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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, September 03, 1883, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1883-09-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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WilmlaifcOnrBel.. i* second-class matter.
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Entered at the post office at
a
PRICE ONE CENT.
WILMINGTON, DEL.,. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3. 1883.

•NO. 109
VOL. XI
amusements.
hand odvra tkmpi.k.
, )S K NIUHTONLV.-W
r gv ENING, SEPTEMBER, 8
G
n
yoNUAl
PAT ROONEY'S
tj fW York Star lomb'n.
T|K Bec0K iiU«l Star Company or America.
the Finest Artists
in the Profession.
(omî'rising
- Porl'ormance
duo of Specialties.
the Hoad.
[SlTKHH
I Best Specialty Cc
.s„iil. Reserved seats for sale at
£ i i o.'s. No. 42 Market st. 30-4140
fri-'f
F.Tho"
OPERA HOUSE.
MASONIC TEMPLE.
ran;
I.
Tuesday, Eve'g, Sept. 4
AMEKICA'S STANDARD ATTRACTION.
—The Celebrated—
to
al
all
us.
in
HEN IZ-SANTLEY
krlty ami Biirlesquo Co.
iruiid Reception Scene, Entitled
Tin- »
_0UR SOCIAL CLUB—
I'renenting a Phalanx of
1*_beautiful and
LaDY ARTISTS-16
Concluding with the New Bur
Hganza, Entitled
nos .Kt-E, THE SPANISH DUDE
I)I)N ,I0Sr! TH► SPANISH DUDE.
c Burlesque, the Latest Parisian
Craze,
TALENTED
be Perform!
i;
S<|
Bbi'Mi'OIaI to
THE WASHEk'S QUAfRIU.E !
niions, and tli* Latest Popular
hes and Medleys.
Lsiitf!»
at V. F.
uuK31-4t
J'RH'EH a*
|Tliiin*a>«1
RE WAMDS.
REWARD OF FIVE
EWAKI).—A
Hl MdtKD 1>' LI. ANS Is hereby offered
h, jrri -i mid apprehension ol Coiringwood
•-raped from Jail at G* ortftdown,
licht .Minday inomlnir, desc lp
* cues, rather
fur
P. H
111
liiid't
:
peculiar fine
binull dark eves, sharp
('ll AS. STDK LEY
Governor.
olee
d
• clli.
ck!u 1'
WASTER.
ANTED.— WOMEN TO WORK IN A
MUIR'S CANNERY.
\V
wry by
Fittt RENT.
RENT —HART • F HOUSE TO A
V* MA L ltt,,,l,y 'ui7 TATN ALL STREET.
all
FOR SALE.
^TORE AND FIXTURES
I v * E. Cor. Ninth and Madison
• ïnckiÂP/ïîÿ
OK SALE
F
Market St.,
- al the store.
roy34-tf
jpOR HALE.
lOOAcrus of Standing Timber.
«1 MAPLE.
YELLOW PINE
*1 three miles of
1 fine
f ! :t11 r<»:f !
Within mu
ill*
her la g''
th ot which Is likcwl
r particulars
address
!U
L
gr
location,
Ko
htb
iAZETTE OFFICE.
1'VltLIV SALES.
DiiOI'FHTY THAT IS RIPE FOR IM
I I'KoYl.MENT.- Payments In monthly lu
mort
llhout Intere.
PUBLIC SALE
Building Lots,
Saturday, September 8, '83,
25
Wilmington, Del., at 4 p. m.
old without postponement, wlth
thlditig.
1 all on high and e
■as y distance
u* gr-a* linj
,r<- cither (routing
En
1 V
11. A »*.
•ii ts of his
ad ja«
W
up.
le
uth
I
Its exi
realdi nee» by any street
h in the city. From Nos.
the be *u lful elevation ad
«1 Ganse Villa«
Delaware
j readily aecesni
. Sixty doll a's pea foot
fused to the subscribers
ding of Clay
ter from Rodney
lle.1
.
Si
Howland
nil
run
m
Hu- -ailI
I d
latterly re
d- vicinity Gra>
•ceding, and wat
• living Introduced fronting these
E
I
Ha
P r "l«T
*1 Mark t street
d i
. F"i
uf sale, plotj
titular*
« t large poster
HEALD A CD.,
Seventh and Market streets.
Agents to effect the sa lt
J^DMINISTKATOR'S SALE OF
jept-u
PEAL ESTATE,
The su
iserlber will sell at public auction
Thursday, September 13,1883,
AT 2 O'CLOCK P. M.,
'C, In the City of Wilmington,
f Lewis Reybold, deceased,
Castle Hundred, on the road
Glasgow.
100 acres, adjoins
ieorge C. Simpson and
At the
rt 11
tbe Y
!.V
»ItUitH
«Minjt fron t ll
•'sC
• Grubb,
'I L located In
The Ki.ru»
l»n>is Of La
of the
'•b» of New Castle county.
•'»If mile Ir iu the -täte
: Rail
.
;
ll
Road Htatl
<1, two mile« from
•*• miles from New Castle, and
I Wilmington;school«, churches,
rketsare convenient. The land 1«
I it st 111 v, suitable for farming
buildings are good. The fencing
orange h
on the I ii■ i ;i
Christiana

He
Tin
!>.
'll v
•dge. There
tl
■hards. Bale
sale. For further iuforma
f LORE A EMMONS, Attys.,
Ir
Ei'H:
JOHN W. MOORE.
Administrator D. II. N. O. T. A.,
on, , of LEWIS REYBOLD, Dec'd.
Delaware, Aug., 31, 188il.
UVENSE APPLICATIONS.
