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The record-union. [volume] (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, July 25, 1892, Image 2

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DAILYRECORD-UNION
ISSUED BY THE
SACRAMENTO PUBLISHING COMPANY
Office. Third Street, between J and K.
THE DAILY RECORD-UNION,
For one year ?fi 00
For six months — • 3 00
For three inontha 1 50
Subscribers served by Carriers at Fifteen
Cents por week In all interior cities and
towns thi- uaper can be had of the principal
Periodical Itealers. Newsmen and Agents. ,
THE WEEKLY UNION,
I* thp cheapest &nd most desirable Home,
News and Literary Journal published on the
Pacific Coast.
The Weekly Union per year.. f 1 50
£9- These publications are sent either by
M«il or Express to agents or single subscrioers,
with charges prepaid. All Postmasters are
agents.
The Best Advertising Mediums on the Pa
eiflc coast.
Entered at the Postofflce at Sacramento as
•econd-cbuw matter.
-•Kec-ord-Uuion" — Telephone No. 49.
for Editorial Rooms, ring one bell.
For Business Office, ring three bells.
The "Record-Uulon" at the Summer
RoHorts.
Subscribers to the Record-Union who visit
the Ben (oast and Mountain Resorts during
the summer, can have the paper sent to their
address on the same terms as in this city.
Postage prepaid.
AVeather Forecast.
Official forecast for the twenty-four hours
ending at mlduisjht. July 25th: Northern
California—Fair, but foggy and cloudy along
the coast; westerly winds, brisk along the
•entral coast; nearly stationary temperature,
except cooler in the north-central portion.
THE ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION.
The murderous assault upon H. C.
Prick was made by a man whom it would
be charitable to assume to be insane, but
was not. He was an anarchist of the
most pronounced stripe and they are the
worst enemies of the workingmen. The
assassin does not appear to have been re
lated to, or inspired by the Homestead
workers, the lenders and committees of
whom have denounced the act unspar
ingly and expressed at the time as great
surprise as anyone olse.
Clearly the fellow who attempted the
killing was tho legitimate product of
Johann Most's diabolical teachings,
upon whose paper he was a compositor.
It is fortunate for labor interests that the
brutal assailant was not from the Home
stead ranks. It will be public judgment,
however, that the act of this murderous
anarchist was the result of tho doctrine
of force, which is dangerous to the utmost
degree. The incident ought to, and it
will teach tho labor leaders aud the lile,
that l'orce and arms is not weap
onry that can be justiliod in aggres
sive proceedings against those who ure
at issue with labor organizations. The
right of labor to organize and by legiti
mate means toadvance its interests lets
upon the game loundation as does the
right of capitalists and manufacturers to
organise for,legitimate ends. We have
held that organization on both sides
tended to conservatism, where each stand
v. ithiu the law, aud wo biill think so.
Bat there should be no such inflammatory
argumenta and doctrines projected as will
afford cranks such as the man who sought
to murder H. C. Prick, any stimulant.
The attempt to prevent men from act
ing as free will agents, in the matter of
seeking employment, can have no broader
justification than would be the attempt
of employers to compel men to work for
them. In either case the employment of
foice is criminal, and so any action that
results in crime, that finds stimulation in
the hot blood of contention involving the
preaching of the doctrine of force, must
reflect upon the cause out of which it
grew. The right to life and liberty is in-
alienable, and no preaching is tolerable
that threatens the right H. C. Frick's
assailant must be punished, and labor
organizations should be foremost in de
manding that he meet his just deserts.
They will thus testify to their condemna
tion of the employment of force, and their
approval only of courses marked by
moderation and wisdom to secure recog
nition of asserted rights. The greatest
successes achieved by labor have been
those thus conducted, and that have not
been the result of tyranny or appeal to
brutal instincts. The resort to these
always fails.
AN ABSURD PROPOSITION.
Senator Palmer's proposition advanced
In the Senate has never had a parallel in
a deliberative body. It will not receive
the approval of labor or of labor organ
ization, because it would in practice
prove the most deadly enemy of labor.
Senator Palmer held that the capitalist
should be secured in a reasonable reward
for investment, but that laborers in an
industry are entitled to an assurance of
permanency of employment, and in the
place where long employed, and, there
fore, should be guaranteed retention by
the employer. The converse of this
amazing doctrine is, and there is no
escape from it, that the employer, by
virtue of the same reasoning, should be
guaranteed permanency of service by the
workers. This, as the commonest intel
ligence apprehends, would mean a condi
tion not a whit above slavery. That is to
aay, if the employer, by the strange
higher law invoked by Senator Palmer,
should be compelled to continue his busi
ness to employ labor permanently on its
own terms, or at all, then by the same
rule labor, whether it would or not, must
be compelled to permanently serve the
employer.
