleyways and houses,
where uumoers of enterprising colored
women and meu were feeding their hungry
customers, who came iu lively style all day.
At the church the crowd was immense,
ruuniug out to the middle of the street, aud
It was impossible for one to make his way
through. Entering from King street a large
tent about 30 by ÖÜ feet was erected. This
was packed aud exercises were held In both
this aud the church three times during the
day. At intermissions they would form
circles of about 12 or 15 witb oue In the
middle who was generally the new convert.
Here they sung and shouted, rocked from
side to si te, aud clapped their bands in re
gular time. Great l>eads of perspiration
rolled down their laces but they
all seemed incapable of exhaustion.
TTieir Bongs seemed to have an unlimited
number oi verses. They would continue
this way for about an hour, when some
"brother'' would start a prayer and the ex
cltement would become iutense. At
Mine during the day three of these gather
ings in the yard and two iu the church were
in lull blast.
About 3 o'clock the crowds commenced
to go and before 7 the crowd was pretty
well cleaned out.
This peculiar religious event originated in
a small way about 70 yearB ago. At that
time there were no colored churches here,
1 ihe members around the neighbor
hood formed a society without regard to
denomination and called it a Union of
Africans. From this was termed the church
before mentioned, aud at the establishing o!
the church, It w as decided to have four
meetings a year of the congregation. Oue
of these was determined upon as being the
anuual Conference aud fixed for the last
Sunday iu August. At this meeting the
ministers,deacons aud trustees were to meet,
look after the tiuauciai and spirit
ual welfare of the people and
endeavor to secure converts to the
church. This movement grew In popularity
and for the last 15 years Immense crowds
have attended.
with straw on them.
better
REAL ESTATE.
Sale of West Side Building Loto on Satnr
oay Afternoon.
The sale of building lots by Edward Far
tner aud Thomas M. Ogle Saturday after
noon was fairly attended, but the prices
realized were especially low, considering
the very easy te> ms upon which they were
sold. Lots Nos. 1 to 17, inclusive, were sold;
the balance were withdrawn. Lots Nos. 1 to
5, inclusive, are eaeh 15 by 80 feet, fronting
Fifth streets between Searles and Clayton;
N06. 6 to 10, inclusive, same size, front on
Sixth street betwe. 11 Searles and Clayton;
Nos. 11 to 10,inclusive,16 by 75 feet,front
Searles street between Fi:th and Sixth, and
No. 17, 28 by 85 feet, 16 ou the southwest
corner «if Sixth and Rodney streets. The
prices aud purchasers were as follows:
Price,
per ft.
$0.50
Total
Purchaser,
Peter .1 Ford,
Peter J. Ford,
J. Ford,
Peter J Ford,
No.
$97.60
9U.00
90.00
00.00
87.00
136.00
102.00
102.00
102 00
102.00
97.50
97.f 0
97 60
97.60
97.60
97.60
L
0,00
0.0
6.80
J. Wilkiu«on,
5,
0.00
Elijah Black,
j. Wilkinson,
J. Wilkinson,
J. Wilkinson,
J. W'llkiuson,
J Wilkinson,
J. Wilkin
J. Wilkinson,
J. Wilkinson,
J. Wilkinson,
J Wilkinson,
Frank J K- lley,
0
7.
6 10
r, .,1
6.00
.
13.
0 60
4
0.60
Iù.
0.-'o
10 .
16,40
481.80
iv.
,.$2,013.70
Total.
A Miraculous Kseape.
As the Delaware railroad train reaching
j this city at 6.45 o'clock was approaching
Harrington station, Saturday afternoon, the
engineer noticed a child lying between two
ties in the middle of the track, but be ore
and
the train could be «topped tbe engine
two cars passed over the body. The child,
however, when removed, was found to be
; only somewhat bruised. It was about two
years old, aud a sou °f a man named
! Handley, living at Harringto». Its escape
was miraculous.
BASK BALL.
How the Inter-State Club« Mtsn<i-Morei
of Saturday's Dames.