N°ÏSi E \ - I. p. HAGGERTY
*1 Y u ER of the house «1 uated at Np
1 F, '"d « reel, being the N
"d and Jeffers n streets, in
"I of the city of Wilmington, county
*•, state of Delaware, In compliance
"Ircinentsof the Acts of the General
hirt iVv '„iV 1,1 s,l '' n (, «»c made and provided, do
totM i r. ,, 'i t 'c«that 1 shall applv In writing
Jail hi.nl. <>f tb neral Session* of the Peace and
for WÎ?' ry .° r th *' ^tate of Delaware, in aud
"T i -ou '>ty, on Monday, the 17 th day
of said SS, 1 « r J A " > WW. being the next
lonriFi.». license for said house
the«ale the- ein of Intoxicating
to he
thwest
ÿ.Tlilnt
»Itli thf n
h
it.
drun* 8 «. 1 .', 1 n S8 quun lt, es tlian one quart,
fpertuiiin ; Vi ami the following
tSSSSS «»tdeuts of said ward,
'I Johii u* BR < * application, viz ;
; Archibald Wilson,
•C. hi li al Hr r * ( ' ,,a8 - T * Walters,
vîrW. 1, Powell. Henry Wltsll,
Harry Taylor,
Mitchell Newell,
John J. Kennedy,
P. Killroy,
M. llehlr,
James A. Bourke,
Thomas Donahoe,
C'has. Danz,
ly D:
des,
M. M.
"tf'iel
fej'Wnjrs,
• tzhl mmon s,
WILMINGTON SHOE HOUSE»
AT TBE
Wilmington Shoe House.
©
w*
Vf©.
V
7
We have a few more bar
gains left in those Hand
Sewed Shoes; they are goin'r
last, you have only to see them
to know their value.
New fall «roods next week
when we will be pleased to see
you and talk shoes to you.
You will be none the less wel
come if you do not buy.
To ti e sporting men we
would say let us show you the
new Sporti g Boot; it's light
and pleasant to wear and does
not t re you out to wear them
al day. Come while we have
all sizes in stock.
Parents that are getting
their children ready for school
would do well to come and see
us. In rel ability ol material,
thoroughness of workmanship,
beauty of style, elegance of
finish and perfection of lit the
goods we ofLr you cannot be
surpassed, while in complete
ness of assortment our stock is
second to none. Nor is this
M bile we've endeavored
in every way possible to fur
nish you with shoes of superior
quality and finish and to do so
upon the most accommodating
terms we haven't tor a moment
lost sight of the fa-1 that our
prices must he kept within
competing limits,
therefore by careful comparison
that we ask no more tor our
goods than others do for theirs
Full line of Trunks and
Traveling Bags in stick.
GEO. I). CLELAND,
421 MARKET ST.
all
You'll find
f
t!
to
a
It EG IS TER f S N O T J G ES.
REGISTER'S ORDER.
UBGIHTBK'8 OFFICB,
NEW CASTLE COUNTY, l»KL., July 25, 1883.
Upon the apnlh tttlon of Mary E. Campbell,
administratrix ol Wllll m J. Campbell, late or
1, In said county,
It Is ordered and directed by
Register that the administratrix aforc
glve notice of granting of letters of ad
friitlon upon the estate ol the deceased, with
granting thereof, by causing adver
posU-d within forty days from
letters In six of tne most public
places ot the county of Newcastle, requiring all
persons having demands against the estate to
resent the same, or abide bv an Act of Assembly
i such case made aud provided; and also cause
• to be Inserted within the same period in
the Daily Gazette, a newspaper published
Wilmington and to be continued therein
weeks, (e. <». d.)
Given under the hand
■> .Office of Register aforesaid, at Wllmlng
. Iton, In New Castle county aforesaid, the
* 'day and year above written.
8. C. BIGGS, Register.
NOTICE.—All persons having claims against
the, estate of the deceased must present the same,
duly attested to the administratrix, on or before
July 26, 1884, or abide the Act of Assembly in
"" "»6 e » nd UXbYE. OAMPBKI.L.
Adrnlnl trat' lx.
Address. Wilmington. Delaware. aug2»>-3w
huii'i
W llm
HT
le
said
minis
the date o
llseinents
the date of such
b<
E
I
d Seal ol
I*. H
J^EGISTEK'S ORDEK.
Register's Office.
New Castle County, Del.. July 25,
Upon the application or Asengtb Demp;ey, ad
ministrator of John Dempsey, late ol
White Clay Creek hundred, In said county, de
ceased, it Is ordered and directed by the Register
that the Administratrix aforesaid give notice ot
granting of Letters of Administrât! >i> upon
Hie estate of the deceased, with tbe date of
granting thereof, by causing advertisements to
be post««! within forty days from the date of
such* letters In six of the most pu bile places of the.
county of New « astle, requiring all persons
having demand« against the « state to presen
same, or abide by an Act of Assembly tu
case made and provided ; and alsocause the
to be Inserted within the same period in the
i ^ä^s^. m jrssBsst 'esters
weeks R, o. D •
t Given under the hand and Seal (•
) i, g. > office of the Register atoresald.at 11
1^, Smlngtou, in New Castle county afore
.HO, and yemr Tc e IS; KtK'ster.
181 I,
ch
NOTICE.
All persons having claims against the estate of
the deceased must present the same, duly at
tested to the Administratrix, ou or before
July 25, 1884, or abide the Act of Assembly
10 " U< ABjSnaTH DKMrS EÎ: 'Adnil u Utr»trli.
Address: Newark. Del. alft-aw
TREES.
fj^REES.
FRUIT, SHADE AND ORNAMENTAL TREES
IN GREAT VARIETY.
raspbegreb.
Bl ACKBERRIES,
STRAWBERRIES,
GOOSEBERRIES,
CURRANTS,
APPLES,
PEARS.
