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The daily gazette. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, October 02, 1883, Image 1

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Entered et the Post Office et»l
ington, Del^M second-class matter.
vol i iti-isro. 134 .
WILMINGTON, DEL., TUK8DAY, OCTOBER 2, 1883.
PRICEONE CENT.
amvi %MKta.
/'IRANI* OPERA H °22îc>»IOT*MPLE.
G
«
Wednesday Eve'g, Oct. 3.
Thatcher, Primrose & West
tC onsolidated Minstrels.
MANAGER.
bRO. T. ULAPHAM
rnM mtlHf . prognun of uobmO brUll.oor.
N EW END SONGS,
NEW JOKES,
NEW BALLADS,
Funniest Aherplfio. Brer Written.
And the
Heats for aal« atC. F. Thomas
septw.atao
t ;s! ,r Æ « M tAr«i.
(TraNd OPERA HO0SEj ic
FKIDAT EVE'G, OCTOBER 5.
TEMPLE.
The Two Johns Comedy Comp.
In the Muslc.l Comedy ln I Acte, EnUtled
THE TWO JOHNS !
n, Mint LeiuftmMe^ enjMr.nnleet Comedy
THE MUS l HKFINW> C<IMEBT OF THE DAT.
BKILLIANT DIALOGUE I
LUDICROUS SITUATIONS I
usual. Beat« for aale at C. F. Thomas
oct2 4t
8Co/« No. 421 Marnet street.
LOST AND FOUND,
T OST.— AT EASTBURN'S FIRE A
Jj HOSE reducer. Any one that has found It
M! leave it at the Fame Hose House
Kill ht ne I and receive thanks.
septlO-tf
UK WARD ».
R ~ KWAKD—A RKWAKD OF FIVE
lil NDREii DOLLARS Is hereby offered
■Ht and apprehension of Collingsworth
p. Hsllett who escaped from Jail at Georgetown,
DO., suer midnight Sunday morning, deacrlp
. lilulit about five feet ten Indies, rather
e, high ehe* k bones, v< Ice peculiar, Une and
I, hrown hair and small dark eyes, sharp
upper teeth. Cli AB. C. STOCK LEY,
Governor.
for the
chin
FOR RLNT.
UOK RENT.—A LARGE ROOM SUITA
1 «LE KOK balls, parties and soirees, second
Building. *Kor terms, etc., apply
REYNOLDS, Restaurant,
Oor. Water and King sts.
J. A G.
wpiffi-flt
U0R KENT —PART OF HOUSE TO A
I >.MALL family.
my» 1117 TATNALL BTREET.
FOR SALE.
pu SALE.
100 Acres of Standing Timber.
Chiefly YELLOW PINE and MAPLE.
Within one mile of railroad and three miles of
adjacent to otb*-r large and fine tracts
Und, the growth of which Is likewise
itrket. For particulars as to location,
this, etc., address
GAZETTE OFFICE.
on th
pro
W'llli'lw'tf
DANCING.
pROF. A. 8. WEBSTER'S
SELECT
DANCING ACADEMY,
MASONIC TEMPLE,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
1883 -SEASON OF —1884
Commencing Monday, September 10.
GENTLEMEN*» CL ABB—Monday and Thurs
« vt-uiiiirs from S to 10, commencing Septem
UDIFS' AND CHILDREN*BCLAB8-Tht
•lav uric
IfUThixd
Special
Bata r<lsy
from & to (i, and
6, commencing Saturday
•ptember 1&, at 3 o'clock.
V,
:i
Instructing chll
■upervlsloit.
, are Is exercised to make them grace
ful ami prutlchmt daucers.
utlon gi
reive my personal
!.
Alt m w .lances will be Introduced as
me y are issued by tbe association.
SCHOOLS, SEMINARIES or PRIVATE
CLASSES.
wniSH itmi gcuiiemen desiring to form private
«!uR ,ln llu ' c,, y° r of town sho la confer
un mi- mh u.w. n .. practicable, for choice of
■Uv.
* r,,r terms, circulars, etc., apply to H. F. Ro
»•710 Market street ;at iny residence. No.
llilnl street, or by mall at the Masonle
I" 1,
ÜJ3W'.
TV„„.|,,
DRUGGISTb.
QL'RRY POWDER,
CELERY SEED !
MUSTARD SEED 1
FINEST SALAD OIL
BOTTLE WAX !
"TIuLESaLe AND RETAIL BY
JAMES BELT,
—APOTHECARY—
^ 0r ' Sixth aud Market Streets,
w ilmin«tov, del.
■'"MUSIUAAJ, i' a u ns
1) R8 ' J N - aTXhôSÏnsaor,
S^Mitrit «ÄPvl- «OKENBACK of 206N.
P* r »on, durinuM / l * del Phla, either by mall or by
<*• m ,QK 1 kour* of 8 a. m to 2 p. m., and
aud ui« Whosoever should know his con
"«G«*! Way 10 it should read
wittDOM
__ j r «ctlpt .rt»,
J'' HN u cole,
"•»Any
SKI'.äi" <u j , 5*. ** «•
'N A NUT-BHKLL. *'
8*tit c, n
«-«•ent stainn.
