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Southern shield. [volume] (Helena, Ark.) 1840-1874, February 26, 1853, Image 1

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[“THE PEOPLi SAFETY IS THE SOVEREIGN LAW.”]
VOL. XIII.
HELENA, ARKS.. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1853.
NO. 46.
THE
SOUTHERN SHIELD,
OFFICIAL PAPER
For Publishing the Laws of the United States,
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY
by q. k. underwood.
of SUBSCRIPTION:
go 50. if paid in advance—$3 if paid within
x montiis—or $4 if not paid until six months
gxpires lr0,n t'me °f subscribing.
Vo subscription received for a less term than
| ! three months.
♦ * No paper discontinued until allarrearages
gre paid up, unless at the option of the publisher.
Professional Cards,
DAVID BRUTON. WALDO RINGO.
BKUTO'!Y&' RIJYG O,
attorneysat law,
WILL attend to all business entrusted to
their care in the State of Arkansas and
Western part of the State of Mississippi, and
will act as
LAND AGENTS
in payment of Taxes, investigating titles, and
redeeming lands. Office at Helena, Arks.
December 4, 1852.
THOS. B. HANLY.
MARK W. ALEXANDER.
Hanly & Alexander,
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT LAW.
."XJJAVING this day entered into Co-paiLier
A ■*- ship in the practice of their Profession,
attend all the Courts in the 1st Circuit in
this i/^tate, the Circuit Courts of the counties ol
Chico * and Desha in the 2nd; the Supreme and
Federa. I Courts at Little Rock, and the Circuit
Courts in the counties of Tunica and Coaho
ma in tin ’ State of Mississippi. Their office
for the tii ,ie being is in the old Real Estate
Bank on L’i™ street, in Helena, where one of
them can at all times be found and counseled
on business.
Helena. Oc. 'ober 25, 1852.
JAS. T. MOORE. *• OU11UN
.noon & & SUTTOJY,
ATTORNEYS .AND COUNSELLORS AT
LAV/.
and gener. al land agents,
WILL practice in all the Courts of the va
irious counties compo. thefirst Judicial Cir
•cmt of the State of Ai kansas and of the North
Western Counties in l'he State of Mississippi
_Office near the Court House, Helena, Arks
Not. 27, 1852._
g. w. bl 'a/ly;
attorney a t law,
MOUNT VERNON, St. . Francis Co., .Vries
Dr. T. m. JAt-KS,
HAVING located himself permanently ir
Helena, tenders his Professional services tc
the citizens of the place and the people of tht
surrounding country.—Office nea. <" the mark<
house, corner of Cherry and Diag onal street!
where he will be found unless professionally en
gjaged from 8 to ilj A. M- and fro. n ~.j tiil £
P. M - ai other times at h/s residence in Wesi
Helena.
He will pay particular attention to tlie tfeaf
nient of clironie diseases.
Helena, March 27, 1352.
/OHM C. PALMES. ALFRED H. It ISE.
JP*iLJflEK £' IIXSE,
ATTORNE VS A T LAW,
Helen a, A rk a no as.
They are likewise Commissio.ners to take ac
knowledgements of Deeds, to administer oaths,
Ac., for the States of Tennessee, Mississippi
and Kentucky.
JOHN PRESTON, JR. A AS. C. TAPPAN.
JPJtES TGSY & T. JPIMvY,
Attorneys at Law,
HELENA, ARK'S.
January 3, 1852. __
J. B. JACKSON,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law.
Helena, Arkansas.
[TILL practice in the several counties com
posing the first Judicial Circuit of the
State, and in the Supreme and Federal Courts,
at Little Rock, and also, in the Circuit Courts of
Coahoma and Tunica counties, Mississippi.
August 16, 1851.—18-ly.
Z. S. BEPUT4'. R. O. KINO.
Sirs. &EFUTI* A' KING,
TENDER their Professional services to the
citizens of Helena and vicinity.
Office next door north of Deputy & Comfort’s
Drug Store. Feb. 14, ’51:
THUS. J. BVHIKEJUORE.
Attorney at Law V General Lund Agent,
'ILL attend promptly to all business en
trusted to bis care, througout the State.