PEACHES,
PLUMS,
CHERRIES,
And all varieties of
kept lu a first
that
class nursery.
to name.
AU trees guaranteed
4&"Seud for price-list.
WILLIAM F. PKTEItS,
No. • Wot SeVïOÜi btret't,
(Exchange Building»)
aug23-8U)28
NOTICES.
îtfOTÎCE^^ M IT
AN u»e of New Castle county. The School
fund has been distributed and placed to the credit
of cacti District, In the Farmers Bank at New
Castle. JOHN M. HOUSTON,
State Treasur« r.
AUGUST 30 1888.
OTIC E—ANY WEIGHTS, SCALES
A'I OR measures requiring Inspection may be
lea at 828 A 880 King street.
JACOB DEARY vf,
Sealer of Weights and Measures for New Castle
county. |e28-tf
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON
-La TUESDAY, September 11th, 1888. at. No.
Ilmlngton, Delaware, between
and 6 o'clock p. m., the books
for subscriptions to the
Delaware Heat, Light and
WM. JENK8 FELL,
WM. E. TAYLOR,
Incorporators.
730 King street,
the hours of 4
will be op
stock of Th
Company.
cap tal
Water
augai
J^OTICE!
New Castle County
Thb State or Delaware,
, I -TOTHS—
(Sheriff or New Castle
/ Co., Ore ting :
Where*", Annie M. Mingus, by her petition to
the Judge- of our Superior Court filed In the
office oi the Prothonatory of the said court in and
for New Costle coun y. for the cause o'
plaint therein alleg'd, has made application to
said Judge» that a decree may he pronounced
dlHso.ving the marriage exlstbw between the
petitioner and her huaband Robert C. M. Mingus.
We therefore command you, as you h>ve been
heretofor eommai ded, that you ttummon Robert
C. M. Mingus so that he be and appear before
the Judges of our said court, at the time thereof,
to be he d at Wilmington, on Monday, t'<e seven
teenth day of September next, to answer the al
legation ol the said petitioner, according to the
Act of Ass mbly, ln such case made and rovlded
and also t ■ do and receive what the said court
shall then and there const«
this behalf, as to t^e court Khali seem meet and
consistent with the provisions of the said Act of
Assembly. And have you then there this writ.
Witness, the Honorable Joseph P. Comegys.
Esquire, at Wilmington, the twenty-tilr.t day
< f May, A. !>., eighteen hundred and eighty -
three. GEORGE A. MAXWELL,
Issued May 31st, 1883. Prothonatory.
11-1 tw3m
concernln him in
J^OTICE.
Thomas H. Morrison,
In Chancery,
New Castle County,
Partition.
In pursuance of an order of the Chancellor In
the above cause made at the February term, A.
D., 1X83. All persons having any lien er liens
affecting the Interest or estate of Thomas H.
Morrl on, William Morrison. Ann Morrison,
Samuel Morrison, Francis Carson. Eliza J. Car
, James P. Morrison, John Morrison. Ellen
M rrlson and Ellen C. Morrison, or, either of
them, In the lands and premises to which said
cause relates, are hereby notified to file a petition
setting forth the nature aud amount of the same
in the office of the Register In Chancery for N
Castle county, ten days before the fourth MON
DAY' In September, A. D., 1X83,and to appear and
prove said lien or Hens at the ensuing term of
the court, before the rising of the court
third day of the term.
Wilmington, Aug. a, 1888.
William Morrison,
et. al.
J. H. RODNEY, Trustee.
aug6-6w
£|ST MONTHLY MEETING
PERPETUAL
Savings and
Loan Association
WILL BE HELD
TUESDAY
?
The 4th Day of September.
At the flOth monthly meeting |8,500 sold at pre
miums quite acceptable to purchaeers.
This association It
each share, deducts
the name with
NEW SERIES ISSUED EVERY SIX MONTHS.
Any information
secretary, M. L. Lichtenstein.
Withdrawing members receive
est of 7 per cent.
four hundred dollars for
premiums, but collects
th y dues.
be obtained from the
annual Inter■
l-3t
OUR GREAT NEED.
Something for Wilmington 's Philanthropic
Something for Wilmington 's Philanthropic
Citizens to Ponder Over.
To the Editor of the Gazette: Sir —
Our people need a hospital for contagious
diseases, more particularly small-pox pa
tients. We cannot hope to be rid of small
pox lor any great length of time; we are too
the cities of Philadelphia and Balti
more. The weekly reports show that small
pox exists in the hospitals of said cities all
t! e time. Mechanics and laborers are con
tinually coming and going Irom our city.
These people come from all parts of the
United States and foreign countries. I
think it is clear to any and all persons who
will give this subject of traveling from placée
to place a careful investigation, that we are
likely to have the small-pox brought to our
city any day by this roving set of people.
Now the question Is, how
a hospital erected ? I believe most of our
tax-payers say, "Hold, enough; . no more
increase of the bonded debt of our city."
This being the feeling our city legislators
step* toward erecting such a
building; what are we to do? Fold our
hands, remain silent in regard to this im
portant matter and allow the reputation of
our city to become a by-word, and first class
working men shun us because we make
provision for them in case of emergency ?
Can we have a building without the aid of
our city legislators ? Undoubtedly we can.
The large manufacturing establishments In
our city owe it to the poor workingmen to
provide such a place for their comfort wheu
stricken down by this dreadful disease. I
believe that If a committee of our wealthy
men
could raise, say $25,000 in one week, which
would be ample to erect such a building as
The expense of maintain
ing the hospital could be borne by
the city. If some great conflagration or
some deadly disease were to visit, any of our
towns in this State aud the people were ren
dered homeless, with death aud starvation
staring them In the face, I ask how long
people to raise $25,000
or more, to relieve their wants aud save
them from death ? It would be done at once.