The race for the Inter-State championship
is becoming quite Interesting, the almost
moribund Quicksteps having made a spurt
that bids fair to soon make a vast Improve
ment Il their standing. Iu percentages of
games won the clubs stand as follows:
Merritt, 76: Brooklyn, .50, Harrisburg, 57;
Active, .49; Anthracite, .40; Trenton, .45;
Quickstep, .84 The Anthracite has played
more games than the other clubs, which ac
counts for the fact that, with more victories
Its percentage Is lower than that of the
Active's. The Quickstep are at the bottom
of the list, but a continuation of last week's
playing will rapidly Increase their standing
In the column of averages. The detailed
including
record, up to and
games, Is as follows:
THE I1VTEK-STATE RECORD.
Saturday's
*■ s
IS!*
I
I
E
S
I
CLUB*.
*
7
a
n
: H
Active.
Anthracite.
Brooklyn.
Harrisburg.
Merritt.
Tienton.
Quickstep..
8 4
B
4
2
6
4
7 9
I
I
1
0: 0
4
M
6 4
I
6i 7
81
0 4
I
f.
4 I
3 2 ..! 0
4
4 3
28
1 2
-■
3 :•
3 ..
22 24 8 30,37
Games Lost.
27 30
184
SATURDAY'S GAMES.
At Boston:
Providence....
Boston.
00010001 0—2
00101100 X— 3
Base hits. Providence, 7; Boston, 8; errors,
Providence, 4; Boston, 2; pitchers, Whitney and
liadbourne; umpire, Furlong.
At Philadelphia:
New York.
00202100 0-fi
Philadelphia. 01 1000000—2
Base hits. New York, 4: Philadelphia, 6; er
rors, Now York, 6; Philadelphia, 9; pttohers,
Welch and Purcell; umpire, Bradloy.
At Detroit:
Detroit. .
Cleveland. OIIOIUOO x~ 3
Base hits, Detroit, 8; Cleveland. 8; e r..rs, De
troit, 6: Cleveland. •; pitchers, Shaw and Mc
Cormick; umpire. Lane.
At Chicago:
Chicago.
Buffalo.
10000000 0-1
... 4 1 8 7 0 0 2 1 0—18
.I. 83200140 2-16
Base hit«, Chicago, 26; Buffalo, 20 errors,
Chicago, 9; Buffalo. 8; pitchers, Gol .'smith and
Galvin; umpire Decker.
At Baltimore :
Balt i more
Eclipse.
Bhso hits, Baltimore, 15; Eclipse, 9: errors,
Biltimore. d; Eclipse lb; pitchers, Henderson
and Hecker; umpire, Kelly.
At N w York :
Columbus. 04 2 000000-6
Metropolitan . 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1—2
Base hits, Columbus, 8; Mets, 9: errors, Co
lumbus, 6; Mets, 6; pitchers, Mountain aud
Lynch; umpire, Daniels.
At Pittsburg :
Allegheny. 43000000 0—7
1. . 10000001 13
. 3 2 3 2 0 2 0 1 —13
- 331O0 2 000— 9
Bt. Louis.
Base hits, Allegheny, 8; St. Louis, 0: error«,
ltchers, Driecoli
Alle
and
ghehy, 6: St. L uis, 2; pi
MoGinnls; umpire, Walsh.
At Brooklyn:
Brooklyn..
Anthraolte.
. 8032 2 401 0—16
.000000330—0
At Trenton (fourteen innings):
.. 20000133000002 -11
.. 3000000000000 3—12
Trentou..
Harrisburg ...
At Chester
Houston
Uoss
... 00002000 7—9
... 000011000—2
At Millville, N. J.:
Millville..
Uamden ..
.100100001—3
. 01020031 X— 7
At Manayunk: Active, of Reading, 32:
Active of Manayunk, 13.
NOTES.
The Dauntless defeated the Gray club
Saturday by a score of 25 to 2.
A game of base ball played
Saturday
between nines from the morocco factories oi
J. T. Quigley and Charles Mullin, respect
ively. It was won by the Mullin nine by a
score of 23 to 15.
Ex-Manager McHugh showed good judg
meut when he secured the new battery—
Henry aud St. Lawrence. He took them on
the strength of their records, not having
seen them play prior t > their engagement.