! ' UBU FltAcit JUS ' 1 *"* TH1 '
101 WestRlxlh street. Tel«
8-1-12*4
» n.MinoTon anom houkk.
-
AT THE—
Wilmington Shoe House.
-SEPT. 27
We suggest aome advantages
which shoe buyers have when
dealing with us Our stock is
probably as large again as that
of any other shoe house in this
city; our styles are all of the
newest and latest patterns. Our
prices are not approached by
any de« 1er offering equally
good qualities.
GEO. D CLELAND.
Special bargains can always
be found in our large assort
ment—by asking for them,
none need go away dissatisfied.
GEO. D. CLELAND.
Our old friends and custo
mers will find stirring times at
424 Market street just now.
Trade opens with a bounce and
strength that makes things
very brisk. Everything fs
brightened up- and improved,
but best of all our fall and
winter stock is the handsomest,
largest and best we have ever
shown.
GEO. D. CLELAND.
We r<ceived this morning
400 more pairs of Cyrus
Phillips & Son's Ladies,Misses
and Children's shoes; in this
line our stock is now full and
complete.
GEO. D. CLELAND.
A matter that has not as yet
been mentioned is that we are
the authorized agents for Laird.
Schober & Mitchell's fine
ladies shoes, a fact that will
meet with favor among the
ladies who desire a fine shoe
and a neat fit.
GEO. D. CLELAND.
We have just tabled a lot of
ladies shoes which we are sell
ing at a decided bargain; stop
in and look at them.
GEO. D. CLELAND,
424 MARKET ST.
COAL,
J. L. & (J. CO.
—for—
I M E
L
—AND—
CEMENT,
COAL
—AND
WOOD
—GOTO—
Jackson Lime & Coal Co.,
SHIPLEY A KING ST. WHARVES.
mvl7-42
GOAL. COAL.
TRA n BPORTATION.
BUSH'S
WILMINGTON AND PHILADELPHIA,
STEAM FREIGHT LINE.
Balls dally from Pier 2. Bo. Wharves, Pblla. aud
Foot of Frehch Street, Wilmington.
FREIGHT HANDLED CAREFULLY AND
DELIVERED PROMPTLY.
COAL! COAL!
ANTHRACITE !'
BITUMINOUS !
cannel!
retail orders.
«^Particular attention given
G.W. BUSH & SONS.
mlO-ly2S
J AM NOW PREPARED TO DELIVER
ALL SIZES OF COAL
SUPERIOR QUALITY FOR FAMILY U8E
—AT—
MARKET RA TES
THE LOWEST
cellers.
All coal well screened amd put
B. F. TOWNSEND
OFFICE A YARD FOOT OF FOURTH ST.
49"Telsphone communication with all parte of
the city.
N OTICKb,
XTOTicE.—CITIZEN»' LOAN AH80
Av CIATION. The 18th annual meeting of the
stockholders will be held Thu rsday evening next,
October4th, at 8o'clock. Annual report, elec
tion of officer«; first payment on new stock now
being Issued. GEORGE C.
Mpto-ér
MA RIB,
Secretary.
A
ATOTICE.—DIAMOND STATE LOAN
i.v ASSOCIATION new stock lor sale; no back
payments; has successfully matured Its Urständ
second aeries; Is in a prosperous condition.
Ayply day or evening
mtM>l
GEOR GE C. MARI«, 8ec^y._
T'ake notice.—county and poor
A TAXPAYERS. Taxes for the year 1883 are
due and payable at the office of the collectors
•02X Market street. Please call and settle your
taxes without further notice
to collect the
we shall proceed
In 10 days after EARY° tJCe
Collector Second District,
J. T. DICKEY,
Collector First District.
•eniîo-tr
VTOTICE.—ALL PERSONS DESIRING
H To register as nu>ses of sick persons will
No. ftl2 King street, seoona story. A
hook for that purpose has been prepared, and
blank forms for ref.rences will be Turnt- lied.
Male and female, white and colored are Invited
to avail themselvas of the opportunity.
E. B. FRAZER. Registrar,
> o. 512 King street.
Mpttktf
XTOTICES.-ANY WEIGHT', SCALES
i-V OR measures requiring Inspection may be
left at 828 and 880 King street.
J 5GOB DEAKYNE,
Sealer of Weights and Measures for New Las tie
county. _ leM-tf
JpiFTY -SECOND
MONTHLY MEETING !
-OF
PERPETUAL
Savings and Loan Ass'n,
-WILL BE HELD -
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2D,
AT TUE OFFICE OVER THE
Telegraph Office,
THIRD AND MARKET STS.
At the September monthly meeting nine thou
sand dollars sold at a low premium, which no
doubt will atiract many
Tills association allows four hundred dollars
each share—double the amount of any other loan
association. Moreover ihla l<*an association de
ducts no premiums, but collects the same will
the mom lily due«. The borrower therefore
only receives twice the amount for each shar»-,
but has the privilege of paying his premium in
small monthly Installments. sept?9-3t
members.
