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The daily gazette. (Wilmington, Del.) 1874-1883, October 06, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014805/1883-10-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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Entered
«I aecon<l-eUss matter.
VOL. XII--NO. 138.
WILMINGTON, DEL., SATURDAY, OCTOBER6, 1883.
ss r—■ ai,*.:, 'i-. : :_ -
PRICE ONE CENT.
AMUSEJUENIS.
R AND OPERA HOUSE.
QRAN»»'* MASONIC TEMPLE.
U-Bl'BCIAL KNUAtlEMKNT.f»
Saturday Eve'g, October 6th,
Kiigagenient ot the Famous
c. D. HESS
acme opera comy
Company In the
T „ c
ivi—ARTISTS, CHORISTERS AND MUSI
W CIAN8—60
Will appear as above In
r>
Bohemian Girl !
a OMISSION : First floor, 76 cents; balcony,
n't»- reserved «eats, il; balcony reserved, <5
U , ,„ Kr.ale *t C. V. Thonia. A Oi.'A, HI
M.iLrt »Irrel. OCIX-41-J5
4;
7.KAS.I OPERA HOUSE.
(jr MASONIC tEmfle.
Tuesday Eve'g, Oct. 9.
Fsuflt-aBallali for the Celebrated Irish Comedian
JOHN F. WARD,
Iglnal character play
14 ai ts aud «"tableaux, written for Mr. Ward by
«popularauthor, Fred O. Mieder, entitled
entirely
In
In
»I
"TOP 0'THE MORNING' 1
* 'Irish
ngs, "Top O' the Morning,"
.Hllaby," and "Tho Shamrock."
Supported by
Kith
MISS MARY DAVENPORT
With * company of sterling ability, Including the
Ittsclnalliig culld actm», Utile Lillie Ward.
Popular prices. Seat* for sale at U. F. Thomas
tCo.v, No. 421 Market street. oct5-4.
LOST A Nit NOUN It.
OST. —AT EASTBUKN'S FIRE A
that lias found it
L HOSE reducer. Any
*111 please leave it at the Fame Hose House
on 11 street and receive thanks.
•ptio-tr
Bei'
REWARD*.
I » EWA WjC—A~ REWARD OF FIVE
it HUNDRED DOLLARS 1* hereby offered
•Ht and apprehension of Collingsworth
1*. Hullrtt who escaped flroiii Jail at Georgetown,
Del., utter midnight Holiday morning, descrlp
i: bight about live feet ten inches, rather
re, liigli che« k bom s, v< Ice peculiar, fine and
kid, brown liulr and small dark eye*, sharp
rinn liilac upper teeth. CH Ab. C. HTOcKi.EY,
Governor.
ivr tin
•l;
FOR RENT.
1/OK RENT.—PART OF HOUSE TO A
J Mil ALL family.
1117 TATNALL STREET.
FOR SALE.
COR SALE.
100 Acres of Standing Timber.
Chiefly YELLOW PINE and MAPLE.
mile of railroad and three u lie* of
, and adjacent to othtr lnrre and An«- troets
I lid- land, the growth of which is llkuwLe
i* mnrkct. For particular« a« to location,
s, terms, etc., adore*» _ .
M|»li2dvr*tF GAZETTE OFFICE.
Within
watt r.
Of till!
ii.
.
VAN VINO.
pKOF. A. S. WEBSTER'S
SELECT
DANCING ACADEMY,
MASONIC TEMPLE,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
1883— SEASON OF —1884
COMMENCING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10.
GENTLEMEN'S CLASS-Mon«lay and Thurs
day ivuiiliiK» from 8 to 10, commencing Septem
ber 10.
I.ADIKS' AN I» CHILDREN 'S CLASS-Tint r«
from 6 to A and on Saturday
aiurnoon from 3 to 6, commencing Saturday
aiurimon, September 15, at 3 o'clock. *
Special attention given to Instructing clill
riren, who receive my personal supervision.
Is exercised to make them grnce
•I...
ful
«1 proilclent «lancers.
All new dances will be lnlnxluced as soon
tlicy arc Issued by the association.
SCU00L8, SEMINARIES or PRIVATE
CLASSES.
Uilles and gentlemen desiring to form private
msscB in the elty or out of town ibO'iltl confer
JtUi me as soon as practicable, for choice of
for t«
K«\\
a, circulars, etc., apply to H. F. Ro
No. 7ID Market Btreeljfet my resldence.No.
t Third street, or by mall at thcMasonio
bill
DRUGGISTS.
Çl'RRY rOWDER,
CELERY SEED !
MUSTARD SEED I
finest salad oil
BOTTLE WAX !
•WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BY
Z. JAMES BELT,
-APOTHECARY—
Cor. Sixth aud Market Streets,
„ _WII.MINQTOV. »XI..
Titjsna.
r |'KEES.
1'liUIT, bIIA.DK AND ORNAMENTAL TUEE»
IN GUEAT VARIETY.
{■pit»/'
IHKUU1B8,
AuU all
RASPBERIRE8,
III.ACKDEURlKd,
BTUaWDKHRIES,
GOO»KMKKUIU».
UUUKANTB.
kept la a•
varieties of trees that ai
class uurscry.
A guaranteed true to name,
for price-list.
