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Southern shield. [volume] (Helena, Ark.) 1840-1874, September 25, 1852, Image 1

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" IMMEM
VOL. XUL
HELENA, ARKS.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2
5, 1 852.
NO. 25.
SOUTHERN SHIELD,
OFFICIAL PArER
For Publishing the Laws of the United States,
pUBLlSIIK 13 EV E R Y SATURDAY
BY (l IC. UNDERWOOD.
OF SUBSCRIPTION:
<5,2 50, if puiil in advance—S3 if paid within
a months—or S4 if not paid until six months
, v 'lives from t he time of subscribing.
No subscription received lor a less term titan
three mouths.
« * No paper discontinued until all arrearages
ue paid up, unless at the option of the publisher.
Professional Cards,
a n: be ally"
A T T ORNEY A T L A W ,
MOUNT UEIiNON, St. Francis Co., Arks.
"jaa "m-r: •m: ^tBr* sag^sSHBC assltru•
Tenders his Professional Services to the public.
Office—One door below his residence.
Helena, August, 1852.
DrTf.M. JACKS,
HAVING located himself permanently ir
Helena, tenders lus Professional services tc
the citizens of the place and the people of the
surrounding country.—Office near the marke
house, corner of Cherry and Diagonal streets
where he will he found unless professionally en
gaged from 8 to 11A A. M. and from 2j till I
]*. M.; at other times at his residence*in Wes
Helena.
He will pay particular attention to the treat
ment of chronic diseases.
Helena, March 27, 1852.
OHN C. PALMER. ALFRED H. IIISE
PALMEB Sc MISF,
AT TO It N E F S A T • L A TV,
Helena. Arkansas.
They are likewise Commissioners to takeac
knowledgements of Deeds, to administer oaths
&,c., lortlie States of Tennessee, .Mississipp
and Kentucky.
JOHN PRESTON, JR. JAS. C. TAPPAX
PRESTO.Y Sc T,srJP.3.V,
Attorneys at Law,
HELENA, ARK'S.
Jammrv 3. 1852.
JAS. IS. JACKSON. A. G. UNDERWOOD
JACKSON & UNDERWOOI>,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
Helena, Arkansas.
ILL practice in the several counties com
posing the first Judicial Circuit of th
State, and in the Supreme and Federal Courts
at Little Lode, and also, in the Circuit Courts cj
Coahoma and Tunica counties, Mississippi.
August 16, 1851.— 18-ly.
J. S. DEPUTY. K. G. KING
FPj-s. S9JEI9UT\* & &WG,
'I'ENDER their Professional services to th
citizens of Helena and vicinity.
Office next doornorth of Deputy & Comfort’
Drue Store.
CHARLES ADAMS.
JAS. T. MOORE
,239'S',IIS & *7100121?,
A T T O 11 N E Y S AT L A W
HELENA, ARK'S.
EWTILL practice in all the Courts of the firs
v w Judic
jial Circuit, composed ofthecoun
ties of Green, Poinsett, St. Francis, Monroe
Mississippi, Crittenden and Phillips.
Htlcna, April 19, 1851. ___ _____
H. JF7 SUTTOS,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
WILL attend to sll business entrusted to hi
care in the State of Arkansas and Western pa:
of the State of Mississippi, and will act as
LAND AGENT,
in payment of Taxes, investigating Titles, an
redeeming lands. Office at Helena, Arks.
January 31, 1852.
DAVID BRUTOJ
WM. H. RIXOO.
jRJ.V&tf & BRUTOJ*',
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
M7ILL attend to all business entrusted t
V* their care in the State of Arkansas an
Western part of the State of Mississippi, an
will act as
LAND AGENTS
in payment of Taxes, investigating titles, an
redeeming lands. Ofhce at Helena, Arks.
October 18, 1851.
JAS. A. SCOTT, J- R- iE'VI
Uatesville. Clinton.
LEWIS & SCOTT,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
rILL diligently attend to all business co
fided to their care in the counties <
Van Burcn, Searcy, and W hite, in the thi
Judicial circuit. July, 1851.
thosTjTbl AC KMOIIE,
Attorney at Law A General Lund Agent,
'ILL attend promptly to all business e
trusted to his care, througout the Stat
Office at Osceola, Arkansas. May 25.
J. A. LOVE JOY,
Attorney and Counsellor at Lair,
MARION, Crittenden co., Arks.
ALSO, General Land Agent in the transa
on of all business connected with lands.
May 25.
