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The record-union. [volume] (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, January 22, 1892, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015104/1892-01-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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DAILYJRECORD-UyiON
ISSUED BY THE
SACRAMENTO PUBLISHING COHAN!
Office. Third Street, between .1 and K.
THE DAILY RECORD-UNION,
For one year f 6 00
For six months 3 00
For three months 1 50
Subscribers served by Carriers at Fifteen
Cents per week In all interior cities and
towns the paper can be had of the principal
Periodical Itealers. Newsmen and Agents.
THE WEEKLY UNION,
Js the cheapest and most desirable Home,
»ws and Literary Journal published on the
Pacific Coast.
The Weekly Union per year $ 1 50
K9~ These publications are sent either by
Mail or Express to a^entsorsinglesubscribers,
with charges prepaid. All Postmasters are
agents.
The Best Advertising Mediums on the Pa
cific coast.
Entered at the Post office at Sacramento as
Mcond<class matter.
The Rkcobd-Union and Weekly
Union are the only papers on the Coast,
mutsid* of San Francisco, that receive the
full Atsociated I*ress dispatches from all
par is of the world. Outs-ide of San Fran
ci*co, they have no competitors either in
influence or home and general circulation
throughout the State.
San Francisco Agencies.
Thli paper is for sale at the following places:
L. P. Fisher's, room 21, Merchants' Exchange,
California street; the principal News Stands
and Hotels, and at the Market-street Ferry.
49" Also, for sale on all Trains leaving and
sjomincr into Sacramento*
Weather Forecast.
Forecast till 8 p. m. Friday: For North
ern California—Fair; stationary temperture,
Except warmer and probable light rain on the
extreme upper coast.;
THE COMING OF THE NATIONAL
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION.
A special dispatch to the Recokd-
TJnioit from Cincinnati announced on
Thursday that the next session of the
National Editorial Association has been
fixed to begin on the 17th of May,
in San Francisco.
The importance to California of this
simple item of news may not be fully ap
preciated without some words of ex
planation. The National Editorial Asso
ciation is representative almost wholly of
rural journalism. Metropolitan journal
ism has very little voice in it. The asso
ciation stands for the proprietorship and
brains of the best there is in American
journalism, to the practical exclusion
of the journalism of mere money and of
the metropolitan phases of newspaper
work, which are chargeable with about all
there is vicious and humiliating in the
business and profession.
In short, the National Association
stands for the real journalists of the
country; men who are not under the
"blue pencil," and who retain their inde
pendence and are in close touch with the
masses of the people.
The publishers, editors and writers
upon newspapers in the lesser communi
ties of the Union more nearly than any
others are in communion with the body
of the people. They reflect the local
and individual sentiment in the several
sections that in aggregation make up
what we term public opinion. They are
intimately known in their individual es
tates to their communities ; their charac
ters, aims, purposes and methods are
bare to public view, and maintenance of
their positions is wholly dependent upon
their faithfulness to their communities
and the respect they command from
them. It is the rule, in seven cases out
of ten with the rural newspaper, that
merit determines the measure of its suc
cess—not the mere success of money get- !
ting, but that greater success which is
framed in the confidence and esteem of a
reputable clientage and in achievement
in' building up a section.
Now the coming to California of such a
body of men and women, from nearly
all the States of the Union, is an event of
infinitely greater magnitude to California j
than the gathering within our borders of
Knights Templar in triennial conclave,
of the Grand Army of the Republic, of
educational associations or political con
ventions, and for reasons that are so ob
vious that they will not be further ad
rerted to.
The coming, then, of this body of work
ing journalists from town, city and
country of the whole Union gives Cali
fornia an opportunity to be advertised to
the people of the United States such as
she has never before enjoyed. Through
the medium of these thoughtful, observ
ant and straightforward minds, Cali
fornia will reach those thoughout the
Nation most likely to seek residence
among us and to reintorce our capital,
and thus augment our population de
sirably and wholesomely enlarge our
material wealth.
What is now wanted is not grand ban
quets, carriage drives, midnight revels,
dress parades, low necks and short
sleeves, the slobber of empty platitudes
and the gush of hollow compliments, but
such generous, manly, sober and in
structive entertainment and unostenta
tious hospitality, as will be acceptable to
right-minded, right-living, right-think
ing, observant and level-headed men and
women, who know what it is to found
communities, conquer waste places, build |
States, preserve the landmarks of patriot
ism and stand fast by the temperate,
strengthening and tried institutions of
the best American civilization.