WILLIAM F. PETERS,
No.lrt'West Seventh Street,
(Exchange Bulldluir,)
WILMJNQTON SHOE HOUSE.
AT IKE
Wilmington Shoo House.
OCT. 3
Our Shoe stock was never
in better shape as. regards
variety, grade, quality or price
than now. If you want in
formation only we'll tell you
what we know about shoes
with the greatest pleasure and
you won't get tripped up on
what we tell you. Then when
you're ready to buy you will
know all you need to know
about the make and the chances
with the various goods before
you. Nothing like choosing
intelligently. We don't want
any customer in the dark.
GEO. D. CLELAND.
If you are in search of a
cheap shoe, good in quality,but
low in price, we can show you
all styles of ladies' American
Kid Shoes from $ 1.50 up A
large lot of this variety are
now displayed which we are
selling at bargains at $1.50, the
regular prices of which are
$2 50 and $3.00. As we have
only a limited number ol these
bargain shoes an early selection
is advised.
GEO. D. CLELAND.
In Men's Shoes much can
be said. The present genteel
style is the wide toe, ol which
we're selling large numbers, is
particularly neat. Strange that
it should be so hard to get the
young men out of the habit of
wearing the narrow toed „hoes
when they are virtually out ol
style. Bannister's shoes are
all made on the wide toe last.
They are the finest ready-made
shoe in the market and give
entire satisfaction. Stacy,
Adams & Co.'s shoes are also
much sought after on account
of their cheapness combined
with their really good quality.
GEO. D. CLELAND,
—PROPRIETOR—
Wilmington Trunk and
Shoe House
NO. 424 MARKET STREET.
?
COAL.
COAL. COAL
TUA N SPORT ATI ON.
BUSH'S
WILMINGTON AND PHILADELPHIA,
STEAM FREIGHT LINE.
Sails dally from Pier 2. Bo. Wharves, Phlla. and
Foot of Frehch Street, WUmlngtou.
FREIGHT HANDLED CAREFULLY AND
DELIVERED PROMPTLY.
COAL! COAL!
ANTHRACITE !
BITUMINOUS !
CANNEL!
J^Partlcular attention given to retail orders.
aw. BUSH & SONS.
m!0-ly28
J AM NOW PREPARED TO DELIVER
ALL SIZES OF COAL
—or
SUPERIOR QUALITY FOR FAMILY USE
-AT—
TBE LOWEST MAR KET RATES
All ooal well screened and put in cellera.
B. F. TOWNSEND
OFFICE A YARD FOOT OF FOURTH 8T.
garTelephone communication with all parts of
Uie cltv. __
L. & C. CO.
J.
—FOR—
LIME
-AND—
CEMENT,
A L
c o
—AND—
WOOD
—GOTO—
Jackson Lime & Coal Co.,
SHIPLEY & KING ST. WHARVES.
my!7-42
NOTICES.
N otice.
TION.
CITIZEN'S LOAN A 30CIA
ment
Now stock for unie: tiret pnym
UKo. U. MX ill»,
H« oretnrjr.
duo Thursday, October ».
oct3-tf
XTOTICK—DIAMOND STATE LOAN
ASSOCIATION ncwHp-ch or sale: 1m n»V
ment October 10;hns successfully matured Ils first
and second series; la In a iiruRiM-rous condition.
Ayply day or cvenlnur to
■cpi2ft-lin UKOUUE
C. M ABP, Her _
1 VAKK NOTICE.—COUNTY AND POOR
. TAXPAYERS. Tuxes for the year are
no w due end paya'»!** *f the outre oft
•02* Market An . .. 1 We c 'll and
taxes witl oui lurilter notice
to collect the
>
we rdiull proceed
: in 10 days after mis notice.
P. NKAItY,
Collector Second District,
J. T. DICKEY,
Collector First District.
«©niao-tf
NOTICE.—ALL PERSONS DESIRING
11 TO realiter ai mi »sea of sick person! will
call at No. 612 King street. second* story. A
I »«ok for that purpose lias been im pure.», aud
blunk forms for refVrenecs will be fUriiMted.
Mule and leinsle, wlilteand cob
to avail theiDsclvas of the opportunity.
E. U. FUAZfc.lt. K« Klstxar,
>o. M2 Kinir street.
Invited
septH-tf
^OTICES.-ANY WEIGHT«, SCALES
XI OU measure* requiring Inspection may he
left at 826 and 830 Kin* street.
J 4 COB DE AKT NE,
Sealer of Weights and Measure* for Now Castle
county. Ie»-tr
1» ENTS COLLECTED WITH THE BEST
-IV AND CHEAPEST kind of guarantee. Wc
have never In any year lost 1 per cent of the
property tinder
rents on
oct4-6t
i'ße.
IIKAT.D A CO.
temperance.
Signera Still Being Added to the Non*
Partisan Pledge.
To the Editor of the Gazette : The
list of new names in this week's Conference
Worker is as follows: A. G. Caulk, Rev.