The Quickstep play the Harrisburg to
morrow and Wednesday. The boys will en
deavor to down the Harrisburg and keep up
their good record of last week. Large
audiences should encourage their good
efforts.
The Virginia Base Ball club arrived here
this morning at 10.15 o'clock from PbilaJel
phla. They play here to-day and to-morrovf
at Chester with the Houston. A good game
may be expected this afternooon
ginias are first-class, having defeated the
Trenton by a score of 15 to 5.
In the American Association there is a
very Interesting fight for the championship
between the St. Louis, Cincinnati and Ath
letics, with the former slightly in the lead.
In the League the Piovidence, Boston aud
Cleveland are fighting viciously for the
first place, while the Philadelphia club re
mains in undisputed possession ot the tail
end of the line.
The Quicksteps, Saturday afternoon,
played a sort of practice game with the Our
Boys club, ar, Quickstep
pitched, for the Our Boys, with
Ward as catcher. The Quickstep battery
was Hoover, the new player from Reading,
aDd Geary. The game, as was to be ex
pected, was devoid of excitement, although
some good plays were made, and the bat
ting was quite heavy. The Quicksteps
finally won, bv & score of 20 to 14.
the Vir
Park. Ocheltree
Pud"
A Handsome present.
A committee of Admiral DuPont Post,
No. 24, G. A. R., of Philadelphia, will visit
DuPont, Post, No. 2, of this city, early next
month, and present the latter a set of reso
lutions, expressing thauks for the kind re
ception tendered the Philadelphians during
their visit to this city on Memorial Day.
The resolutions have been handsomely en
giossed by Captain William B. Hamilton in
20 colors at:d tints, and enclosed in a frame
of velvet trimmed with burnished gold and
bronze. Its size is 36x48 inches. The top
is ornamented by naval scenes representing
war aud peace. On one side is the Union
Jack and on the other the Stars and Stripes.
Other naval embh ms are also admirably
executed, the wh«>le being a superior piece
of workmanship.
Delaware Prohibition.
At the Gilbert Chapel last evening the
Rev. A. Poulson, father of the Rev. Thomas
Poulson, of Maryland, the noted temper
ance lecturer, gave a brief history of
the prohibitory law of Delaware, which wu6
in force here about 30 years ago. Mr. Poul
son was a 'squire In Wilmington at that
time and Is thoroughly familiar with the
subject.
Peach Shi pine* to.
The peache& shipped over the Delaware
railroad on Saturday were distributed as
follows: Jersey City, 21; Philadelphia. 22;
Boston, 19; Chester, Wilmington, Hartford,
j New Haven, Springfield, Cleveland, Buffalo,
. Chicago, Cincinnati, 2 each; Pittsburg, Day
ton, Columbus, 1 each; total, 88 cars; pre
* vious shipments, 1,607; total to date, 1,690.
UAUSK8 or BKATfl.
A state of Affairs That Ought to be
Remedied Without Delay.
tue Gazette.— There
was a considerable Increase in the cumber
of deaths, last
drowning, two deaths from diphtheria, two
from typhoid fever and one from malarial
fever. Some cause can be given for the
deaths from the three diseases mentioned,
the question is could they have been pre
vented ?
At present the sewers in our cltv are what
might be termed death-traps Numerous
complainte have been made to this depart
ment of the stench arresting from Shipley
run sewer. Mr. B. Beste, residing on Ninth
street between Jefferson and Mrabop, says
his properity is ruined by the g. ® ., -2-ojn
the sewer. He has petitioned Council but
effect. The danger Is Increased by cess
pools being continually drained Into the
sewer by permission of Couucll
tion of the ordinance. Staulcup run sewer
Is in the stone condition, and the residents
have no redress. The nuisances are being
increased from day to day instead of an ef
fort being made by the authorities to dimin
ish or abate them. The time is not far dis
tant when our people will awake from their
slumbering disinterestedness by being
called upon by our courts to
give those wlioare justly aggrieved, re
lief. But who will bear the res[>onBiblllty
for I he deaths emanating from this neglect ?