Office at Osceola, Arkansas. May 25.
Win. as. SEKSTSTIJTJY*
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HELENA, ARKANSAS.
albekt pike*
ATTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS.
S. JI. .T1’ C vim* r,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MOUNT VERNON, St. Francis Co., Ark.
J. LEVY
TAKES pleasure in announcing to his
friends and old customers, and the public
in general* that he has just received a new
etock of
IM & 1VIJVTJER GOOHS,
•■consisting of all sorts of Ready-made Clothing,
Dry Goods, Woolen Goods, Hosiery; Hats
and Caps in gieat variety; his Boots and Shoes
are a complete assortment.
He has also received a fresh supply of
GROCERIES.
All of which.he will sell at a very small ad
vance above cost for cash—but cash only.
Helena, Nov. 1. 1851
Miliner & Mantua Maker.
Miss GREEN, of Memphis, Tenn.. begs
leave to inform the Citizens of Helena, and vi
cinity that she is prepared to execute all work
in the above business, with dispatch and latest
style. She will be found at all times at her
room, No. 7 Conmmercial Hotel, Front Row,
Helena, Ark. Jan. 22, 1853.
Business Cards,
F- F. HOWERTON,
General Dealer,
I N
PRODUCE & GROCERIES,
G l J L D say to his numerous customers
that he is daily receiving fresh supplies
of Produce 4” Groceries, which he is determined
to sell very cheap for cash. His motto is, a
“quick penny is better than a slow shilling.”
fail and examine quality and prices.
BLAKEMOItE & BUCK.
WHOLESALE & RETML
GROCERIES
AND
WESTERN PSOauOE.
'front row, opposite the perry landing.)
to inform their friends and dealers
V v generally throughout the country, that
.hey are now receiving a large and extensive
3tock~~of Groceries and Produce, consisting of
-very article usually kept in their line, which
hey will sell for a small advance upon cost.
I’hev further desire to assure country dealers
hat they will make it to their interest to call
ind see us before making their purchases here
)r in Memphis. Feb. 19, 1853.
<
MEMPHIS
Marble Manufactory.
J. WiMITE,
Tmporter and Dealer in Foreign and
American Marbie,
Adams street, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
C^EGS leave to inform the citizens of Hele*
na ami vicinity, that he is always prepar
ed to furnish any kind of work in his line, viz:
leac & Foot Stones, llox Tombs, Monuments
Mantles, <tc., <kc., on reasonable terms, and in
i style of workmanship not surpassed by any
istablishment in this country.
UIUAll work sent, from his establishment will
;o well boxed, and warranted to be delivered
iafely.
1
Maj. Jesse A. Jackson, at the store of Hicks
. & Bumpass, in Helena, will attend to all orders
for any thing in tny line.
J. WHITE.
March 6, 1852.
TO THE PUBLIC.
Fgj^UIE UNDERSIGNED having associa
j _BL ted themselves together under the]
i name and style of I*'y rtle, Moore, &i Co.,
tor the purpose o- transacting a general'
rk mercantile business in the town of Helena,
take this method of appearing again before
their numerous acquaintances, soliciting a
port ion of their business.
W a will keep for sale a general supply
of Stable and Fancy Goods, together, with
plantation supplies forthe market at the
most reasonable prices, and oue or both of
the firm will be always at hand to serve
those who may favor us with their trade.
Our motto is, ‘‘small profits and quick
sales,” at AYyrtle, Moore & Co’s.
MYRTLE & FRASER,
W. F.MOORE.
Jan. 22, 18b’3.
J. M. PATRICK. JOHN MARTIN. !
J. M. P atrick & Oo.«
COMMISSION M E R C H A NTS
Dealers in Sagging. Rope, and Groceries.
MEMPHIS, Tennessee.
•^Particular attention paid to selling cotton.
October 9, ’52.
TIN SHOP
THE undersigned has opened a Tin Shop
in Helena, for the purpose of carrying on
a general manufactory of everything in his line.
Every description of TIN-WARE will be
kept constantly on hand, and sold as low, either
Wholesale or Retail, as it is in Memphis. '
JAMES MOORE.