4;
LOCAL LACONICS.
Deviled crab« at Fullmer's. m
Roast dinners at Fullmer's.
Soft shell crabs at Fullmer's.
Ice cold salt oysters at Fullmer's.
James Mcllhenny, left yesterday for
Bogota, United States of Columbia.
* The Delaware Sængerbund will give a
concert in New Castle on Monday evening,
October 22.
Senator Bayard will deliver the oration at
tbe agricultural lair at Martiusburg, Va.,
October 11.
Deputy Supreme Regent, Frank F. Cum
mings, assisted by the
institute a new Council
proper officers will
of Royal Arcanum
Professors Jacobs and Walton will give »
complimentary sociable at their dancing
academy in the Institute Building to-morrow
evening.
I). T. Hawkins & 8on have just issued a
neatly printed iour-page quarterly sheet
called the Real Estate Bulletin. It is for
free distribution.
General Thomas A. Smyth Post was pre
sented by Eli Baldwin last evening with a
sword which he had captured from a rebel
lieutenant at the battle of Five Oaks.
Robert Tong, a butcher at Nineteenth and
Market streets, will begin the erectiou to
day of a slaughter house in Joseph Tatnall's
woods. It will be used exclusively for the
killing of hogs.
Oliver L. Bell,the newly-appointed keeper
of the front light of the New Castle range,
situated about two miles below New Castle,
moved bis family to the lighthouse dwelling
yesterday and enter upon his duties th is
morning.
The Reliance Steam Fire Engine Company
is arranging for another tour in the fall of
1884. The route will probabably be South,
aud be absent about two weeks. The uuni
her will be limited to 50 aud already 85
names are on the list.
Register Biggs yesterday granted letters
testamentary to Rachel Ann and Frank R.
Carswell, executrix and executor of the will
of Robert Carswell, deceased, of this city,
and letters of administration to William
Rothweli on the estate of Mary E. Roth well
late of Middletown.
A new mission Sunday School has been
organized by the Bethany Baptist Church,
at Delaware avenue and Union streets. The
officers are as follows: J. H. Muhlhausen;
superintendent: Frank Strfckland, assist
uperlntendent; R. D. Evans, secretary;
C. Gregg, treasurer.
ant su
Miss
Streets that Need Attention.
To the Editor of thb Gazette : Some
40 years ago King, Market, Shipley, Orange
and Tatnall streets were paved with cobble
f the
stones at the expense o
Very little money has been spent during all
these past years to keep these streets
respectable condition. King street is
passable at this* time, but the others
disgrace to tbe city. The owners of the
property on
streets
higher
goes for
S irts of the city.
ur people should have more pride than to
allow these streets to remain in such a piti
able condition. The gutters on each side of
Market street should be remodeled, made
smooth, and inviting; the curb should be
made uniform, and straightened up, or,
what would be better, entire new curb
placed down. Market street could be made
beautiful to look at, as well as greatly im
K roved to drive on, with little expense. It
1 hoped that this much-needed improve
ment will be made before this generation
passes away.
Wilmington, Oct. 2,1883.
tax-payers
in a
very
re a
the four last mentioned
have been taxed higher and
every year and the money
improvements In remote
This should not be
* Brick.
An Interesting Case,
Judge Wales yesterday morning sat
bench to hear tbe exceptions of Benjamin
Neilds and Charles B. Lore, Esqs., to the in
terrogatories filed by John C. Patterson and
William G. Whiteley, Esqs., in the case of
Kirkpatrick vs. Kirkpatrick. Mr. Nields re
presents the Kirkpatrick heirs, Mr. Lore
represents Miss Williams and Miss Hughes,
holders of promi6ory notes made in their
favor by tbe late Martha Kirkpatrick, and
Messrs. Patterson and Whiteley represent
William M. Pyle, executor of the will of
Martha Kirkpatrick, deceased. The case 1 b
an interesting oue, which involves many
nice points or law, which were ably argued
by the learned counsel engaged in the case, i
thl
THE CHAMPIONS HOME.
GRAND RECEPTION TO THE
ATHLETICS.
A VICTORY FOB THE QUICKSTEP
The Atlantic Club, or Brooklyn, Kaeily
Defeated—The A thletitffteeeptlon --Great
Rnthuslaaui In Philadelphia.
Philadelphia, Oct. 1.—The conquering
and champion Athletics came home in
triumph this evening, joined at Pittsburg
by the Metropolitan Club, of New York,one
of the clubs that were the captives of their
skill with ball and bat, and who had gener
ously consented to grace their triumph.
At Harrisburg they enjoyed the foretaste of
the victorious home-coming that had been
provided for them in this city. William B.
Smith, the president of the Select Council,
aud a delegation of both Chambers of the
City Fathers there met them, and, if they
did not extend the freedom of the city in a
jewelled box, at least gave them to under
stand that Individually and collectively they
were regarded as heroes whom their fellow
citizens were anxious to honor.