The Board oi Health ? No; they are power
less iu this matter of regulating the sewers
in this city. The ordinances are being vio
lated every day, and by whom ? The time
will soon come when more attention will be
given to the sanitary condition of our city.
These nuisances must be abated. Our city
is growing rapidly, and the longer this mat
ter is neglected, the more It will cost when
we are compelled to abate them.
There are other sink holes in our midst,
which contalu the germs of disease, such as
streets that no person or persons own, filthy
alleys on every hand, and the air
polluted with the vile odors
lrom overflowed cesspools, dirty
gutters and stagnant ponds of water
in various parts of our city. The Board of
Health is doing all in its power to give the
people relief, but raauy rebel against its
authority, ami suffer themselves to be
brought before the Municipal Court, as viola
tors of law, and having no regard lor the
authority vested in our Bourd of Health,
whose sole Object is to give our people a
healthy e.iiy, and the comforts ol happy
homes. A Board oi Health in a city with
a population of 50,000 people eaimot do
much with
$ 1 / 200 ,
To the Editor
:k—one accident from
and iu vlola
ual appropriate
and iu th ab« nee of sufficient
*y to abate the nuisances brought «'•
their attention, the only alternative is to re
sort to law, which is verv unplrasaut tor all
connected with the department.
Mr. Editor, how would ur city, which
has a lair reputation abroad, look advertised
The Sanutarian , of New York city, as
Pattersou, New Jersey, is. I have the re
port before me, which says Pattersou is oue
of New Jersey's flrst-elass cities, has a
population of upwards ot 50,000, extensive
manufacturing interest.«, etc., but her repu
tation is exceptionally bad, aud
deservedly so, with an impure
water supply, no drainage or sewerage
worthy of the name, a ground surface, par
ticularly in her back yard inch sures, almost
literally covered with filthy out.throw ol
every conceivable kind, and with an aver
age of at least one cesspool or privy pit to
every house. Mauy of these cesspools and
pits are filled to the surface of the ground.
Her best hotel reeking with filth and ver
min, filthy water closets In the midst, and
urinals reeking stench, with a foul odor
from the tack-yard.
How would our people like to have a repu
tation like Patterson's and see it published
to the world? Go on in the old ruts and we
will soon have such a reputation.
>t
E. B. Frazer.
Wilmington, August 25. 1883.
A Novel Invention.
Messrs. Wood <fe Bancroft, of this city,
have been appointed sole agents for the
State for the sale of a novel' instrument for
sealing or opening envelopes. It saves time
and relieves
to use the tongue in wetting the mucilage.
No Dusiuess man should be without one.
of the necessity of having
Grand Lodge to Convene.
H. W. Morrow, Grand Worthy Chief
Templar oi Delaware, has issued a call for
Grand Lodge of Good Templars to meet
in special session in this city on September
13 and 14. Arrangements are uow being
made for thdr eutertalnmeut.
Municipal Court.
before the Municipal Court
The only
this morning was a complaint against
William A. Bacon of maintaining a nuisance
In shape of a running ces«pool. Dismissed
on payment of costs.
LOCAL LACONICS.
Deviled crabs at Fullmer's.
Roast dinners at Fullmer's.
80ft shell crabs at Fullmer's.
Ice cold salt oysters at Fullmer's.
Smyth Post Guards are making prepara
tions tor holding a G. A. R. Fair in Odd
Fellows' Hall, next February.
William Dean, James M. Braekln, Samuel
Lindsay, Josiah G. Hughlatt, Chandler
LamboVn and other Delawareans who at
tended the Grangers' picnic at Mechanics
burg, Pa., have returned home.
One of the pump rods of the Worthington
pump at the City Mill broke at 5.45 o'clock
Friday morning,* but the engineer
trouble iustautly and stopped before any
further damage was done.
Ihe picnic given by the Rockford dye
workers at Scheutzen Park on Saturday was
well attended, and the daue re tripped the
light fantastic toe to the music of Albert's
orchestra until a late hour. A row was
raised by a party of drunken roughs, but it
was soon quelled.
A Chester man
tlon on Saturday afternoon. In attempting
to jump off the moving train he leaped
toward the rear of the train, aud was caught
by some projection and hurled violently to
the ground, breaking both arms and his
neck, and badly bruising hit body.