Pctor J. Adams, George I. Hansell, Patrick
McKenna, Richard W. Brown, William
Haley, Robert Hiller, G. D. Jester, Charles
C. Brown, /. R. McClintock, Joseph Ernest,
Rev. George W. Wilcox, Samuel H. Benson,
I. T. 8ufphay, Charles Miller, George Gee,
J. Bayard Pierce, Thomas Worrllow, M, M.
Hill, George W. Elliott, Joshua Taylor, Lea
T. Archer, Amos Irons, D. B. Anderson, Jr.,
Amos Brown, Edward H. Mason, George
W. Kreer, John 8. Benson, John Walling,
J. T. Smith, George W, Murpliey, John Mc
Kinney, Jgmcs Lank, Albert Lank, Henry
Lank, James Fisher.
Any work on hygiene in our schools that
made no reference to such a possible thing
as poison, would be considered fearfully
lacking. In such a work the poisonous ex
halations escaping from drains, marshes and
sewers would bo necessarily treated and if
they exhibited in tho neighborhood would
be branded as places to be shunned, and the
alarm would be rung out in every school
room and a demand made for a thorough
Investigation. Now there is a poison whose
exhalations hang over our cities and towns
like a great, terrible cloud of death; there is
not a corner of our land that does not feel its
evil effect. It is a-furnace whose tongue of
flame licks up its tens ol thousands of
victims yearly. It is the great demon de
stroying the morals of our nation. It brings
hunger, cold and nakedness into tbou&ands
of homes. Is it not high time that It became
obligitofy, that every teacher In our public
schools should warn the poor little victim
of the nature of this poison.
CECIL COUNTY FAIR,
A Large and Popular Exhibition—Award
of Premiums.
Elkton, Md., Oct. 5.—The attendance at
the Cecil county fuir to day is estimated at
between ten and twelve thousand. Tho
weather of the past few days has been every
thing that could be dealrtd, and the attend
ance o, farmers has b »en noticeably large.
The number aud quality of the exhibits has
never been excelled at this fair. Ilecker's
self-raising buckwheat exhibit and Lever
ing'« coffee pavilion are centres of attraction.
Sanders & Stay man, of Baltimore, «nd Stieff
have line displays ofpianos and organs.
The unfinished 2.37 class race was decided
this morning by Albert Fiance, of Balti
more, winning the deciding heat in 2.34<.£.
Six horses started in the 2.50 class race;
Charlie L., of Baltimore, won, with Dela
ware Boy, of Newark, second; Belle, of Ox
ford, third; time, 2.41, 2.41, 2.39, 2.38K*
The 2.34 class was hotly contested and won
by Alice Addison, of Philadelphia, Mamie
Kieruan, of Now York, second, Orange Boy,
of Philadelphia, third; tln.e, 2.40/2.34%,
2.38%, 2.36%.
Three started in tho 2.20 cla^s race, which
was wou by Ike Shultz, of Philadelphia,
Maud second, Mollle Mrek third; time,
2.35%, 3.37%, 2.35%.
The New Castle Presbytery.
At yesterday's session of the New Castle
Presbytery, held at Dover, Chesapeake City
was settled upon as the place for holding
the spring meetiug, on the first Tuesday in
April, 1SS4, and a committee to make the
necessary arrangements was appointed.
The Kovs. Hayes and Wolverton were or
dained with the usual ceremonies aud on the
recommendation of the Ministerial Relief
Committee $300 was allowed the Rev. G. L.
Moore of Green Hill. At the conclusion of
a hymn and a prayer the Rev. A. N. Keigwin
adjourned tbe meeting.
Citlsens Loan.
At the thirteenth annual meeting of the
Citizens Loan Association, held on Thurs-"
day night, the old officers were ro-elected
aud George C. Marls was chosen as secre
tary and treasurer, the two offices being
made one. The annual report of the treas
urer showed a very healthy condition of the
finances. There are at present 12 series
running. _ _ _ _
A Stato Convention.
Tbe Irish American League will hold a
State Convention in this city on Thursday,
October 18. A number of societies have
already elected delegates, aud it is probably
that others will elect to-morrow as it will
be the last day upon which au election can
be held. It is believed that the Convention
will be a large and enthusiastic one.
AMUSEMENTS.
The 800 peop'e that were present last,
evening in the Opera House to witneis the
performance of the "Two Johns" Combina
tion laughed until tears ran down their
cheeks. The comedy is full of laughable
situations, from tbe first to the last act. The
principal actors were John, better known as
"Futile" Stewart and John Hart, who did
their parts in an excellent manner. The
performance waa interspersed with entre
acte, which were very good, especially the
DaRell twin brothers the eong and dance
men; the St. Felix sisters in duets, aougs
and dances, and also Thomas A. Daley, late
of the "Tourists," and Miss Lixzle Derlods
In the pleasing little sketch of "That Girl
from Vossar."
This
evening the Hess Opera Company
appear in tbe ever welcome opera 01 tbe
"Bohemian Girl." The music is always
welcome, aud among the much-admired
and ircauently-sung solos are "The Heart
Bowed Down/' "Then You'll Remember
Me," "The Fair Land of Poland," I
Dreamt that I Dwelt in Marble Halls," and
others, while the gypsy chorus is familiar to
all. The Hess Company comes well recom
mended as capable of doing effective work,
and, inasmuch as the "Bohemian Girl" has
not made her appearance iu Wilmington for
a number of years, a full house 1« assured.
A CHILLY LAY'S GAME.