An immense multitude met them at the
Broad Stxeet Station, thronging the build
ing as it has never been before. Nearly
3,000 men, belonging to base ball clubs, so
cial clubs and various civic organizations,
stood in line outside, bearing banners ana
transparencies, on which were inscribed le
gends oi welcome. How many Joined in the
welcome in the serried lines which blocked
the many miles of their line of march can
not oe accurately computed, but they came
to welcome and not to jeer, and S 2 arcely a
block of the long route was destitute of illu
mlnated houses or elaborately decorated
business structures.
A banquet in Mercantile Hall concluded
the reception, which was one of the largest
aud most remarkable that has taken place
in this city of pageants. At the conclusion
of the banquet Charles Mason presented
Harry D. Stovey with a magnificent gold
watch, chain and charm. A speech was
then made by Colonel Fitzgerald, who re
vied the history of the club, and each mem
ber ol the club was presented by Judge Her
uemun with a gold badge, upon which was
inscribed "Athletic, Victors 1883," with the
name of the recipient on the obverse side.
Speeches were also made by William B.
Smith, Esq., President of Select Council;
President Lex of Common Council and
others.
ANOTHER VICTORT.
Tin* Quicksteps, yesterday, defeated the
Atlantic club, of Brooklyn, by a score of 9
to 1. Pyle pitched for the home club, and
struck out 17 men. The following is the
score by innings:
Atlantic
Quickstep. 2 3 1 1 1 1 0 Ox— 0
Runs earned. Quickstep, 1; first base on
brrors, Atlantic, 6; Qu ckstep, 8; first on called
calls, Gill, West; struck out. Buckley, Burtlss
(2), Holmes (3), Gill, West. Lowry (2), Cooper
bases, Atlantic,
4; Quickstep, 6: two-base hits, Klengel, Albert;
double plays, Hligh and West, Lowry, Bllgh
and West; Cusick and Snyder; passed palls.
Holmes, 3; Cusick, 1: wild pitch, Lowry, 1; um
pire, St. Lawrence; time ol game, one hour aud
30 minutes.
000100000—1
GAMES ELSEWHERE.
At Boston—Exhibition game ;
Boston
Bufialo. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3—4
At Providence :
Providence. 0 1 004 1 4 3-13
Cleveland
At New York—New York, 8; Brooklyn, 1.
At Richmond :
Detroit
Virginia. 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 x—4
At Trenton—Championship game :
8 0 0 2 0 0 2 0» 7
0 0. 0 2 0 1 1—4
Game called on account of darkness at the
end of the eighth iunlng.
NOTES. .
Shappert, fthe Harrisburg pitchers, will
open a school for pitchers this winter.
Charles C. Waitt has joine.d the Anthra
cite aud will continue with them until they
break up.
The Seventh Ward Rangers defeated the
Quickstep, Jr., Saturday afternoon, 5 to 1.
— Trenton Time*.
Milligan, of the Anthracite Club, who has
signed to play with the Athletic during Oc
tober aud next season, was black-listed yes
terday by Mr. Sullivan for deserting the An
thracite Club last Saturday to play with the
Houston Club, of Chester, against the Ross.
The Anthracites were booked to play tbe
August Flower yesterday, the Ironsides at
Lancaster, to-day, Harrisburg or Danville
Wednesday, but owing to circumstances
over which Mr. Sullivau has no control the
games are off, aud what remains—of the
club is iu Pottsville.
FIRE IN A BED ROOM.
A Mysterious Fire at the Residence of
John B. Ritchie Yesterday Afteruoou.
About 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon
smoke was discovered issuing from the
third-story window oi the residence of John
B. Ritchie, 105 East Sixth street, by his
daughter, Annie T. Ritchie, who imme
diately gave the alarm. Mr. Ritchie, who
fortunately was at home, made his way to
the third floor, where he found that the fire
was iu a room occupied by 8. K. Bowen aud
wife, the latter a daughter of Mr. Ritchie,
and the fire
culty, extinguished with several buckets
of water. In the meantime the
Delaware Truck Company had been no
tified and ran their apparatus up in frout of
the house, but their services were not
needed. How the tire origkated is a mys
tery, as it was confined mainly to a walnut
bureau aud its contents, but is supposed to
have been caused by spontaneous combus
tion. The bureau, a heavy waluut, marble
top affair, with French plate mirror, wa6
totally ruined, the marble slab aud glass
plate being cracked by the heat. The con
tents of the draa ers, mainly valuable cloth
ing, were damaged to such an extent that
they will be worthless, and a silver butter
dish was melted down. The carpet was
burned lor several yards around and the
floor, washboard and
charred. The bureau s
the heavy walnut bedstead,the foot of which
was not damaged but the headboard which
reached to within a few inches of the ceiling
was badly scorched, shewing plainly that
the flames from the burning bureau reached
tbe celling and lapped toward the headboard.
The loss to the furniture will reach about
$150, aud to the building about $50, ou
which there is.an insurance. Unfortunately
the furniture was not insured.
lOOlOulO 2— 6
01000000—1
00020000—2
Trenton....
Harrisburg
'
was, with
some diifl
paper were badly
tood at the foot of
Resolutions of Respect.