~ S. Jfi. «/T* ’ C I*
A T T O R N E Y AT LAW,
MOUNT VERNON, St. Francis Co., Arl
limm. K. SF,IS.1STE'1A\
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HELENA, ARKANSAS.
AI.11.BUT PIKE,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW
LITTLE ROCK. ARKANSAS.
TIN SHOP
.is. B BAB-it a
ripHE undersigned has opened a Tin Sue
in Helena, for tiie purpose of carrying (
a general manufactory of everything in his lin
Every description of TIN-WARE will 1
kept constantly on hand, and sold as low, eith
Wholesale or Retail, as it is in Memphis.
JAMES MOORE.
March 13, 1852.
SALE OF LANDS FOR TAXES
IN PHILLIPS COUNTY, ARKANSAS,
FOE THE TEAR 1 8 5 2.
i
TtfTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That I, Davis Thompson, as Sheriff and ex-Officio
Collector of the Taxes within and for the County of Phillips, in the State of Ar
kansas, will sell at the Court-IIouse door in the town of Helena, in the said'County of
Phillips, on the first Monday in November next, a. i>. 1852, (being the 1st day of said
month,) the whole of the land< described in the list hereto annexed or so much of each
tract as will be sufficient to pay the taxes, penalty and costs due thereon for the year
1852 and other years therein mentioned, (the penalty being 25 per cent on the amount
of State and county taxes due on each tract,) unless such taxes, penalty 6c costs be paid on
or before said day of sale. Sale to take place at and after the hour of ten o’clock of, t
said day, and continue from day to day until the whole are sold or offered for sale. 1 i
Note.—If a less quantity than the whole of any tract and more than one-half be sold,' <
it will be surveyed off of the south side of such tract, and if less than one-half of any
tract be sold it will be surveyed off the south-east corner of such tract in a square, so a>
to evade the improvements, if possible, should there be any thereon.
e
IN WHOSE NAME Part OF Sec
TAXED.
Ball, Harrv
Black, B. D. [d.]
Bertrand, C. P. and
L. Gibson
Bickham, Win.
Bickham A: Ford
same
Borden, Phillip
Creekman. Fred.
Campbell, Charles
Colburn, Jonas W.
Downing, Ed.
Dewitt, Jacob
Dunn X Lincoln
TION.
* rr
5 ®
71 ‘ r
s w
n e
If,
o
s e
152 s
31 1 s
2 e
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28 1 n
•21 1 n
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31 1 n
2012 s
301 n
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32 2 n
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1
Fraser, William
Iloldher, John
Hollingsworth, J. heirs of
tr
same
Jenkins, John
Jones, E. VV
Asher
same
same
Keeler, Daniel
Larkins, Annie
Miles, Ben.
same
Menorief, Jno.
Pratt, Thomas
Shrewder, R. F.
Smoots, Leonard
Res. s w
Res. s w
Res. s w
122,2 s
24 2 s
341 n
e * n e
8 4 s 3 e
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2312 s
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9.
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Ward, James
Williams, N.
same
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231 s
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September 25th, ’52
DAVIS THOMPSON, She rill’
and ex-Oflfjcio Collector, Phillips County, Arkansas,
-cost of advertising SO cents per tract.
The French Settlers in Sonora.
o
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e.
c
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ip
in
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sr
The following extracts are from a letter
to the San Francisco Herald, from Arispe,
in the Mexican State of Sonora, dated the
27th May last:
“The panic which formerly existed in re
gard to the Apachas, has gradually abated.
They only attack the weak, and fly before
the brave. Their chief object is to carry off
the girls. A body of Frenchmen fought
them a short time ago, and killing four,
they took about fifty horses and made one
prisoner, from whom they learned that the
Indians had silver balls for their rifles, as no
lead is to be found in the mountains. Some
of these balls were found on the prisoner.
The first company of about 100 French
man is settled at Cacespera, where they are
working gold and silver mines, and cul
tivate the land, but indifferently. The last
company of CO men has received the haci
enda de la Cruz near Tuson, above twenty
leagues beyond Cocospera. The Govern
or has given to each emigrant about half a
square mile of arable land, provisions for six
months, the neccessary tools and seeds, be
sides one mule for two men, and two oxen
for eight men. As soon as these emigrants
arrive at Ures, (the present seat of govern
ment) 'Blanco makes them sign the act oi
allegiance to the Mexican government, and
pays them three reals per day till a sufficient
number have arrived to make the grant of
a ranch under the inspection of an officer.