A WALK-OVER FORTHE CLEVE
LANlI CLUB.
THE ATHLETICS PAHAI.YZED.
— «
Cleveland's Strong limitera tiive a Bean
tlful Exhibition In this City—Other
damns and Soare In ter ©ht mg Motes.
The game at Qulckrtep Park yesterday
afternoon vu wltneaeed by a disgustingly
small audience. It was Interesting through
out. In the filth and sixth innings
the Clevelands sized Pyle, aud
beautiful long
been witnessed on a field before. The home
team played a good game, hut when there Is
such terrific hatting there Is bouud to be
errors. The fielding of the Clevelands was
superb and awoke the applause of the audi
ence. Sawyer the Cleveland's lclt.
hand pitcher did the sphere teas
ing for the Cleveland, and he was pretty
hardly bit bv tbe hone team, Snyder hitting
for thrcj with a total of four bases and
Cuslck getting two doubles.
The score follows:
such
never
hits
have
OL1VBLAVO,
A.B. R. IB. T.B. F.O. ▲. X.
3 0
0 0
1 2
8 3 3 3 0 0
3 2 4 8 0 0
2 2 2 0 1
6 11110 0
6 1118 0 0
4 1110 2 1
Dunlap, 2b...
Hotaiing, c.f
(JlltSBCOCk, s.s
York, 1. f. 6
Phillips, lb. 6
McCormick, r. f 6 1
Muldoon, 3b
Briody, c..
Sawyer, p...
0 2 2 6 3
8 112 1
0 8 8 0 1
Totals. 47 10 18 26 27 8 4
QUICKSTEP.
A.B. ». IB. T.B. P.O. A. »
0 0 0 2 2 1
6 3 0 3
13 3 2
10 11
Klenyol.. o f,... 6
Benners, rf. 6
.618
.601
.601
Hoover, 2b
Alberts s.
»t. Lawrence, 1 f 4
Snyder, lb..
Klekley, 3b.
Cuslck, c
Pyle, p..
Total..
0 0 0 1 0
2 3 4 7 0
0 12 8 0
1 2 4 8 3
1
1 l
4 1
0
1
4 0 0 0 0 0 1
40 4 11 17 27 9 11
SCORE BY IXEINQS.
Cleveland. 01096010 0—18
Quickstep
Runs earned, Cleveland, 3; Quickstep, 8;
first base on called bal s, Sawyer, bt. Lawrence;
struok out, <lla8scoolc(2), Sawyer (3), 6; Kienzel
(3), Albert, St. Lawrence, Klekley, 8; left on
bases, Cleveland,4; Quickstep,IU: two-base hits,
Dunlap, Hoatltng, Giassoock, Snyder. Klekley,
Cuslck (2); throe-base hits, Dunlap, Giassoock,
Phillips, Henners; passed balls, Briody, .,
Cuslck, 2; wild pitches, Sawyer, 2; Pyle, 1; flies
caught, Cleveland, 10; Quickstep, 7; umpire,
William H. Morris; time of game, two hours.
01000021 0—4
1;
9
a
OTHER (JAMES.
At Baltimore:
Baltimoro. 3 0 1 0 3 3 0 x—10
2 0 0 00 3 0 0m 6
Drtroit
At Philadelphia:
Athletio
Providence. 30003230 1—12
At Staten Island :
Boston.
y taten Island...
At St. Louis:
Chioago.
St. Louts.
At Trenton (ten innings): Trenton 5.
Philadelphia 5. ' '
000000000—0
28021301 0-16
000011000—2
001110210—0
000001 02 0—3
NOTES.
The Philadelphia Club is the worst beaten
team that has played in tbe League since
1876.
The ball used in the game in which the
Athletic won the championship is to be
gilded.
Jim Whitney and Paul Radford were each
presented with watches at the Boston bene
fit game.
The Athletic had but 30 bats in yester
day's game, just enough to put them out
out three timc3 around and three over.
Stovcy, of the Athletic club, has made 20
home runs this season—15 in champion
ship games, four in April and one iu October.
Wea Fisler and Dickey Pearce are both
spoken of in connection with the manage
ment of next year's Active Club, of Read
The
Robs club, of Chester, will probably
take a Southern trip next week. A series
of games will bo played with the Virginia
club.
The seating capacity of the Athletic ground
will be increased to 15,000. Numerous
changes will also be made to tbe grand
stand.
Tho entire cost of running the Eclipse
Club during the year has been $25,000.
Every player bas been paid in full up to
October 15.
Jumping Jack Jodos will appear on the
ball field lor the lost time this seasou iu to
day's game between tho Athletic and Phila
delphia club6.
Keefe, pitcher of the Metropolitan, is ac
knowledged by the Cincinnati papers to be
the man who kept the Cincinnati out of the
championship.
The benefit to the Boston club netted each
player about $250. In addition to this each
man was presented with a check for $100 by
the management.
The Metropolitan club has secured new
grounds for next season, and Manager
Mutrle is confident ol having the strongest
American Association club in the field next
year.
The prospects for a Southern League ai e
brightening. Tom Breunan has secured
Memphis, Mobile, Columbus, Montgomery
and Savannah. He will call tbe convention
tome time in Mardi Gras week.