March 13, 1852.
H. F. COOLIDGE. JOHN FEARING.
H, P, Cooiidge & Co.,
WHOLESALE <fc RETAIL DEALERS IN
Foi'i isn and Domestic
dry goods.
Diagonal Street, HELENA, ARIv’S.
John Williams;
COMMISSION MERCHANT.
87 Gravif.r Street,
New Orleans^
Groceries, Wines & Brandies j:
-o- <
EDU ARD THOMSON, ,
No- 33, Common Street.
NEW ORLEANS. J
(Successor to A. Montauge A Co.) ,,
IS NOW RECEIVING direct from Boston,
New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and '
Europe, a large supply ot
PROVISION GROCERIES, 1
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, line Wines and
Brandies, Oid Rye, B«’e ' 'ton and Irish Whisky,
assorted Cordials A... Air.. ‘ • hich he offers
an the most RE.i SO A J131L TERMS, to
Merchants and Planters.
EF’Urders promptly attended to. Buyers of
Wines and Liquors may rely upon getting the
article and qualiiy represented.
Jan. 8, 1853—-0m.
s
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LIFE OX THE BO%R.
A THRILLING NARRATE;
OR TIIE
SEARCH FOR THE SILVER IDNq OF
THE OZARK MOUNTAIN!
[concluded.]
IS
The two meo remained for perhaps iu.
ter of an hour in their hiding place; l
when all seemed to be seeute, and l;
peared as if the Spaniards had/jpne fi'T^
up the stream. Thompson rated f's h> -V
ind gazed for a moment ‘dow\ npo \
bailey, which was illuminated bythe moon
which now shone brightly above them; l.t;
ihert turned to his older companion, who1'
n the meanwhile, had risen to his feet, anf
was examining the lock of his rifle, to sec1
whether in laying down the weapon, the
mwder had not fallen from the pan.
“Well, Pearson, what think you of thir'
ipparition?” he said. “I did not altogether
ike it; for a moment 1 felt a great desirf
o spring out, and plunge my knife intothP
ong rascal’s throat; there would have been1
me less of them.”
“It would have been as thoughtless as
oolish,” said Pearson, in a half-suppressed’
one, “it would not only have baffled ourr
vnole plan, but it would have exposed us
o the vengeance of a 11 these brown-skinned,
ascals. No—1 see it all now ; the fellows?
oust bring their booty down the valley,1
nd in the rocky bed of the stream itself,
itherwise I should have found their tracks
ast year and the year before ; and this long
nave was stationed up here, only to secure
hem against surprise, while they in the
neanwhile were bringing their burdens to
he thicket,'where, I suppose, they load their
nuies at their leisure. Wo have now no
(lore time to lose, for who knows whether
hey will make more than one oilier trip,
nd if we do not find them busy digging,
o that we can carefully mark the spot, all
ur pains will be for nothing.”
“But it is impossible that they can find
II the best ore in one night, and they will
ertainly continue their work after day
reak,” replied Thompson.
“They are now removing what they dug
esterday, and then they will destroy all
flint flint; mat; liaro loft tlcom **
replied Pearson; “No, no, we must not
! wait till daybreak; besides it seems as tho’
they smelt mischief, or what is the meaning
i oi this sentinel? Come down into the val
i ley, then ; wc will creep through the thicket
where they can hardly have left a watch,
I end follow silently the course of the river.
II we find them busy at the mine, we must
; mark the spot, and then depart as quickly
and as softly as possible; for I have mv
reasons for suspecting that they are here
; in greater numbers than usual. We will,
| therefore, let them carry oft' what they
have collected; when they return next
year, they will find it harder to fill their
leathern sacks than heretofore, unless the
j silver lies in heaps in these mountans.”
The hunters now descended carefully in
j to the narrow valley, and glided like’ser
I pents into the somewhat open thicket,
watching attentively for the slightest object
which might threaten them with danger or
discovery. But there was no guard left
with the mules, which were grazing quietly,
and did not seem to remark the stealthily
approaching adventures, who, panting hea
vily, at last reached the open wood beyond
the thicket. Here, as Pearson was on the
point of hastening toward the river, Thomp
son grasped him by the arm and asked
whether they should not rather look for
the silver which the Spaniards must already
have secured somewhere thereabouts.