The Paper Werkers' Assembly will give a
picuic at Scheutzen Park on Saturday, Sep
tember 8. Albert's orchestra wU* .urulsh
the music, aud au efficient committee of ar
rangements with David Clough, chairman,
Patrick J. Green, Secretary, and John
Splaln, Treasurer, has been appointed.
Wilmington Division, No. 1, Uniform
Rank, K. of P., has received the new set of
military tacticß adopted at the last session of
the Supreme Lodge. The tactics wen pre
pared by General James R. Carnohan, com
manding the Department of Iudl; na, G. A.
R., and Lieutenant William R. Hamilton of
the Filth United Stales A rtilery.
Coroner Smith on Saturday investigated
the causes of the death of a white infant in
Christiana hundred and of Isaac Bell, who
died suddenly at No. 112 Decatur street,aud
In both cases It was found that death resulted
from natural causes. Yesterday lie also in
ve«tlgated the cause of the death ot a colored
child ten days old, which died suddenly In
the Eleventh ward, and gave a certificate of
dealu from natural causes.
killed at Paschall sta
A THOUSAND MARISES.
GREAT FAMILY RE U Nl ON NEAR
MORTON, PA.
A DISTINGUISHED GATHERING.
George Maris' Descendants Celebrate the
Two Hundredth Anniversary of His
Landing In This Country.
[ Philadelphia Record, Sunday. J
One thousand descendants of George Maris
assembled yesterday in the Maris home
stead to celebrate the 200th anniversary of
the settlement of George Maris at that place.
It is three miles north of Morton, on the
West Chester Railroad, and Is now In the
possession of Mr. Joseph Maris. The house
which the ancestor built has long since
passed away, and on its site is a
quiet, quaint stone structure, two and
a half stories high, which was erected by the
old man's grandson iu 1772. George Marls,
the pioneer, left England In 1683 and settled
iu Chester couuty, and a spring on his farm
gave the name to the village of Springfield,»
mile away.
The grove In which yesterday's reunion
was held is about four acres in extent, near
the old homestead, and here
and every comfort were arranged for the
great assemblage. A large speaker's plat
form, capable of seating 500 people, flauked
one side of the grove, and in front of the
stand a graceful arch, tastefully decorated,
was erected.
A large number of the old family descend
ants arrived before dinner, and hundreds of
the family and invited guests took the noon
day meal in true picnic style. There were
many children in the company.
In the afterno n,wben the throng had been
augmented until 4 1 exceeded a thousand,
everybody repaired to the grand stand,
where the following organization was
«•ffeettd: President, Dr. Edward Marie, of
Philadelphia. Vice Presidents, George J.
Marie, Iowa; Nathaniel Maris, Illinois;
Phebe Maris Horton, Ohio; Charles M.
Taylor, Philadelphia; William Marls Jr.,
New Jersey; Dr. Isaac Massey, Pennsylva
nia; George C. Maris, Wilmington, Dela
ware; Sarah Maris, Iowa; D vi i C. Lewis,
Oregon; Maifchu P Gibbons, Pennsylvania;
Pen nock G. Leonard, IVnusyl vania; Lewis
I). Marls, Kansas; Morgan Hall, Penn
«\lvattia; Gem-ge Brom all. Pennsylvania;
Norris Mari», Delaware; Sat
Pennsylvania; Jo«* pii
v nia; William VI . C. Hernia; Charles
H. Matit, T. xk ii
7 ork ; Pliein* M
le cheer
vY
.ell,
-V Bar
f-I, IV
ryl
rv .J.
. P. nusyivitnia;
George Maris, In ti.i•*: >
d • P. LI
>n.
Pennsylvania: Dr. H< :
Georg« Maris. P- * r\ ;
Maris, Dak.-t*.
Dr. Clarence F. M . -, u* Columbus, O.,
M.iris Family iu
Europe," which wa- i^ad by YU«« Emma F.
West, ot Philadelphia,who traced the family
ill England bn*k to King Arthur's time.
