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The Illinois standard. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1948-1949, January 08, 1949, Image 1

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Copyright, 1948, by The Illinois Progressive Publishing Company
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VOL. 1, NO. 18 CHICAGO, JANUARY 8, 1949 5 CENTS
Curtain goes up,
[ Chicago sees stage
through iron bars
By Bob Lucas
There’s a police drag-net out for William Shakespeare.
In fact, Chicago’s cops are hot on the trail of any play
wright who puts realism into drama.
Recent additions to the rogue’s gallery created by Chi
cago’s nightstick censors include Joshua Logan, author of
Mr. Roberts , lennessee Wil
liams, “Streetcar Named De
sire”; and Alfred Hitchcock,
“Rope.”
Now on the long list of Pub
lic Enemies of the theater is
I* “Respectful Prostitute,’’ recent
ly banned from Chicago’s Rialto.
This play, about a lady of easy
virtue who is the only person
in a southern town to defend
a Negro prisoner, had a long
and successful run in New York
! City.
High priest of Chicago’s corn
;• belt culture is Police Commis
sioner John C. Prendergast. He
decides what thousands of Chi
cago movie and theater-goers
may or may not see. His ruling
, is final; there is no appeal.
The movie “Mom and Dad,”
an educational film dealing with
the “facts of life,” offended the
oracle’s sense of good taste. As
a result, mature Chicagoans
who might have considered the
film informative and worth see
ing were denied the right to de
cide for themselves.
BOARD APPOINTED
The Censor Board, composed
of five women and one man, is
headed by Police Capt. Harry
Folmer. Nine investigators do
the board’s “leg work," watch
ing new films and plays to make
sure that all cuts ordered have
been made. The board members
and investigators are appointees.
Should a naughty word or sit
uation not listed in the bulky
Continued on page 6
WITH CHIANG KAI-SHEK'S dictatorship expected to fall momen
tarily, some 200,000 civilians storm government banks to ex
change inflated currency for gold bullion or silver dollars. Hun
dreds injured and at least seven killed as police, supported by
armored cars, try to disperse crowd.
By Bernie Asbel
Illinois' "little Mundt-Nixon Bill" is the product of the same hands in
the state legislature that two years ago saved the life of organized gang
sterism in Chicago.
An investigation just completed by The Illinois Standard reveals that
a group of legislators, linked with Capone mobsters, who last session
blocked five bills proposed by the Chicago Crime Commission, are ring
leaders behind the proposed witchhunt raid to jimmy open the minds of
progressives and tie the gag on free expression.
Specially active as a member of the Illinois Seditious Activities Com
mission, which already has garnered a formidable record of intimidating
school teachers and smearing textbooks, is Senator Roland V. Libonati.
Virgil W. Peterson, director of the Chicago Crime Commission, offers
this comment on Illinois' pocket size edition of J. Parnell Thomas:
"In the Senate, Roland V. Libonati, from the 20th Ward, was a key
opponent to all Crime Commission bills. During the height of the Capone
regime in Chicago during the early 1930s, the Chicago press featured pic
tures of Senator Libonati attending a public function in the company of Al
Capone, 'Machine Gun' Jack McGurn, and bodyguards."
Sen. Paul W. Broyles, chairman of the seditious activities commission,
which will sponsor the proposed red hunt, credits most of the spade work
for the bills to Sen. Libonati's brother, Elliodor, who is American Legion
Americanism chairman for Illinois.
Slated to plunk hard along with Sen. Libonati for passage
of the Broyles-Libonati bills are the following distinguished
patriots:
SEN. LAWRENCE E. DOWD, who the Crime Commission
describes as "a lawyer who specialized in the defense of
gambling cases in Racket Court in Chicago. In 1947 he repre
sented almost 500 defendants charged with gambling vio
lations."
REP. JAMES J. ADDUCI, who was, according to the crime
commission, "arrested by police in 1933 with William Bioff
(convicted in the $1 million movie industry extortion case) and
... a pal of Capone mobster 'Dago' Lawrence Mangano.”
REP. ANDREW A. EUZZINO, who in the recent grand jury
investigation of the parole of four Capone mobsters, was called
as a witness to identify the handwriting of Tony Accardo,
syndicate boss.
REPS. PETER C. GRANATA and JOHN D'ARCO, who along
with Euzzino are from the old "Bloody Twentieth" Ward.
Granata and D'Arco were dubbed by the Crime Commis
sion as "key men from this locality who fed the fight against
the proposed legislation" which would merely have given
powers to Cook County grand juries investigating crime equal to
those allowed by other counties in the state. At present, county
grand juries expire after only one month which prevents panels
from developing full-scale investigations of crime.
Witchhunt payoff
Will the proposed Broyles
Libonati witchhunt eliminate
“un-Americanism” from among
Illinois teachers? If the red her
ring runs true to form it will
be more successful in eliminat
ing a few teachers—this way:
This week in New York Mrs.
Minnie Gutride, a first grade
te-cher, turned on the gas jets
in her home after two days of
frantic worry following an in
quisition by school officials into
her private politics.
M-s. Rose V. Russell, of the
CIO Teachers Union, charged
that th' suicide victim had been
questioned “in a threatening
manner.” She further charged
that although Mrs. Gutride was
told anything she said might be
used against her, she was de
nied legal advice.
Mrs. Russell made public a
letter written by Mrs. Gutride
to the superintendent of schools
immediately after the question
ing.
In the letter, Mrs. Gutride said
the incident was “shocking,” and
that the questioning took place
in a “terrifying atmosphere.”
She said she was not told why
she was being questioned.
Mrs. Russell said the question
ing waj about “alleged Commu
nist meetings supposed to have
been held in 1940 or 1941.”
Exclusive
in The Standard
Here are
the bills
Highlights of the Broyies
Libonati bills to be introduced
this month are:
1 Dismissal of school teachers
accused of “indoctrinating”
students with subversive
ideas.
2 Outlawing the Communist
Party, “Red-front” organ
izations and any other groups
named “subversive” by the
attorney general.
3 Barring from public of
fice and from election any
persons affiliated with Com
m u n i s t and “subversive"
groups.
4 Making it a criminal of
fense, punishable by a
sentence of two to ten years
in prison, to take an oath of
allegiance to a “foreign to
talitarian sovereignty.”
5 Making it mandatory for
all state and municipal
employes to take an oath that
they are not members of any
“subversive” political party
or organization.
6 Making it a criminal of
fense to “slander" politi
cal, religious or fraternal
groups, through “rabble rous
ing” speeches and thus “in
citing to riot.”

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