Fortunately for the intelligence of the
a^e labor will never commit itself to any
such dangerous doctrine that it may not
cease when it pleases, for the right to
strike is as undeniable as is the right of
the conductor of an industry to cease to
operate it, or to employ under the law
•whom he sees fit in it. Moreover, labor
is not and never will be so unwise as to
attempt the establishment of a principle
that would prevent investment or aggre
gation of capital to conduct great enter
prises commensurate with great demands.
"Under the rule Senator Palmer's logic
makes inevitable, enterprise could never
foe capitalized, since the accumulation of
th» ne :cssary property would result in
putting its possession practically out of
its owner's hands; but if such works
were established labor would steer clear
of them because of the liability of en
forced or involuntary servitude in such
works.
The fine-spun theory of the Senator is
a step beyond radical socialism. It
would stagnate ambition and paralyze
labor; it would deny ownership and stop
inventive genius; it would mean that the
individual, who in this age is more and
more asserting his manhood, should be
absorbed and become a mere spoke in a
wheel, tirebouud to never-ceasing revo
lutions. When labor is ready for such a
doctrine it will be when the spirit of indi
vidual liberty is dead, and the era of
human slavery is revived.
HUMBOLDT BAY.
It is in order to congratulate the people
about Humboldt Buy over the appropria
tion of gI,7OO,(KXj for the further improve
ment of that harbor. At Eureka, the
chief town of the section, an imposing
celebration was held on Saturday in honor
of the event. We congratulate the citi
zens of that section of the State upon the
success that has attended their persistence
in this matter. Congress and the Presi
dent have done the right thing to order
the completion of the improvement; they
have responded to a California need in a
manner that will give a new impetus to
the growth of the Humboldt section. The
dangerous bar that has made entrance to
the bay so dinicult will soon be re
moved for a width amply sufficient, and
one of the best harbors on the coast will
be givenxew importance.
The first considerable appropriation for
the work was vetoed by President Cleve
land; the next became a law, and with
?125,000 at command, the construction of
jetties to confine the tidal now across the
bar, and thus give the induced current
necessary scouring capacity, began in
l&^S. In IS9I a supplemental contract was
let for further work, but to carry out the
engineer's plans in full, and give full de
sired results, required more money, and
the approval of a bill by President Har
rison appropriating it, is the cause of
justifiable rejoicing. Humboldt Bay,
which is some fourteen miles in length,
with assured free entrance for ships of
heavy draught, will become a greatly
more important port, not only as a refuge
for vessels, but as a foremost commercial
unit in the wealth and trade of the coast.
cartoonist is already attempting
to play a part in the campaign. But it is
noteworthy that he is not making a suc
cess. Tho cartoon depends for its effect
iveness upon the exaggeration of home
dis'inctivo feature in a person, doctrine or
a party, in the present campaign the car
toon has to deal with matters upon which
the ranks of both parties divide, or in at
tempted ridicule of declarations that re
late to tho soberest considerations of
political economy. Out of these there
never can be wrung very much fun, and
rarely are they susceptible of humor.
Sometimes an issue is no strongly defined
and so simple that the cartoon may be
employed in the manner of the fable
with good effect, but in this campaign,
wiiich promises, by the way, to be a
clean one, there is very little room for
the exercise of the weaponry of ridicule.
The pictures the newspaper artists are
producing upon political subjects are
therefore heavy, dull, and require a great
deal of explanation. The genuine, pun
gent cartoon never does; it tells its story
at a glance; the humor of it glistens in
every stroke, and without a title, or with,
it is its own interpreter.
BUILDING RAILROADS.
What a Sauta Rosa Editor Thinks of
the Prospect.
[Santa Rosa Republican, July 21st.]
There is considerable railroad gossip
floating around, for little of which is there
any foundation. Well informed men are
not of opinion that the Great Northern or
any of the other leading Eastern lines
will build to the coast in the near future.
In lact, there is but one railroad project
now under discussion in which there is
hope of a competing line. The project to
which we reier is the one backed by the
business men and property-owners of
Ban Francisco.
The old, well-established Eastern lines
are not arraugiug to build to the coast
for the reason that they can do better un
der the existing traffic arrangements. It
is more profitable to get a email share of
tho business of this country, as they do
now, than to build a virtual bridge &00 to
900 miles long across deserts aud mount
ains to secure a larger part. In fact, the
people of California are about the only
ones to be greatly benefited by the con
struction of a second transcontinental
railroad. The same may be said in re
gard to additional lines within the State.