At a meeting of Smyth Post, G. A. R.,
held last eveniug, the following preamble
and resolutions were adopted:
Whkrvas, Death has again Invaded
ranks and stricken down our late eoinrade. Dr.
E. W Qosewisch, under clroumstaneeB that
poouliarily distressing: therefore, be It
Resolved , That we hereby express our apprec
iation of the many virtues and high character
of the deceased, aud our deep regret at his
timely end.
Resolve That we sincerely sympathize with
the stricken mother so suddenly and so sadly
bereaved of a dutifül and affectionate son. who
the mainstuy aud'support of her declining

A FINK KXH1BIT.
The Agricultural VHeplay In Charge of E.
H. McWhorter A Co., at the Hover Fair.
The exhibit of agricultural Implements
and machinery at the Dover fair, last week,
surpassed that of previous exhibitions by
far. Messrs. Warren, Har(er & Co., made
a handsome display in almost everything
pertaining to agricultural implements, farm
wagons, etc. Notably among the agricul
tural display was the champion binder, ex
hibited by Mr. T. R. Henthorn, the efficient
lieutenant of L. H. Lee & Bro., of Balti
more, assisted by Mr. John McWhorter, of
E. H. McWhorter & Co., of Wil
mlugton. This binder is probably
one of the most perfect machines
ever invented and a brief description of its
wonderful working may prove interesting
to some of your readere. The machine,
when in operation on the field, mows, rakes
and binds its sheaf with more ease, accuracy
and rapidity than by the old hand power.
It ties an accurate bow knot, has an adjust
able stoper and drill packer, a relief rake
lor cleaning the end of knife wheel, thereby
always having security against any clogging
of its parts. Indeed, the entire working of
the machine la by a cog wheel so simple,
that in case of any mishap to the machine
or any part of it, it could be readily reme
died by any ordinary mechanic. The Cham
pion Binder is perfect in simplicity, and
is pre-eminently the best machine of its kind
ever Invented. Messrs. Lee & Bro., Balti
more, are the agents for this State, and also
lor Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey,
Virginia, North and South Carolina and
Georgia.
were kept busy last Thursday, showing this
wonderful machine and Its modus operandi ,
together with various other labor-saving
farm Implements to the assembled crowds.
Mr. Henthorn and his assistants
BAPTISTS IN SESSION.
One Hundred and Seventy-Sixth Annual
Session.
This afternoon the one hundied and
seventy-sixth annual session of the Phila
delphia Baptist Association will convene in
Grace Baptist Church, Philadelphia,
will continue in session to-morrow. Eighty
three churches comprise the association,
which Include all the Baptist churches in
this State.
The Second Baptist Church wili report
403 members, 55 additions and $4,400 raised
and expended, aud the following delegates
will attend: The Rev. R. B. Cook, D. D.,
pastor; the Rev. Moses Heath, the Rev. J.T.
Craig, Washington Jones, J. Gould, T. C.
Dill, Alfred Gawthrop, Thomas Milner, A.
Stevenson, R. Wheaton, W. E. Taylor, H.
T. Alexander, George A. LeMaistre, A. E.
DeNormandie and Maury James.
The Delaware AvenUe Baptist Church
will report 800 members and $6,266 raised
and expended, and the following delegates
will attend : The Rev. I. M. Haldeman,
pastor; Evan W. Countlss, J. H. Westcott,
A. S. Sawin, L. B. Jones, Charles Simmons,
Charles Smedley, Henry Betts, H. C. Cant
well, Jame^'T. Morgan, John G. Bennett,
Samuel Brown, Pancoast Allen and James
G. Walker.
Shiloh Baptist Church will report 115
members and $1,378.26 raised and expended
and the following delegates will attend :
The Rev. B. T. Moore, pastor; Thomas An
derson, Jr., A. P. Henley, John P. Banks
and Jumes W. Dowan.
The German Baptist Church will
encouraging report, and the Rev. H. G.
Geil, L. Hirzel and J. H. Muhlhausen will
attend as delegates.
It
ake an
Trials for the Month.
Clerk Penington of the Municipal Court
makes the following report of cases brought
before the court for the month of Septem
ber: Disorderly conduct, 2; assault and
battery, 4; murder, 1; accomplice to a mur
der, 1; larceny, 1; total, 9 In view of the
fact that Council was going to take some
action on the manner ol tiyiug cases it seems
a little strange that, out of the 214 arrests
reported by the Chief of Police, onlv nine
should be tried by the Municipal Court.
The Hues from this court, of course, go into
the city treasury; the fines of the 205 tried
before 'Squire O'Neill went into the county
treasury or the pockets of the models. But
as long as the tax-payers find no fault there
appears to be but little use in speaking oi
the injustice of the Chief toward the tax
payer iu his peculiar method of having
prisoners tried.
Directors Elected.