Our people, when aroused, are generous
toward suffering human!ly. What we want
at. this time Is some one or more of our in
fluential men to take this matter in hand
and agitate it as a measure of the greatest
Importance to all of our citizens, and do it
Delays are dangerous. By le
in
we to get such
will take
ol
ot
of
to
of
(•
11
would take this matter in hand, they
we want now.
ch
would it take
of
at
at once.
malning silent, and giving this subject
thought, and allowing things to move along
in the old ruts, may cost the business men
of this city $500,000 besides many lives.
Now, what will cause this loss ? I answer
fifty cases of small-pox in our city will do
it. Fifty cases at one time may cause five
hundred cases to exist before the disease
could be controlled. With a hospital pro
perly managed, thedisease can be kept under
control, and our city saved the humiliation
of becoming a pest house. New Castle
county can build a Court House, Alms
house, numerous expensive bridges and the
like, but our city will do nothing in this
matter. In other cities the people keep
ahead of the^county. They make the im
provements and do all things necessary to
cause the people to keep pace with this pro
gressive age. Who will agitate ibis subject
at once ? E. B. Frazer.
Wilmington, Del., Sept. 1,1883.
first
SHUT OUT BY TRENTON
AN OPP' DAY" FOR
E QUICKSTEPS
S00EES OF SATUBDAI'S GAMES.
RATHER
TH
How the Trenton. Walked Away WHU a
Fine Victory In Thte City—A Thirteen
Innlng Content In Baltimore.
Although It was a disappointment to the
large audience gathered at Quickstep Park,
Saturday afternoon, the Quicksteps could
not bat Harkins, the Trenton pitcher, and
failed to make arm. The Trentons, on the
other hand, batted Pyle with great freedom.
The following is the detailed score:
THBNTON.
B. IB. TB.
Harkins, p. * 1 1 1 ° 0 2
Lynch, of. 0 J 2 4 1 0 1
.... 6 1 2 g 10 1 U
lb... 5 3 3 0 7 0 0
_ 6 8 3 6 3 1 0
Williams, 1. f... 4 8 12 10 0
5 1112 0 0
5 112 8 10
5 0 0 0 0 0 0
517 3 3
S uintoD, o
ood man. .
Bastian, 2D .
Bradley, r f
Smith, s. s.
,3b
16 14
Totals.
quickstep.
AB. B. IB TB. PO. A. b
0 110'»
Kienzel,of. 8
Banners, r. f- 4
Hoover, 2b
Fox. 8b ...
Waltt, 1. 1. 4
Albert, s s.
Snyder, lb
Pyle, p....
Geary, c..
Totals...
0 10 0
4 0 0 0 1 0 o
4 0 0 0 0 0 8
0 0 0 1 0 0
4 0 2 2 2 8 0
4 0 0 0 13 I
0 0 0 2 2
8 0 1 1 0 0 0
0
I
I
0 4 4 27 11 7
80ORB BV INKING*.
. 2008441 1 0-15
. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0—0
Trenton ..
Quickstep
Earned
, Trenton 4; bases on balls, Tren
ton l, Quickstep 2; left on bases, Trenton 6,
Quickstep 7; struck out, Trentou 7, Quickstep
lu; first base on errors, Trenton 0, Quickstep 2;
passed balls, Quinton 3, Geary 6: Hies caught,
Tienton 10, Quickstep 0; files missed, Lynch 1;
double play, Quickstep 1; umpire, John F.
Holland. Time of game, one hour and 45 min
utes.
GAMES ELSEWHERE.
At. New York:
New York.
Providence.
Base hits. Now York, 9; Providence, 8;errors,
New York, 7; Providence, 6; pitchers, Welch
and Uadhourne; umpire, Bradley;
At Detroit:
Detroit.
Buffalo.
20004000 0—0
2 10 0
0 10 0-4
0 6 1 0 0 1 1 4 0—12
0 0 4 1 3 1 1
account of darkness: base hits
Detroit, 17; Buffalo, 14; errors, Detroit, 7;
Buffalo, 6; pitchers, Weidmau and Galvin:
umpire Lane.
At Baltimore, thirteen Innings:
001010 2 010002—7
3020 L 0000 o 00 O— 6
Bas hits, Cincinnati, 8; Baltimore, 10; errors,
Cincinnati, f.; Baltimore, 8; pitchers, White,
and Henderson; umpire, Kelly.
At Philadelphia:
Athletic.
Metropolitan.
Hase hits. Athletic 13, Metropolitan 13: errors,
Athletic 8, Metropolitan 11: pitchers, Matthews
and Lynch; umpire, McNicholl.
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 00050100—7
a is
Game called
Cincinnati
Baltimore.
0 0 0 1 6 2 3 0 0—1.
100021001—6
0 0—0
Philadelphia
Boston.
Base hits Philadelphia, 3; Boston, 14; errore,
Philadelphia, 4; Boston, 4.
At Chicago:
Chicago
40.1200 1 3 0—21
020022100—7
Base hits, Chicago. 24; Cleveland, 10; errors,
Chicago, 8; Cleveland. 14: pitchers, Corcoran,
Daly and Hunter; umpire, Decker.
At Brooklyn:
St Louis
Brooklyn
The Columbus club play* d at Harrisburg
Saturday and was defeated. The home nine
did much the better fielding and the Asso
ci ition team the better batting. The Co
lumbus had 10 errors and the Harrisburg
five, while the lalter made a total of six hits
and the visitors 13. Following is the score
by li nlngs:
Harrisburg
Columbus.
102121100-8
300 1-7
0 3 0
0040—5
0 0 0 «
000000011—2
The Anthracite-Active contest at Potts
exhibition game, be
ville Saturday was
cause of the absence of an official umpire.