Si;ch roads are a necessity for the future
growth and prosperity of San Francisco,
and much of the capital to build them
must be arranged for there or they will
not be built.
In their wisdom the people of Califor
nia determined in adopting their new
Constitution that voters should not have
tho power to lend the credit of towns,
townships, counties orother subdivisions
to aid in securing competing lines ol"rail
road. If this was permitted, or if contri
butions could be made directly from gen
eral funds in aid of such enterprises, the
way to secure a competing line of railroad
would be plain. But since the property
to receive the greatest benefit from such
an enterprise cannot be made to contrib
ute equally toward its promotion, the
matter rests and for the present must rest
with the individual owners of property,
and until the skinflints in San Francisco
can be made to realize how much thej r are
losing by inaction nothing will be done.
The property-owners of the metropolis
will have to raise the money to build the
first competing transcontinental railroad
to that place.
All this talk about the great railroads
on the other side of the Rockies building
to this coast is mere stuff, sent out in the
hope that it may brace up a falling real
estate market at the metropolis. Accord
ing to the recent stateniems of dealers
there the shrinkage in value* in that city
alone in the past year would build a lino
to an eastern connection. Nothing can
be plainer than that the work necessary
to restore values and also increase them
must be done by the men who have most
at stake. This is the fact, and all talk
about getting a road in some other way is
to divert attention from this fact.
At the 1876 Centennial at Philadelphia !
an elertric light was exhibited as a curi- i
osity. and now nearly all the cities of the
United States are so lighted, aud Mr. Ed
ison has given the world the incandescent
light fur the interior of our dwellings and
buildings.
The value of a good name was well
j exemplified the other day, when a man ,
asked one of our druggists for a bottle of i
sarsaparilla. "Whose?' inquired the
clerk. "Whose? Why, Aver's, of course,
i "^ c don't suppose I'm going to run any
j risk with Hannah, do ye?"
SACRA^ffiyTO DAILY KECORD-Ijyioy, MONDAY, JULY 25, 1592.-SIX PAGES.
THIRTY-THREE AND A QUARTER.
The Millions that Mark Sacramento
Assessments.
An Increase of a Half-Million Dollars
this Year-Some of the
Chief Items.
There has been an increase of about
$500,000 in the tax roll of the county this
year, as shown by the following figures
compiled from the Assessor's books:
The assessment value of real estate In
the country is 112,432,680; improvements
on the same, $1,583,500; city and town
lots, §7,922,275; improvements, |6,409,92&.
Telephone and telegraph lines are valued
at f31J845t and irrigating ditches at 920,
--500. This makes a total of $28,400,005,
solid and material wealth of the county.
The personal property includes State,
county and municipal bonds, $«5,000;
goods, wares and merchandise, $1,448,145)
machinery, §.{70,295; furniture, $820,380;
common cowb, $134,100; 2UO thoroughbred
cows, §ti,LSO; 16 beef rattle, £4,740; 8,078
stock cattle, $H),7so; 15 jacks and jennies,
§3,000: oU2 mules, 132,580; 28,010 sheep, 956,
--020; 900 lambs, $i*io; 3,740 calves, $1^,700;
2,780 colts, $69,500; 6,410 hoys, $32,950;
5,270 common horses, 9083,500; 306 thor
oughbred horses, 200 standard-bred
horses, §52,0 iK); 170 bicycles, $5,280; 4,000
gallons of brandies, $2,000; 4,000 tons of
coal, 824,000; electric plants, $25,000; farm
ing utensils, §50,750; 274 firearms, S2,4<it; :
storo and other fixtures, $»S3,'i3U; fran
chises, #>,0u0; furniture, $520,380; 30,800
bushels of wheat, $30,800; 13,640 bushels of
barley, $10,230; 5,100 bushels of corn,
$5,100; 2,255 tons of hay, $18,040; 290,100
pounds of hops, 929,010: jewebry and plate,
$14,475; libraries,sli>,2(r); machinery, $370,
--295; musical instruments, §22.710: !«>4
pianos, $80,700; 4,y70 dozen poultry, §19,
--8 hO; printing prosses, 9X2,000; wine
presses, $1,700; hay presses, 95,040; 1,421
sewing machines, $17,800; 40 steam ves
sels, 93,865; 417 telephone boxes, $41,700;
56 typewriters, $l,fi80; 6,880 road vehicles,
$206,400; 1,706 watches, 990,708; .i 24,700 gal
lons of wine, $32,470; 552 cords of wood,
92J60.