At the December meeting of the American
Association, it 1« said, four more clubs will
bo admitted. Chicago and Indianapolis
from the West and Washington and Brook
lyn irom the Eust. This will give a mem
bership of 12 club«.
The Boston Club, winner of the League
pennant, during the season held every po
sition in the race except the iast. The
Athletic, the American Association cham
pions, held first position most of the time,
acd was never lower than the second.
The revised list of the team of professional
who are to represent New Orleans this win
ter 16 us lollowe: I-'aly, the cnc arnud
pitcher of the Cleveland, pitcher; Flint, Chi
cago, catcher; Brouthers, first baseman of
Buffalo; Farrell, second baseman of tho
Providence; Williamson,Chicago, third base;
Wise, Boston, short stop; Gore, Chicago,
centre field: Kelly, Chicago, left field:Wied
mau, the Detroit pitcher, right field and
change pitcher.
The members of the Anthracite club, to
gether with the Association, held b confer
ence yesterday morning, when it was con
cluded to disband. There was little else for
it to do, seeing that the Actives and Brook
lyns no longer exist ana the Harrisburgs
show no disposition to play tbe postponed
championship games. The players which com
posed the Anthracite club have engaged as
follows: Knowles,with the Allegheny; Milli
gaiif with the Athletics; Annls, with the
Boston League Club; Miller is with the Har
risburg«. Grady aud McLaughlin are as
tonishing the natives at Chambersburg;
Lang goes back to Wilhelm and Kennedy's;
Galbraith remains in town for a season and
Blakely, Alcott aud Holland are still open.
The Association returns to the practice of
law, throwing in his spare momeuts iu the
preparation of his lecture, on "What I
l Know About Base Ball."
O.
T.
COURT OF CHANCICRÎ.
Continuation ortho Argument* In tho Bay
Window Suit.
The case of Charles F. Thomas and John
M. Whit ford, Manager and Treasurer of the
Every Evening Publishing Company,
against Samuel U. Bayr ard was continued
before Chancellor Saulsbury yesterday from
10 o'clock until 3 o'clock In tbe afternoon
without interruption, the proceedings o!
which were published in the Gazette up to
1.30 o'clock, when Mr. Spruance, counsel
for Mr. Uavimrd, was still epeaking,
made a strong argument against the grant
Ing ol an Injunction, as It would lie a mani
fest Injustice to the defendant; and also
held that If It were granted, and equat jus
tice meted out, hundreds ot others having
bulk windows In the city would be sub
jected to tbe same Inconvenience. He also
made the point that tbe bill complained of
the erection of walls, and that there were
no uffl avits to support the allegation,which
was not true. The bill was not a compli
ment to tho candor of the drawer of the
paper. It was argued that It was absurd to
assort that the three feet projection on Fifth
street and 13 Inch projection on Market
street were obstructions, when near them
were area-ways projecting out four feet.
Tbe question was whether Baynard's win
dows obstructed tbe passage. There were
hundreds of 13 inch obstruction,
and that Mr. Thomas himself had
violated tho law by building
solidly from the sidewalk, It was
claimed that City Council had no power to
give anyone the use of the street by ordi
nance and that the public bad the right of
the street from building line to building
line, thus declaring existing orilinancea void.
What was to become of the bulk and bay
windows, steps, area ways erected! C. F.
Rudolph had a bulk window standing three
leet out, built up from the pavement, on
Market street, which had never been
thought a nuisance, for there were four feet
projcctloLS above and below. It was the
public that was to he protected and
Every Evening Publishing Company
Mr. Thomas because their buildings were
dwarfed and over-shadowed by Mr. Bay
nard'» new structure. The er.se of the
Clianeelloi's refusal to grant an Injunction
In the case of the Harl.c and Hollingsworth
Company against 8. D. Paschall was cited,
as were the permissions to erect awning
posts, signs, Ac. The material of the re
spective affidavits was reviewed, and a mo
tion to strike out . those of Mr.
Thomas and Mr. Whltford as irrelevant: but
the Chancellor ruled that they snould stand
for what they were worth. The
by the plaintiff were gone over, and the
speaker averred that no case In tbe lot was a
parallel to the one now pending, and that a
Court In Equity should not and would not
interfere If the Injury was
talp and irreparable," T
He
up
not the
and
case. cited
not "great, cer
he proper courap
was to proceed by indictment, when the
proper judgment, If found to he a public
nuisance, would be to order It abated and
Impose a fine. The remedy by Indictment
was so efficacious that a Court of equity
would Interfere with great reluctance. Mr.
Spruance affirmed that the building had
been erected In good faith and In no spirit of
defiance, though his client stood firmly on
his rights, and that a temporary injunction
would work him irreparable injury, while
the public could suffer no Inconvenience or
Iocs by requiring the proceeding to be by In
dlctment.
The decision of \he late Chief Justice
Sharswood to tho effect that a prrjcction of
ornamental work, pillars, etc., of 15 Inches
beyond the building line on Chestnut street
in Philadelphia was not a nuisance, and his
ruling that "Courts in equity are not Insti
tuted to enforce absolute legal rights," were
mentioned. Technical obstructions »
necessarily real and every case must be de
cided on its own peci
was argued that City
right to authorize Baynard to erect those
bay windows in spite of tho general ordi
nance to the contrary that it had to grant
special permission to erect a lrame bullid
iug contrary to the general ordinance, and
quoted the permission given to Archibald
Given to erect a whole row of houses with
bay windows lour feet out.