Blakely pitched for the Anthracites. The
score was:
10 0—6
0 2 2 0 0
000000000—0
Anthraelto
Active.
At Chester the Ross and Houston clubs
played a drawn game, the score standing 5
to 5. Rain prevented a tenth inning.
Newark, Del., Sept, l.— 'The McGrath
Senat« Base Ball Club played a game with
tbe Actives of this place to-day, which re
sulted In a victory for the former by a score
of 19 to 12. The game was well played and
full ol interest from beginning to end.
as follows:
was
The score by Innings
McGrath . 40023 18 1 0 19
1 4 0 6 0 1 1 0 0-12
Active
The McGrath Senate had 12 base hits with
a total of 24, while their opponents are
credited with five lilts with a total of 11.
A nine from MulUn's morocco factory de
feated a nine from McClary's factory, at
Fourth and Harrison streets Saturday
noon, by a score ol 19 to 6.
The Ottawa defeated the Meta by a icore
of 28 to 20 Saturday.
utei
THE INTER-8TATE RECORD.
The following Is tbe record of the Inter
State clubs, up to and including Saturday's
games:
Sf\ i
m g
1
0
F I
$
§
clubs.
3
8
a
4 I 30
r.
2
Active
Anthraoite
Brooklyn..
Han lab
Merritt...
Ti enton...
Quickstep
Ü
I
1
I
6
T 4
8 31
4 j ! 27
71 28
I
4
org
rt 4
5
4! 7 8
6 2
:
2 2 3
1 29 !39|l 197
29 39 26
Games Lost
NOTES.
Baltimore is no louger the tail-end club.
Boston lias won 14 straight games from
Philadelphia.
The Athletic played six and won five
games last week.
The Boston players have made 21 h(
runs this season.
Charlie Comiskey will probably manage
the St. Louis Club.
Harry Wright thinks that either Provi
dence or Boston will carry off the pennant.
The Detroit Free Press says it is high time
the Detroit club was reconstructed and all
members who prefer to bum rather than
$300 per month he blacklisted
and permitted to follow their inclinations.
One of the deals in the Cleveland Club,
and one that shows how much McCormick
is Interested iu winning the championship,
is that after each League game "Mac" gives
up a good silver dollar *o the man who
makes the best record during it .—Cleveland
Herald.
"The "hoodlums" were hard on Fox Sat
urday afternoon, on account of his three
This is not right. The men cannot
It is but na
earn $200
errors.
play a uniformly good game,
tural for them to have errors occasionally,
•it "off day.
» to-morrow
" Look
and next
and
yesterday was th<
for splendid games
isiting clubs in the American Association
receive 865 and the receipts go to.the home
club. In Philadelpha the visiting clubs In
the'League receive 40 per cent, of the gate
receipts. In other cities, where the admis
sion is 50 cents, they receive 15 cents for
every man that passes through the turn
stile.
Following are the Inter-State games to be
played during the present mouth, the place
of the game being at tbe home of the first
named club in each case: 3-4—Anthracite
Quickstep; Acttve-Trenton; Harrisburg
Brooklyn. 5-6—Active-Quickstep; Harris
burg-Trenton; Anthracite-Brooklyn. 7-8—
Harrisburg Quickstep; Anthracite-Trentou;
Active-Brook lyn. 10-11—Active-Harrisburg;
B rookly n-Trcn ton. 12-13— An tli racite-H ar
risburg; Trenton-Brooklyn. 14-15—Harris
burg-Anthiacite; Quickstep-Brooklyn. 17 18
— Harrisburg-Active; Trenton - Quickstep.
19 20—Active-Anthracite; Brook lyn-Qutck
step. 22—Anthracite-Active;
Trenton. 24-25—Trenton-Active; Brooklyn
Anthracite; Qulckstep-Harrisburg. 26-27—
Brooklyn - Active; Quickstep - Anthracite;
Treuton-Harrisburg. 28-29—Quickstep Ac
tive; Trenton-Anthracite; Brooklyn-Harris
burg.
out.
day.
uiekstep
HOME AGAIN.
Keturn of the Knights Templar from 8an
Francisco — A Reception Tendered
Them.
On Friday afternoon, August 3, Eminent
Commander, J. Parke Postle and wife; Gen
eralesslmo, Samuel C. Melntire; CaptaiD
General, Albert C. Griggs; Captain, N. R.
Benson, and J. Winfield Scott and wife, and
J. P. Dough ten, left this city
Car Company's car Jerome M
Francisco, Cal., for the purpose of attending
the triennial conclave of the Grand Encamp
ment. The party with the exception of J.
Winfield 8cott and wife who remained
in Chicago, returned home on Saturday
evening, at 7.30 o'clock.
The delegation was met at the depot by
45 uniformed
minent Com
Allen Gawthrop, actiug as Captain
headed bv the First Regiment Band
on Woro«8ter
arble, for San
the Commandery, numbering
men, commanded by Past E
mander,
General,
which played a few bars of "Home Again"
t he train came into the station.
As soon as possible the returning Knights
were placed in cabs and accompanied to the
Temple where the reception took place,
Hon Charles B. Lore made the address ol
welcome afty
escorted to tne banqueting room where an
elegant supper had been prepared.
Notwithstanding the short notice which
was given the commandery, as to the time
the delegation would arrive, the arrange
ments for the receptloD were complete in
every particular. To avoid any possible
misunderstanding a committee of the com
mandery went to Philadelphia Saturday
afternoon and met the excursionists and
eucceeded in having the car held in Philx.
delphia until the 6.30 o'clock accommoda
tion trail., otherwise they would have ar
rived In this city at 6.57 o'clock, which
would, of course, have made it necessary to
dispense with the reception, as the notices
to the members of the commandery called
upon them to be at the Temple in lull uni
form at 7 o'clock.