To get out of the groove of past meth
ods of reception into a better atmosphere,
arrange for the coming of the real jour
nalists of the land as arrangement should I
be, is a task of no small character, and ;
no light achievement. The work is to <
devolve upon the country journalists of
California, the membership of the Cali- I
fornia Press Association and of tho South
era California Editorial Association. Hut *
they are equal to it; we have confidence
in their clear comprehension of what I
should be done. They did not, we ap
prehend, invite the national body with
out thought and clear foresight. They j
are not of the junketing order of men and '
women; their lives are devoted to hard [
labor, and in the main to ill-requited j
labor; but they are deeply, earnestly de- j
voted to the State. They are first for thi» >
Nation, next for California,£:ir::
county of their home, then for their town
and lastly for their journals. To such
mm and women who know what it is to
! face trial and hard work, to live do-vvn
| contumely, overcome obstacles and build
up communities, is committed the task of
bringing their brethren of the East to the
State and making their visit satisfactory
to the guests, and beneficent for Califor
nia.
The two California associations, which
are working in perfect harmony and cor
dial agreement, ought to meet jointly,
and immediately upon the return of the
committee they sent to Cincinnati, which
lis already en route for their homes,
they should meet at a point most con
venient to the Southern Association, while
easily accessible to the other. We should
say Stockton is, of all points, the best for
this special purpose.
The Southern Association, it is true,
has just adjourned, and the State Asso
ciation does not meet in regular session
until March, but their joint meeting
ought to be special and immediate, and
devoted to the one purpose of consid
ering and adopting ways and means.
It is vitally essential that the whole pro
gramme should be laid out in February,
that every .member of the national body
be fully and especially advised by per
sonally addressed communications
touching every detail, the exact cost to
him or her of attendance, the time to be
spent, the rallying points, the routes of
travel, and the like—and all this at the
earliest possible day, since the member
ship must have very considerable time in
which to make arrangements to leave
their homes and their work. The earlier
the meeting of preparation the larger will
be the attendance upon the May session
of the national body.
At this writing the outcome of the
Miners' Convention in San Francisco is
not known to us in necessary detail, but
the spirit of the convention on its first
day clearly indicated a disposition
amounting to settled judgment to meet
valley and river interests upon a level
acceptable to the both. That is to say,
mining interests and river and lowland
interests propose to say to tho Federal
Government that it is the desire of each
party that no industry on either side
shall be checked or inhibited, except it is
necessary to prevent infraction of the es
tablished right and security of the other;
that if engineering or mining science can
devise means for the carrying on of hy
draulic mining without injury to the
navigable streams and the agricultural
lands, such means ought to be employe],
and to that end the Federal * tovernment
is to be asked to undertake the work of
river reclamation and protection. This
is wise, and precisely the position the
RBOO&D-UxiON has held fast to for all
these years. We have unwaveringly in
sisted that the river and valley must be
protected from the lloodof mining refuse;
that hydraulic mining should be re
-i!atned when it does damage to free
highways and agricultural property; that
when it does not do them injury it should
not prohibited; that the true policy is to
conserve both mining and agricultural
industries by all proper means, and to
welcome any practical solution of tho
question that has so long been an issue.

Some one had the courage to ask the
Salt Lake Tribune to briefly outline the
benefits of adversity. To suggest such a
subject to hard-working county jour
nalists who have known adversity in j
many phases was rather hazardous. The
! inquirer might have contented himself I
with Dr. Johnson's judgment as to the !
uses of adversity, or have read Jeremy
Taylor upon the subject, or have taken i
counsel with Bacon or Whatley. All j
these hold that trials, the riding of storms
and the breaking of bones with Borrow
"tend to produce improvement"; are
beneficial in a disciplinary sense, and i
"lead us to think properly of our state." !
But the Tribune did not fear the question,
nor to cross blades with the philosophers
and essayists. It takes issue with these
thinkers and avers that—
Adversity is more apt to hardeaTthan •often
hearts; more apt to make people believe that
there is no mercy on earth, do j>ity in heaven,
than the revei Be. We do not believe in adver
sity as a beneficent agent In improving the
morals any more than the finances of mortal*.