The total valuation of personal nrop
erty is $4,125,185; real estate, £28,400,065,
making a grand total of $33,^:46,450.
CLEARING-HOUSE STATISTICS.
Business Transacted in the Principal
Cities tlie Past Week.
New York, July 22.—Th© following,
compiled by the Bradstreets, are the
banks' clearings for the week ending
July _lat, with the percentage, increase,
i and decrease, compared with the corre
sponding week last year: New York,
: §570,771,000, an increase of 1." 1,0 per cent.;
Boston, $95,043,000, au increase of 11.7;
Chicago, 890,927,000, an increase of 18.8;
Philadelphia, §73.202,000. an increase of
17,7; St. Louis, 923,731,000, an increase of
0,4; San Francisco, $14,802,000. a de
crease of 18.4; Baltimore, §15,001,000. a de
crease of 1.7; Cincinnati, 113,794,000, an
increase of 11.6; Pittsburg, §15,619,000,
no comparison; Minneapolis, 257,401,000,
an increase oi 37.1: Omaha, 12,000,
an increase of 7-._: Denver, §5,173.000,
an increase of 8.3; St. Paul. g_,314,000,
au increase of 5.8: Portland, ur.,81,h09,000,
an increase of 9.9: Salt Lake. -51,812,000,
an increase of 15.7; Seattle, §1,028,000, an
increase of 27.7: Tacoma, 1876,127, an in
crease of 23.5; Los Angeles. §702.764, a
decrease of 2.3; Galveston. §2,809,000, a
I decrease of 16.3. Total of the leading
j cities of the United States for the week
j ending July 21_t, $1,052,3t _i,7O'J, an in
j crease of 12.6 per cent.
PAINLR.SB EXTRACTION OF TEETH by
one of local anesthetic. DX. WELDON Den
tist, Eighth ana J street*.
_
E'EN tbough tho fucc b« not so fair,
And btauty may be all but flown,
Dear MhUm, you need not despair
If soZuDwVl' you niuke your own,
And brush your teeth and mouth with skill
You'll i'ascinute and conquer still.
FAST TIME TO THE EAST.-The Atlantic
and Pucllic Railroad (Santa Fe roure) is now
Iweive hour* shorter to Kan-as City and SU
Louis, and twenty-four hours shorter to Chi
cago thau formerly. Pullman Tourist Sleep*
ing Cars to Chicago every day withoutchange.
Personally conducted excursions eyerj
Wednesday, with tourist car to Boston.
GEORGE W. RAILTON, Agent, 1004 Fourth
■treet, Sacramento. MWF
MRS. WINSLOWS "SOOTHING SYRUP,
has been in use over flfty years by millions ol
mothers lor their children while teething,
with perfect success. It soothes the child,
softens the gums, allays pain, cures wind colic,
regulates the bowels, and is the best remedy
for diarrhoea, whether arising from teething
or other causes. For sale by druggists In
every part of the world. Be sure and ask for
Mra. wlnslow's Soothing Syrup. Tweniy-fl va
cents a bottle. MWF
glen? glfrtrertiggntcntg.
A GRAND MUSICALE WILL BE GIVEN
A MONDAY EVENING, July 25th, at
Pythian Cast je,|cor. Ninth and 1 streets, for the
benefit of Hiloiim Lodge, I. O. G. T. Pro
gramme—Vocalists, Air. Weeks, Mrs. W.
Kiitzciistein, Mrs. A. Carter, the Misses Zim
merman and Messrs. Gibson and Vandercook.
Recitations by Mr. and Mrs. Durrell. Miss H.
Stargel and Mr«. F. 11. Klefer. Instrumental,
Mt-srs. Kell, Neale and Miss Pommer. Ac
companists, Mrs. <J. A. Nealc and Miss Annie
Aitkeu. Admission, 25 cents. It
CiSrd of thankb-wF wish to ex
/ press our sincere thanks toTehama Lodge
>>t Mn^ons aud the many friends that came to
our aid, and mauiti-sted such respect and
sympathy in the death of our beloved bus
bund and son W. E. Quinloy. Your kindness
dear Iriends will ever be remembered by us,
and may God* richest blessings be yours.
MRS. W. E. QUINLEY, C. W. H. WILLIS.
FIFTH ANNUAL. PICNIC
r\F IRON MOLDERS' UNION. NO. 199.