At a meeting of the German-American
School Board, held last evening, the follow
ing directors were elected for the ensuing
year, except Carl Specht, who was elected
for six months: Anton Hauber, Henry
Blouth, Francis Scheu, Frederick Knapp,
Carl Specht, Edward Seideuberg aLd Peter
Ebner. The committee on the Volksfest
also met and reported that the total receipts
during the affali were $4,790.18. Of this
amount $4,389.91 had been paid out. There
were yet a few bills unpaid. The commit
tee expect to clear about $1,250, which will
be $400 more than last year.
amusements,
'Two Johns," a laughable comedy, much
the order of the "Two Dromeos," will
be presented at the Opera House on Friday
night. The play was given here last fall
and created a veiy good impression among
those who were fortunate enough to see it.
They will undoubtedly be greeted by a large
audience.
The Heiss English 0|>era Company, in
the delightful opera, "Bohemian Girl," ap
pear here on Saturday next. The troupe
numbers over 60 members and will bring
with them their own orchestra. This opera
has not been rendered in this city for more
than 10 years, but many of the choruses aud
peculiar melodies are decidedly popular.
Thatcher, Primrose and West's celebrated
ministrel's will give a performance here at
the Opera House to morrow evening. Dur
ing this troupe's stay in Washington D. C.
of a week recently they con pletly cap
the fun loving people of the city and
greeted with crowded houses every night.
The Washington Capitol say :
Thatcher. Primrose and West at this
theatre during the past week held their
own with splendid houses against the pecu
liarly ugly behavior of the weather. They
presented a performance in the mlnistrcl
line that equaled in every particular their
announcement of a"big show.'' The comedy
element of the companv is the strongest that
has appeared here this Sfcason. It does one
a vast amount, of good to sit for an evening
and listen to the discourses of such com med
ians as George Thatcher, Billy Rice, George
Primrose, Carl Rankin and Pete Mack,
and it requires Just the large
patronage they receive to enable
a single company to support such an array
of noted talent The unusually brilliant in
troductory closed with a very ridiculous
burlesque on the play of "Squatter Sov
ereignty." The features of the second part
of the programme were the wouderful evo
lutions of Frank McNlsh in his famous
specialty entitled "Silence and Fun;" the
musical comedy by tbe Raukins and Frank
Howard; the jockey clog led by the favorites,
Primrose and West; and the exci uciatingiy
funny monologues of George Thatcher. The
performance ended with Carl Ran Kin's
original burlesque entitled "La La Muskrat,"
one of the most catching finale* seen here in
a long time. The musical part of the
' gramme was strong and well sustained.
tured
were
pro
E.
by
of
of
,
A RIDE TO DEATH.
A Fatal Collision Caused
Shore Hoad by the Waving of Flags.
Utica, N. Y., Oct.. 1.—Shortly after noon
to-day the West Shore train known as the
Albany local, bound east and due ^t St.
Johnsville at 12.01, and the Syracuse ex
press, bound west and due here at 12.12,
came in collision about two and a half
miles east of this place, on a heavy curve
near Diefendorf Hill. The loemotives came
together at full speed and are now standing
on their ends, completely wrecked and good
for nothing but old iron. The baggage car
of the Albany local train was thrown at
right angles off on the south side of the
track upon a side-hill. The eastern train
consisted of five passenger coaches and one
baggage car, and the western of four
coaches and one baggage car. All but two
cars of the western bound train remained
on the track and were taken back to Fort
Plain, and all but two of the cars of the
east bound train were taken back to 8t.
Johnsville.
the West
TWO MEN KILLED.
Michael Lyons, the engineer of the Albany
local train, and a man named James Whit
lock, of Euphrata, Fulton county, who was
In the smoking-car, were killed. The en
gineer of the westbound train saw smoke
around the curve, set tbe air-brakes and
jumped, with' his fireman and J. B. Davis,
the division roadman. All of these escaped
without much injury. As tbe eastbouud
engine turned around the curve the fireman
Jumped and escaped. Engineer Lyons,
however, stood at his post and was
crushed by the engine. He was alive
when first' seen, but died soon after
and his body is burled under the wreck in
plain sight. A. Newman, of Nelliston, who
was eltth g lu the seat with Whitlock, had
both legs broken. Henry Cable, of Eu
pbrata; L. P. Cole, of Amsterdam, and
about a dozen other persons are wounded.
The cause of the a' cldent Is said to have
been Engineer Lyons' disregard of the sig
nal set out at St. Johnsville to stop the
train until the west bound train had arrived
there. It does not seem to have been ob
served. The conductor of the east hound
train is understood to have "supposed'' that
that the west bound train would be held at
Fort Plain, the card place of meeting.
A SIGNAL MISTAKEN FOR A SALUTE.
Another statement ol the cause of tbe
accident has been sent to Utica. All along
the line of the road to-day from Syracuse
eastward flags and handkerchiefs have been
waved in greeting to the flist trains of the
new railroad. An order was telegraphed to
St. Johnsville to hoid the east-bound train at
that point until the west-bound train had
arrived, and the operator ran out with
his flag on the track waving it. Engineer
Lyons saw the flag, it is said, and undoubtly
mistaking the signal for a jubilant salute on
the operator's part kept on with his train to
death. If the signal had been heeded the
accident could not have occurred.