Our experience is that tire bfst side of human
nature is generally manifested In prosperity,
not in adversity. We believe thai the chas
tening Influences of adversity have i een over
praised from the first. There Is a species of
laise pride which adversity will kill, but
pie who are born with that false pride do
j.ot amount to any great deal even when re
generated.
Aud we agree with our contemporary.
Mere passing trial is not adversity, but 1
when conflicting winds and black skies !
mean wreck and overthrow, and human
sympathy iias in it no comfort, adversity
cows and weakens and puts what is brave
in a man in lower state. The "benefits"
of adversity have been established in
theory, but there are very few instances
of its beueticence in practical life. All
favoring breezes no man expects, and a
courageous heart is not cast down by
cross currents; but we concur with the
Tribune that a healthy mind and honest
heart do not need adversity to develop
them.
«.
The New York Post thinks the worst
i feature of the Russian famine is not lack
i of food, but the incapacity of the Russian
Government to deal with the situation.
This is an irresistible conclusion. Had
the Russian Government and people a
tithe of the tact of the Americans, the
French, or the Germans, the famine
' never would have assumed the propor
! tions it has attained. Russian policy and
habit and character lack the elements
that enable a people to meet emergencies
with promptitude, courage and heart, and
to ul vise speedy and effective remedies.
None more than Russian writers have
dwelt upon this unhappy trait of Russian
character.
Righteous Indignation.
Mrs. Suburb—Why can't you come and
do the washing as usual to-morrow ?
Washerwoman (angrily)—'Cause I got
tf r stay ter hum and mend the childer's
clothes—that's why. I's y'r own fault,
too, that ye can't get y'r washin' done
this week,* and you've got to do it yr'aelf
er go dirty.
"My fault ? How can it be ?"
"What business had ye to go an' put a
barbed wire fence around y'r apple orch
ard. 1 sh\l like ter know !"—Good News.
• SACKAJHIENTO DAILY B^CUKI^UAIOy^FBIPAY, JAXTTAKY 22, 1892.—51 X PAGES.
SEWAGE DISPOSAL.
The Pollution of the Water Supply of
Many Cities.
The modern movement of population
into cities has produced changes an<l ere
j ated conditions of which our fathers
I hardly even dreamed. In the matter of
sewage disposal these changes are ex
ceedingly marked, and our urban popu
lations of to-day are confronted in many
places with the problem in its most ag
gravated form. The lake cities began by
taking water supplies from the lakes on
the shores of which they are situated, at
the same time irrationally turning sew
age into thr> bodies of water from which
ihfl public supply was derived. This has
led at Chicago and Cleveland to expensive
i extensions of water supply intakes in
j search of unpolluted water, and the end
is not j-et. On the great inland rivers the
! sewage of one city, after flowing a few
miles, is pumped uut for the water Bap
ply of another, with the result that the
j diseases produced by drinking sewage
polluted water have increased steadily
among such populations In a ratio pro
portionate to the increase of sewage con
tamination. The remedy clearly lies
either in seeking an unpolluted source of
water supply or in purifying sewage be
j fore discharging it into the running
stream*.
In the month of November, 1890, the
Massachusetts health returns indicated
that the number of deaths by typhoid
fever in Lowell far exceeded that of the
whole city of Boston. The returns
showed a rapid increase at the same time
in Lawienre. and as no similar increase
appeared ia other cities tin- State Board
i made the matter the subject of special in-
I vestieation in these two. Lowell has a
j population of 78,000, ! awrence 45,000 and
Boston about 448,000. Lawrence and
I Lowell are both un the Merrimac, Law
rence being nine miles down the river
I from Lowell. Both cities take their
j water supply from the river, and the
i crude sewage of LoweU is further dis
charged into the same stream, a short
distance below the Lowell water-supply
intake. A probable cause of contamina
■ tion of the Lowell water-supply was
j found in the discovery of the discharge
I of the dejections of typhoid patients into
Stony Brook, three miles up the stream
from the Lowell water-works intake.