\J at Richmond Grove,Sl'NDAY.Uuly 31st,
Prizes for Jig Dancing and Waltzing. Tickets
50 cents: ladies tree. jy2s-3t
WANTED!
Women and Girls
At the Siicrami-nto Packing and Dry
ing Company's
C jPI IST IST E PS. IT.
jy-3-ot Cor. Sixth and G sts., Sacramento.
4H^ ERRORS OF YOUTHS2KS
KullMS b.> NEHVOUS DEBILITY PILLS. All
nflMaS&aa thane Buffering froiu Nervous ttebilit?
iLSflpg?.! (»nd we«Arif«B, and baviug been unsne.
ceosfully treated, will end tbis famous
remedy a oenain aud t-peedy cure for
lost manhood, preßCHture decay Inability, lack of
oonfldenoe. mental ri-preesiott, palpitation of the
hearVwwii memory, exhausted vitality, bad dreams,
fee. Price 81 per box. or 6 boxes, which »U1 cure most
caaae, for «6. poetpaid. Address or call on
N. E. MEDICAL INSTITUTR,
24 Tremont Bow. Boston. Mau.
GALVANIZED.
WH. LUELLING. PLUMBING, STEAM
. and Ga*-Fitting. General Jobbing
done. Stoves and Tinware. Agent for Aer
moter Windmills. Well Tubing. Daniel L>st
Gas Engine*, Horse Powers. Tanks and
Frames a specialty. Well-borine. Tank and
: Pumo Builder. 1116 J street. Sacramento.
FRIEND a XER RY
Lumber Company.
\TAIN YARD AND OFFICE, 1310 BECV
i>l ond street. Branch Yard, corner Twelfth
•ZUI J *treeU.
FRANK 'WICKWIRE~~
jT h • M<9 r r-i &s c Maker
817 X Street,
TIT ANUFACTURER AND DEALER TW
ITJ. haddles, Harness, Whips, Robe« Blank
et«, etc. Repairing on short notice. '
UNION UYERY, FEED AND SALES STABLEST
Railroad Street, East Auburn.
BOARDING A SPECIALTY, AT REA.
•onable rate*. W. H. HOUCHIN. Prop
THE SOFT GLOW OF
The tea rose is acquired by ladies -who
use Pozzoni' s Coinplexioa powder. Try
£)<*** &VO&. & <£o.
; FOURTH WEEK
of——
The Summer
Clearance Sale.
The prices made for
this week need no com
ments from us; they ARE
AT LOW EBB.
SHOES.
A mixed lot of LADIES' LOW
CUT OXFORD TIES to be closed
out at $1 per pair. Reduced
from $1 50 and $2 75.
At 30c per pair, a mixed
lot of INFANTS' BRONZE AND
RUSSET SHOES; sizes 1 to 7.
At 18c each, a lot of
FANCY FEATHER AIGRETTE
FANS.
Window Shade Bargains.
PLAIN OPAQUE WINDOW
SHADES, mounted on patent
spring- rollers, colors light and
dark olive. The price on these
in a regular way would be 75c.
Sale price, 26e each.
36-INCH BLACK LONG CLOTH,
a very popular dress material
much used instead of sateens has
been placed on sale at 8c per
yard.
HALE BROS. & CO.
a— Cavje«»on'«,
WILL BEGIN THIS MORNING
At 8:30 O'clock Sharp,
Din wAi \jlmum AnD IiEOIGTION SHE
OF
Honest and Reliable Footwear!
AND WILL CONTINUE FOR ONE MONTH.
Hi Don't miss this opportunity; *
m you may regret it. IH
f| Bear in mind that we will ||
g exchange or refund money on ||
|| every pair of Shoes that are not f|
S satisfactory. ffl
The Largest and Most Reliable Shoe House in Sacramento,
FIFTH AND J STREETS.
3^» Orders from the country filled at the same prices as adrertised. Inspect oar window display.
This is the day dedicated to St. James, the
put ron saintof Spain. When tne tide of battle
at Clavijo was going against the Spaniards he
is said to have appeared on the neld, armed
with a sword of dazzling splendor and
mounted on a white horse. Tradition credits
him with having siain t;0,000 Infidels, and
Spanish faith in the legend is unshaken.
PRICES
ON
CHILDREN'S
SUITS
HAVE
DROPPED
PLUMP
DOWN.
CHILDREN'S TWO-PIECE
KNEE PANTS SUITS, ages 4 to 14,
on sale at $1 50 each. For
mer price, $2 so. Colors are tan,
gray and brown in different pat
terns of checks, plaids and stripes.