At 3 o'clock the case was postponed until
9 o'clock this morning when Mr. Bates, oue
of the counsel lor the plaintiffs, began his
argument in favor of granting the injunc
tion during the course of which the speaker
said that where there is an admitted inten
tion to encroach upon the public highways,
a court of equity should lutcrfere without
tho formality of taking evidence. The frame
of the answer is an admittance of having
built a bay window three feet from the
building line, and
croachineut they offer
City Council permitting Samuel H. Bay
nard to do this thing and
suspending the general ordi
nance already passed. There can be
but two simple questions, is the ordinance a
valid license, aud secondry can a public
nuisance be legalized by un ordinance of
Council. The Chancellor here stated that
there was no question as to Council's right
to legalize a nuisance ns that was impossi
ble. The question at issue was, "is the bay
windows of the building in question a public
nuisance."
The fact of the windows being outside the
building line was not a question of measur
ment but an encroachment of any klud is a
public nuisance without authorized law.
Mr. Spruance said "il that is the case
every door jam, window frame and
bulk window, including those of the
Every Evening Building
street were illegal,and coula
Bates admitted this fact and expressed
thanks that his dwelling was built back from
the line.
Mr. Bates further said that if Baynard is
allowed to build his building as be proposes
you cannot stop every man who has a build
ing ou the corner from appropriating the
feet of the public highway for his private
use. If every man who has or buys a cor
ner store can buy three feet less ol land than
he requires and then take three feet of the
public property and build a string of bay
windows and asserted that is what it
would come to if Baynard was
allowed to proceed with bis building.
The speaker frequently referred tbe discis
sions reudered in similar cases by Judge
Dillon, and held that the public streets were
for the general public, aud that any en
croachment upon them by private parties
was of vital importance, as it affected both
the local and general public.
LOCAL LACONICS.
not
uliar circumstances. It
Council had the same
an excuse for this en
ordinaucc of the
on Shipley
be taken down.
The delegates from this city to the Phila
delphia Baptist Association returned tuet
evening.
An entertainment will be given by the
American Mechanics In the Odd Fellows'
Hall this evening.
The property at Tenth and Shipley streets
hae been sold by Stidham & Son to Frank
Kelley for t7,000, for Poole & Pierce.
A supper will be given at Faria & Lewis'
restaurant to night to thechlafs of the Great
Council of Delaware by Lonape Tribe Imp.
O. R. M.
The following officers were elected at the
regular meeting of the Neptune Social Club
held on Wednesday last, toscrveelx months:
President, H. J. Stuber; Vice President, J.
T. Mlllikin; Secretary, H. A. AlaenUer;
Assistant Secretary, G. W. Butz; Treasurer,
W. L. Haiuaun; Trustees, H. J. Stuber,
dialrman; W. L. Daman, H. A. Alsontzer.
YISIAIIW FEVER.
Several Death* from the Disease at Various
Places in Mexico.
San Francisco, Out. 5.—The tirera an on
the steamer New hern, who Hied yesterday
from yellow fever, was burled this morning.
It le the opinion of many that It would have
been belter to have cremated the remains.
bo as to more <-ff(£tual)y destroy the fever
germs. Second Officer Gatau's condition
lias improved, and the other patients
convalescent. The Quarantine Officer says
there is absolutely no danger of the devel
opment of the disease hers, and that vellow
lever germs are brought in every day by
rail, but do not develop, the weather being
too cold.
A dispatch received to day from M&zatian
announces the death from yellow fever of
Horace Adam«, a well-known mechanical
engineer, who resided in this city.
Some excitement has been caused by the
fact that the steamer San Juan, whie
rived after the Newbern had takeu
gers from Magatlan, was allowed
her dock without being quarantined, her
captain havlDg a clean b'll of health and
stating that he had not had any communl
ettion with that Infected port.
Advices from Culiacan, the capital of
Cinaloa, Mexico, state that the fever is rag
ing there terribly, but no exact details
obtainable.
Guavmas, Mexico, Oct. 5.— Rain fell last
night and cooled the atmosphere. No deaths
nor any new cases of yellow fever were re
ported to day. Lyons, the foreman of the
machine shops, died last night.
New Orleans, La., Oct. 6.—A dispatch
from Nashville reports considerable excite
ment from Mobile to Montgomery over the
yellow fever at Brewton, Ala., 14 miles from
Pensaoola Junction. There are now 17 coses
which the medical examiner declares to be
genuine yellow fever.
Dr. Jerome Cochran, Health Officer of
Alabama, telegraphed yesterday in regard
to the yellow lever at Brewton, on the Mo
bile and Montgomery railroad, as follows:
''Only one case on hand and that not a
marked one. Am doubtful as to what sort
of fever it ii."
A Mobile s
Foard, the
county, to-day says: "My opinion of the
character of the sickness prevailing at Brew
ton, Ala., is unchanged. A diagnosis shows
the disease to be hemorrhagic malarial
fever. There have been no new cases since
September 33 and no critical case is now
under treatment. The people are in good
spirits."