Those who work their land during two
years, receive a proper deed to the same,
which authorizes them to sell the same; but
many of these Frenchmen take their noises
and go straight to the mines.
You see that the Mexican government
has done a great deal for the promotion ot
immigration, and various companies aie
now arriving, as well from the inter ioi as
from foreign countries. Others have been
formed to promote immigration from Eu
rope. For the better conveyance of pas
sengers into the interior, a line of diligences
will be shortly established between Guay
mas and Ures.
Ijjr’ The heirs of Robinson Crusoe, it is
said, have instituted a suit to recover the Is
land of Juan Fernandez.
What they say of Gen. Pierce at his
own Home.—The Independent Democrat,
a ireesoil paper, published in Concord, Gen.
Pierce’s own town, and edited by Mr. Fogg,
a gentleman of character and standing, the
late Secretary of State of New Hampshire,
makes the following remarks upon Gen.
Pierce’s letter denying the truth of the re
ports of his New Boston speech. There is
no sort of doubt that Gen. Pierce in that
letter denied with the utmost deliberation
what he knew to be true:
“The extraordinary character of this re
ply of Pierce leaves us no other alterna
tive but to believe the writer insane . That
he would deliberately pen such a batch of
untruths, in his right mind,is too monstrous
for belief. lie certainly would not, unless
laboring under some fatal hallucination,
venture to make an issue of veracity against
as many unimpeachable citizens as have al
ready sworn to the accuracy of the reports!
oi his New Boston speech. Wemust be in
sane.
Before God and the hundreds who heard
that speech, he knows that he uttered the
sentiments attributed to him in all their
length and breadth. He knows that he ut
tered similar sentiments at Bradford and in
this town. And yet he dishonestly or in
sanely denies them, and claims the Presi
dency on the "round that he never utlter
ed a word in disapprobation of slavery.
But we will not pursue this subject at the
present time. We regret to see that Gen.
Pierce places himself in the humiliating po
sition he now occupies. In the first place,
it was silly in him to write a letter at all.—
In the second place, he should not have
I written to a fire-eating disunionist. And
in the third place, he should have written
the truth. As it is, he will sull'er for being
in bad company; for having joined issue on
a question of” veracity already decided
against him; and, finally, for evincing a
spaniel-like craving for the Presidency, at
the expense of all self-respect, which must
lose him the respect and confidence of high
minded men, North and South. General
Pierce will lose thousands of votes by this
letter in the free States, while he will not
gain one in the slave States.
f
Aotiier Affidavit.—Here is another
iffidvit, says the I^ouisville Journal in ad
litic to the many we published last 'J’ues
iay.in relation to the remarks of Gen.
’iere in his New Boston Speech. The
eadr will see, that, like those already
lublShed, it is strong and directly to the
>oin No Democraticeditor ofgood sense,
lonewliose brains are in a better state of
•rescvation than the yolk of an addled egg,
lavatny doubt of the strict truth of these
ffidvils, but they know that they cannot
dm the truth of them without giving up
he ‘residential election and all hopes of
he poils, and, sooner than do that, they
vilbrelend to feel the loftiest scornforthe
a:!joi nien and angels:
I, Phillip N. Little, of Sutton, in the
ousty of Merrimack, and State of New
[arlpshire, depose and say, that I attend
J apolitical meeting which was addressed
v General Franklin Pierce who spoke at
ingth on the subject of negro slavery and
be Fugitive Slave Law. He represented
laviry as having ever been a disturbing ele
nert in our confederacy, and instanced va
ioi* historical facts to prove it. lie re
did the charge tnat the Democracy of
\Tiv Hampshire were disposed to favor in
ny way the interests of theSouthern slav
iv,and asserted,on the contrary that they
vin as much and as truly opposed to that
nitiution as any political party in the State,
b Epeatedly expressed his aversion to sla
riryand the fugitive slave law, in language
jfgcat force, and declared that his heart
avuted at the surrender of the fugitives lin
in'ihe provisions of the law. The entire
anjrks of Gen. Pierce on this subject were
j'a decided character, and well adapted to
aonote the unity of the Democratic party
j' proclaiming the anti-slavery sentiments
3 tint party in general and of himself in
m tbular, and the aversion of both to the
gitve slave law, the execution of which
2 aid his party acquiesced in as being ne
isstrv to the preservation of the Union.
PHILLIP N. LITTLE.
Sworn, August 1 I, 1S52, before
Robert Lake, Justice of the Peace.