“Go to the d—1 with your folly !” replied
Pearson, sharply, “would you waste your
time here at child’s play, to look for a thing
which, if we should find, we could not car
ry away? Come, come, everyjnoment we
may meet the knaves on their return, and
it is quite important for us to hear them be
fore they have a suspicion that we are in
the neighborhood.”
With these words he freed himself from
Thompson’s grasp, proceeded into the bed
of the river and glided onward with noise
less steps over the round, smooth pebbles,
followed as noiselessly by his companion,
like two dark shadows of the lower world.
They had kept on their way undisturbed
and uninterrupted fer about a half a mile,
without remarking the slightest token of
the presence of living beings, when sudden
ly, close before them they heard voices, and
had scarcely time to cast themselves behind
a fallen pine, before five dark forms appear
ed, with small sacks upon their backs,
which, to judge by the bent attitudes of
those who bore them, must have been of
considerable weight; they came directly
towards them, and stepping silently from ne
|r:
il<
ti
tl
se
16
lei
to
one large stone to another, proceeded in
the direction of the thicket.
When hut a few paces from the spot hi
where our adventurers lay concealed, their
eader stopped, and addressed some words
in Spanish, to those who followed him
then he, at once, continued his way, anc
soon disappeared behind a projecting angle
af a rock, near a bend in the river.
“Could you understand what that tal
*ascal muttered, in his beard?” inquired
rhompson, turning to his companion, who
was lying near.
“Not a word.” replied the latter; “it is^e
he first time in my life ! ever heard Span-hd
en
e
is
en
co
id
id
he
ir
ox
h spoken; but be quick, we must not lose
i instant; perhaps we can discover the
ine before they return; for, by heaven,
lere are more of them than I thought, and
ie fellows carry long and sharp knives.”
The tw7o followed the course of thestream
ipidly and silently for about four hundred
ices further, when Pearson, who led the
ay, stopped suddenly, and pointed to sev
•al pickaxes and hammers which lay scat
red around, in a part of the river’s bed,
hich was completely dry.
“It’s here, by heaven !” he cried, grasp
>g Tl ompson’s shoulder convulsively, “\ye
re at the spot.”
“At d what is that dark thing yonder,
, 'f'g under that bush?” asked Thompson,
hile bending forward, he approached, to
(amine the object which had attracted his
Mention.
But with a cry of terror and astonishment
3 leaped backwards, for, but a few inches:
slant from his own, he beheld the dark,)
ishing eyes of a human being, who at the
me moment sprang to his feet, with a
awn knife in his hand, and uttered a loud
y for help.
“The d—1!” exclaimed Pearson, who at
e first movement ol the stranger, had also
awn his knife from its sheath, “the d—1!”
1 cried, and sprang upon the Spaniard.—
:iis act would probably have proved fatal
him, had not the rifle which he held in
s left hand, accidentally turned aside the
re thrust of the assaulted stranger, who,
the same moment, felt the broad knife
the hunter in bis breast, and fell with a
jd cry to the ground ; but even in falling,
drew a pistol from his girdle, and dis
armed it at Pearson as he started back.
“The ball missed indeed the one at whom
was aimed; it hit, however, the left hand
his comrade, who stood near turn, which
3 latter had just raised to dispatch their
erny by a blow with the butt of his rifle.
Thompson’s arm sunk powerless to his I
e, and his rifle fell clattering upon the
Ines, and like a tiger he sprang upon the
rtally wounded Spaniard, and plunged
1 broad blade three times into his breast,
Itn Pearson grasped his arm, and drew
n back.
‘Come, come !” cried the latter, “leave
h, he lias enough ; but the d—Is will
k mnn nnr -rnma I ii’rmlrl
it make acquaintance with their live
Mi'fc for all the silver mines in the world.”
'tim wounded,” whispered Thompson,
brewing heavily; “my hand is shattered
in ces.”