They are well made, of good
cassimere.
TABLE COVERS.
TURKEY RED DAMASK
TABLE COVERS, 60x72 in size.
Sale price, 60c each.
CHILDREN'S GENUINE BLACK
LISLE HOSE, sizes to Bx.
Sale price, 18e per pair.
They are regular value at 40c.
At 19e per pair, a lot of
BLACK SILK JERSEY MITTS.
They are pure Milanese silk and
brilliant finish.
LADIES' VESTS.
FINE RIBBED COTTON VESTS,
silk braid at neck and arm holes-,
colors pink, blue and ecru.
Sale price, 23c each.
WORTH DOUBLE.
HALE BROS, d CO.
— 1'
CLUNIE OPERA HOUSE.
To-Nlght, Saturday, July 2 3
*S-LAST I'KIJFOHMAXCE.a
THE COMEDY HIT OF THE BSASQN,
GEORGE
thatcher's
iviiimstre:u.s,
COMIUNKD WITH
RICH & HARRIS'
COMEDY
COMPANY,
In Ed Marble's Minstrel Farce Comedy,
TUXKDQ
A Grand Dual Organization, under the man
agement of \V. H. A. < r. nkhite. By special re
quest old-time ballads will be sung" PKICES— |
60c, Too and fj, Seath on sale box office, jyis
METROPOLITAN THEATER.
Thuraday, - - Ji-ily 28th.
TESTIMONIAL CONCERT
W. H. KINROSS.
M'NEILL CLUB, AHION MANDOLIN
Club, Prof. Rusewald. Mrs. A. K. Brune,
Mrs. Chas. Du-kman, Allred Wilti.' and H. A.
Melvin. with the best of local talent. FULL
ORCHESTRA. Reserved seats, dress circle or
parquet, 81: balcony. 50c. Ke.-ervc! Beats
may be secured at Purnell's Bookstore after S \
a. m. Monday, July 2.*Hh. jy23.SMWTh
NuW DI'KN—THE B\VIMMIN(i BATHS,
Twenty-first and O streets. Hours—B to
12, 1 to 6. 7 to 10; Sundays, from 6 to 12, 1
to 6. AAnission—Adults, k!se; 5 tickets for
$1; children under 15 yearn, 15c; commuta
tion tickets, S3 per month. Tub baths in
cluded iv admission. Applications for swim
ming lessons should be made to the Superin
tendent. The rl^ht to refuse admission and
to eject reserved.
KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS,
OISKIYOU COUNTY, CAL., TWENTY
Fl miles from Ager, on the California and
Oregon route. Hunting, fishing and soenery
unsurpassed. Hot sw'inmin^, !>team. sulphur
and the Hnest mud baths on the coast. Table
tirst-class; service excellent. Every attention
shown guests, Just the place to spend your
vacation. EDSON I>HOS.. Props.
_Jyj23-lm Beswkk P. 0., Cal.
MARK WEST
HOT SPRINGS,
VTEAR SANTA ROSA. FBESE & JUER
iI GEN TSEN T, Proprietors. Tnis place has
been entirely renovated. First-class accom
modations. A new and well supplied bar and
billiard-room is connected with the hotel. The
way to get there la to start at the loot of Mar
ket utreet, San Francisco, on the 7:40 a m
train and arrive at Santa Rosa at 10:16 \. m!
Meet our stage and arrive at the Springs at 1
p. m. All trains will be met by appointment
Round trip tickets from San Francisco, ji? 75.
The accommodation* at the Springs are first
class. The bat his are naturally hot, the min
erals being soda, magnesia, sulphur, iron and
arsenic Terms, j.er day, $2; adults, per
week, $10; children, under 10, $0. Head
quarters at Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa.
CAMPBELL HOT SPRINGS
QIERRAVILLE, SIERRA COUNTY, CAL.
Lj A favorite bummer resort. Fiißt-class
board and rooms, with baths free for guests
for ?10 per week. A two seated conveyance'
suitable for carrying rive persons, will meet
quests at Truekee. Total expense of stopping
at this favorite resort, only jglO per week
Excellent nunting ami fishing. Stages run
!^i yl Ji^Z^^L U- VEARt'K- Proprietor.
C B, VOSK. B. E. HICKOK.
PUTNAM HOUSE,
Auburn, Cal.
NEW MANAGEMENT. ONLY "IRST
cla&s house in the city. Charges moderate.
Free :bus to and frqaa all trains,
HICKOK & YOKE, Proprietors.