It was found that such discharge was fol
lowed in proper sexuence of tin
rapid increase in the number of deaths
from typhoid in Lowell, the increase
there being further followed by an alarm
ing increase In the number of deaths
from typhoid in Lawrence. In Decem
ber bacteriological examinations of water
drawn from the service-pipes in Law
j rence resulted in finding the bacillus of
i typhoid intJio Lawrence supply.—George
\V. Kalter, in The Juugineerinjj Maga
; /.ine.
WARNER MILLER AN OPTIMIST.
Believes tho Growth of < harity Duo to
Christian Religion.
Ex-Postmaster-General Thomas 1..
James talked about the work done in the
country by the Methodist Church, in the
Asbnry M. E. Church, in Washington
Square, New York, recently. Warner
I Miller of Herkimer followed Mr. James,
i and said: "It is common nowadays to be
a pessimist It is easy to look to the old
times and say that tilings were better than
; now. I, however, prefer to be an opti
[ mist. I believe that the world is growing
i en. r. I know that we arc told thai re
ligion is on the decline, and that people
no longer believe the Bible. 1 prefer to
judge these things for myself. The
churches of tht; country were never in so
prosperous a condition as to-day. There
never was a time when so much money
j has been spent in charities as to-day, [f
we have our hospitals and charities to
day, it is because the religion of Christ
, has taught us charity and good works.
Jin-education or the masses is the ont
i growth of the principles laid down by
Christ. Those men who go around telling
you that people no longer believe in the
Bible and in religion are making a great
mistake.'"
iin Mr. Miller spoke of intemperance
and said : "The evil of intemperance cen
ters right h«re in this city. There are
550,000 people living below Fourteenth
street, in New York. There are LOO chap
els and churches below Fourteenth street
and4,oooHcensed saloons runningdayand
night and in many cases on Sunday
This is one of the great'evils that now
confront us. li is a problem which calls
tor tin. 1 action of the Government itself.
The Government of this country is finally
controlled in its action by strong public
sentiment, tf crime of every kin. 1, in
creases it is because the educated people
of all denominations are not doing their
duty."
Eruption of the Skin Cured.
Ed. Venney, Brockvilie, Ontario, Can
ada, says:
"I have used Brandbeth's Piixs for
the past fifteen years, and think them the
best cathartic and anti-bilious remedy
known. For some five years I suffered
with an eruption of tho skin that gave me
great pain and annoyance. I tried differ
ent blood remedies, but, although gaining
strength, the itching was unrelieved. I
finally concluded to take a thorough
course of BSANDBETH's Pu.rs. 1 took
six each night for four nights, then li\e,
four, three, two, lessening each tinio !>y
one, and then for one month took one
every night, with the happy result that
now my skin is perfectly clear and has
been so ever since."
25c for a box of Beechain's pills, worth
a guinea.
9vvcxal plotters.
FAST TIME TO THE KAST.—The Atlantic :
and Pacific Railroad (Santa ie route) is now
twelve hours shorter to Kiui.r.s City and st.
Louis, and twenty-four hours shorter to Chi
cago than formerly. Pullman Tourist Weep
ing Cars to Chicago every day withoutchantje.
Personally conducted excursions every
Wednesday, with tourist <ar to Boston.
fJEORQE W. RAILTON, Agent, 1004 Fourth
street, Sacramento. MWF
MRS. WINBLOWS "SOOTHING SYRUP,
has '■•c, n In use over fifty years by millions ot
mothers tor their children while teethine,
with perlect success. It soothes the child,
softens the gums ailays pain, cures wind rolic,
regulates the bowels,and is the best remedy
for diarrhoea, whether arising from tet-thing
or other causes. For sale t>y druggists in
every part of the world. Be sure tadwk for
Mrs. wlnsknr's Soothing Syrup. Twent v-fl ye
centsa bottle. M\VF
DON'T HUB OFF TIIK ENAMEL
Of the teeth with gritty preparations. The
teeth are too valuable t<> be tritle;l with.
When gone, you must lii\l- false ones or
"SSS." yourself through life. ITee SOZO-
O >.\T. whicli contains no grit. It, cleanses
the mouth and vitalized the secretions.
PAINLESS EXTRACTION OF TEETH by
use of locul anesthetic DR. WELDON, Den
tist, Eighth and J streets.
%lew 3lfctfertisemente.