‘*tter the hand than head,” cried Pear-,
sotjrinding his teeth, while lie raised the
riflrom the ground, and reached it to his
dised companion. “Come! in five min
utcit will be too late,” and followed by
Thpson, who felt the magnitnde of the
dair, he ran a short distance up the bed
ofe river, and then clambered up the)
prpice, on the right bank, in order, if!
pcole, to reach the top of the mountain!
bee their pursuers, and when on the oth
erle to effect their escape under cover of
thight.
ith his wounded hand concealed in his!
hen, Thompson, stifling his pain, kept!
cf to his companion’s heels,and in a few,
rrnents both had disappeared in the;
gmy shadows of the wood; but at the
s;J instant a rustling was heard in the
tltet, and five dark forms emerging from
ll bushes appeared upon the scene of
bd which had just been left by the fugi
Lii.
cry of horror escaped their lips as they
b:ld the body of their murdered comrade,
a they glanced keenly around to discov
sie authors of the deed, that they might
sifice them to their vengeance; then a
d, command'ng gesture from their load
jidmonished them to silence, and like so
av figures hewn from dark marble, the
i! stood breathless, and listened lor the
itest sound, in the' silent forest, that
around thern, hushed in hallowed repose.
. deathlike stillness prevailed for a few
merits, when suddenly the cracking of a
1 branch fell upon their ear—then anoth
ind with a loud cry of joy, like hounds
1 scent their dying enemv, the panther,
five powerful forms sprang up along the
ost precipitous ascent, and with ven
nce gleaming in their eyes, followed
direction from which the sound pro
led*
'hompson, embarrassed by the injury
ch be had received, bad stumbled and
:n, and by this mishap had brought their
suers upon the track of the fugitives,
> had already reached the lowest height
tbleMand, andjwere hurrying, at the top
leir speed, toward* a grove of chesnut
s, which stood darkly before them,
n they heard the steps of the fleetest of
; enemies close behind them. In good
Pearson drew his companion aside
a small ravine, which had been formed
. spring leaping from the rock, and near
;h scarcely three paces distant from
i, yawned a dark abyss, from which
top of a tall hickory reared itself. At
instant a long, dark form, sprang past
i, and hastened toward the grove. A
nd, a third followed, and the two last
dread y climbed the verge of the terrace
were about to take the same course,
i one of them, whether from chance,
ipelled by an instinctive sense of the
imily of enemies, turned aside toward
lark spot which hid the two fugitives,
which probably seemed suspicions to
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him, an stooped to examine it attentively.
At this very moment the moon emerged
from behind a thin cloud, und its light glea
ming probably npon a glistening rifle bar
rel, betrayed their place of concealment,
for a sudden exclamation of surprised esca
ped the Spaniard ; but this was the last
sound that issued from his lips, for when he
saw that they were discovered, Pearson
had calmly raised his rifle, and taken sure
aim; there was a flash, a quick, sharp re
port, then a cry of pain, and the Spaniard
fell lifeless upon the stony soil.
“Settle the other knave quickly, or he
will escape us,” he exclaimed to his com
panion, who, pale and breathless, was lean
ing near him against a rock.
“Take my weapon—I cannot use it,”
groaned forth the latter as he reached Pear
son his rifle. His comrade seized it in fe
verish excitement, and raised it to his cheek
to rid them of their other enemy; but the
latter stepped behind a large oak, which
completely covered him, and his call, in a
few moments, brought the others to the
spot, who, checked in their course by the
report of the rifle, now obeyed the signal
with wild joy.
But Pearson had not been idle mean
while. Perceiving that the Spaniard was
entirely protected from his aim, he had laid
Thompson’s rifle aside, reloaded his own,
and was in the act of pouring powder in
to the pan, when he beheld the dark shad
ows of their pursuers, as they glided rapid
ly onward through the scattered masses of
rock and trees.
The Spaniard from behind his shelter, ^
described in a few words the lurking place
of their enemies, and pointed to the new
victim that had fallen by Pearson’s hand.