Messrs. Postles, Melntire and Griggs were
the representatives to the Grand Encamp
ment.
which the whole party were
Found It Lying
About 9.30 o'clock on Saturday night,
Inane Strauss, salesman for Meyer Mevers
at the northwest corner of Fifth and Mar
ket streets, noticed that a coat valued at
five dollars,
forms standing in front of the store.
the coat and it
uamed
the Pavement.
missing from one of the
No one had sold
was soon discovered that a
James Mateer had taken it and w
way up Market street. Strauss started In
pursuit and caught Mateer in front of the
Delaware House with the missing coat on.
He was immediately conveyed to the hall by
Messrs. Myers and Strauss and locked up.
At 9 o'clock this morning he was
given a hearing before 'Squire O'Neill and
held in the sum of $300 for his appearance
at court. When asked by the 'Squire if he
had anything to say the prisoner excused
his act by saying that "the coat fell off the
form and I picked it up «and put it on."
At the same session Alfred Johnson for as
saulting Harry T. Deary, was fined $5 and
his
costs and held in the sum of $200 to keep
the peace. Six cases of druukeuuess were
also disposed of.
Baltimore's Carnival.
September 11, 12 and 13 have been set
apart for tbe Summer Night's Festival at
Baltimore, and it is promised by the com
mittee in charge that the illuminations, pro
cessions and other features of the Oriole
celebration will surpass all previous efforts
in this line. On September 11 an associa- ;
tion of gentlemen, representing Lord Baltl
more, his courtiers, household and officers,
will be escorted irom the vessel landing to
the City Hall by a great military procession.
September 12, grand illumination of Balti
more. September 13, mystic procession ot
40 great tableaux, on wheels, in which it is
stated that 1,300 men and over 200 horses
will be employed. Grand ball at the Acad
emy ol Music will conclude the celebration.
The Pennsylvania Railroad Company will
sell excursion tickets from all principal
ticket statious to Baltimore a."d return, par
ticulars of which may be had at ticket
offices.
A Brutal Driver Fined.
William Walker, colored, hired a horse
and bugiry from John Hanson, liveryman,
on East Fourth 6treet, Saturday morning at
10 o'clock, and by noon had almost driven
the horse to death, and had, in turning into
Girard street from Tatnall mashed both
wheels by running into the curb. Wheu
the wagon broke down Walker returned to
the stable and demanded his money, stating
that the wagon Had broken down. Investi
gation followed, when it was liscovered
how Walker had been acting:. A warrant
for his arrest was immediately sworn out
and placed in the hands of an officer who
arrested Walker and took him before 'Squire
O'Neill. He was fined $25 and costs.
A Liberal Donation
The Neptune Library, au organization
t omposed of members of the Water Witch
Fire Company, have douated their stock of
books valued at $200 to the Neptune Social
Club, whose room is in the Opera House.
The action taken by the library was caused
by the determination of the fire company
to disband aud as their members belong to
the fire company and their room has always
been in the third story of the company's
bouse it was deemed better to donate the
books to tbe Social Club than to try to dis
pose of them at public sale.
Peach Shipment*.
The peach shipments over ' he Delaware
Division on Satuiday were distributed as fol
lows: Jersey City, 40; Boston, 35; Philadel
phia, 24; Chester, 6; Hartford, 5; Cleveland,
4; Wilmington, 3; Cincinnati, 3; Chicago,
3; Buffalo, 3; Pittsburg, 2; Scrauton, 1;
Wilkesbarre, 1, New Haven, 1; Bridge
port, 1; Springfield, 1; Columbus, 1; Day
ton, i; Erie, 1; Corry, 1. Total, 136; pre
Vlously shipped, 2,137; total to date, 2,273.
DKATH ON THE RAIL.
Thirteen Persons Injured on a Boston Kx
prM»< Train In Vermont.
St. Alban, Vt. Sept. 2.—The fast train
leaving Boston at 1 o'clock Saturday after-*
noon, for Chicago via Central Vermont
Railroad, collided with the last New York
express, which left here at 9 25 p. m., at
Colchester at 8 o'clock. Colchester is the
meeting place for these trains. The New
Express arrived first aDd had turned the
switch, preparing to setting off on the side
track but before the engine of this train had
reached the side track the Bos!
express came along at a great
speed. Euglneer Jones, of the Hoston train,
applied the air brakes, but they did not
work. The engineer and fireman of the
New York train jumped and saved their
lives. The hands of the other train stuck to
their
New
when the collision occurred, and this fact
alone prevented a most terrible accident.
The engines and tenders of both trains were
wrecked, and the baggage cars behind them
were telescoped, one tender going almost
through a baggage car ot the Boston train.
A large number of gravel men
in this baggage
were slightly hurt,
persons on the Boston train were
injured, as follows: G. F. Jones, engineer,
badly bruised; his son, G. 8. Jones, badly
bruised; W. H. Chelson, severely hurt in the
Dack; Michael Finn, baggage master, bad
scalp wound; James Rooney, collar bone
fractured and a number of bruises about
the body; Felix Larnett, thigh fractured;
Andrew Osier, severely bruised about the
body; and six gravel train men. Everything
is being done for the Injured by the railroad
officials. The track was cleared about 10
o'clock this morning. The night express
trains were delayed on account of the acci
dent. As far as can be learned the accident
was due to the failure of the brakes of the
Boston train.
posts, and both were badly hurt.
York train was nearly at a standstill
were
and six of them
The thirteen
SEASHORE TRAINS COLLIDE.