The trains were due to meet at Fort Plain,
and on occasions like this the crews on both
trains are always anxious to make the meet
ing point.
in
in
D.,
C.
A.
H.
E.
115
:
An
G.
will
It
THE REGATTA CLOSED.
Teenier, the Hoy Oarsman's Wonderful
Rowing Yesterday — The Consolation
Race Declared Off Owing to Tea Eyck's
Illness.
Pittsburg, Oct. 1. — The regatta closed
to-day with a magnificent race, John
Teemer, the boy oarsman, of McKeesport,
wl.o first came into prominence last Spring
at Pullman, and who beat Hanlan at Point
of-Pines, lowering his record three seconds
and winning the first beat in the professional
race. The weather was ail that could be de
sired and the water smoother than on any
previous day. *
The starters in the final professional heats
were Conley, Ross, Teemer, Hosmer and
Flamm. They were called out at half-past
3 o'clock. When the word was given, Con
ley, with his broad, sweeping stroke, pulled
•o the fore, closely followed by Rose, with
Teemer, Hosmer and Hamm following in
the order named. At the quarter Conley
was ahead, with Ross a close second,Teemer
third, Hosmer, fourth, and Hamm lu the
"27, but before the three-quarter point was
reached Hamm came up almost even with
Conley. *
an
the
oi
A WONDERFUL SPURT.
From the three-quarters down, it was an
elegant race. Teemer, by a wonderful
spurt, pulled up and passed Hosmer, who
bad secured second place, and was closely
hugging, Conley, who still maintained the
lead. The one and a half miles was made
in the good time of 8.59. On the home
stretch Hamm spurted, and at the three
quarters up took the lead, Teemer a half
length behind him, Conley third, Ross
fourth.
Hosmer, on account of bis boat springing
a leak, stopped rowing here and the race
virtually between Hamm and Teemer.
It was a magnificent finish. Hamm held
his position a half length ahead until about
one-eighth of a mile from the finish, when
he caught on a sandbar for a moment. In
the meanwhile Teemer got in good work,
passed Hamm, and came in winner by four
lengtbs in 20 minutes and 11 seconds,
amidst the tremendous yelling of the enthu
siastic crowd.
Teemer claims he could have made much
better time bad not Conley crowded him and
made him pull out of a straight course. As
it was, he lowered his record three second»,
and was carried off
friends. This eve .ting he was tendered a re
ception by his townsmen.
Prior to the professional race, ti e final
heat of the veterans' race was rowed. The
starters were Faulkner, of Boston: Seibert,
Coulter and Taylor, Faulkner won easily in
22.46. The final heat in the professional
consolation was declarèd ofi, on account of
the Illness of Ten Eyck. The purse was
d'vided.
in
the shoulders ol his
A Case of Tetanus.
A little five-year-old daughter of Daniel
Fritz, residing at Eleventh and French
streets is suffering from lockjaw. About
three weeks ago she fell
cutting a severe gash in the back of her
head. As the wound was dressed nothing
was thought of the matter until a few days
ago when she was seized with tetanus. Her
mouth Is not quite closed and she takes food.
As she has survived so long it Is thought that
she may recover.
The New Two-Vent Stamp.
postal law went into effoct yes
terday and at all the ptinclpal post offices
throughout the country there was a rush
for the new two-cent stamp. At tbe office
in this city there were about 22,000 sold,
being it ore than three times the number
of three-cent stamps sold on the heaviest
day. The office in this city, which has
heretofore been a second-class office, has
now been placed
a stone step
Thi
the first-class list.
'Bqulre'a Oases.
John Thompson was fined $1 and costs
for drunkenness and disorderly conduct by
'Squire O'Neill last evening and two cases
ol plain drunk were also made to suffer to
the extent of 50 cents aud costs each.
Thomas L. Mousley, of the Ninth Ward,
was held In $200 ball by '8qulre Bertolette
to keep the peace for threatening to shoot
Mrs. Frederick Hagemeyer.
A DEMOCRATIC JUBILEE
AN IMMENSE TURN-OUT IN
CLEVELAND.
JUDGE HOADLEY'B FIB8T SPEECH
An Audience Numbering Fifteen Thou
sand Greeting the Convalescent, Who
Makes a Telling Mpeeoh.
Cleveland, Oct. 1.—Judge Hoadly's re
ception iu Cleveland has been a triumph
such as was rarely accorded by the Romans
to their most successful generals. All day
he has been overwhelmed with visitors and
letters and despatches hailing his return to
tbe field, and predicting a glorious victory.
the democratic jubilee.
Fully 15,000 people were present at to
night's Democratic jubilee on the public
square. Judge Hoadly was received with
unbounded enthusiasm. His speech, which
was long, was received with great satisfac
tion. When the applause which greeted hie
introduction had subsided, he spoke as
follows :
I thank, you, tellow-citizens of Cleveland,
for this cordial and magnificent reception
to-night, and I thank the band which has
played that kindly tune, of which I feel un
worthy, "Hail to the Chief," because on
Saturday night the elements played the
same tune for my brother Foraker.
(Laughter.) I am here to try to address
you to-night, not between quinine and mor
phine, but between a sick-chamber and a
governor's office.