A loud, wild cry of vengeance was the an- (
swer; the two fugitives started involuntari- '<■
ly, and, like tigers, the Spaniards cast them- [
selves upon their prey. (
Pearson’s rifle was at his cheek, and the <
first, who, with a pistol in his left hand and l
i knife in his right, sprang towards him "
from behind a rock, fell, at a distance of f
scarcely ten paces, shot through the heart. J
I'hen casting aside his rifle, he seized that 1
of his companion, and with the rapidity of (
lightning, took aim at the next—but his r
finger touched the trigger in vain; the cock 1
snapped indeed, and the sparks were scat- '
tered in the open pan, but the powder had <
escaped from it in falling, and the flint fell *
(
i
, mly upon the steel.
At the same moment a bright flash gleam
ed from behind an adjacent rock, and Pear
son sank back lifeless upon his companion.
The latter, collecting all his remaining
strength, extricated himself from beneath
the corpse, drew his knife, and defended
himselt with wild despair against the three
remaining assailants; but a blow with the
butt end of a rifle sent him staggering
backward, and while with his wounded
left hand, he endeavored to grasp the rug
ged rock, he fell, with a loud cry, into the
deep, yawning chasm at his side.
Three days had passed, when a hunter
from the settlement on the Hurricane, who
i was following the track of a deer: observed
* a multitude of vultures circling about one
of the terraces which rises in succession
above that stream.
Curious to see what kind of game had
here fallen a prey to the voracious birds,
i he approached the spot and found the skel
eton of a human body on the mountain,
and, guided by the vultures, a second in the
abyss below. Not far distant from the for
mer. hovvever.hediscovered a recent grave,
and upon it, as a sort of monument, was a
wide-brimmed black felt hat, thrust through
with a long knife, and thus fastened upon
the hastily-raised mound.
He hurried back at full speed into the
settlement, and on the succeeding morning
returned t6 the fatal spot, with all the
neighbors that he could collect, in order
from here to follow the tracks of the mur
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uvicjs. vv noinese were, 11 was no uimcult
matter to conjecture; and if overtaken
they would have been visited with the
most summary punishment. But all their
efforts were in vain. They followed the
tracks of the mules for days long, and with
ail the perseverance and subtlety of Indi
ans.
The Spaniards were too crafty for them,
however* Transferring their treasure to
their canoes, they hau made their escape by
water, with the exception of one of their
number, whom they despatched across the
country with the beasts in order to lead
their pursuers astray, who, as they rightly
supposed, would soon he upon their trail.
1'he single Spaniard, alter having sold the
animals in a distant village disappeared, no
one knew where.
Since that time, indeed, no Spaniard has
ventured into those mountains, where they
were sure to fall victims to the vengeance
af the rude borderers, but neither has the
silver mine on the Hurricane been found bv
diose who live near by, and although many
i hunter has roamed the mountains for this
Durpose, yet, thus far, all efforts have been
n vain, to discover a secret which had cost
10 much blood to preserve.
Immensity of Ancient Cities.—The area
>f Bablyon was two hundred and tvventv
ive square miles, and that of Nineveh two
tundred and sixteen square miles, while
hat of London and its environs is but one
tundred and fourteen square miles.
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TERMS OF ADVERTISING.
For .1 square of 10lines, first insertion, - SI 00
For each subsequent insertion, - - - 50
Any number of lines under ten, counted as
one square,—over 10 and under 20, counted as
two squares, and advertisements ofgreater length
in like proportion,
Liberal deductions will be made to those who
advertise by the year.
Announcingcamlidates for State]offices, $I0 00
“ “ District “ - 7 Ofj
“ " county, “ - 5 00
*• “ township, “ - 3 00
Communications of a personal nature will bu
charged double price. [Payment in advance.J
JOB WORK of every description executed
in the best style and at reasonable prices.
[Q^Tliere is some hope for England! A
lord has been sent for twelve months to the
house of correction. Think of this, ye
Britishers! a real live lord, one of the dii
minores or demi-gods, as Herman Mellville
hath it. in his next-door-to-immortal Mardi!