Numbers of our people are so solicitous
a evlend the limits of freedom that they
tana prepared at a moment’s warning to
innex Cuba, the Lobos and Sandwich
slands, .-qn jn fact all the Islands on the At
anticand ^acifjc coasts. They seem to be
anxious to begin with Cuba; and ,u-' -l
‘hu'Islar^ to raiupcior would only
predpt-ate the movement. The annexa
tiorof Islands may satisfy their appetites
for time, but the period will arrive when
notUg less than the whole of Mexico will
suflic; for the word is onward; and onward
we sill go until, weakened by expansion,
we sill tumble to pieces, and give place to
somejur or five distinct Governments.—
Thostre born who may yet live to see the
Ametan people split into fragments, each
rulinyts own destiny. We are too rest
less, b grasping, to hold together as one
great jpublic, and haifa century more may
see S<thern, Middle, Northern, Western,
and hide Republics arising from the ruins
of themtral Government. We hope not;
but oiiears are that such will be the result
of ounperiment of self-government. We
seem toe following in the footsteps of those
who lie experienced a similar fate. Noth
ing buvirtue and intelligence in the peo
peopldn avert the evil.—Baltimore Clip
per.
FxTiORDINARY AFFAIR AT SMYRNA.
Letterrom Smyrna, of the 26th of July,
give aiccount of a terrible disaster which
occun at Adalia some days before. A
furioufolf suddenly Appeared in the midst
oftheirket place, and bit several persons
mostferely, but taking fright at the cries
whicjrose on all sides, he jumped overa
wall,id got into a large garden where se
veralfundred persons, who had come to
towriu account of the silk crop, were
sleep* in the open air. Here he wounded
. .. I ! J * .. L - I „ I
uuu «uuicu aim {'uiduud, uui
|lri.
aga$Yightened away by tiie cries of the
peo5, he got into a sheepfoltl, where lie
|{\ll»eighty-<ive sheep and wounded seven
ty^- Unfortunately, the Governor had
cau the whole population to be disarmed
a ft days before, so that the unfortunate
pen were without the means of defence;
bur the following day arms were distri
bu. and the wolf killed. According to
theport of the place, the wounds inflicted
bye animal are hideous, but the most
hole circumstance of this disaster is that
seal of the wounded have already died of
hvlphobia, so that the whole population
is Je utmost consternation.
sasant Reflections.—A lady in Cin
cilli, not long since, wedded to her
foi husband, has the walls of her private
apiient garnished with three copies of
ea f her deceased lords, whose portraits
arus honored only after their demise.—
Aiorama like this staring the reigning
the face every night and morning
ggest, we suppose, no very delecta
bl<lotions, but must have a tendency to
red him of the grave period when he
she the recipient of similar posthumous
nee.
lo
cal
re
“Daddy,” said a young hopeful, “let’s
to the nine-piu alley and roll.”—
what do you know about rolling?”
“j|now about it?” Why I can roll vour
eyes out in ten minutes.”
1 wo Kentuckians Killed.—A Califor
nia letter gives the following accounts of a
tragedy in which two Kentuckians were en
gaged.
A terrible tragedy was enacted on the
Plains near Bear River. It occurred be
tween two brothers-in-law, Beasly and
Beal. The parties agreed on a separation;
and Beasly got the weaker team and had a
sick man in his wagon. Immediately after
the division, he hitched up his team and pro
ceeded on his journey, leaving Beal at Green
river. In a few hours after, Beal started
and in the course of the day overtook Bcas
ly on a hill where he had stopped to rest
his mules. The former turned out of the
road and passed by—the latter asking him
if it were his intention to leave him (Beasly)
with the sick man. Upon Beal’s answer
being given in the affirmative, Beasley step
ped to the front of his own wagon, drew
out his rille, and deliberately shot him down,
killing him instantly. A large train came
up about this time, and stopped and buried
the murdered man. Beasly was tried, found
guilty, and shot the next morning. Both
were from Kentucky.
ErSr’The following curious advertisement
of the sale of a negro in California occurs in
the Sacramento State Journal:
Negro for sale.—On Saturday the 26th
inst., 1 will sell at public auction a negro
man, he having agreed to said sale in pre
ference to being sent home. I value him a'
$300, but it any or all the abolition brethren
wish to show that they have the first hono
rable principle about them, they can have
an opportunity of releasing said negro slave
from bondage, by calling on the subscribe!
at the Southern House previous to that time,
and paying $100.
I make this great sacrifice on the value o!
the property, to satisfy myself whether they
prefer paying a small sum to release or play
their old game, and try to steal him. If no'
redeemde, the sale will take place in front o
the Southern House, 87 J street at 10 o’
clock of said day. B. J. Latiiuop.