New York, Sept. 2.—The train on the
Long Island railroad leaviug Far Rockaway
tor Huuter'6 Point at 7.30 p. in., was
stopped on the curve near Springfield
Station to put off a person who refused to
pay fare. While standing on the curve a
train from Long Beach dashed into the
rear of the Rockaway train, completely
wrecking the two rear cars of the latter,and
the engine and first car of the Long Beach
train. TWo men, whose names have not
yet lieen learned, were killed, and several
passengers were seriously ft jured.
ANOTHER SERIOUS ACCIDENT.
Baltimore, Sept. 2.—A collision occurred
at Highland Park Station, a short distance
beyond the city limits, on the Western
Maryland Railroad at 5 o'clock this morn
ing between & regular and an extra freight
train, both coming East. The regular train
had stopped on account of a hot box, and a
few miuutes afterward was run into by the
extra, going at a speed of 20 miles an hour.
Joseph Cruse, engineer of the extra, jumped
from his engine aud got off with a sprained
ankle; William Abell, a brakeman on |the
road, who was coming to the city to spend
Sunday, was killed; Joseph Dorsey, a cattle
drover, ot Frederick county, Md., sustained
injuries from which he died at 6 o'clock
this evening. William Fleigh, fireman,
was injured, but not seriously. The verdict
of the coroner's jury to-night charged the
collision to gross negligence.
Civil Rights In Louisville.
Louisville, Ky., Sept. 2. —The Georgia
delegates to the national colored convention
which meets in Louisville, on the 24th in
stant, have formally announced their deter
mination to demand admittance to the
hotels and to Insist
accommodations. The managers of our
principal hotels have been interviewed on
the subject, and say that they will not
admit them as guests at all.
rooms of these hotels
continue to be in demand during the season
of the convention, there is no probability
that in a suit for damage under the civil
rights bill a case against any of the hotel
propi letere can be made out. They are
every day refusing applicants whom
they would like to -entertain, but c&nuot,
and they say there is no reason why they
should not ref use applicant« whom they do
not want.
first class
As the
now full, and will
LOCAL LACONICS.
of
by
the
St.
and
rad
A
of
the
the
St.
s*
Deviled crabs at Fullmer's.
Roast dinners at Fullmer's.
Soft shell crabs at Fullmer's.
Ice cold salt oysters at Fullmer's.
All the public, aud a large majority of tbe
private schools of the city opened for busi
ness to-day.
The piling for the new Market street
bridge has arrived and is now lying at tbe
Shipley street wharf.
Rebecca D. Marls and her sister, D. D.
Maris, will reopen their select school at No.
609 Tatuall street on Monday, September 3,
1883.
;
The secular school connected with the
Sacred Heart Church, will open in the
school building on Madison below Tenth
street, to-morrow morning.
George A. Le Maistre bought of Heald &
Saturday, the prop
I li
Co., at public sale
erty 1210 Delaware avenue, and a lot at the
Pennsylvania, for $6,270.
Fifteen thousaud descriptive circulars of
the State of Delaware, are being printed for
distribution in Germany, by the Freie
Presse tor the Immigration Commission.
The Water Witch Steam File Engine
Company did not disband od Saturday and
will in all probability remain in service
until thev give up the possession of the
building on the 15th of the month.
The steam yacht Freyja of Philadelphia,
has leturned to the shipyard of the Pussy &
Jones Company and has been hauled out on
the marine railway to be replanked. She
was here several months ago and received a
new brass propeller.
In attempting to swing through the
Saturday, the
rear
be a good
ception scene, entitled, "Our Social Club,
presenting a phalanx of 16 beautiful young
ladles. The performance will conclude with
the extravaganza, "Don Jose, the Spanish
Dude."
Market street draw
schoouer SI ay maker dragged her anchor
aud was carried against the bridge. Her
boom was broken, her shrouds torn away
and her mainrails badly torn. The damage
done will cost about $200 to repair.
The till of Morris W. Smith, who oc
cupies stalls No. 4, and 49 in the Second
Street market, was tapped by a small boy
on Saturday night. The youthtul thief
was detected aud captured after a phort
chase and the moneyjhe had taken recovered.
He was allowed to depart after receiving a
very strong and practical lecture.
in
AMUSEMENTS
Vo doubt there will be a large audience
present in the Opera House this evening to
greet the first appearance of Pat Rooney's
New York Star Specialty Company. The
program will be full of fun, and those who
desire to enjoy a good, hearty laugh should
not fail to attend.
I
To-morrow evening the Rentz Santley
Combination will appear. The program will
and will consist of a good re
CHURCH DEDICATION
IMPOSING CEREMONIES AT
THE SACRED HEART.
AN ADDEESS BY BISHOP BEOKEE.
Procession of Catholic Societies- The Ser
vices In the Church—home Very Hand
some Donations
The Church of the Sacred Heart, which
has been in course of erection for some years
past at the corner of Tenth and Madison
streets, was dedicated yesterday morning
with the imposing ceremonies used
occasions by the church. The dedicatory
ceremonies were cooducted by the Rt.
Rev. Bishon Becker.
The attendance was very large and was
augmented by the attendance ot all the
liglou6 societies from the other city Catholic
churches.
The societies met at Sixth and West streets,
and moved at 10.30 o'clock in the following
order : Joseph Fullmer, chief marshxl; B. P.
Hasson and Michael Cannon, aids; Knights
of St. Lawrence, 36 men, Charles O'Conner,
commander; W. P. Windish, first deputy;
D. T. Kilroy, second deputy; J. F. Ryan,
third deputy; St. Peter's Beneficial Society,
40 men, marshaled by Thomas Fedigan; St.