ORLEANS HOTEL,
4 ÜBURN, CAL.—THE ORLEANS IS A
2\ tire-proof building, with larpe, airy rooms;
000 l verandas. It is located in business part
of city, is will conducted and has lar^e sam
ple-rooms. Free 'bus to and from all trains
P. McHALE. ProDrietor.
mHE RECORD-UNION AND WEEKLY
JL UNION, clean, reliable, largest in circula
tion.
A. NATHAN,
OA" X STREET, ADJOINING WESTERN!
frVt) Hotel, Sacramento, dealer in < lears
Tobacco and Notions. Every purchaser «"if
the oelebraled Lillian Russell Cigur wUI b«
Dreaeiiied with a handsome souvenir.
A. LOTHHAMMER,
PRACTICAL TUNER AND REPAIRER.
, ± tunes and repairs all kinds of musical \n.
} struments. l'iauos and Organs a specialty-
Reference.-p r of. Kinross, St. Joseph's Acad
emy. Leare orders at A. J. Pommers. stein
way apeiicy, corner Ntnth and J streets.
Di J c W" F \ WI^RD. PHYSICIAN AND.
Surgeon has renao* ed his office to south-'
?'p Sn e C^ ni er ?'s hth J streets; residenoe,
1608 O street, Sacramento. Telephone numi
bers—residence, 387; office, 287. "UUI"
FINEST TURNOUTS IN THE CITY
i fITO HIRE AT REASONABLE RATES A?
DR. DIXON
HAB REMOVED HIS RKBIDENCE PER.
rnanently to 704 N street. £-164/
SCHEUNERT BROS. & CO.,
79fk X STREET, BETWEEN SEVENTH
i ,-,17 and Eighth, Sacramento. WlilTH
LABOR CIGAKS A SEECIALT_* I __~_
J. J. WINGARD,
I Q W. COR. TWENTY-FIFTH AND O STS
: k?. Sacramento, deuler in Choice Familir
Grucerios, Provisions, Hour, Hay, Grain But.
ter Cneese, E«gs, Teas, Coff<>es, Hams, Bacon,
Tobacco, _Cl»ars, Wines and Liquors.
JOHN J. BUCKLEY,
QEARCHER OF RECORDS, 611 I STREET*
0 Sacramento.
H. 9. KOOT. ALEX. NKII,SON, J. DRIBCOU
ROOT, NEILSON & CO..
TTNION FOUNDRY-IRON AND BRAB3
\J Founders and Machinists, Front street,
butween N and O. Castings and Machinery
o£every^e»cription made to order.
S. CARLE,
SUCCESSOR TO CARLE <fc CROLY, CON
tracUir and Builder. Orders solicited and
promptness guaranteed. Office and ghop
-11J24 Second Street, between X and L.
A. MEISTER,
pARRIAGEa, VICTORIAS, PHAETONS,
\j Buggiea and Spring and Fruit Wagon*,
blu, Ul^, 9X4 Ninth street, SacramentoT
LIVERPOOL SALT,
EX Mill' ANOORONA. LARGE LUMP
Rock and Fine Liverpool Halt.
E. P. FIGO,
1119 Fo v r th_ street_
WAIEREOUSE & LESTER,
DEALERS IN IRON, STEEL, CUMBKlt
land Coal, Wagon Lumber and Ouriage
Hardware. 70y, 711, 7iii, 715 J street,
Sacramento
BUTLER CARRIAGE AND COUPE CO.
QTAND AND OFFICE AT CENTRAL
p House, 880 X street. Telephone No. 329.
Kates of hire, 25 centß per mile: $l i>er lmur.
Orders promptly attended to at all hoars of
the day or night. S. W. BLTLEU, Proprio-
HARRY M. BOWMAN.
ni O ELEVENTH STREET. II L. WISE'S
ylO old stand. Piuctical Carriage Painter.
a\ ork and prices guaranteed to suit custom
ers. Give me a call.
EBNER BROS^~~
116-118 X Street, Front and Seoond.
Sacra niento,
TMPORTKRS AND WHOLESALE DEAL-
X en in wine* and Liquors. Agents for the
celebrated Pommery and < ireno Cuampagne.
M. CRONAN,
830 X St., and 1108-1110 Third St.<
Sacramento, Cal.,
TMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALES
X iv Fine Whiskies, Brandies and Chanv
Y*<in".
CAPITAL ALE VAULTS, SO2 3 STREET.