TRADE AND LAHOR FEDERATION.
A Declaration of Principles by the As
sembly at St. Louis.
8t. Louis, Oct. 5.—The Trades and Labor
Federation continued its session to-day.
The committee on declaration of principles
tnade & report, which was adopted. Its
salient points arc that those who labor and
create wealth are the most important part
of society, hence they should enjoy the full
benefit of their industry; that a just and
equitable distribution of the fruits of labor
is not possible under the present system of
society; that the present tendency toward
the formation of corporations is
dangerous to the people's liberty and that
the emancipation of the working people
mqst be achieved by themselves. The re
port demands that the railraaö land *
forfeited shall be reclaimed by tbe govern
ment; that legal days shall be legal holidays
and that all laborers have a half holiday on
Saturdays; that equal pay shall be given for
equal work to both sexes and that the con
vlct contract system shall be abolished; that
compulsory education shall be enforced and
that the State furnish books and other
school material free; that a law be passed
making eight hours a legal day's work,
and that penalties be fixed for its
violation; that the employment of
children under 14 years of age in factories
and mines be prohibited; that the Commis
sioners of Labor of this State shall belong
to some labor organization; that railroads
and telegraphs shall become the property of
the Stjife; that all acts known as "conspir
acy" acts, as applied to labor organizations,
shall be repealed, that a purely national cir
culating medium shall be issued directly to
the people; that an employers* liability act,
holding corporations liable for injuries re
ceived by persons while in their employ,
shall be passed, and that all trades and
labor unions shall bo Incorporated by the
Legislature, the same as other incorporated
bodies.
are
ar
passe ii
to come to
pedal to the Register from Dr.
Health Officer for Escambia
MUBDERfiU DY HIS P4KTNEU.
A Young Man Slain In the Presence of
Ula Wife and Child.
Pittsburg, Oct. 5. —John Brown entered
the house of his partner, Henry Weaver, in
Allegheny City this evening, and without
provocation killed him and then beat his
brains out in the presence of his wife aud
child. Brown Is 23 years of age. Weaver
was two years hi« senior, married and the
father of one child. They were engaged In
buying and selling horses. A short time
ago Brown became infatuated with Mary
Maglnley, a young woman of bad reputa
tion. He took her to Weaver's house. Mrs.
Weaver learned the girl's true character to
day and compelled her to leave Instantly.
Brown heard of this, and shortly before 7
o'clock went to Weaver's, house and de
manded a settlement of the partnership_
counts, and the payment of $47 which he
claimed to be due. Weaver told him to call
In the morning, but he replied that he _
determined to settle Immediately, and, with
an oath, drew a revolver and fired three
shots at Weaver. Every one took effect,aud
Weaver fell dead Instantly. Brown jumped
on his prostrate body, took the money and
valuables from his pocket«, and theu com
menced to beat him on the head with the
butt of his revolver.
In order that the bloody deed might be
complete.he seized a chair aud continued to
strike the bead of his victim. He did not
desist until the shrieks of Mrs. Weaver
brought others to the scene. Then he sprang
through a window and escaped. IIis cap
ture is considered certain, and lynching is
threatened.
A DESPERATE PRIZE FIGiiT.
Two Unscientific Bruisers Exchange Ter
rible Blows to Settle an Old Grndge.
Pitt8hurq, Oct. 5. —Early this morning
Frank Geisler and James Lafferty, two mill
workers iought a desperate 12 round prize
fight with bare knuckles in a field a few
miles beyond the city limits. The men
fought three hard rounds a few days ago to
settle an old grudge, but were separated be
fore either were satisfied. They left their
homes accompanied by a small number of
sympathizers. Tho Mayor was notifie 1 and
detailed a squad of officers to follow the
fighters, but they were easily eluded. The
men fought 12 rounds at daybreak, Laf
ferty being knocked out in the last. Both
men were badly puuisbed and considerable
money changed hands.
Sunday Papers.
All tho New York, Philadelphia aud Wil
mington Sunday papers at 6 a. m. every
Sunday morning, at A. V. Gaynor'6 old
stand, Second and Orange streets, and
Christy <& Son's, Sixth and Market streets.
Please leave orders at either of the above
places and any paper will be servod at your
residence.
<
EPISCOPAL CONVENTION
FULL REPORT OF YESTER
DAY'S PROCEEDINGS.
BISHOP THOEOLD'S COMPLIMENTS
Protestant Episcopal Growth In the Far
West—Hit. hop Rare'a work Among the
Indians.
Philadelphia, Oct. 5.—Dr. Tboroid, the
B.shop of Rochester, England, was Intro
duced to the Episcopal Convention this
morning, and addressed the house, all the
deputies remaining standing. Let no one
persuade you, he said, that England has
ceased to love America. The English Church
is proud of the life and activity of her
daughter. We in the old country do not
feel as ii' we are in our decrepitude yet. The
American Church is foremost among the re
ligious bodies of which he might truly call
a religious land. In less than 100 years 52
sees have been created in this country with
out asking the permission of a Legislature.