Very Remarkable.—Some days since a
hen belonging to a farmer near Loveface
ville, in Ballard county, laid an egg, upor
which is inscribed in raised letters the fol
lowing words:
General Scott,
n-od,Iant of the United Stat1060.
We do not (netend to account for thi:
singular circumstance, and do not ask ant
one to believe any stronger in the resuf
than before the prediction appeared—bu
' that the fact is as we state, there can be nc
sort of doubt. Three men of unimpracti
cal veracity, and several piousand eminent
ly truthful ladies, are ready to bear testi
mony (as we are informed,) to the truth ol
I the above.
Alas! for Democracy, when the chicken
' cocks, the emblems of that party, are going
it for Scott, and even the old hens are bear
ing testhnom/ of his triumph!
1*. S.—The old hen is as well as could be
expected under the circumstances.—Padu
cah, (Ky.) Journal.
Rivers and Harbors.—Pierce Vetoes.
Mr. Venable, of North Carolina, is one of
the most ardent supporters of Gen. Pierce,
and opposed the Harbor and River bill in
the House by speech and vote. He is talk
ed of as the probable successor of Mr. Man
gum in the United States Senate, and is re
garded as the leader of the Southern Ex
tremists. lie addressed the Democracy of
Richmond, Ya., on the 31st ult., and the Re
publican says, he congratulated the Demo
cracy that after Me election of Pierce, no R i
ver and Harbor bill will become laws. Do the
Western voters here this? Would they
rather have a Democratic President than
safe harbors and navigable rivers?
A Philosophical Rule.—Cist., of the
Advertiser, at Cincinnati, lays down the
following rule from close observation:—
“vvnenever you see a marriage notice, and
the lady Vnatne first in order, set it down
she means to be the principal in the matri
monial firm—the husband, in this case, be
ing merely a Co., or sleeping partner. I
have noticed this for years, and cannot
state an exception to the rule.”
0Q3 The other day a lady fell off the
Brooklyn boat into the East River; a poor
Irishman sprang over and rescued her.—
When she was safe on the deck again; her
husband, who had been a calm spectator of
the accident, handed the brave fellow a
shilling. Upon some of the by-standers ex
pressing indignation, Fat said, as he pock
eted the coin, “Arrah, don’t blame the jin
tlemon, he knows the best; mayhap if had
not saved her, he’d have given me a dollar.
FCF A very cool way of earning a living
is diving for coal in the Ohio river, at Cin
cinnati. Men work up to their chins in
water, and make good work of it at that.
They obtain, during the day, some SO or
100 busheis of coal; and occasionally secure
a barrel of whisky, and various miscellane
ous articles of hardware, etc. There are
some strange ways of making money in the
world and surely this is one of them.
TST” “John, 1 fear you are forgetting
me,” said a bright-eyed coquette to her
sweetheart the other day. “Yes, Sue, 1
have been forgetting you these two years.”
TERMS OF ADVERTISING.
For a square of 10 lines, first insertion, - 81 00
For each subsequent insertion, - - - 50
Any number of lines under ten, counted as
one square,—over 10 and under 20, counted as
two squares, and advertisements of greater length
in like proportion,
Liberal deductions will be made to those who
advertise by the year.
Announcing candidates for State'offices, 810 00
“ “ District “ - 7 Of)
“ “ county, “ - 5 00
“ •* township, “ - 3 00
Communications of a personal nature will be
charged double price. , [Payment in advance.]
JOB WORK of every description executed
m the best style and at reasonable prices.
Limimir ~ ~ i tit ~r—fn—""r— liiaiiLUBwn
[by authority.]
Laws cf the United States,
Passed during the First Session of the Thirty
second Congress of the United States oj
America.
[Public Act—No. 58.]
AN ACT making appropriations for the im
provement of certain harbors and rivers.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of
Representedives of the United States of Amer
ica in Congress assembled, That the following
sums of money be, and the same are hereby
appropriated, to be paid out of any money in
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, and
to be expended under the superintendence of the
Secretary of War, lor the following purposes,
to-wit:
For the continuation of the Delaware break
water, thirty thousand dollars.
For the construction of a harbor on the east
side of Reedy Island, Port Penn, Delaware,
fifty-one thousand and ninety dollars.
For the repairs of the works at the harbor of
Chester, on the Delaware river, five thousand
dollars.