Professor George L. Maris, of West
Chester, read a "history ol George Maris,
the Pioneer," in which he said : "Previous
to leaving England
m Mari«. Nevada;
a, and Jcptm G.
' i b
.it a palter
•estor had pur
chased from Robert Toomer oi Worcester,
1000 acre« of land in Pennsylvania, but un
located. In a short time after his arrival he
took up a tract of 400 acres aud built upon
it a h* use on the exact spot now occupied
by the residence of him, by
erosity we
laud where our pioneer ancestor took up his
abode 200 years ago."
Hon. J. M. Broomall of Media, read an
Interesting sketch of "The Family of George
Maris."
Jared Maris of Columbus, Ohio, read a
paper on "The Maris Family in the West."
The occasion throughout was of the most
Interesting character, and many promiuent
people were preseu*, among them Hon.
John Welsh and Dr. Ed Maris of Philadel
phia; State Sentor Cooper, of Media; John
Maris Mace, Greensburg, Pa.; Hon. John
M. Broomall, Media; Josh îa Maris, of Wil
mington, Del., ex-Mayor, aud his brother,
George C. Marls, ex-City Treasurer, of that
city; Samuel W. Pennypacker, Esq., the
historian, Philadelphia; Phebe Marls Horton,
Mount Pleasant, Ohio; Jervis Hatton,
Harveysburg, Ohio; William W. Maris, of
the firm of Maris & Smith, bankers, Phila
delphia.
A conspicuous feature of the occasion was
a collection of souvenirs of the early mem
bers of the Maris family. In this was an
old chair,which had belonged to the original
George Maris, and was brought from
land. It is
primitive in its general style and workman
ship, there being no nails employed in Its
construction—wooden pins being used.
There was another chair,
Elizabeth J. West, o f this city, which once
did service in the parlor of Caleb Marls,
who was the pioneer Maris in Chester
county. He resided in Williston township,
where he took up his home in 1744.
There were deeds, marriage, certificates,
wedding gowns, etc., in the collection. The
oldest descendant, Eliza Pennington, of
Harveysburg, Ohio, who is98 years old, was
not able to make the trip, but sent her pho
tograph, and also sent a pewter pie plate,
two feet in diameter which had belonged to
a grandson of the pioneer.
KILLED BY AN ENGINE.
hose gen
permitted to gather upon the
0*
chai 1 *, aud is exceedingly
belonging to
A Team Kan Into by a Locomotive and the
Occupant Killed.
Between 6 aud 6.30 o'clock Saturday
evening a fatal accident occurred on the
Delaware railroad, by which Edward At
well, a farmer, living between Middletown
aud Townsend, was instantly killed.
The accident happened a short distance
below Middletown, at a point known as St.
Anne's curve. Mr. Atwell was driving
along the road In a wagon, and failed to no
tice the approach of an extra freight train,
coming uorth, until it was upon him.
There
was running at a
the locomotive struck the
with full force, br akiug it
fragments. Mr. Atwell was
about 15 or 20 feet and iustautly killed, his
head being crushed and «everal bones
broken. The horse, strangely enough, es
caped without a scratch, having crossed the
track before the collision occurred.
The usual warning whistle was sounded
by the engineer as he reared the croc sing,
but it was evidently uot beard by Mr. At
well, who unconsciously drove on to bis
doom. The train waa «Irawn by engine No.
17, VVm. H. Redmile, engineer.
Mr. Atwell was a well-known resldert of
Appoquinimiuk hundred, aud was about 30
years of age. He leaves a wife and twe
children. Coroner Smith was notified of the
accident and will make an Investigation to
day.
no time to stop the traiu, which
pid rate, and
wagon
into
hurled
Leg Broken.
Martin Ferrv, a young man employed at
the works of C. <fc J. Pyle, suffered a pain
ful fracture of his right leg Saturday after
noon. He
the machine fell upon his right leg,breaking
it in two places between the knee and the
ankle. The injured man was removed to
his home, Thirteenth and Fren h streets,
where Dr. Maull set the broken limb. To
day he Is much Improved aud will soon re
cover from the effects of his unfortunate
mishap.
assing to move a lathe when

xml | txt