In the words of Cardinal Newman and John
Bright, only be united among yourselves
and you will be Invincible. When the house
met with the House of Bishops as the Board
of Missions, the rules were suspended Id
order that Che Bishop of Rochester might
present a communication from the Arch
bishop of Canterbury. Dr. Thorold said
that the Archbishop desired to
gratiilate the American church on the ap
proaching centennary of the consecration of
the Right Rev. Bishop 8eabury. He said
he would do all in his power to persuade
Archbishop Benson to visit the United
8tates. He knew what progress this blessed
church was making in this great country.
1 he American church is not guilty of that
infinite baseness of telling us because there
is work to do at home, the work abroad
must not be done. Although bis diocese had
been louuded 1,200 years ago, it was a mis
sionary diocese. He had heard that the
Episcopal Church was the church of the
wealthy and not
He did not believe it.
con
of the
The conditions
in this country are different from those
of England, but the needs are the same.
He considered the United States as the
kingdom of common sense. Much of our
preaching is unintelligible to the masses,
but must we leave them to themselves? The
key to the problem is: "Let a mission
church be aunexed to every wealthy church,
and 6cc that the congregation are cared
for." There are some who, if asked to
mount a chair in the open air and preach to
the working people, would reply that they
would rather be hanged. He did not wish
to be considered guilty of impertinent flat
tery, but when he went home he always said
that tbe Ameiican people were the most
religious people in the world, and
he considered any religion better than none.
He wished the laymen in America to reflect
that their Master might have a work for
them to do hero that they never thought of
before. You are all of you born speakers,
and if you can speak on politics, and tem
perance and other subjects, why cannot you
speak in the service of the Lord Jesuh
Christ. Another subject was the battle with
Intemperance. We may have as many free
churches and free libraries as we please, but
as long as the demon ui lutuiuporauua
haunts our homes the churches will be use
less. At St. Louis recently he heard some
of the best speakers he ever heard in his life.
A man got up at that meeting and stated
that all the ravages of fire, civil war, etc.,
were not equal to the evil .caused by intem
perance. If you want to earn the eternal
gratitude of the masses, you
will use your energies and prayers
in this battle against Intemperance.
The letter from tue Archbishop of Canter
bury was then read by Bishop Lee, the
deputies standing. It congratulated the con
vention on the approaching centenary of the
consecration of Bishop Seabury,the first pre
late of the Episcopal Church In America.
Congratulations wero also read irom the
society for the propagation of the Gospel in
foreign parts. The second triennial report
of the Board of Managers to the Board of
Missions stated that the total income
$1,169,058, being an increase of $220,731.
Bishop Clarkson, of Nebraska, reported
that his diocese was able to support its own
bishop. It has 36 clem, 35 éhurches, 2,200
communicants, the church institution, a
cathedral, a hospital, a bishop's residence
and a moderate Episcopal endowment.
Bishap Clarason pleaued for bishops for
Dakota, Wyoming, Idaho, Arizona and even
Alaska. Bishop Williams, of Yedo, re
ported that since the last convention the
VII
number of catechists and assistants had
doubled and foreign teachers bad increased
from two to five, the number of schools
from four to eight, scholars from 40 to 90,
and there are now 12 chapels.
Bishop Hare, of Niobrara, maintained
that the Indian« were mentally and morally
a superior people, but with any bargain un
dertaken with our people they have been
egregiously swindled. If an outbreak of
Indiau violence should make us shudder
we must remember that with a sense of
their great wrongs they are apt to forget
themselves. There are In his diocese 13
clergymen of who five are natives. They
have several books in his own language. If
any one thing has made tho Indian the prey
of the white man, it is that they bave lived
on little reservations aud constilute an In
digestible mass of which the social body
was anxious to get rid. The sooner the In
likc our people, the sooner they
will cease to be Indians. In Niobrara there
are 13 ministering women aud43 clergymen.
During the past three years 864 adults and
468 children have been baptized and in the
past ten years 900 persous have been pre
sented at confirmation. The Board of Mla
sious then adjourned.
dlioa
ROBBED BY BOLD PIRATES.
After Extensive Burglaries They Sal I
Away to Sea in Their Craft.
Gloucester, Mass., Oct. 5.—Quite a sen
sation has been caused here to-day by exten
sive robberies committed by men supposed
to be pirates. Dr. Conant and his wife were
asleep at their home this morning early,
when a tall man entered their chamber.
Mrs. Conant was partly awakened when the
man clutched her throat, placing one hand
kerebief to her nose and another to her hus
band's. Both were unconscious iu a moment
from the effects of ether. When they woke
up jewelry and silverware to the value of
$1,000 was gon^
Among the articles taken were several
valuable pieces of silver-plate, which have
been in the Conant family four of five gen
erations. A number of watches were also
ralRslng. Dr. Quinby's taouso and the office
of Parmenter, Rice <fc Co. were next visited,
and the 6afe of the latter firm drilled open
and robbed. Just before daylight a boy de
livering milk saw a tall man with a silk hat
jump a fence and run toward the Cove, and
shortly after a sloop yacht put out of a
eluded nook into the Cove. There
four men on board.
were
The craft was carrying a small sail when
it started. Before the mouth of the harbor
was reached every stitch of canvas had been
raised, and as she went spinning out to
it looked as though she would capsize. No
name could be made out
< raft's stern by the stapngest glass.
1 1 ■ I
the 8trauge

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