100S Third strrrf. NAGELB 4 SVjSNsC
SON, Proprietors. The finest lunch in the*
city, 11 a. h. to B p. m. Best of Wines,
Liquor's au>l Ciarars always on band. Clam
Chowdei and Mussel soup every night. Tele
phone jSTo. 38. iu'24-tf
Only the Choicest Viands Dispensed, by
JIM & HARRY,
1 ftflQ THIRD ST., BET. J AND K. PABST
IUUJ Milwaukee, Ruhstaller's fcteum.
Wnlte labor noods.
GEO. E. DIERSSEN & CO.
(Successors to G. W. Chesley & Co.),
Tl9 J STREET, - - SACRAMENTO*
WHOLES ALS DBA LESS IN
Wines, Liquors and. Cigars.
NOTICE OF BOND SALE.
"PURSUANT TO A RESOLUTION OF TUB
XT Board of Directors of the Perris Irrigation
District, duiy passed at a regular meeting oi
suid Boaril, held at its office in said Perris Ir.
rU;:Uion District, County ol .'-an Diego, BtaU
of i alifornla, on rucsdny, the 7th day of June.
lH'.ig, notice la hereby triven that staled pro»
[X)sals will be received by said Board at tin
odice of suid Hoard in Perris. County of Baa
Diego, Htate of California, up to ami including
the FIFTH DAY OF JULY, ist>2, at ihi
hour of 10 o'clock, a. h., of that day, for th«
purchase of bonds of said district to th<
■.mount of one hundred and seven thousand
i$107.000) dollnrs. Salt! bonds are of th«
first and only Issue of the bonds of said Perrli
Irrigation District—are of the denomination
of (lye hundred dollars each, payable in gold
coin ot the United States of America, and beal
interest at the rate of six per c> nt., payable
seml-anuuftlly, on the first day of January and
July of each year.
At the time appointed the Board will open
the proposals and will award the bonds to the
hictn-.st responsible bidder.
The Beard reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
All bidaare to be filed with the Secretary ol
Bali Bwurd of Directors at the office of said
Board In Perris, in San Diego County, State ol
California, on or before the day and hour la
said resolution appointed.
By order of the Board of Directors of tha
Perris Irrigation District.
H. A. PLIMPTON. Secretary.
The time of receiving and opening the above
proposals Is postponed until TUESDAY, tha
2d day of August, 1892, at 10 o'clock a. ii.
of that day.
By order of the Board of Directors of Perris
Irrigation District.
Perris, County of San Diego, State of Cali
fornia. June 25. 1892.
W. F. PERRY, President.
Jelstd H. A. Pumwon, Secretary.
CHAMPAGNE."
Krug& Co., Reims, Piivate Cuvee.
MESSRS. HELLMANN BROS. A CO. OB
Sun Fr&nclflco bavejnst received by rail*
road New Orleans the first shipruenUllrcol
from Messrs. KRUG 4 CO. of Reims of thl
famous "Pri\ate Cuvoe,"*and they arenowen«
abled, after the lapse or some years, to plac(
this unexcelled vineagftio upon the market
Many connois-seurs can attest to the lame th\a
Champagne attained In .San Francisco and on
the coast during the stirring times of the Coin*
st.:ck bonanza, when it was universally coni
ceded to be the reigning favorite. The great
iuccess of late years ol this brand in the Lok<
don and colonial markets has Induced Messrs.
HELLMANN BROS. & CO. to reintroduce ii
here, and by roason of its exquisite liavor anO
bouquet they can confidently assert that ii
has no superior and very few equals araongs!
the many Champagnes now-a-days imporUil
The taste of this market has been eareiullj
stiuih-.i, and we have reason to believe tbul
HeMre. BELLMANM BUOS. & CO. ure to N
congratulated upon belns atraln appointed tW
direct agcuu for this coast. For turner pad
tlculars, samples, prices, eto., apply to
HELLMANN BROS. 4CO.
525 Front Street, San Francisco,
Or to 11. WTEINREICH «ft CO., W holrsalt
Liciuor Dealers. 514 J street. Bacramcnto.
■MEAT® FOLKS]
"ANTI-CORPUIEKi PIUS"
HMHBE Reduce Flesh IS pounds a Montir
Ciuie no tlcbnefi: eoatiin as pelien, m*
TtettT /j», Dnigglto or bj tu>;U
I Da La Monts*s Complexion Wafer,
bleach tha skin snow white.
\T* "A Dmys'itj, or by null. - • I'arttoaUn (itmlfd) t
mSm wthcox specific co.. phila., pa. {
Sold by KiKK. GEAIiV & CO.. bacraaisarf

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