When the 38 votes of Cuyahoga eounty
were cast for my nomination as the Demo
cratic candidate for Governor of Ohio, and
with their aid I was selected, it was my
hope and purpose to make a personal can*
vase of the State as thorough, persistent and
as my health and strength would permit. It
has been my misfortune to be stricken
do* n with severe illness almost at the be
ginning. The hope has been disappointed;
the purpose frustrated.
Democrats of Cuyahoga county; I con
gratulate you on your union and spirit and
hope of success. Fifty years in the minority,
if you are at lAst triumphant, your clarion
voices and vociferous outbursts at the head
of the column have called the Democracy of
Ohio to duty. It is no small thing to bear
with defeat for half a century and not lose
courage; it is much more on the end of this
long period, during which Whig and Repub
lican triumphs have been tempered only by
occasional pluralities during the brief times
that the division between the Whig and Free
Soil parties made temporary success possi
ble, and broken only once by the signal but
noble victory in 1874—when your honorable
citizen. Henry B. Paynç, was called Into f be
nation's official service lor a brief period—
(applause)—it is much more, 1 say, at the
end of this half century, to know that you
occupy the held of battle as permanent
vk tors; that you have come here to stay in
the majority, perhaps, for half a century to
come; and that, all that is needed to insure
your continued triumphs for a period of
equal length with the Whig and Republican
majorities is moderation in the enjoy meat of
victory and its employment for the public
good. Of this we may l>e certain from the
knowledge of the manner In which you have
used your power since first it was Intrusted
to you by the people.
Two great parties are before you,claiming
your Confidence, claiming your votes. The
Democratic party comes as the champion of
governmental economy and personal liberty.
(Applause.) Of Governmental economy,
for in the first session, during which it held
power in Congress, it was able to reduce ap
propriations by (22,000,000, and in the next
session by many more; and in the first
sion of Republican power that party restored
and much more
expenditure to the wasteful point at
which Democratic economy had checked it.
The Democratic party is the guardian oj
popular light and has at all times been the
champion of tbe national honor and «be
author of its development. Louisiana, Flor
ida and California aie the iewels it has added
to tbe nation's diadem. At tbe same time
its submission at all times to comreUnt
legal authority is complete. Witness its ac
quiescence in the action of the Electoral
Commission, infamous though that result
was.
On the other hand, the Republican party
have no guiding principle of any kiud which
binds its members together, by which its
action can *<t any time be foretold. Com
posing nearly one-half of the people, made
up mostl> of good citizens, its members 6eek
the public good; but since the adoption of
the fifteenth amendment ended the slavery
agitation, they have been bound together,
not by principle, but by party interests
only. Hence we are not surprised to find,
even in counties in the same State—a?, for
instance, Hamilton and Cuyahoga—some
on one side of a divisiou of principle within
the Republican pai ty aud others on the other
side. I « is a division of principle, I repeat,
not merely the factious divisiou of one as to
the choice of all
than restored the
"RENEGADES"—THE TARIFF—TEMPER IS NCR
It is no wonder that millions of people's
money were spent in Star-route fraudB, aud
to carry elections in Indiana aud elsewhere.
Seward, Chase, Greely, Summer, the Blaire,
Cassius Clay, Trumbull, Gideon Wellesand
thousands of others who were identified with
the Republican party on the slavery issue
are the company in which I am proud to be
called a renegade. Never faltering as they
never faltered, in devotion the priucipl
hostility to American slavery, when slavery
ended, my allegiances was due to the party
of my youth, the party of popular govern
ment, the party of economy. ( Applause. )
We, as Democrats; favor a tariff for
veuue, limited to the necessity of tne Gov
ernment, economically administered, but so
adjusted in its application as to prevent un
equal burdens and encroachments upon the
productive industries at home and afford
just compensation to labor,but not to create
and lo8ter monopolies.
On the question of temperance the
inconsistency can be traced to the Republi
can party. The Republican party of Cuva
hoga County is in favor oi the Scott law,'
tbe second amendment,
ocratic party stauds squarely upon its plat
form-opposed to supluary legislation, and
in favor ol graduated license
stitutional authority cau be had for that
purpose. The Republican party are sup
porting men for re-election who voted
against the Scott law, while it is advocatiug
the second amendment.
1
1 M
sa mi
both. The Dem
soon as con
HOADLY SATISFIED WITH THE OUTLOOK.
Judge Hoadly said to-day: "The loog
Journey from Philadelphia here fatigued me
vtry much, and I was feeling much tbe
worse for It yesterday, but I have had a good
rest, and your invtg ratiug Northern air has
strengthened me wonde folly. I am feel
ing much better and stronger to day, and
although I have to avoid great exertion. I
hope to be able to make several speech« be
töre tbe campaign Is over."
"What do you think of the proepect«»"
"I have been out of the Sut» and awav
Irom political information generally but
from what I h»ve seen and learned since mv
return I am very well eatlefled aud believe
that our chance» are very goo i. Indeed 1
think our ticket will be elected bv a good
majority." J s H

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