For the removal of obstructions in the Sa
vannah river, at a plae called the Wrecks, and
the improvement of the navigation of said river,
forty thousand dollars.
For continuing the improvement of the navi
gation of the Hudson river, above and below
Albany, and not above Troy, fifty thousand
dollars.
For the improvement of the navigation of the
Mississippi river, below the rapids, ninety
thousand dollars; the Ohio, including the repairs
of the dam at Cumberland Island, ninety thous
and dollars ; the Missouri, and the Arkansas
rivers, each forty thousand dollars; and for the
construction and repair of snag-boats, dredge
boats, discharging scows and machinery to be
used on the Mississippi, Ohio, Missouri, Ar-_
kansas, and other western rivers, one hundred
and fifty thousand dollars,
For the improvement of the James and Ap
pomatox rivers, below the cities of Richmond
and Petersburg, forty-five thousand dollars.
For the improvement of the Rock River
rapids, and the Drs Moines rapids in-’ the Mis
• sissippi river, at the lower chain and the En
gllSIl ClliUII, ulit; limmiiu uiuiiaauu uunaio.
For opening a ship canal of sufficient capaci
ty to accommodate the wants of commerce
through the most convenient pass leading from
the Mississippi river into the Gulf of Mexico,
seventy-five thousand dollars. And it shall be
1 the duty of the Secretary of War to apply said
moneys to the opening of said ship channel by
contract, and at an early day in the next session
of Congress, to report the progress of the work,
the amount necessary to complete it, and an es
i timate of the annual cost of keeping said channel
' open; and any contract made shall be-limited to
the amount hereby appropriated.
For removing the raft of Red River, one hun
, dred thousand dollars; and that the Secretary of
War be authorized to contract with the lowest
responsible bidder, within this appropriation,
for the removal of said raft after reasonable pub
■ ! lie notice.
For the improvement of the navigation of the
Colorado river, Texas, twenty thousand dollars.
For the survey of the Trinity river, Texas,
including the bar at the mouth, three thousand
dollars.
For a breakwater at Richmond Island harbor,
and repairing the breakwater in Portland har
bor, Maine, ten thousand dollars.
For removing the rocks obstructing the navi
gation near Falls island, Cobscook bay, Maine,
five thousand dollars.
For a survey in reference to the construction
of a breakwater on the eastern side of the Is
land of Matinicus, Maine, one thousand dol
lars.
For the protection of Great Brewster Isfand,
in the harbor of Boston, rtiirty thousand dollars.
For the preservation of Cape Cod harbor, at
and near Provincetown, Massachusetts, five
thousand dollars.
For repairing the breakwater at Hyannis har
bor, Massachusetts, five thousand dollars.
For the preservation of Great Woods Hole
harbor, two thousand five hundred dollars.
For a survey in reference to the construction
of a breakwater at East Dennis, Barnstable
uay, massacnuseus, one mousanu live nuiulrcu
dollars.
For repairing the injuries done to the Gov
ernment works on Plymouth Beach, in the great
storm of eighteen hundred and fifty-one, five
thousand dollars.
For a survey in reference to the improvement
of the harbor of Scituate, in connexion with the
North river, Massachusetts, one thousand dol
lars,
For the removal of Middle Rock, designated
on the chart as Rocky buoy, in the harbor of
New Haven, Connecticut, six thousand dollars.
For removing a rock near the mouth of the
Sekouk river, harbor of Providence, Rhode
Island, five thousand dollars.
For the further improvement of the harbor of
New York, by removing the rocks at Hell Gate
and Diamond Reef, in the East river, twenty
thousand dollars.
For a survey of the harbor at Port Jefferson,
New York, with reference to the improvement
thereof, twelve hundred dollars.
For the removal of the bar at the junction of
the Passaic and Hackensack river, in Newark
bay, New Jersey, ten thousand dollars.
For the survey of Cranbury inlet, Ilarnegat
bay, New Jersey, in reference to its improve
ment, one thousand dollars.
For the improvement of the Patapsco river,
from Fort McHenry to the mouth of said river,
twenty thousand dollars.
For the construction of a steam dredge, equip
ment and discharging scows, for the waters of
the Chesapeake bay and the Atlantic coast,
twenty thousand dollars.
For removing obstructions at the mouth of
die Susquehamma river, near llavre-de-Grace,
Maryland, ten thousand dollars.
For reopening a communication between Al
bemarle Sound, North Carolina, and the Atlan
tic ocean, by the construction of a breakwater
across Croatsn Sound, fifty thousand dollars.

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