CREAM BREAD
AT THE PACIFIC BAKERY, CORKER
Fourteenth and G streets, at 5 and 10
cents a loaf. Delivered to any part of ;he city
free ot extra charge. ja2-!-3i"
SREED! SREED! SREEDI
Blue Bell 75, lielmnnt C 4, CJuy Wilkes
•JBG7, The Moor 870, Nutwood 600.
MAMMOTH SALE
OF STANDARD BRED RROOP MARES,
Colts and Fillies, being the entire breed
ing establishment of DR. H. M. HICKS, Sac
ramento (sold on account of ill heaith |,
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27,
At 10 A. M.. at salesyard. corner Van Ness
avenue and Market stie ts. Ban Francisco.
Full catalogues, giviii-i breeding, registry,
etc., together with breeding of stallions, lor
reference, may be had upon application to the
undersigned, 22 Montgomery street, San
Francisco.
Horses at yard Saturday, January 23d.
Ja22,25 KILLIP & CO., Auctioneers.
W&terhouse & Lester,
—OSALERS I2T—
Iron, Steel, Cumberland Coal, Wagon
Lumber and Carriage Hardware.
"00. 711, 71C. 715 J St.* Sacramento.
______ ftaU gyoe. $ <£«r, __^
Sporting Shoes.
Men's Best Kangaroo Boxing Shoes, heavy buck
skin soles; sizes 5 to 10, $^ 50.
Men's Best Kangaroo Gymnasium Shoes, heavy
buckskin soles; sizes 5 to io- per pair $3 so.
Men's Finest Kangaroo League Wheelman's Shoes,
with spring shank—the best bicycle shoe in the
market—leather soles; sizes s to io ; per pair $4.
Men's Fine Kangaroo Lawn Tennis Hook and Lace
Shoes, rubber soles; sizes 5 to io, $4.
Men's Fine Kangaroo Lawn Tennis Oxford Lace
Shoes; sizes s to io ; rubber soles, $3 so.
Men's Best Puritan Calf Sporting or Hunting Boots;
sizes sto io ; per pair $7.
Men's Fine Puritan Calf Lace Hunting boots; sizes
6 to io; per pair $6.
Men's Best Duck Sporting Leggings; per pair $1 75.
Men's Light-weight Rubber Hunting Boots, best
grade Bostons, $^ 75.
Men's Good Kangaroo Bicycle Oxford Lace Shoes-,
sizes 6 to io; per pair $2.
Clothing.
Men's and Youths' Fancy Checked Veloue-finished
Cassimere Cape Overcoats, rubber lined; very nobby?
sizes 34 to 38. Price $20.
Men's Medium Light-colored Sack Suit, double
stitched edges; sizes 34 to 40. These goods come in
two colorings. The price has been made $10.
Our Children's $2 so Suits are the best value in
our Clothing Department. They are intended for
school wear. See the line before purchasing.
Boys' Suits in fine dress worsted are now on the
counters and are beauties-, ages 14 to 18. Prices
range from $12 to $17 50.
Children's Waists.
We have just added a full and complete line of
Children's Waists at soc, 7sc and $1 each. The pat
terns are new and novel and comprise some late
styles in sateens, percales and flannels. They might
prove of interest 10 you.
HALE BROS. & CO.,
825 to 835 X St., and 1026 Ninth.
<£>attmmm & XKttleon.
Grand Dissolution Sale
.A.T
k WILSON'S,*
-601 J Street.
Low Prices Booming Business
! in Every Department.
The powerful inducements we hold out to the
people are effective, and we rejoice in their convic
tion that our prices are LOWER than the LOWEST.
SOME SPECIAL BARGAINS IN MEM! AND KMT UNDERWEAR.
Children's Merino Vests, small sizes, reduced to 15c
Ladies' Merino Underwear; regular price, SOc
. :v-v~ ;•;■• V reduced to 33c
Ladies Scarlet Underwear; regular price, $1 23
reduced to 76c
Ladies' Jersey Ribbed Cashmere Vests; regular price,
S>l SO reduced to $1
Ladies' Knit Underwear; regular price", $1 23
reduced to 78c
GATTMANN & HIM, 501 i STREET.!
Baker & Hamilton,
—IMPORTERS AND JOBBEHS OF—
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEL,
COAL, POWDER,
Agricultural Implements and Machines,
BARBED WIRE, CORDAGE, BELTING.