The report is explicit; his hair was cut to
the regulation felon clip; he was washed
and shaved; we fear his cherished mousta
ches must have* been sacrificed by the re
lentless fates, or rather by the adamantine
turnkeys; furthermore, lie was dressed in a
suit of pepper and salt, and condemned to
the—we speak the word with a slight ner
vous twitch of horror—to the mile. Yes,
reader, at this precise moment, the Noble
Lord Frankfort is engaged in the remarka
bly monotonous employment of the perpet
ually walking up stair?, without ever get
ting any higher. If the reader has ever
been on the treadmill—we do not mean
professionally, but experimentally—he will
understand and appreciate the surTerings of
this [alien angel from the empyrean of Brit
ish aristocracy. Lord F. was a great scamp;
no doubt he was a thoroughly debauched
and degraded a specimen of a rowdy lord
a? dne might hope to meet on a summer
day. Nevertheless it is satisfactory to re
flect that even this titled “ne’er do vveel”
:an be made eminently useful to the cause
af justice. This punishment is an example
to his fellow nobles. It vindicates the ma
esty of the law and the equality of justice.
N. Y. Sachem.
From the St. Louis Republican.
jater from Fort Laramie—Great Snows,
and Suffering of Animals!!
Independence, Mo., Feb. 5, 1853.
The Suit Lake mail reached here yester
lay, bringing us dates of the 12th of Janu
iry, from Fort Laramie. Beyond that
mint the c arriers have not been able to go,
ir come, for three or four months on ac
:ount of snow. Such a winter has not
leen known in that region for many years,
fhe American Fur Company have lost
nany of their horses and cattle. Buffalo
nd antelopes are found dead in some of
he canons—having been frozen. Tutt’s
ompany, of which I wrote you last, have
noved their camp a few miles over to some
leighboring timber.—Quite a number of
he men are frost-bitten, and a few more
:attle have died. The snow between Lar
imie and Kearney has not melted much—
ts average depth is fifteen inches.
The mail party had to follow the mean
lering of the river, and pack their provis
ons and mail.
We have no local news of interest. The
^hermometer indicated one degree above
ero this morning.
[O^The sister of Gen. Pierce, (widow of
he late Gen. John McNeill.) for whose re
ef the House has just passed aspecial pen
on bill by an overwhelming majority, had
een in vain pressing her claim on Con
fess for years past—ever since the death
f her distinguished husband. The good
irtune of the brother, however, has happi
: influenced her fortunes also, and she gets
er pension. Her claim is now, no more
ist than it was at the outset, and stands in
le same position of hundreds of other wid
ws of gallant officers, and some also who
>st their lives in the actual service of their
ountry. But times have changed; she was
<!pni but a poor widow, asking of Con
fess, the small pittance due the services of
er gallant husbapd, and her just claims
ere neglected, postponed and passed by,
* were manv similar petitions, with whom
iope deferred has made the heart sick.”
ow.she is a sister of one fortuitously pla*
;d in power, and her claim is taken up and
assed at once.
We mention this as a pregnant illustration
some of the peculiarities of human na
ire. It is unfortunately, too often the case
lat men prefer to curry favor with power,
ther than do justice. Mrs. McNeill, but
r tiie election of her brother as President,
ould still like many other widowed ladies,
ith similar claims, be knocking unavail
gly at the door of Congress.—Arka7ixas
y/dg.
A miserly, skinflint old gentleman down
st having lost a son, was waited upon by
s minister, who suggested various allevi
ions to his calamity, adding that, doubt
3s, his own reflections would suggest
any more. “Yes,” replied the old cur
udgeon, wiping away his tears, “Jo had
awful appetite—it cost almost twice as
uch to feed him as any other member of
e family.”
DCTA quaint old gent, not a hundred
les horn here, who is withal one of the
?st active, stirring men, had a man to
>rk in his garden who was quite the re
rse. “Mr. Jones,” said he to him one
jrning, “did you ever see a snail?” “Cer
nly,” said Jones. “Then,” said the old
y, “you must have met him,for you could
ver overtake him.”
SOULE’s SPEECH ON CUBA.
sscent or purchase is the only way
) take estates, as fearful lawyers say,
;ainstail purchase Soule’s soul is bent,
it wants to take poor Cuba by descent'
Washington Republic.
DCpThe Duke of Wellington had confer
1 upon him, in his life time, sixty-seven
les, which were proclaimed at his grave
ten buried.

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