Mary's Beneficial Society, St.. Mary's Tem
perance Society, St. Michael's Beneficial So
ciety, 50 men, marshaled by Arthur Jen
nings; Divisions Nos. 1, 2 and 4, Ancient
Order Hibernians, 102 men, marshaled by
John P. Donahoe, with John McElwee, Pat
rick Casey and Hugh Foster, aids; St. Paul's
Beneficial Society, 23 men, marshaled by
Patrick Hagerty; St. Benedict's Beneficial
Society, 63 men, marshaled by Jacob Ant
weiler.
The line marched over the following
route: Down Sixth street to Vlarket, to
Tenth, to Delaware avenue, to Eleventh, to
Madison, to the church.
The ceremony of consecrating the High
alt^r commenced at 9 o'clock and lasted
about one hour.
The dedication proper commenced at 11
o'clock. The procession, heade 1 by 13 altar
boys and followed by all the priests in at
tendance, with Bishop Becker bringing up
the rear, tiled slowly down the main aisle.
In the vestibule prayer was offered by the
Bishop, after which he and attending priest«
recited the "Miserere" alternately. The
procession in the meantime was slowly
marching around the outside of the church,
the Bishop blessing the walls. They re
turned and proceeded up the main aisle to
the altar. The Litany
cited, wheu Bishop Becker celebrated
Pontifical High Mass, the most impressive
service of the Catholic Church. He
was assisted by Father McGrane,
of St. Peter's; Deacons of Honor,
Father Tierney ot St. Paul's aud Father
Flynn of St. Mary's; Deacon of the Mass,
Father Fallon of St. Patrick's; sub-Deacou,
Father Dennis, O. S. B., of the Church of
the Sacred Heart. Father Keiley of St.
Peter's acted as master of ceremonies.
Among other priests who were present but
actively participating were Father
Militus, O. S. B., of Newark, N. J.; Father
Melchoir of Alabama, Father Kelley of St.
Joseph's, Father Dollard of St. James's. A
choir of fifteen voices under the leadership
of J. P. Theodore Fuekel, Miss Ella Gross,
organist, sang Wiegand's Mass and an offer
tory by Campana, with such a ring aud tone
as to prove tbe acoustic properties of the
room perfect. The Very Rev. Father Gerard,
Benedictine of the Monastery at Newark,
N. J., then made the opening address in
German. He complimented the congrega
tion on their success, and gave a short
sketch of the history of the congregation
and the building of the church. The congre
gation was founded in IS'* 4 by the late pas
tor, Father Wendelin Meier, when about 15
to 20 German lamilies banded themselves
together, which was the nucleus from which
the present congregation of between 501. aud
000 souls started. The corner-stone wa& laid
August 20, 1874, by Bishop Becker, but de
lays occurred frequeutiy lrom lack of funds.
Bishop Becker followed with a few
marks iu German and a lengthy address in
English on the standing of the Catholic
Church.
Father Corbinian, pastor of the church,
closed the service with a few remarks to the
such
of the Saints w
'
DOl
congregation.
In the evening Father Corbiuian, Father
Melitus of Newark, N. J., aud Father Dennis
of St. Viucent's, Westmoreland county,Pa.,
celebrated Vespers, when the choir sang the
Vespers by Buehle, "Ave Maria" by Mil
lard, "O, Salutaris" by Ros*iui, "Tantum
Ergo" by Father Meier. The church was
crowded.
The following are some of the donations
made toward the erection of the church:
The maguiticeut maiu marble altar, made
by Davidson & Brother for $1,500, was con
tributed by Eisiug & Lange: the sanctuary
contains 13 windows, the middle
which is the gift of Bishop Becker, and to
the right are windows uamed after St. Paul,
St. John, St. Andrew, 8t. Jacob, St Matl.ew
and St. Simon, presented by the Rev. Pat
Reiily, Vicar General, John and Eva
Fox, Joseph Beste, William MeMeramiu,
William and Margaret Stewart and S. G.
8immons & Brother respectively. To the
left of the middle the windows are named
after St. Peftr, St. James, St. Thaddeus,St.
Philip, St. Thomas and St. Bartholomew,
presented by Bernard and Mary Beste, Con
rad Keller, James Bradford, William
and Maria Haugh, a gentleman who
does not wish his name men
tioned and Daniel Bickta respectively.
A window in the north wall named after St.
Benedict was presented by St. Benedict's
Beueficial Society of the church. The first
of the remaining 6ix windows in the north
wall w»s presented by Thomas P. Twibill,
the second by Father McGrane, the third by
George Truschler, the fourth by Nicholas
Ellinger and Nicholas Maas, the fifth by
Fidelis Berner, and sixth by a gentleman
who does not wish his name mentioned. In
the south wall is another large window' pre
sented by Joseph and Mary Elslng and
St. Scholast'cA. The first of the n maintng
s* x was donated by August Bierman aud
August Bickta, the be ond hy Peter and
Julia Miller and Henry C. Turner, Esq., the
third by Gustav aud Rosa Konitzer, the
fourth by Mrs. James Byr e and Elizabeth
Fullmer, the fifth by Helena Roller, Adolph
Cocb, Catherine Bleyer and Elizabeth
Schafler, and the sixth by a gentleman who
does not wish his name published.
of
I li B
Water Advocates.
J. H. Traxler, presided at the regular
Sunday evening "emperance meeting held
in Gilbert Chapel, Thirteenth and French
streets, last evening. Addresses were deliv
ered by several prominent temperance
workers of the efty. It
hold a children's meeting on Sunday even
ing next, from 6.45 p. m. to 7.45 o'clock,
before holding the regular meeting.
resolved to
Death of aPhilailplphia Lady.
Mrs. Margaret M. Field, of 24 South
Eighteenth street, Philadelphia, died at the
residence Dr. Reed J. McKay, this city on
Saturday, of consumption. Deceased had
teen a sufferer from the disease about two
years, and came to this city a short time ago
on a visit. The body will be taken to Phil
I adelphla for burial.

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