Sacramento California
HAMMER'S GLYCEROLE OF TAR
For Coughs and Colds.
A SPEEDY AM) RELIABLE CURE.
Fourth and X streets and all Sacramento
druggists. _
NOTICE "TO STOCKHOLDERS,
THE STOCKHOLDERS OF THE FREE
port TVlt-phono T'l-graj'h Company are
hereby notified that a stockholders' meVtinp
will behold at Freeport on the 30in 1 »A"V <»F
JANUARY, at 10 o'clock a. m.. to elect Iras
tees and revise by-laws. By order of
l>. T. LUFKIN. President.
P. G. Rieul, Secretary. ja2o-4t\VF
r PunyTTKrp D- j °hnst°n & c°- j
: I XVLLI 1 All IX 410 J STREET.
I * OR3ERS FROM THE COUNTRY PROMPTLY FILLED ' a
MINCE MEATS,
IVIOLJIMTAIIM AF»F9I_E:S
And the most select stock of
GROCERIES.
R. A. OLMSTEAD & CO.,
81 1". Cor. Fourth mid L Sta
gtofteggfr mine OTabU,
SULTtIERN PACIFIC COMPANY
[PACIFIC SYSTEM.]
DECEMBER 6, 1891.
Trains I,eave and are Due to Arrive at
Sacramento:
LEAVE ! TRAINS RUN DAILY. 1 ARRIVE
0:50 A Calistoga and Napa.... I 11-05 A
-;8:00 A Calistog»an<l Napa.:"
3:05 P....Vailejo and ('alistoga. . B*4o P
10:50 P ...Ashland and Portland. | 4-20 \
7:00 P liemins;. El Paso and East 6:35 P
7:30 P Knights L'dingdtOroTille 7:40 A
10:40 A Los Angeles 10*30 A
Ogden and East—Second
11:55 A Class 6 #45 P
Central Atlantic Express
3 0:00 P for Ogden and East | 7:40 A
3:00 POroviile via Kosev'lo.J'n'c 1030 \
3:00 P Red Bluff via irarysville 10:30 A
lO::^ A ....Redding via Willows.... 4:00 P
4:35 A Han *• raueisco viaKenirta Il:o5 A
6:50 A Han Francisco Via Benlcia 11:30 A
>:vO A Han Francisco via Hen Ida 8:40 I 1
3:05 P Han Francisco via Benicia 9:40 P
7:05 1' San Frauciscu viaßeniciu* 10:30 P
•10:00 A Sun Francisco via steamer J6:00 X
10:40 A San Fran, via Liver more 2:50 P
10:40 A Saa Jose P
7:00 P Banta Barbara lu::-SO A
*6:50 A Santa Rosa 13:05 A
3:05 P £anta Rosa *8:40 P
8:30 A Stockton and 1 fait. 10-.SO A
lv:40 A Stockton and Gait.. . 2:">0 P
7:00 P Stockton and Gait 0:35 P
11:55 A Truckee and Reno 7:40 A
10:00 P Truckee and Reno i 6:45 P
t8:00 A Va'.lejo ' P
3:05 P Vulielo 1105 A
*S:2O A ..Folsom and Placerville.. *2:40 P
*12:15 P ..Folsom and Piacerville.. *10:20 A
P I Horn *S:00 A
•Sunday excepted. fSuuday only, i Mon
day excepted. A.—For morning. P.—For af.
ternoon.
RICHARD GTtAY, Gfc. Traffic Manacer.
T. ii. U'.jOl.-MAN. O3i>ctul Pmmbum AfS&i.
U 1- ®vth.
put these on yirir
And while you are out shopping come in
and see them. It will pay you.
INFANTS' CROCHET WORSTED HOODS ) A r.
Colors—pink, blue and cream white. ' } 14fcC
INFANTS' CROCHET BOOTEES, in asMHOI
sorted colors. }x^2C
INFANTS' CROCHET SACQUES, assort-) Qn
ed colors. )2_IOC
INFANTS' WOOL JERSEY CAPS, assort-) (T> C 5
ed colors. /2jOC
INFANTS' KNIT ZEPHYR SHIRTS.IQA^
white. }2iUC
INFANTS' SILK SKULL CAPS, cream) C)n rt
white. }2IOC
INFANTS' WORSTED LEGGING DRAW- ) X^C\^
ERS, white and black. / OvJC
W. I. ORTH, 630 J- ST.
i?umtsemcnteu
CI.UNIB OP^RA HOUSE.
WASHINGTON Norton,.^.. .Manager and Proprietor.
Great success of the young American Actor,
IVlr. Percy Hunting,
AND WASH. NORTON'S DRAMATIC COMPANY.
TO-NIGHT— FRIDAY—TO-XIGHT,
I In a new dramatisation of Robert Louis
Stevenson's famous novel,
DR. JEKVLI AND MR. HYDE,
Presented by the Full Company.
DON'T FOKGET OUR POPULAR PBICSS,
IS, aind. 35 Gts.
BEST EESER7ED SEATS 50 CENTS.
Grand Popular Matinee on Saturday for
ladles and children. Matinee prices, lo and
25 cents. X. C.j
METROPOLITAN THEATER.
L. HENRY Manager
2 IM I CS M T S 2
MONDAY and TUESDAY, JAN. 25 and 26.
AN ELITE EVENT.
That Peerless Emotional Actress
I MAU DE I
Supported by MR. CLARENCE HAXDYSIDE
and her own Select Company.
Monday "INHERITED"
Tuesday "THE CREOLE"
Usual prices. Seats on sale Saturday. J_>3-4t
"JOY BE Wl' YOU A."
GRAND PROMENADE CONCERT AND BALL
mHE 133 D ANNIVERSARY OF / <~7 N
JL Bobby Burns will be celebrated;.- j&o",
by the Sacramento Caledonian Asso-
ciation at Turner Hall.
MONBAT EVENING, JAN. 25
Single admission, 50c; payable at door. Ex
ercises commence at 8 o'clock sharp. By
order of [j»2] "tt] COMMITTEE.
SKATING RINK,
f\LT> PAVILION, CORNER SIXTH AND M
\J streets. Now oj-en for the winter season.
There will be sp_>cin.l attractions and music
every Wednesday and Saturday evenings.
The Rink has been entirely renovated, re.
fitted, refurnished and supplied with new
skates. Open ail day.
J. M. riULLIVAN. Proprietor.
"pvANCINO CLASSES AT TUR- &%
±J ncr Hall. Gentlemen's Class «s£s.
Monday, 7:30 p. m. Ladies and
Ueutlemen. Tuesday, 7:30 p. m M^rPtL
Children, Saturday, 1:30 p m (£ijE&
Music furnished for all occasions? JiTwKl
JONES, FISCH «fe WATSON. <$$§§§§
T3ROFESSOR O'MALLEY'S DANO *•
JL ing Academy, Y. M. I. Hall. Ladles' at
and cents' class Wednesday. 7:30 p v /SSi
ladit-s' class Wednesday, 3 p. m.- chii-GSfe
dren'.s class, Saturday, 2 v. ir. Private lemons
given in fancy dances. Music furnished for
all occasions. jal2 tf
gluctiong.
AUCTION SjPILE
THE BELL-GREER CO., - - Auctioneers,
WILL BBXX ON
Friday, *Jat-t\-istry 25th,
AT 10 A ON THE PREMI
x\ «es, 72 . street, between Seventh and
l.i-hth. by order ol the assignee, all tlie stocK
<«i tneChlcasro Importum le.i Company con
sisting of Tea. Colic.-. Spies, Extract*. Fix
tures. Scales, Tea and Coffee Bins. Counters
; ll BtEtO, BELL, Auctioneer.
AUCTION SALE
OF
Furniture, Carpets, Crockery,
Stoves, Etc, Etc.,
SATURDAY, January 23,
At 10 A. M.,
SALESROOM, 323 X STREET.
W. H. SHEKBURN, Auctioneer.
==' i
EBNER BROS.,
116-118 X Street, Front and Second,
Sacramento,
TMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEAL
JL ere In Wines and Liquors. Agents for the
celebrated Pommery and Oreno Champagne.
M. CRONAN,
830 X Bt., and 1108-1110 Third St..
Sacramento, Cal.,
JMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALER
X in fine Whiskies, Brandies and Cham*
pagne.
BOOKBmDIIMO.
RW.URUENING. BOOKBINDER, PArER
Raler and Blankbook Mnnulactnrcr,
819 J St.. Sacramento. n6-ti
M ■^yourselfmH
/--. SSyiftrouV.k-'lwithfionorrhcea^H
Gleet,Whiter.?permatorri:coaWj
°r any uunn niral discharge ask^"
I^^^lMI your druggist for a bottle of
flQHsfSliig ii. It cures in a few days
HCn»H without the ni<l or publicity oia
ly^^^B doctor. Non-poisonous and
■ ftflfjK guaranteed not to stricture.
WjfflgWSß The Universal American Care.
Manufactured by m_m
The Evans Chemical Co.H
1' mL. Cincinnati, o.
u.s.'■^#i|
IJeal CSatctte, QBtr.
GREAT BARGAINS
—AND—
EASY TERMS
Placer County Fruit Lands.
160 Acres
Fine Fruit Land, located only one quarter ct
a mile(from New England Mills, f 3,200-S6o<*
clSimlTrest. iU °De °r lhree yeirs at 7 pe*
8O Acred
Adjoining the Hickey Colon v; finest of Fruit
Land; forty acres cleared; good house ami
«ce.*->.OOO-sl.ooo cash, balance oa
es^^ fTer^^f a pe Sr:a ann nr. PaymentS; int*r"
co Acres
First-class land, f 3,200; easy payments.
1O Acres.
Loomit°Ji6s0 nd Shed> adJoiuinX station of
Lots
t£ns Wn °f Loomis 'Jrom ?50 UP: good lota.
Also,
Fine twenty a-re tracts on Light Tract. No
aSr^^^^ reqUlrCd'°nly lntcrest »»«
CALL FOR CATALOGUE.
Edwin R. Alsip d Co.,
Main Office, 1015 Fourth St., Sacramento.
Branch Office, 22 Montgomery St., Saa'
Francisco.
Real Estate and Insurance Agents.,
ME NEW I§BE
On I Street, lot 40x160,
FOR SALE CHEAP.
Good Paw Restaurant
« 0
On X Street.
A BARGAIN.
Money to Loan.
Agents Sun Fire Office of
London.
STEPHENSON & HARTMIN,
Real Estate and Insurance Agents,
Fourth 3treet.
W. P. COLEMAN,
Real Estate Salesroom, 325 J St.
COLOHA VINEYARD FOR SALE,
pOLOMA, F.L DORADO COUNTY,
\J acres, all in beating virus, : iii<l elegant
awellittg of 10 rooms, fine barn,good di
[cry, well equipped winery, consisting of :;
buildings, fl re-proi • f v ;l : n s,' 12 cask s <i o vet
1,000 gallons capacity, other smaller ones,
fermenting tui>s. wine press; cows, horn .
wagons and farming Implements; all tools for
vineyard and cellars: fino springs adjoining
the house; 3 miles of water ditch. Must be
sold on account of dividing the estate. QftU
lor anyothir information. We have phot -
graphs of the place. PRICE, $10,000.
MONEY XO L-OAN.
P. BOHL. E. A. CBOUCH,
JAMES E. MILLS,
Commissioner of Deeds
For all the States and Territories,
301 J ST., SACRAMENTO, CAL.
Acknowledgments and Depositions taken
m compliance with the lawn ut the States and
r< rr.i' i
EUGENE J. GREGOKV. FRANK GKKGORV,
GREGORY BROS. CO.
rtUCCESSORS TO QRBOOBY, ISARNES A
O Co.. Nos. 126 and 128 J »t.. SSucr^mento,
wholesale dealers in .Produce and Fruit. Full
Stocks of Potatoes. Vegetables, <»reen and
Dried Fruits, Beans. Alfalfa. Butter, Eggn,
( heese. Poultry, etc.. always on hand Ordera
niledatLOWKST ItATES
CURTIS BROS. & CO^
General Commission Merchants,
Wholesale Dealers in Fruit r r] ?vsw
806, 310, 312 X St.. Sac
Telecbone 37. Potto
BLANK BO .
Ledgers,
, Jou ma Is,
Day Book
CaaH L
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE MI ;tf
PATENT FLEXIBLE
ft S. CROCKER I
FRIEND &1 V
Lumber Con
MAIN YARD AND OFF 3EO\
ond street. Branch Yar^ 6LtW

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